Friihjahr - Phil.

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Friihjahr - Phil.
Priifungstermin
Priifungsteilnehmer
tl
Einzelprtifungsnummer
ir
I
Kennzahl:
Friihjahr
62618
Kennwort:
2006
Arbeitsplatz-Nr.:
Erste Staatspriifung
fiir
ein Lehramt an tiffentlichen Schulen
- Prtifungsaufgaben -
o
Fach:
Englisch (vertieft studiert)
Einzelprtifung: Wissenschaftl.Klausur-Literaturw
Anzahl der gestellten Themen
(Aufgaben):
13
Aruahl der Druckseiten dieser
Vorlage:
12
Thema Nr.
o
1
1.
Interpretieren Sie den vorliegenden Textausschnitt aus Henry Fielding's Tom Jones unter besonderer Beriicksichtigung des Stils und der Erzlihlhaltung!
2.
Beschreiben Sie das spezifische Romankonzept Fieldings; gehen Sie dabei auf Fieldings Technik
der Figurengestaltung, Handlungsfiihrung und Zeitgestaltung ein I
3.
Nehmen Sie eine literarhistorische Einordnung der Romane Fieldings vor, indem Sie sie mit
Romanen mindestens zweier anderer Autoren der Zeilvergleichen!
Fortsetzung neichste Seite!
62618
Seite: 2
ChaPter:11'
A
short
Desciption of Squire Allwoihy. .and a fuller Account of Miss Bridget
Allwbrthy ftis Sisfe/.
j
:::tBi;i'fi i:lilfJ:ff n:Hif:*nn:?
""ihY"'i#,:,'uT;ff
Name was Allworthy, and who mightwell be called'the Favourite
whose
of both Nature and Forhrne; for both of these seem to have. contended
which should bless and enrich him most In this Contentipn,.Nature may
seem to some to have come off victorious, as she bestowed on him maSry
Gifb; while Forhrne had only one Gift in her Power; but iir pouring forfl-t
this, she was so yery profixe, that others perhaps may think this.single
Endowment to have been_more than equivalent to all the various Blessings
which he enjoyei &om Nature. From the former of these, he derived an
agrpeable Pcno1, a sound Constitution, a solid Understanding, and a belevolent Hgarl by tlig la{er, he w4s decreed to the Inhpritanl. ofo""of
the largest Estates in the Coung
This Gentleman hid, in his Youth, married a very woflhy and beaufrful
,
worhan; of--,wtpm he had been exhemely fond: By her he had.,three
Children;: ell. of whom died in their Infancy. He had likervise naa ne
Misforhrne'.of burying his beloved Wife herself, about five Years before the
fime in which this History chuses to set out. This loss, however great,
he b,o1elike a.lvlan of Sense and_Consbncy; tho' it must be eonfeiq he
would often talk a little whirnsically on this iJead: For he sometimes,shid,
he looked
himserf as still maniei, ,r"a
his wif.,;;t
o
a'Iittle
_on
befor_e
;;;;
"o"ria"t.d
him a foumey which he should
most certainly, ,qr1J, o,
later, take after her; and that he had not the least:Doubt of meeting her
again, in a Place where he should never part with her more. Sentirienb
for wh'ich his',Sense was-arraigned by one Part of his Neighbours, his
Religion by a second, and his S-incerity by third.
.'
He now lived; for the.most Par!. retired in" the Country, with one Sister,
for wlrom he had a very tender Mection. This Lady *r, no* some*h"i
past the Age of 30, .an t$ra, at whiih, in the Opinion of the Malicious,
the Title of old Maid may, with no Impropriety, .be assumed. she was oi
of Women, whom you commend rather for good Qualities
g:neraly cailed by their own 5.*, uiry good
sort of w_omen-as good a sort of woman, Madam, as you *ouid i"irh
f4t
thin
S_pecies
B_eauty, and who are
l;f.;n::tn*f*it*1fr -mT,*ft{#xft
whom perhaps Beaug had led into Errors; whibh
*i",x
oth.;;;
she might have
avoided. Miss Bndget Allworthy (for that was the NamJof this Lady) vef
rightly conceived the Charms of Person in a Woman to be no Uettei ttran
Snares for herself, as well as for others; and yet so discreet was she in her
Conduct, that her Prudence was as much on the Guard, as if she had all
the Snares to apprehend which were cver laid for her whole Sex. Indeed.
I have observed (tho' it may seem unaccountabie to the Reader) that this
Guard of Prudence, like the Trained Bands;r is always readiest to go on
o
Duty where there is ihe least Danger. It often basely and cowardiy deserts
those Paragons for whom the Men are all wishing, sighing, dying, and
spreading every Net in their Power; and constantly aftends ai the Heels of
[]'"?#jhl;ff
.
:,,]]"ff :;Hl's.$:,11',""';:[:":,,*:j:,$'.f $
Reader, I think proper, before we proceed any farther together, to acquaint thee, that i intend to digress, through this whole History, as often
as I see Occasion: OF which I am myself a betier Judge than any pitiful
Critic whatever. And here I must desire all those Critics to mind their own'
Htr*s'::$:;'il;,till,;5#,$iiri;::',.i{j;;*:"rn:,-:1:
Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, /vorfon criticat Edition, Sheridan Baker,
ed., Norton &
Company, New York/London, 1995, ch. ll, pp.27_2g.
-3
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Seite: 3
Einzelprtifungsnumme r : 626 I 8
...:
t;
i'
Thema Nr. 2
1.
2.
Beschreiben Sie die typischen Merkmale englischsprachiger Dekadenzliteratur des ausgehenden
19. Jahrhunderts anhand von'mindesten zwei selbst gewdhlten Prosatexten!
Erkldren Sie die sozialhistorischen Hintergriinde , die zur Ausbildung des Dekadenzbegriffes
fi.ihrten!
3.
o
Bewerten Sie die philosophischen und dsthetischen Grundideen der Dekadenzliteratur!
Thema Nr. 3
Diskutieren Sie anhand von mindestens drei Erziihltexten verschiedener Autoren die Bedeutung
der'Asthetik des Moments' fi.ir die englische Literatur der Moderne!
Thema Nr. 4
o
1.
Fassen Sie den Inhalt der Auseinandersetzung dieser bertihmten Szene aus Shakespeares Hamlet
zusammen!
2.
Charakterisieren Sie die unterschiedlichen rhetorischen Stile und kulturellen Bezugssysteme, die
von Hamlet rind Ophelia verwendet werden, und erkliiren Sie ihre Bedeutung fiir deren Debatte!
3.
Was sagt die Szene iiber die Konzepte von Gender und Sexualitiit in der Renaissance aus?
Fortsetzung niichste Seite!
----':::Giat -"
Frtihjahr 2006
William Shakespeare, Hamlet
Einzelprtifu ngsnunrme r : 62618
Seite: 4
(1601 )
from Act III, Scene I
I
HAMLET Ha, ha! are you honest?
OPFIELIA My lord?
HAMLET Areyou fair?
OPIffiLIA What means your lordship?
HAMLET That ifyou be honest and fair, your honesty should
admit no discourse to your beauty.
o
o
OPEIELIA Could beauty, my lord, have better commerce than
with honesty?
IIAMLET Ay, truly; for the power of beauty will sooner
hansform honesty from what it is to a bawd* than the
force ofhonesty can translate beauty into his
likeness: this was sometime a paradox, but now the
time gives it proof. I did love you once.
OPI{BLIA Indeed, my lord, you made me believe so.
HAMLET You should not have believed me; for virtue cannot
so inoculate* our old stock but we shall relish of it.
I loved you not.
OPI{ELIA I was the more deceived.
IIAMLET Get thee to a nunnery. Why, wouldpt thou be a
breeder of sinners? I am myself indifferent honest;
but yet I could accuse me of such things that it
were better my mother had not borne me. I am very
proud, revengeful, ambitious, with more offences at
my beck* than I have thoughts to put them in,
imagination to give them shape, or time to act them
in. What should such fellows as I do crawling
between earth and heaven? We are arrant* knaves
all, believe none of us. Go thy ways to a nunnery.
Where's your father?
OPIIELIA At home, my lord.
HAMLET Let the doors be shut upon him, that he may play rhe
fool no where but in's own house. Farewell.
OPHELIA O, help him, you sweet heavens.
HAMLET Ifthou dost marry, I'll give thee this plague for
thy dowry: be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as
snow, thou shalt not escape calumny.* Get thee to a
luTTy,farewell. Or, if thou wilt needs marry,.marry a
fool; for wise men know well enough what monsters
you make of them. To a nunnery, go--and quickly
too. Farewell.
OPHELIA Heavenly powers, restore him.
HAMLET I have heard of your paintings too well enough. God
has given you one face, and you make
fourselues
another. You jig and amble,* and you lisp, you
nick_
name God's creatures, and make your wantonness
your ignorance. Go to, I'll no *oi" on't, it
hath made
me mad. I say, we will have no mo* marriage.
Those
that are married already--all but one_shali
live;
the rest shall keep as they are. 'l'o u nunn"ry,
gu.'
105
110
* brothel-keeper
115
* $aft
a shoot onto
another plant
120
125
*command
*complete
130
135
*slander, false
accusations
140
145
rwalk deliberately
slowly
*more"
150
williarn Shakespeare, Hamlet,ed. Ilarold.lenkins,
The Arden Shakespeare(l,ondon: Methuen & Co
), pp.281-28a.
2001
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:62618
Seite:
Thema Nr. 5
Der Beitrag des englischen Dramas seit Ende des 19. Jh.s zur Geschlechterdiskussion
1.
Skizzieren Sie vergleichend drei weibliche Hauptfiguren aus drei verschiedenen Phasen des englischen Dramas seit dem Ende des 19. Jh.s mit Blick auf ihren jeweiligen Beitrag zur Diskussion
der Geschlechterfrage !
2.
Erliiutem Sie einige der dramatischen Verfahren (episches Theater, Figurengestaltung, Sentimentalisierung,...; die zur Diskussion der Geschlechterfrage auf der Biihne bevorzugt gewiihlt
wurden / werden und bewerten Sie die spezifischen Leistungen dieser Verfahren!
3.
Stellen Sie an einem beliebigen Beispiel dar, welchen Beitrag ein Btihnenstiick zur gesellschaftlichen Diskussion der Geschlechterfrage geleistet hat / leistet!
o
Thema Nr. 6
Erstellen Sie eine vergleichende Interpretation der hier vorliegenden Gedichte von Marlowe und
Donne. Berticksichtigen Sie dabei folgende Fragestellungen:
1.
Welchen argumentativen Aufbau und welche damit verbundenen Stilmittel weisen die Gedichte
auf?
2.
Wie lassen sich die Gedichte in den literarhistorischen Kontext
3.
Welche unterschiedlichen Liebesauffassungen liegen den Gedichten zugrunde?
der
pastoral poetry einordnen?
o
Fortsetzung nachste Seite!
5
TIJE
JTASSIO
NATE
SHE,PHER
TO HiS LOVE
o
a
The Bait
Come jive widr mee, and be my love,
.\nd l'e i.-i1l all the pleasures prove,
Tlrat Vailies, grovesT hilIs and fieldes,
Woods, or steepie mountaine yeeldes.
And
rv-ee
Come live with me, and be my love,
And we will some new pleasures prove
Of golden sands, and crysial brooks,
Wiih silken lines, and silver
w-ill sir upon the Rocks,
There will the river whispering run
Warmed by thy eyes, more than the sun.
And there the enamored fish will stay,
Begging themselves they nray betay.
Seeing the Sheepheards feede theyr flocks,
B,i shallow Rivers, to whose fa-lls,
llelodious byrds sing Nladrigalls-
And I will make ilree beds of Roses,
.{nd a rhousand fragrant posies,
A cap of ffowers, and a kirtle,
ro
imbroydred all with leaves of Mirtle.
A gowne made of the finest wooll,
-Which
from our pretty Lambes we pull,
Fayre lined slippers for the cold:
VTith buckies of the purest gold.
rt
When thou wili swim in that live bath,
Each fish, which every channel hath,
Will amorously to thee swim,
Gladder to catch thee, than thou'him.
zo
For tJry delight each May-morning.
these delights thy rninde may mov€;
Then live with mee, and be my love.
If
l0
If thou to; be so seen be'st loath
By sun, or moon, ihou dark'nest both,
And if myself have leave to see,
I need not their light, having thee.
Let others freeze with angling reeds,
And cut their legs with shells and weeds,
Or beacherously poor fish beset,
With sbangling snare or windowy neh
A belt of straw, and Ivie buds,
With Corall clasps and Amber studs,
A-nd if these pieasures may thee move,.
Come live with mee, and be my loveTlie Sheeplreards Swaines shall daunce and sing,
hooks.
I5
20
Let coarse bold hands, from slimy nest
The bedded fish in banls out-t+'rest
Or curious taiton, sleave-silk flies,
Bewitch poor fishes' wandiring eyes.
For dree, thou need it no such diceig
For thou thyself art tfrine own baig
That fuh that is not iaiched thereby,
AIas, is wiser &r than I.
z,
[c. 1589;1S99J
complete works of christopher Marlowe, vol. 2, Fredson Bowers, ed.,
Cambridge; Cambridge University press, 1g7g, p. 837.
T-he
116331
John Donne's Poetry, A Norton criticat Edition,sbcond Edition,
Arthur L. Clements, ed., New YorUlondon: Norton, 1gg2, p.Zg.
Fnihjahr 2006
Einzelprtifungsnummer : 626 1 8
Seite: 7
Thema Nr. 7
Diskutieren Sie anhand einschlagiger Beispiele, auf welch verschiedene Weisen in der englischen
Dichtung nach i945 vor-neuzeitliche Vergangenheit oder Mythologie aufgegriffen, verarbeitet
und
funktionalisiert worden sind !
Thema Nr. 8
o
Erliiutem Sie den Transzendentalismus in seiner Bedeutung fiir die amerikanische prosaliteratur
bis zum Btirgerkrieg (mind. 3 Beispiele)l
Thema Nr. 9
Diskutieren Sie fiktionale Repriisentationen von Kleinstiidten und modernen urbanen Welten in amerikanischen Erzahltexten aus der Zeit zwischen den Weltkriegenl Belegen Sie Ihre Ausfi.ihrungen an
mindestens drei Beispielen unterschiedlicher Autoren/innen!
Thema Nr. 10
O
Analysieren Sie unter dem Gesichtspunkt der Interkulturalitat amerikanische Romane (seit 1960), die
durch Angehcirige von (mindestens drei) ethnischen MinoritZiten publiziert worden sind!
-8-
626t8
Seite:
Thema Nr. 1L
Mark Strand. .The Tunnel, (1993)
A man has been strrding
in front ofmy house
for days. I peek at him
I
seal the basernent
off
window and at night,
unable to sleep,
I shine my flashlight
down on the lawn
He is always there.
After awhile
I
open the fiont door
just a crack and order
him outofmy yard.
He narrows his eyes
and moans. I slam
the door and dash back
to the kitchen, then up
o
to the bedroom, then down.
I weep like
a
schoolgirl
and make obscene geshrres
throughthewindow. I
write large suicide notes
andplace them so he
can read them easily.
I deshoy the living
room furniture to prove
I own nothing of value.
When he seems unmoved
I decide to dig a twmel
to a neighboring yard.
I
seal the basement
off
from the upstairs with
a brick wall. I dig harl
and in no time the fiuurel
is done. kaving my pick
and shovel below,
o
I come.out in front of a house
and stand there too tired to
move or even speak, hoping
someone will help me.
I feel I'm being watched
and sometimes I hear
a man"s voice,
but nothing is done
and I have been uuiting for days.
1.
Beschreiben Sie die Strophenstruktur des Gedichtes
2.
Wie entwickelt sich das Gedicht thematisch?
3.
Welche symbolische Funktion haben die geschilderten Rziume, der Tunnel und Aktionen des
lyischen Ichs?
4.
Ordnen Sie dieses Gedicht in die Traditionen und Konventionen des "American Gothic" in Lyrik
und Prosa ein!
-9
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8
--',ir!:iq!a?'
Friihjahr 2006
r--
Einzelprtifungsnumme r : 62618
Seite: 9
Thema Nr. 12
Text: David Mamet. Oleanna (1992). New York: Vintage, 1993. exe. pp. 1-5
1
lnterpretieren Sie die Figurenvorstellung und Figurenkonstellation in der vorliegenden Eingangsszene aus David Mamets Oleanna!
2.
Analysieren Sie metasprachliche Elemente und Strategien im vorliegenden Textausschnitt!
3.
Erliiutern SieVesentliche Tendenzen des amerikanischen Dramas und Theaters der letzten25
Jahre!
o
CHARACTERS
CAROL
JOHN
A wornan of twenty
A man in his forries
The play takes place in
John's office
ONE
trntr
o
loHN
desk
rs talking on the phone. cARoL is seated
across the
from him.
phone): And what abour rhe land. (pause)
The land. And what abour rhe land?
inourrl
'What
abour it? (pause) No. I don,r understand.
Well, yes, I'm I'm
Do, l,m.sure it's signif
. . I'm sure it's significant. (pause) Elecause
ir,s
significant ro mmmmmm . did you callJerry?
(Pause) Because . . . no, no, no,
no, no: What did
they say . . . ? Did you speak ro the real esate
. . . where is she . . . ? Well, well, all
righr. Where
are her notes?'Where are the .ror.,
*. took with
her. (Pause) I thought you were? No. No, I,rn
sorry, I didn't mean that, I just rhought
that I saw
you, when we were there . . what . .
.?I
thoughr I saw you with a pencil. WHy
NOW?
is what I'rn say . . well, thai's why I say ,.call
'Well,
I can'r righr now, be . . . no,l didn,t
Jerryr."
;oHr.r
(orz
Fortsetzung nAchste Seite!
o
o
DAVID
TI
r-t
(h
-Ntr
MAMET
schedule any . . Grace: I didn,t. I,m well
aware . . . Look: Look. Did you callJer,ry? v/ill
you call Jerry . . . ? Because I can,t now. I'll be
there, I'm sure I'il be there in fifteen, in rwenty.
I intend to. No, we aren't going to lose the, we
aren't going to lose the house. Look: Look, I'm
not minimizingit. The "easement." Did she say
"easemenr"? (Pause) V/hat did she say; is it a
"term of ert," are we bound by it . . . i'rrr rooy
. . . (Pause) are: we: yes. Bound by . . . Look: (He
checks his waxh.) before the other side goes home,
all right? "a term of art." Because: that's right
(Pause) The yard for the boy. Weil, rhar's the
whole . . . Look: I'm going to meet you there
. . . (He checks his watch.) Is the realtor there? All
right, tell her to show you the basement again.
Look at the this because . . . Bec . . . I'm leaving
in, I'm leaving in ten or fifteen . . . yes. No, no,
I'll meet you ar the new . . . Thar's a good. If he
thinks it's necc . . . you tellJerry ro meet . . . A1l
right? We aren't going ro lose the deposit. All
right? I'm sure ir's going to be . . . (pause) I hope
so. (Pause) I love you, roo. (pause) I love you,
too. As soon as . . . I wiil.
(He hangs up) (He bends ouer the desk and
makes a note.) (He looks up.) (To canor:) I,rn
sorry...
CD
oq
o
cARoL: (Pause) What is a
JoHNr (Pause)
I'm
"term of art"?
sor4r
CD
-g
r-t
cARoL: . totalkabout. '.
E
FD
?
N)
it, shall we?
JoI{N: Let's take the mysticism out of
Carol? (Pause) Don't you think? I'li teli you:
when you have some "thing." Which must be
broached. (Pause) Don'tyou think
' ' '?
o\
(Pause)
cARoL: . don'tIthink.. ' ?
JoHN: Mrnm?
cARoL:...didl...?
JoHN:...what?
' did I
cARoL:Did. . . did I .
wr
say something
;t.)
You're right' I'm
JoHN: (Pause) No. I'm sorry' No'
very sorry. I'm somewhat nrshed' As you see'
I'm sorr)'. You're nght' (Pause) What is a "term
of art"? It seems to mean a term ' which has come'
through its use, to mean something more specrfic
than the words would, to someone not acquainted
with them . ' . indicate. That, I believe, is what
a "term of art," would mean' (Pause)
You don't know what it means ' ' '
o\
oo
?
7
(D
cARoL: (Pause) What is a
I]
to talk about?
JoHN: Is that what you want
cARoL:
(n
(n
OLEANNA
"term of
2
art,,?
what it means' It's one
JoHN: ['m not sure that I know
had them' that'
you've
of those things, perhaps
3
a
CD
-
o
a
DAVID
MAMET
OLEANNA
you look rhem up, or have someone explain
them to you, and you say "aha,,, and, you imme_
dtately forger
cARoL:
what . .
I.
r_t
ts.
d.
DO
JoHN: I think so, though. (Pause)
distracted.
.
You don't do that.
You don't have to
cARoL:
JoHN: ...i...?
rl
canot: No.
I'm sorr)' that I was
!l
to me.
say that
You paid me the compliment, or the "obeisance"-al right-of coming in here . ' ' AII
nght. Carol I find that I am at a standstill' I find
JoHN:
cARoL:
You don't do
JoHN: . . .
.
thatl...
I don't, what. . . ?
cARoL:...for
cARoL:...what
JoHN:...idon'tfor.
JOHN:
t-t
.
to
cARoL:
dal
?i
your
no
CAROL]
o.
one moment. In regard to Your
.
;j
)l
Oh, oh. You're buying a new
housel
l+
-
CD
JoHN: . . . forget
cARoL:
rhings? Everybody does that.
No, rhey don't.
JoHN: Thelr don't . .
.
o\
b..)
o\
cARoL: "get on"? (Pause)
oo
JoHN:
I know how '
.
belieue
me'
. . . potentialTy humiliatingthese
canor: No.
Why would they do that . . .
JoHN: Because. I don't know. Because
terest them.
I
overthe...
?
cARoL: I'm just, I'm just trying to
it
doesn't in_
JoHN:
ro, it will not do'
[.^J
I
4
I know how
' " I have no
desire to . . . I have no desire other than to help
you. But: (He picks up sorne Papers on his desk') |
won't even say "but." I'li say that as I go back
JoHN: (Pause) No. Everybody does that.
cARoL:
JoHN: No, let's get on with it.
-5
a
I(D
Friilryahr 2006
Einzelprtifungsnumme r : 6267 8
Seite: 12
Thema Nr. 13
Postkoloniales Schreiben ist ein Erinnerungsprozess, der mit Metaphern wie Ubersetzen oder in Anlehnung an Foucault als Archiiologie bezeichnet wurde.
Diskutieren Sie die Bedeutung dieses Erinnerungsprozesses fiir postkoloniale Autoren! Welche nafiativen, poetischen und dramatischen Techniken charakterisieren diese literarische Uberschreitung von
kulturellen Grenzen?
Wiihlen Sie mindestens drei Texte von nicht weniger als zwei Autoren und berticksichtigen Sie zumindest zwei Gattungen in der Behandlung des Themas!
o
o