Report on the Sub-regional (South America) Awareness Raising

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Report on the Sub-regional (South America) Awareness Raising
Report on the Sub-regional (South America) Awareness
Raising Workshop on Pollutant Release and Transfer
Registers
São Paulo, Brazil – June 24 and 25, 2003
Submitted to:
Environment Canada
Submitted by:
Marbek Resource Consultants*
September 2003
*
Marbek Resource Consultants Ltd. is one of Canada’s leading environment and energy management firms. It was
engaged by Environment Canada to contribute to and report on the proceedings of the above-noted workshop.
Table of Contents
GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS .................................................................................................... I
1.
INTRODUCTION..............................................................................................................1
1.1
2.
Background ..............................................................................................................1
SUMMARY OF PRESENTATIONS AND WORKSHOP DISCUSSION...................2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
Workshop Session 1 Presentations – June 24, Morning..........................................2
Workshop Session 2 Presentations – June 24, Morning..........................................2
Workshop Session 3 Presentations and Roundtable Discussions – June 24,
Afternoon .................................................................................................................3
Workshop Session 4, Country Presentations – June 25, Morning...........................5
Workshop Session 5, Working Group Discussions – June 25, Morning/Afternoon5
Workshop Session 6, Final Plenary – June 25, Afternoon ......................................8
APPENDICES:
Appendix A:
Appendix B:
Appendix C:
Appendix D:
Workshop Programme and List of Workshop Participants
Workshop Presentations
UNITAR questionnaire and tabulated responses (in Spanish)
Working Group Focus Questions
PRTR Awareness Raising Workshop, São Paulo, Brazil
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GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS
ABIQUIM
CCPA
CIELAP
HEMA
IFCS
NPRI
OAS
OECD
PRTR
RETC
UNITAR
UNEP
WSSD
Associação Brasiliera de Indústria Química
Canadian Chemical Producers’ Association
Canadian Institute for Environmental Law and Policy
Health and Environment Ministers of the Americas
Intergovernmental Forum on Chemical Safety
(Canada’s) National Pollutant Release Inventory
Organization of American States
Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development
Pollutant Release and Transfer Register
Registro de Emisiones y Transferencia de Contaminantes (the Spanish
acronym for PRTR)
United Nations Institute for Training and Research
United National Environment Programme
World Summit on Sustainable Development
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1.
INTRODUCTION
1.1
BACKGROUND
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Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers (PRTRs) are systems that collect and make publicly
available information on releases of pollutants to air, water and land, as well as their transfer to
treatment and disposal sites. These systems are becoming an increasingly important tool for
countries to track, manage and reduce releases and transfers of chemical substances of concern,
for public access to information, and for regional and international efforts to reduce risks
inherent in chemical use. Promoting PRTR development has been identified as a priority within
various international and regional fora (e.g., IFCS, OECD, HEMA, WSSD) and as a useful
management tool in support of countries’ obligations under multilateral environmental
agreements (and, in at least two cases in the Americas, in a bilateral trade agreement).
On June 24 and 25, 2003 a sub-regional workshop on PRTRs was held in São Paulo, Brazil.
Environment Canada, UNITAR and UNEP Chemicals jointly organized the Workshop. Its
purpose was to inform government officials, industry and NGO representatives from nine South
American countries about PRTRs, and to facilitate a dialogue between the workshop organizers
(principally UNITAR and UNEP Chemicals) and participants on their development. The
workshop programme and a list of workshop participants appear in Appendix A.
The São Paulo workshop was the second of three regional workshops initiated by Environment
Canada, in collaboration with UNITAR and UNEP Chemicals. The first workshop, for Englishspeaking Caribbean countries, took place in Kingston, Jamaica. The São Paulo Workshop was
the second in the series. The third sub-regional workshop will be held for Central American and
Spanish-speaking Caribbean countries in San José, Costa Rica in December 2003. Information
and discussions at the workshops will provide input for a PRTR Conference of the Americas to
be held in Monterrey, Mexico in 2004.
Preparation for the workshops included bilateral meetings in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Costa Rica,
Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic. The purpose of the
meetings was to inform representatives from government, industry and the NGO community in
these countries about PRTRs, and invite them to attend the workshops in São Paulo and San
José.
Environment Canada contributed financial and organizational support to the São Paulo
workshop. In addition, one session focussed specifically on the Canadian experience. An
Environment Canada official gave a presentation on Canada’s National Pollutant Release
Inventory (NPRI), and the context in which it works. Via telephone, a representative of the
Canadian Chemical Producers’ Association gave that industry sector’s perspective on the
Canadian NPRI. Finally, a representative of the Canadian Institute for Environmental Law and
Policy provided the NGO view. All presentations were well received and were the subject of
questions or discussion by participants over the course of the two days.
The purpose of this report is to present the principal areas of discussion around PRTRs at the
workshop.
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2.
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SUMMARY OF PRESENTATIONS AND WORKSHOP DISCUSSION
This section of the report will follow the workshop agenda in order to outline the principal points
from each presentation, and capture the nature of the questions and discussion following the
presentations. Hard copies of each presentation available are found in Appendix B.
2.1
WORKSHOP SESSION 1 PRESENTATIONS – JUNE 24, MORNING
The “context-setting” presentations given in Session 1 were:
1. PRTRs: From Theory to Practice (UNITAR). Jorge Ocaña defined a PRTR, outlined
resources for PRTR development (the OECD Guidance Manual for Governments,
UNITAR’s Guidance Series for Implementing a National PRTR Design Project), described
some of UNITAR’s pilot projects and presented the PRTR “Virtual Classroom”
(http://prtr.intranets.com).
2. PRTR: The International Context (UNEP Chemicals). Osmany Pereira outlined the
various multilateral efforts around PRTRs (Agenda 21, IOMC PRTR Co-ordinating Group,
Aarhus Convention, IFCS).
3. PRTRs and the Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs) (UNEP Chemicals). Jim
Willis explained the role of a PRTR as an integrative instrument for data collection in the
context of fulfilling national obligations under MEAs.
The discussion following these presentations focused on:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
2.2
How to address the situation where multiple registers already exist (e.g., at the municipal,
state and/or federal level), and among them, where reporting is a mix of mandatory and
voluntary.
The nature of reporting by industry and data credibility/reliability.
Reporting issues: measurement vs. estimation techniques, data on releases and transfers
vs. data on the chemicals that exist in a facility’s material inventory and their use in
manufacturing processes.
How to overcome resistance to reporting – the need to demonstrate benefits to industry,
and involve them (with other stakeholders) in the design of a national PRTR, including
arriving at an understanding of how the data will be used.
The need to build/support capacity within NGOs and industry to understand and
disseminate the information generated by a PRTR.
WORKSHOP SESSION 2 PRESENTATIONS – JUNE 24, MORNING
Three Canadian presentations were made in Session 2:
1. PRTRs: The Canadian Government Experience (Environment Canada). Jody Rosenberger
described Canada’s National Pollutant Release Inventory, and North American efforts to
increase the comparability of the Canadian, American and Mexican PRTRs.
2. PRTRs: Perspectives of the Canadian Chemical Industry (Canadian Chemical Producers’
Association). Bruce Caswell described the industry’s Responsible Care program, its
complementarity to the Canadian NPRI, and outlined the principal issues for industry in the
development of a PRTR.
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3. PRTRs: Canadian NGO Perspectives (Canadian Institute for Environmental Law and
Policy). Jolante Rasteniene described ENGO participation in the Canadian NPRI process,
and outlined a number of ENGO outreach initiatives that aid the Canadian public to
understand the data published by NPRI.
The statements and questions following these presentations focused on:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
2.3
How greater integration of markets as trade negotiations for a Free Trade Agreement for
the Americas advance should necessitate support for the development of PRTRs in the
southern hemisphere.
How to involve SMEs in the PRTR process where they are small and/or operating
without being officially registered.
The techniques and calculations used by industry to produce the data on their releases and
transfers (e.g., emissions factors, standardized measurement techniques, well-developed
baselines, in-house calculations based on reporting experience). It was noted that
companies are asked to estimate their releases and transfers, and are not obliged to
comprehensively measure them each year.
How mercury, asbestos and agrochemicals are treated in the Canadian NPRI.
What is the link between a PRTR and the adoption of new, cleaner technologies and
processes by industry.
The key common elements between Responsible Care and PRTRs that help industry buy
into the idea: easy to determine thresholds; facility size; a focus on releases (not internal
processes); a well-defined list of substances, that should begin with a small number of
substances which can be added to over time, depending on the capabilities and needs of
each country.
How Canadian NGOs are involved in the NPRI (the use of a single NGO access window
by government).
WORKSHOP
SESSION
3
PRESENTATIONS
DISCUSSIONS – JUNE 24, AFTERNOON
AND
ROUNDTABLE
Following lunch, Brazilian representatives made the following presentations:
1. The Brazilian PRTR (Brazilian Ministry of the Environment – MMA). Professor João
Salvador Furtado (consultant to MMA) gave an overview of where Brazil stands in the
development of its PRTR, and provided a possible roadmap for future action. Brazil
proposes to commence an initial PRTR phase (national reporting of a limited number of
substances) within 18 months, and have a complete PRTR in place within 48 months. The
purpose of this timing is to have a PRTR in place before the next election.
2. Perspectives on the implementation of a PRTR in Brazil – Industry’s vision (Brazilian
Association of Chemical Industries – ABIQUIM). Marcelo Kós noted that his Association
has been involved since the beginning of the Brazilian PRTR process, its position is that the
PRTR should begin on a small scale, with fixed facilities (vs. non-point sources), it should be
legislated and should include the 100 substances that industry reports on as required by
current legislation. He added that there is a need to be flexible between sectors, as technical
capacity varies, and include an emphasis on dialogue with communities.
3. NGO Perspectives on the Implementation of a PRTR in Brazil (Brazilian NGO Forum for
the Protection of the Environment). Gilson Spanemberg (Friends of the Earth – Brazil)
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emphasized the NGO view that reporting to a Brazilian PRTR must be mandatory, and that in
particular the following sectors must be covered: pulp and paper; smelting; transportation;
mining; and, treatment and disposal of hazardous wastes. In ensuring that the public have
direct access to the information, he noted that this information must be understandable and
gave the example of a group of water quality indicators currently used in Brazil. NGOs
support the use of economic instruments, in particular to reward companies that reduce their
use of chemicals, and of mechanisms (social and institutional) that ensure data quality.
The questions and answers following these presentations focused on:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
The state of Brazilian legislation with respect to public right-to-know. Legislation must
still be assessed to ascertain whether this is adequately covered.
Basic reporting guidelines, types and amounts be necessary for releases from individual
projects. Parameters and criteria for substances, and exposure thresholds will be
specified. The idea is to build capacity within industry to enable it to report.
The relationship between a national PRTR and existing state and municipal inventories.
The expectation is that reporting will be standardized and the data harmonized; any
federal legislation will prevail, however.
Data verification. This was recognized as a major challenge, and aid from countries with
PRTRs on validation systems and best practices will be necessary. It was noted that
Brazil can anticipate having between 800 and 1,500 respondents.
Motivating companies outside industry associations. ABIQUIM works to motivate the
adoption of EMS, and through this, build capacity for substance reporting. It engages the
unions, and with large companies attempts through trade/commercial initiatives to
implement environmental management actions that will trickle down to smaller
companies in the supply chain.
Incentives for the private sector. Currently, incentives are cost savings to be made by
companies, and possibly an exemption on state taxes on the circulation of merchandise.
Point vs. non-point sources, especially with respect to transportation. Brazilian industry
prefers to begin with the easier point sources and once those are well covered, move onto
non-point sources.
Mechanisms to attract civil society. The Brazilian government is examining options;
there is a public hearing process for new legislation.
A round table discussion followed the Brazilian section of the program. At this time, UNITAR
distributed a questionnaire designed to ascertain for each country: the level of priority for
PRTRs; the level of familiarity with PRTRs by government, industry and NGOs; what stage of
PRTR development was currently most important (legal, financial, infrastructure, technical);
interest in the development of a PRTR; and the importance of external aid to do so. For
information purposes, the tabulated responses to this questionnaire are attached in Appendix C.
The discussion at the round table covered:
Ÿ
Industry fears of public backlash and legal action with the release of PRTR data to the
public. Participants noted that the participative process around PRTR development is
where these fears can be mitigated by ensuring that all players understand the objectives
and the ground rules. The U.S. example was given, where the government agreed not to
pursue legal action against companies in the beginning period of its Toxics Release
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Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
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Inventory. Industry also needs to understand that the PRTR exercise can help them
improve performance by reducing their emissions – the numbers in the inventory can be
used for comparative purposes. A PRTR is complementary to other environmental
management tools, such as risk management plans and chemical safety rules.
Data provided to a PRTR and the question of commercial confidentiality. The Aarhus
Convention provides a clear definition of what constitutes classified information.
Voluntary vs. mandatory reporting and the question of a level playing field that ensures
quality data.
The role of risk communication programs with respect to communities and the media.
Educating the public on the fact that all releases are not equal – what is a threshold and
how is it established, etc.
Integrating existing inventories and the feasibility of a single reporting window – the
necessity for establishing common objectives and consequently useful reporting formats.
The first day finished at 7 p.m. and participants were invited to a cocktail hosted by the
Government of Brazil (the Ministry of the Environment) and ABIQUIM (Brazil’s chemical
industry association).
2.4
WORKSHOP SESSION 4, COUNTRY PRESENTATIONS – JUNE 25, MORNING
The countries listed below made presentations on the main challenges, needs, progress and
experience regarding national PRTRs and/or emissions inventories. As mentioned previously,
their presentations are provided in Appendix B.
§
§
§
§
2.5
Argentina
Columbia
Paraguay
Peru
§
§
§
§
Uruguay
Venezuela
Chile
Ecuador
WORKSHOP SESSION 5, WORKING GROUP DISCUSSIONS – JUNE 25,
MORNING/AFTERNOON
Following the country presentations, participants divided up into three Working Groups
(Government, Industry and NGO) and using focus questions (see Appendix D), came to the
following conclusions. These were synthesized for presentation to plenary.
Government Working Group
1 – Current environmental/chemical priorities
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Implement an integrated management plan for chemical substances, including its legal
framework, covering: contaminated and environmentally inactive sites; obsolete
products; prevention of environmental accidents; production registry and use of toxic
substances (product life cycle); development of disposal sites
Integrated strategy to implement international conventions
Strengthen existing databases.
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2 – Needs and challenges for PRTR development
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Systemization of databases: data harmonization and methodology (comparability
purposes); ensuring data compatibility; establishing mechanisms for dissemination of and
access to the information; ensuring similar quality data from the regions
Human resources and capacity-building
Financial support
Methodology to estimate emissions data
Political support.
3 – What types of regional cooperation most useful
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Existing regional accords: Iniciativa Latinoamericana; MERCOSUR; Andean Pact;
meetings of the Health and Environment Ministers of the Americas; Amazon
Cooperation Treaty and via the OAS
Propose a protocol in which countries commit to pursue PRTR projects
Bilateral accords
International agencies: UNITAR; UNEP; and others
Multilateral conventions: Basil, Stockholm.
4 – Benefits of a PRTR
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Useful tool to establish the current situation vis-à-vis priority substances and their follow
up
Permits the identification of hot spots
Standards
Improves risk management
Provides risk information to the community
Contributes to the ratification and implementation of international conventions
Contributes to reporting of the state of the environment in each country
Contributes to establishing the environmental quality of resources
Decision-making
Point of convergence between governments, civil society and the productive sector
Gives access to international funds
Contributes to comparing industrial competitiveness (bench marking).
5 – General recommendations for the workshop
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Workshop to exchange country experiences
Continuity and in-depth study of PRTR activities in each region by international agencies
(e.g., UNEP Chemicals, UNITAR)
Work on contingency and environmental emergency response plans.
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Industry Working Group
1 – Reporting release and transfer data
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
In general, positive experience however where data is collected, there is very little return
information on what or how government uses the data
It is essential that a PRTR program handles data and helps the public understand them
The benefits of PRTRs are not immediately clear and it is the role of government to show
their value-added
Multiple registers must be avoided – one window with good interdepartmental
coordination is preferable.
2 – Constraints for industry
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
The most important aspect is achieving consensus between all stakeholders on the
objectives of a domestic PRTR
The process must be gradual, simple, beginning with a small number of substances
The responsibility for data accuracy must be clear
A formula for reporting (e.g., thresholds, which facilities report, tonnage, etc.) must be
established before implementation
There is a reporting capacity barrier for SMEs.
3 – Needs for multi-media reporting
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Technical support for those substances that are not already reported on – how to measure,
estimate
Standardization – the exchange of information in similar forms, compatibility. There is
an issue around accredited laboratories to analyse samples
Financial and technical support – including technical infrastructure to be provided by
government, funds for training, public outreach.
Non-governmental Organizations Working Group
1 – Current NGO capacity to participate in PRTR development
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Low knowledge level about PRTR issues
NGO’s technical capacity for PRTRs is not yet appropriately developed for the Latin
American region
Despite few NGOs involved with PRTR so far, NGOs have recognized capacity for
mobilization (such as credibility and open dialogue with different social actors).
2 – Needs and challenges
Ÿ
Ÿ
Must have open access to information (data)
Need for a PRTR global network “umbrella” based on such existing networks as IPEN
and the Ban Hg Network, which are always well supported by UNEP Chemicals
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Ÿ
Ÿ
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Organizational and institutional support from UNEP Chemicals, UNITAR and
governments including fund raising for awareness, dissemination, organizational
strengthening, mobilization, technical capacity and dialogue with industry
Need to increase NGO participation in UNEP Chemicals consultative processes.
3 – How to draw upon established PRTR NGO stakeholder experiences
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
2.6
Invite established networks/NGOs that have already worked closely within the UNEP
Chemicals process
Support the exchange of best practices and experiences between southern and northern
NGO
Organize workshops between northern and southern NGOs on how to work with PRTRs
with the support of UNEP Chemicals and UNITAR.
WORKSHOP SESSION 6, FINAL PLENARY – JUNE 25, AFTERNOON
The final plenary began with an open discussion about the Working Group findings, which then
moved into the advisability of establishing a PRTR protocol for the region. It was ultimately
decided that this concept would be investigated with a possible outcome being a motion for a
protocol put before the participants at the planned PRTR Conference of the Americas. The
workshop concluded with words of thanks from the Government of Brazil, the Government of
Canada, UNEP Chemicals and UNITAR.
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APPENDIX A
Workshop Programme and
List of Workshop Participants
Sub-regional Awareness Raising Workshop on
Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers (PRTRs)
São Paulo, Brazil
24-25 June 2003
Programme
1ST Day:
24th June 2003
08:00-8:55
Registration
09:00-9:40
Opening Session
Welcome and Opening Statements
Ms. Marijane Lisboa, Ministry of the Environment of Brazil
Mr. Ron Davidson, Consul General, Canadian Consulate in São Paulo
Mr James B. Willis, Director, UNEP Chemicals
Mr. Jorge Ocaña, UNITAR
Mr. Henrique Brandão Cavalcanti, President, IFCS
Introduc tion to the agenda
- UNEP Chemicals
Election of Chairperson and Rapporteur.
10:20-10:35
Coffee Break
Session One: Introduction to PRTRs
09:40-10:10
10:10-10:20
10:35-10:55
10:55-11:15
11:15-11:30
11:30-12:00
12:00-12:20
12:20-12:40
12:40-12:55
12:55-14:15
14:20-14:40
PRTRs: From Theory to Practice
Mr. Jorge Ocaña, UNITAR
Questions and answers
PRTR International Context
Mr. Osmany Pereira, UNEP Chemicals
PRTRs and the Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs)
Mr. James B. Willis, UNEP Chemicals
Questions and answers
Session Two: PRTR Implementation in North America
PRTRs: The Canadian Government Experience
Mr. Jody Rosenberger, Environment Canada
PRTRs: Canadian Industry Perspectives
Mr. Bruce Caswell, Canadian Chemical Producers Association
PRTRs: Canadian NGO Perspectives
Ms. Jolanta Rasteniene, Canadian Institute for Environmental Law and Policy
(CIELAP)
Questions and answers
Lunch
Session Three: Perspectives for Implementing PRTR in Brazil
Perspective from the Government
Dr. Prof. João Salvador Furtado
PRTR Consultant - MMA
1
14:40-15:00
15:00-15:20
Perspective from the Industry
Mr. Marcelo Kós, Brazilian Association of Chemical Industry (ABIQUIM).
Perspective from the NGOs
Mr. Gilson Spanemberg, Vice-President, Amigos da Terra Brasil – Brazilian
Forum of Environmental NGOs.
15:20-15:35
Questions and answers
15:35-15:50
Coffee Break
15:50-17:15
Round table discussions
Main points to be discussed:
- Voluntary versus obligatory (policy and legal framework)
- Financial implications
- Infrastructure
- Technical expertise
17:15-17:30
Summary of the first day
18:00 – 19:30
Reception
2nd Day:
25th June 2003
08:30-09:40
09:40 – 09:55
09:55 – 10:35
Session Four: PRTRs/Emissions inventories in South America – Country
perspectives
Argentina
Colombia
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay
Venezuela
Coffee
Chile’s experience
Ecuador’s experience
Session Five: Working Group Discussions
10:35 – 12:35
12:35 – 14:00
Working Group 1 – Governmental issues
Working Group 2 – Industry issues.
Working Group 3 – Community issues.
Lunch
14:00 – 15:15
Session Five: Continued
15:15 - 15:30
Coffee
Session Six: Regional Cooperation on PRTR (Plenary)
15:30 – 16:00
Report from working group discussions
16:00 – 17:00
Summary, conclusions and recommendations of the workshop
17:00 – 17:10
Closure
2
3
Sub-Regional Awareness Raising Workshop on
Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers (PRTRs)
Sao Paulo - Brazil, 24-25 June 2003.
List of Participants
Countries:
Argentina
Brazil
Mr. Lorenzo Gonzalez Videla
Coordinador de la Unidad de Sustancias
Químicas de la Dirección Nacional de Gestión
Ambiental
Secretaría de Ambiente y Desarrollo
Sustentable
San Martín 451, 4º piso Of. 420
1004 Buenos Aires, Argentina
Tel.: +(54 11) 4348 8350 / 4348 8425
Fax: +(54 11) 4348 8624
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Ms. Marijane Lisboa
Secretaria de Qualidade Ambiental nos
Assentamentos Humanos
Ministério do Meio Ambiente (MMA)
Esplanada dos Ministérios, Bloco B, 8° andar
CEP: 70068-900 Brasilia, DF, Brazil
Tel.: +(55 61) 317 1204
Fax: +(55 61) 226 8050
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Armando Norberto Hornus
Integrante de la Comisión de Medio Ambiente
Unión Industrial Argentina
Av. de Mayo 1147,
1085 Buenos Aires, Argentina
Tel.: +(54 11) 4124 2364 / 4762 7153
Fax: +(54 11) 4124 2301 / 4762 7169
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Ms. Silvia Oliviero
Responsable de Medio Ambiente
Centro de Investigación en Contaminantes
Especiales (CISCOE). Instituto Nacional de
Tecnologia Industrial (INT)
Avenida General Paz y Avda. de los
Constituyentes, 1650 San Martin,
Provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina
Tel.: +(54 11) 4754 4066 / 4724 6426
Fax: +(54 11) 4754 4066 / +54 11 4754 4080
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Marcelo Kós Silveira Campos
Gerente de Assuntos Técnicos
Associação Brasileira de Industria Química
(ABIQUIM)
Rua Santo Antônio, 184, 17° e 18° andares,
CEP: 01314-900, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
Tel.: +(55 11) 3242 1144
Fax: +(55 11) 3242 3818
Mr. Gilson Spanemberg
Vice-Presidente
Amigos da Terra Brasil - Forum Brasileiro de
ONG para o Meio Ambiente
Address: Rua Carlos Trein Filho, 13, Auxiliadora
90450-120 Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil
Tel.: +(55 51) 3332 8884 / 9105 0206
Fax: +(55 51) 3320 3642
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Chile
Mr. Marcos Javier Serrano Ulloa
Coordinator RETC.Departamento de Desarollo e
Información
Comisión Nacional del Medio Ambiente
(CONAMA), Obispo Donoso No.6 , Providencia
6640779 Santiago, Chile
Tel.: +(56 2) 240 5603 / 294 2942
Fax: +(56 2) 241 1803 / 241 1888
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Patricio Andrés Kurte Marinovic
Subgerente de Operaciones
Asociación Gremial de Industriales Químicos de
Chile - Asiquim A.G.
Av. Andrés Bello 2777
Oficina 501 Las Condes
755-0097 Santiago, Chile
Tel.: +(56 2) 203 3350 / 233 6483
Fax: +(56 2) 203 3351
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Miguel Ignacio Fredes González
Director Ejecutivo
Centro Austral de Derecho Ambiental (CEADA)
Av. Providencia 1150, Of.31
Providencia, Santiago, Chile
Tel.: +(56 2) 235 5802
Fax: +(56 2) 235 5802
Email: [email protected]
Ecuador
Ms. Irma Elvira Suarez Gomez
Directora Nacional de Prevención y Control.
Subsecretaría de Calidad Ambiental
Ministerio del Ambiente
Quito, Ecuador
Tel.: +(593 2) 256 3492 / 286 3255
Fax: +(593 2) 256 3492 / 286 3255
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Luis Antonio Gómez Avila
Presidente GEA
Fundación Ecuatoriana para la Gestión
Ambiental, GEA
P.O. Box 17-21-0121
Quito, Ecuador
Tel.: +(593 2) 223 6709/ +(593 2) 223 51 69
Fax: +(593 2) 255 6026
Email: [email protected]
Colombia
Mr. Helver Reyes Lozano
Profesional Especializado.Grado 20
Ministerio de Ambiente, Vivienda y Desarrollo
Territorial
Calle 37 No.8-40 , Edificio Anexo
Santa Fé de Bogota, Colombia
Tel.: +(57 1) 332 3400 / 332 3434 Ext.427 / 360
Fax: +(57 1) 288 9725
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Ms. Angela Gomez-Rodriguez
Subgerente Asuntos Ambientales
Asociación Nacional de Industriales (ANDI)
Cra. 13 Nº 26-45, Piso 6º
Bogotá, Colombia
Tel.: +(57 1) 323 8500 / 331 0808 6831
Fax: +(57 1) 281 3188 / 562 7204
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Mr. German Gustavo Londoño Gaviria
Ingeniero Químico Especialista. Subdirección
Ambiental, RED AIRE,
Cra 55 No. 40 A-20
Medellín, Colombia
Tel.: +(57 4) 262 3324 Ext. 130
Fax: +(57 4) 262 3684 / 262 3201
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Miguel Angel Costales Falconi
Director Ejecutivo
Asociación de Productores de Pinturas,
Resinas, Tintes y Químicos del Ecuador
"APROQUE"
Av. República 1783 y Atahualpa.
Ed. PrismaDos. Of. 8 B
Quito, Ecuador
Tel.: +(593 2) 244 6660
Fax: +(593 2) 292 3487
Email: [email protected]
Paraguay
Dr. Victor Francisco Morel Martínez
Coordinador Unidad Acción Ozono
Dirección General de Recursos Naturales
Secretaría del Ambiente de la República del
Paraguay, Avda. Madame Lynch 3500
Asunción, Paraguay
Tel.: +(595 21) 615 813 / 615 806 /7
Fax: +(595 21) 615 813 / 615 803/4
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Gregorio Candia Cardozo
Industrial
Federación Paraguaya de Madereros
(FEPAMA), Caaguazú, Paraguay
Tel.: +(595 522) 42229 / 595 21 441182
Fax: +(595 21) 44 1182
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Awareness Raising Workshop on PRTR, Sao Paulo - Brazil 24 - 25 June 2003 - Page 2
Mr. Ulises Pedro Antonio Lovera Gaona
Técnico Asesor. Programa de Biodiversidad Alter Vida
Red de Organizaciones No Gubernamentales
del Paraguay - ROAM
3132 Asunción, Paraguay
Tel.: +(595 21) 298 842 / 3 / 281 271 / 2
Fax: +(595 21) 298 845
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Peru
Mr. César Ygnacio Cervantes Gálvez Sr.
Director de Calidad Ambiental y Recursos
Naturales.
Consejo Nacional del Ambiente (CONAM)
Avenida Guardia Civil 205
San Borja, Lima 41, Peru
Tel.: +(51 1) 225 5370
Fax: +(51 1) 225-5369
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Luis Abraham Gomero Osorio
Coordinador de Desarrollo Institucional. Unidad
de Campañas
Red de Acción en Alternativas al Uso de
Agroquímicos (RAAA)
Julio Rodavero Nº 682
Urb. Las Brisas - Cercado
Lima, Peru
Tel.: +(51 1) 337 5170
Fax: +(51 1) 425 7955
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Francisco Javier Echegaray Zevallos
Coordinador Conducta Responsable. Comité de
la Industria Química
Sociedad Nacional de Industria
Los Laureles 385 - San Isidro
Lima, Peru
Tel.: +51 (1) 441 2772
Fax: +51 (1) 441 2772
Email: [email protected]
Uruguay
Mr. Ruben Fernando Pacheco Valerio
Jefe del Departamento de Emisiones al
Ambiente. División de Control Ambiental
Dirección Nacional de Medio Ambiente
Ministerio de Vivienda, Ordenamiento Territorial
y Medio Ambiente, Rincón 422 Piso 6
11000 Montevi deo, Uruguay
Tel.: +(598 2) 917 0090 / 707 4211
Fax: +(598 2) 917 0093
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Oscar Luis Rufener Ziegler
Presidente. Comisión de Medio Ambiente
Cámara de Industrias del Uruguay
11500 Montevideo, Uruguay
Tel.: +(598 2) 604 0464 / 208 2921
Fax: +(598 2) 604 0498 / 203 3477
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Luis Eduardo Ghigi Farias
Director Ejecutivo
Organización para Desarrollo Sustentable del
Uruguay, India Muerta 3689
12.400 Montevideo, Uruguay
Tel.: +(598 2) 309 12 05 / 358 21 08
Fax: +(598 2) 309 12 05
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Venezuela
Dr. Emilio Chacón Parra
Director de Manejo de Residuos y Desechos.
Dirección General de Calidad Ambiental
Ministerio del Ambiente y de los Recursos
Naturales
Centro Simón Bolívar, Torre Sur, piso 28
Caracas 1001, Venezuela
Tel.: +(58 212) 408 1125 / 1126 /
+(58 414) 7487197
Fax: +(58 212) 408 4898
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Ing. Aura Nathaly Lamas Quevedo
Directora Técnica
ASOQUIM - Asociación Venezolana de la Ind.
Química y Petroquímica
Avenida Francisco Solano Lopéz
Edificio Centro Solano, Piso 1, oficina 1-A
Chacaito - Caracas 1010 A, Venezuela
Tel.: +58 (212) 762.54.85
Fax: +58 (212) 762.05.97
Email: [email protected]
Ms. Patricia Cecilia Gutiérrez Urizar
Coordinadora Región Oriental
Red de Acción en Alternativas al Uso de
Agroquímicos de Venezuela
Avenida Perimetral, Edificio Mamatica, N°3
Awareness Raising Workshop on PRTR, Sao Paulo - Brazil 24 - 25 June 2003 - Page 3
Cumana, Edo. Sucre 6101, Venezuela
Tel.: +(58 293) 433.02.65 / +(58 414) 7950200
Fax: +(58 293) 451.79.52 / 4521466
E-mail: [email protected]
CEP: 01314-900, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
Tel.: +(55 11) 3242 1144
Fax: +(55 11) 3242 3818
ABIT
Observers:
ABEMA
Mr. Rubens Lara
Associação Brasileira de Entidades Estaduais
de Meio Ambiente (ABEMA)
Secretaria de Meio Ambiente de São Paulo
Companhia de Tecnologia de Saneamento
Ambiental (CETESB)
São Paulo, SP, Brazil
Mr. Cláudio Darwin Alonso
Associação Brasileira de Entidades Estaduais
de Meio Ambiente (ABEMA)
Secretaria de Meio Ambiente de São Paulo
São Paulo, SP, Brazil
E-mail: [email protected]
Mr. José Alberto Wenzel
Associação Brasileira de Entidades Estaduais
de Meio Ambiente (ABEMA)
Secretaria de Meio Ambiente do Rio Grande do
Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
ABEPOLAR
Mr. Raudolpho Marques Lobato
Presidente
Associação Brasileira de Ecologia e de
Prevenção à Polução das Águas e do Ar
(ABEPOLAR)
Tel.: +(55 11) 3721 2252
Fax: +(55 11) 3721 5544
Email: [email protected]
Mr. William Farhud
Associação Brasileira da Indústria Têxtil e de
Confecções
Rua Pedroso Alvarenga, 372 – Itaim Bibi
CEP: 04531-000
E-mail: [email protected]
CEBEDS
Mr. Antonio Fernando Pinheiro Pedro
Consultor Jurídico
Conselho Empresarial Brasileiro para o
Desenvolvimento Sustentável
Rua Diamante, 28 - Aclimação
São Paulo – SP
Tel: + (55 11) 32717668/ + (55 11) 3272 8788
E-mail: [email protected]
Mr. Pedro de Toledo Piza
Consultor Jurídico
Conselho Empresarial Brasileiro para o
Desenvolvimento Sustentável
Rua Diamante, 28 - Aclimação
São Paulo – SP
Tel: + (55 11) 3208 3899/ + (55 11) 3272 8788
E-mail: [email protected]
Ms. Simone Paschoal Nogueira
Consultora Jurídica
Conselho Empresarial Brasileiro para o
Desenvolvimento Sustentável
Rua Diamante, 28 - Aclimação
São Paulo – SP
Tel: + (55 11) 3208 3899/ + (55 11) 3272 8788
E-mail: [email protected]
CETESB
ABIQUIM
Ms. Maria Luiza Couto
Assessor Técnica
Associação Brasileira de Industria Química
(ABIQUIM)
Rua Santo Antônio, 184, 17° e 18° andares,
CEP: 01314-900, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
Tel.: +(55 11) 3242 1144
Fax: +(55 11) 3242 3818
E-mail: [email protected]
Mr. Luís Carlos Marques
Assessor Técnico
Associação Brasileira de Industria Química
(ABIQUIM)
Rua Santo Antônio, 184, 17° e 18° andares,
Mr. Aruntho Savastano Neto
Diretoria de Controle da Poluição Ambiental
Av. Prof. Frederico Herman Jr, 345 - Prédio 1 7° andar - São Paulo – SP - Brasil
CEP: 05459-900
TeL: + (55 11) 3030 6819
E-mail: [email protected]
Mr. Eduardo Mazzonelis de Oliveira
Gerente do Depto. Águas Superfes e Efluentes
Líquidos
A v. Prof. Frederico Herman Jr, 345 - Prédio 1 7° andar - São Paulo – SP - Brasil
CEP: 05459-900
Tel: + (55 11) 3030 6070
Awareness Raising Workshop on PRTR, Sao Paulo - Brazil 24 - 25 June 2003 - Page 4
Fax: + (55 11) 3030 6116
E-mail: [email protected]
CIELAP
Ms. Jolanta Rasteniene
Canadian Institute for Environmental Law and
Policy (CIELAP)
130 Spadina Av., Suite 305
Toronto - ON - M5V 2L4
Tel: + (416) 923 3529 - ex 24
E-mail: [email protected]
COFIC
Mr. Renato Reis Vitoria
Superintendente. Superintendencia de Meio
Ambiente
Comite de Fomento Industrial de Camaçari
(COFIC)
Rodovia BA 512, Km 1,5 Faz. Olhos D´Água
42810-000 Camaçari, BA
Tel.: +(55 71) 634.6810
Fax: +(55 71) 634.6899
[email protected]
CUT
Mr. Oswaldo da Silva Bezerra
Central Única dos Trabalhadores – CUT
Confederação Nacional do Ramo Químico –
CNQ
Rua Caetano Pinto, 575, 4º andar, Brás
03041-000 São Paulo, SP
Tel.: +(55 11) 3272.9411 – Ramal 214
Fax: +(55 11) 3272.9411
E-mail:[email protected]
[email protected]
Ms. Susan Young
Marbek Resource Consultants,
300 – 222 Someset St. W.
Ottawa, Ontario – Canada
K2P 2G3
Tel.: +(1 613) 523 07 84
Fax: +(1 613) 523 07 17
Email: [email protected]
FUNASA
Mr. Carlos Augusto Vaz de Souza
Ministério da Saúde
Fundação Nacional de Saúde – FUNASA
Coordenação Geral de Vigilância Ambiental
SAS, Qd. 04, Bl. “N”
CEP: 70070-040 Brasília, DF
Tel.: +(55 61) 314.6388
Fax: +(55 61) 314.6403
GREENPEACE
Mr. John Butcher
Rua Alvarenga, 2331, Butantã
CEP: 05509-006 São Paulo, SP
Tel.: +(55 11) 3035.1155
Fax: +(55 11) 3817.4600
www.greenpeace.org.br
E-mail: [email protected]
IBAMA
Mr. Glauco Ferrassi Duarte
Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e dos
Recursos Naturais Renováveis (IBAMA)
SAIN, Via L4 Norte, Ed. Sede, Bl. “C”
CEP: 70800-200 Brasília, DF, Brazil
Tel.: +(55 61) 316.1282
Fax: +(55 61) 225.0564
Environment Canada
Mr. Jody Rosenberger
Advisor, Pollution Data Branch.
Environment Canada
351 St. Joseph Blvd, 9th floor
Hull, Quebec, Canada K1A 0H3, Canada
Tel.: + (1 819) 994 1441
Fax: +(1 819) 956 6047
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Antonio Carneiro Barbosa
Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e dos
Recursos Naturais Renováveis (IBAMA)
Diretoria de Licenciamento e Qualidade
Ambiental
SAIN, Via L4 Norte, Ed. Sede, Bl. “C”
CEP: 70800-200 Brasília, DF, Brazil
Tel: +(55 61) 316.1282
Fax: +(55 61) 225.0564/ +(55 11) 248 5842
Mr. Steve Hart
Innovative Environmental Solutions
81 Waterford Drive
Ottawa, Ontario K2E 7V4, Canada
Tel.: +(1 613) 274 0539
Fax: +(1 613) 274 0533
Email: [email protected]
Awareness Raising Workshop on PRTR, Sao Paulo - Brazil 24 - 25 June 2003 - Page 5
IFCS
Mr. Henrique Brandão Cavalcanti
President
Intergovernmental Forum on Chemical Safety
(IFCS)
SHIS QI 09 Cl. Bloco H
Ed. Ipanema Sl. 208
CEP: 71625-009, Brasília, DF, Brazil
Tel.: +(55 61) 364 2246
Fax: +(55 61) 248 6935
Email: [email protected]
MI
Ms. Maria Inez Resende Cunha
Ministério da Integração Nacional (MI)
Secretaria Nacional de Defesa Civil
Esplanada dos Ministérios, Bl. “E”, 7º andar
CEP: 70067-901 Brasilia, DF, Brazil
Tel.: +(55 61) 414 58 49/ 45
Fax: +(55 61) 226.7588
MMA
IPEN
Mr. Jeffer Castello Branco
Member
International POPs Elimination Network (IPEN)
Rua Júlio de Mesquita, 148 – Conj. 203 – V.
Mathias – Santos – SP - Brasil.
CEP: 11075- 220
E-mail: [email protected]
Ms. Fernanda Giannasi
Member
International POPs Elimination Network (IPEN)
Rua Arthur Sabóia, 367 - 143
São Paulo - Brasil
CEP: 04104 – 060
E-mail: [email protected]
LENTZ
Mr. George Lentz Fruehauf PhD
Director
Lentz - Consultores em Meio Ambiente
Rua Alvaro Assumpção, 431
São Paulo – SP
CEP: 04618-021
Tel: + (55 11) 5092 2138
Fax:+ (55 11) 5012 2138
E-mail : [email protected]
Ms. Marilia Marreco Cerqueira
Special Assistant
Ministry of the Environment of Brazil
Esplanada dos Ministérios
Bloco “B” 8 ° Andar, Sala 801
70.068-900 Brasília, Brazil
Tel.: +(55 61) 317 1029 / 317 1244 (c)
Fax: +(55 61) 323-8318 / 226 8050
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Ms. Francisca Mendes de Menezes
Programa de Cooperação Internacional
Ministério do Meio Ambiente (MMA)
Esplanada dos Ministérios, Bl. “B”, 8º andar
CEP: 70068-900 Brasília, DF, Brazil
Tel.: +(55 61) 317.1089
Fax: +(55 61) 317.1022
Email: [email protected]
Mr. José Carlos Assumpção
Secretaria de Qualidade Ambiental nos
Assentamentos Humanos
Ministério do Meio Ambiente (MMA)
Esplanada dos Ministérios, Bl. “B”, 8º andar
CEP: 70068-900 Brasília, DF, Brazil
Tel.: +(55 61) 317.1373
Fax: +(55 61) 323.8318
Email: [email protected]
MDIC
Daniel Valle Corgozinho
Ministério do Desenvolvimento, Indústria e
Comércio (MDIC)
Esplanda dos Ministérios, Bl. “J”, 8º andar
CEP: 70053-900 Brasília, DF, Brazil
Tel.: +(55 61) 329.7620
Fax +(55 61) 329.7385
[email protected]
Mr. João Salvador Furtado
Consultor da Secretaria de Qualidade Ambiental
nos Assentamentos Humanos
Ministério do Meio Ambiente (MMA)
Esplanada dos Ministérios, Bl. “B”, 8º andar
CEP: 70068-900 Brasília, DF, Brazil
Tel.: +(55 61) 317.1373
Fax: + (55 61) 323.8318
[email protected]
Awareness Raising Workshop on PRTR, Sao Paulo - Brazil 24 - 25 June 2003 - Page 6
Mr. André Luiz Dutra Fenner
Coordenador de Informação e Comunicação
Secretaria de Qualidade Ambiental nos
Assentamentos Humanos
Ministério do Meio Ambiente (MMA)
Esplanada dos Ministérios, Bloco B, 8° andar
CEP: 70068-900 Brasilia, DF, Brazil
Tel.: +(55 61) 317 1016
Fax: +(55 61) 226 8050
Email: [email protected]
Ms. Marie Kalyva
Technical Assistant
Secretaria de Qualidade Ambiental nos
Assentamentos Humanos
Ministério do Meio Ambiente (MMA)
Esplanada dos Ministérios, Bloco B, 8° andar
CEP: 70068-900 Brasilia, DF, Brazil
Tel.: +(55 61) 317 1164
Fax: +(55 61) 317 1020
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Osmany Pereira González
PRTR Program Manager
UNEP Chemicals
11-13, chemin des Anémones
CH-1219 Châtelaine, Geneva, Switzerland
Tel.: +(41 22) 917 8194
Fax: +(41 22) 797 3460
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Rogerio Fenner
Consultant
UNEP Chemicals
11-13, chemin des Anémones
CH-1219 Châtelaine, Geneva, Switzerland
Tel.: +(41 22) 917 8439
Fax: +(41 22) 797 3460
Email: [email protected]
UNITAR
PETROBRAS
Mr. Albertino Frello
Av. República do Chile, 65, sala 602 - 6 °andar –
Centro – Rio de Janeiro – RJ
CEP: 20031-912
Tel: + (55 21) 9649 0655/ 2534 8289
E-mail: [email protected]
UNEP Chemicals
Mr. James B. Willis
Director
UNEP Chemicals
11-13, chemin des Anémones
CH-1219 Châtelaine, Geneva, Switzerland
Tel.: +(41 22) 917 8183
Fax.: +(41 22) 797 3460
Mr. Jorge Ocaña
Fellow
Chemicals and Waste Management. UNITAR
11-13, chemin des Anémones
CH-1219 Châtelaine, Geneva, Switzerland
Tel.: +(41 22) 917 8435
Fax: +(41 22) 917 8047
Email : [email protected]
IMPRENSA/ PRESS
Ms. Maura Campanili
Repórter – Agência Estado
TeL : + (55 11) 3856 2533
E-mail : [email protected]
Awareness Raising Workshop on PRTR, Sao Paulo - Brazil 24 - 25 June 2003 - Page 7
APPENDIX B
Workshop Presentations
APPENDIX C
UNITAR Questionnaire and Tabulated Responses
(in Spanish)
Cuestionario a ser entregado a los participantes en e l
Taller Sub-regional de Registros de Emisiones y Transferencias de Contaminantes
(RETC)
Sao Paulo, Brasil, 24-25 de junio de 2003
Nombre y Título ………………………………………………………………..
Organización…………………………………………………………………..
País………………………………………………………………………..
1. Actualmente, ¿es el RETC una prioridad en la agenda ambiental de su país?
SI……………..
NO……………
2. ¿Considera Usted que debería ser una prioridad en la agenda ambiental de su pa ís?
¿Porqué ?
SI…………….
NO……………
Explique……………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………………………………………………………………
3. ¿Son los siguientes sectores familiares con los conceptos y/o caracteristicas del
RETC?
a. Público en General
b. Organizaciones no Gubernamentales
c. Industria
SI………..
SI………..
SI……….
NO………..
NO………..
NO………..
4. ¿Cuáles elementos serían los mas útiles para desarrollar un sistema RETC en su país?
Favor de marcar (1 para el más importante, 5 para el menos importante. El mismo
valor puede ser atribuido en más de una oportunidad):
Asesoría/Apoyo en:
Marco Legal
Financiero
Infraestructura
Experiencia técnica
Favor de marcar (1 to 5)
5. ¿Estaría su país interesado en iniciar un Proyecto para diseñar un sistema RETC?
SI……………….. NO……………
5a. Si la respuesta fue sí, ¿cuan importante sería la asistencia y apoyo externo para
implementar un proyecto de RETC?. Favor de seleccionar una opción:
a. MUY IMPORTANTE
b. IMPORTANTE
c. NO ES IMPORTANTE
Agradecemos su cooperación
Cuestionario RETC
Taller Sub-regional de Registros de Emisiones y Transferencias de Contaminantes
Sao Paulo, Brazil, 24-25 de junio de 2003
1. Es el
RETC una 2. Considera
Pais
Sector
prioridad
que deberia
ambiental
serlo?
SI
NO
SI
NO
Argentina GOB
√
√
Argentina GOB
√
√
Argentina GOB
√
√
Brasil
GOB
√
√
Brasil
IGO
√
√
Brasil
NGO
√
√
Brasil
GOB
√
√
Brasil
IND
√
√
Brasil
NGO
√
√
Brasil
GOB
√
√
Brasil
NGO
√
√
Brasil
IND
√
√
Brasil
GOB
√
Brasil
NGO
√
√
Chile
NGO
√
√
Chile
GOB
√
√
Ecuador IND
√
√
Ecuador NGO
√
√
Ecuador GOB
√
√
Paraguay NGO
√
√
Paraguay IND
√
√
Paraguay GOB
√
√
Uruguay NGO
√
√
Uruguay IND
√
√
Venezuela IND
√
√
Venezuela GOB
√
√
5. Interes del
país para
desarrollar un
del 1(mas importante) al 5 (menos importante)
RETC
Legislación Financiero Infraestructura Experiencia Tecnica
SI
NO
3
1
1
3
√
1
1
1
2
√
3
1
1
3
√
3
2
1
1
√
1
2
2
1
√
3
4
5
3
√
3
3
5
4
√
1
3
3
1
√
1
2
3
4
√
1
3
4
2
√
1
1
1
1
√
1
2
3
1
√
1
1
1
1
√
1
3
2
4
√
3
1
1
2
√
1
1
3
4
√
1
1
1
1
√
2
1
2
3
√
1
1
2
2
√
5
1
3
2
√
1
1
1
1
√
1
2
2
2
√
3
4
4
√
4
2
3
1
√***
4
1
1
2
√
2
1
1
2
√
3. Sectores Familiarizados
4. Elementos utiles para desarrollar un RETC
con los RETC
Publico
SI NO
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
ONG
SI NO
√*
√*
√*
√
√*
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
Industria
SI NO
√**
√**
√**
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
* Algunas ONGs
**algunos sectores, no las Pymes
***no lo sabe
APPENDIX D
Working Group Focus Questions
Sub-Regional Awareness Raising Workshop on
Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers (PRTRs)
Sao Paulo - Brazil, 24-25 June 2003
Working Group: Government
The objectives of the working group are to:
§ Share experiences/needs/challenges around the development of PRTRs in each
South American country; and,
§ Discuss possible regional (North, Central and South American) cooperation in PRTR
development.
The three questions for the government working group are:
1. What are your country’s top three current government environmental/chemical
priorities and how can a PRTR support their achievement?
2. What are your challenges/needs for PRTR development? Key words:
legislation; stakeholder involvement; infrastructure; resources (technical,
financial, managerial)
3. What kind of regional cooperation for PRTRs would be most useful to you?
Sub-Regional Awareness Raising Workshop on
Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers (PRTRs)
Sao Paulo - Brazil, 24-25 June 2003
Working Group: Industry
The objectives of the working group are to:
§ Share experiences/needs/challenges around the development of PRTRs in each
South American country; and,
§ Discuss possible regional (North, Central and South American) cooperation in PRTR
development.
The three questions for the industry working group are:
§ What is the general industry experience in each of your countries with reporting
release and transfer data?
§ What constraints must industry overcome to participate fully in a PRTR?
§ What are the needs (technical, administrative, etc.) of industry with respect to
reporting to a multi-media PRTR?
Sub-Regional Awareness Raising Workshop on
Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers (PRTRs)
Sao Paulo - Brazil, 24-25 June 2003
Working Group: Non-governmental Organizations
§ Share experiences/needs/challenges around the development of PRTRs in each
South American country; and,
§ Discuss possible regional (North, Central and South American) cooperation in PRTR
development.
The three questions for the NGO working group are:
§ What is the capacity (technical, advocacy role, etc.) within South American NGOs to
participate in the design and implementation of a PRTR?
§ What are NGOs’ needs and challenges?
§ How can South American NGOs draw on the experience of NGOs in countries that
already participate in PRTRs?

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