Investigação Operacional

Сomentários

Transcrição

Investigação Operacional
ISSN: 0874-5161
Investigação Operacional
Volume 24
Apdio
CESUR - Instituto Superior Técnico
Av. Rovisco Pais - 1049 - 001 LISBOA
Telef. 21 840 74 55 - Fax. 21 840 98 84
http://www.apdio.pt
Número 1
Junho 2004
PRETO PRETO MAGENTA = APDIO
INVESTIGAÇÃO OPERACIONAL
Propriedade:
APDIO
Associação Portuguesa
de Investigação Operacional
Patrocinadores
Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian
Apoio do Programa Operacional Ciência, Tecnologia,
Inovação do Quadro Comunitário de Apoio III.
ISSN nº 0874-5161
Dep. Legal nº 130 761 / 98
Execução Gráfica: J. F. Macedo - Astrografe
700 Ex.
2004/6
PRETO VERDE = ORIGINAL
INVESTIGAÇÃO OPERACIONAL
Volume 24 — no 1 — Junho 2004
Publicação Semestral
Editor Principal:
Editor Adjunto:
Joaquim J. Júdice
Universidade de Coimbra
José F. Oliveira
Universidade do Porto
Comissão Editorial
M. Teresa Almeida
J. Rodrigues Dias
Inst. Sup. Economia e Gestão Univ. de Évora
Rui Oliveira
Inst. Superior Técnico
C. Henggeler Antunes
Univ. de Coimbra
Laureano Escudero
IBM, Espanha
J. Pinto Paixão
Univ. de Lisboa
Marcos Arenales
Univ. de São Paulo
Edite Fernandes
Univ. do Minho
M. Vaz Pato
Inst. Sup. Economia e Gestão
Jaime Barceló
Univ. de Barcelona
J. Soeiro Ferreira
Univ. do Porto
Mauricio G. Resende
AT&T Labs Research
Eberhard E. Bischoff
University of Wales, Swansea
J. Fernando Gonçalves
Univ. do Porto
A. Guimarães Rodrigues
Univ. do Minho
C. Bana e Costa
Inst. Superior Técnico
Luı́s Gouveia
Univ. de Lisboa
António J. L. Rodrigues
Univ. de Lisboa
M. Eugénia Captivo
Univ. de Lisboa
Rui C. Guimarães
Univ. do Porto
J. Pinho de Sousa
Univ. do Porto
Domingos M. Cardoso
Univ. de Aveiro
J. Assis Lopes
Inst. Superior Técnico
Reinaldo Sousa
Univ. Católica, Rio Janeiro
João Clı́maco
Univ. de Coimbra
Carlos J. Luz
Inst. Polit. Setúbal
L. Valadares Tavares
Inst. Superior Técnico
J. Dias Coelho
Univ. Nova de Lisboa
Virgı́lio P. Machado
Univ. Nova de Lisboa
B. Calafate Vasconcelos
Univ. do Porto
João P. Costa
Univ. de Coimbra
Manuel Matos
Univ. do Porto
Luı́s N. Vicente
Univ. de Coimbra
Ruy Costa
Univ. Nova de Lisboa
N. Maculan
Univ. Fed., Rio Janeiro
Victor V. Vidal
Technical Univ. of Denmark
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
1
On the use of multiple financial methods in the
evaluation and selection of investment projects∗
Pedro Cortesão Godinho
∗ †
António Ricardo Afonso
João Paulo Costa
∗
†
∗ ‡
∗ †
Faculdade de Economia da Universidade de Coimbra
[email protected]
INESC - Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores
‡
Portugal Telecom Inovação
Abstract
This paper addresses the analysis and evaluation of investment projects within a multicriteria framework. We mathematically define a multicriteria framework and we present
a result that allows the identification of redundant methods. Then we try to define which
financial methods can, and which ones cannot, be simultaneously used according to that
framework. We also try to establish a set of guidelines to help decision makers choose the
financial methods best suited to their particular situations.
Keywords: Project Evaluation, Project Analysis, Multicriteria Decision Aid
1
Introduction
Analysis and evaluation of investment projects are fundamental activities in most businesses.
In fact, their prosperity depends upon the correct allocation of the capital they raise - if many
unprofitable investments are made, the survival of the companies may be in danger. Many
methods for economic evaluation of investment projects, also known as financial methods, have
been developed to help decision makers (DMs) assess whether or not an investment will be
profitable, or compare the profitability of different investments. Although all these methods
Supported by FCT, FEDER, project POCTI/32405/GES/2000. The authors wish to thank the helpful
comments of an anonymous referee.
∗
c 2004 Associação Portuguesa de Investigação Operacional
2
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
are, directly or indirectly, concerned with the profitability of the investments, they do not
always yield the same results - in fact, different methods do sometimes yield contradictory
results when evaluating or comparing the same investments. This fact raises some difficult
questions to DMs in charge of investment selection, concerning:
• which method (or methods) should be used in a particular situation;
• whether one or more method(s) should be used in a particular situation;
• how should the results from different methods be aggregated.
To worsen matters, these methods cannot usually account for all the relevant information.
One reason is that some strategic impacts of the investments are too complex to be properly
quantified in the predicted earnings or cash flows. Another reason is that there are usually
some issues, not related with the profitability of the investment, that DMs want to consider
when they make an investment decision - these issues may refer to prestige, power or ethical
concerns and are relevant to the DMs as individual human beings. This raises the question of
knowing when and how these issues should be considered.
In this paper we will address the analysis and evaluation of investment projects within a
multicriteria framework. This framework will provide a theoretical basis to the aggregation
of the results yielded by different methods, and we believe it may also provide a basis for the
aggregation of these with non-financial factors. It will also allow the use of decision theory
methods in investment decisions and, hopefully, avoid some decision errors due to an incorrect
aggregation of factors. The framework we use is based upon the work of Bana e Costa [3]
and Roy [13]. In this framework, all the properties, or characteristics, of the investments are
modelled as attributes, and the results yielded by financial methods will be called financial
attributes. Among the attributes, the decision maker (DM) will build a set of criteria, taking
into account his/her concerns, values and beliefs. Some of the criteria may result from the
aggregation of several attributes.
First, we present the most widely used methods for project evaluation. Using a classification based upon [11,12], we divide the most important financial methods into five classes equivalent worth, rate of return, ratio, payback and accounting.
In order to have a correct structure for the decision problem, we want the set of criteria to
be a coherent family of criteria [3]. This means that we want the set of criteria to be exhaustive,
cohese and non-redundant. Exhaustiveness means that all relevant criteria are included in the
set of criteria. So, if any two alternatives are equal in all criteria they must be indifferent for
the DM, or else we must conclude that there is at least one relevant issue that is not properly
accounted for by the set of criteria. Cohesion means that if two alternatives, A and B, are
equal in all criteria but one, and A is better than B according to that criterion, then A must
be preferred to B. A set of criteria is non-redundant if the removal of any criterion causes that
set to be no longer both exhaustive and cohese. In section 3, we mathematically define these
conditions and present a result that can be applied to the identification of redundant criteria.
Then, we try to find out which financial attributes can, and which ones cannot, be used
together as criteria, assuming that we want the set of criteria to be a coherent family of criteria
and to be based on non-contradictory assumptions and concepts. We try to define whether or
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
3
not financial attributes from the same class should be used together as criteria, and whether or
not financial attributes from different classes should be used together as criteria, according to
our framework. We argue that a DM will usually want to use at most one financial attribute
from a single class. We also argue that a DM may use together attributes from different classes,
but he/she will usually want to use at most one attribute from both the classes of ratio and
rate of return methods. Afonso et al. [1] perform a similar analysis, using a slightly different
classification of the financial methods.
In section 5 we try to establish a set of guidelines to help DMs choose the financial methods
best suited to their specific situations. First, we characterise a set of decision situations, according to the degree of quantification, capital availability for the investments, degree of risk
and uncertainty, interdependencies between investments and existence of previously undertaken investments. We try to find out which financial method(s) is (are) best suited for each
situation, and how should each characteristic affect the investment selection process. Although
this approach is similar to the approach of Fahrni and Spatig [5], there are some important
differences between them. One important difference is that, while Fahrni and Spatig focus on
R&D projects, we try to consider all kinds of projects. Possibly because of this, our characterisation of the decision situations is different from theirs. Also, while we aim to suggest one
financial method for each situation, Fahrni and Spatig never suggest any particular financial
method - they treat financial methods as a whole component that shall or shall not be used
according to the situation.
Next, we try a different approach. We consider some classes of methods and we try to
define in which situations should the methods belonging to those classes be used, without
following any particular situation taxonomy.
We conclude that the net present value (NPV), or other method from the equivalent worth
class, is usually the best choice. However, rate of return or ratio methods may be the best
suited for some particular situations. We do not exclude that, in many situations, the DMs
may want to consider other methods, along with the NPV (or the rate of return or ratio
method), due to additional reasons.
2
Financial methods
A large number of financial methods is presented in financial textbooks and papers. In this
section, we will describe some of the most important financial methods and, following [11,12],
we will categorise them into five classes: equivalent worth, rate of return, ratio, payback and
accounting.
Equivalent worth methods examine the project cash flows and, through discounting or
compounding, resolve them to one equivalent cash flow or to an equivalent series of cash
flows. The most important of these methods is the net present value (NPV). The NPV is the
present monetary value of all the project cash flows (including investment and salvage value)
discounted at the appropriate discount rate. The traditional definition of the NPV is:
NPV =
T
X
t=0
CFt
(1 + r)t
(1)
where r is the discount rate, CFt is the cash flow in period t and T is the horizon period
4
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
(which is often the project lifetime). The NPV is nowadays considered by many authors to
be, in most situations, the best economic profitability measure for investment projects (see,
for example, [4]).
The future worth (FW), the annual worth (AW) and the capitalised worth (CW) are other
equivalent worth methods. The FW is the monetary value of all the project cash flows in a
future date, and it can be found through the compounding of the cash flows to that future
date. The AW is the value of each of the cash flows of an equivalent project (having the same
NPV) with a finite lifetime (usually identical to the lifetime of the original project or to the
considered horizon period), whose cash flows are constant over its lifetime. The CW is equal
to the AW except that it considers another equivalent project with an infinite lifetime. These
methods can be defined in the following way:
FW =
T
X
CFt (1 + r)T0 −t = N P V (1 + r)T0
(2)
t=0
AW =
T
P
t=0
T
P
t=1
CW =
T
P
t=0
∞
P
t=1
CFt
(1+r)t
=
1
(1+r)t
CFt
(1+r)t
1
(1+r)t
=
T
P
CFt
(1+r)t
t=0
1
1
r − r(1+r)T
=
T
X
!
t=0
CFt
(1 + r)t
1
r
NPV
1
−
r(1+r)
(3)
T
· r = NPV · r
(4)
In the definition of FW, T0 is the future moment for which the FW is calculated. The remaining
notation was previously defined.
The use of equivalent worth methods must include an adjustment for the risk of the project.
This risk can be seen as the possible deviations from the expected project behaviour, and it can
be divided into systematic and unsystematic risk. The unsystematic risk can be eliminated by
holding a diversified portfolio of investments, and the systematic risk cannot be eliminated by
diversification, and it is the only type of risk that should matter to investors with diversified
portfolios. Also, financial theory prescribes that only the systematic risk shall be incorporated
in the value of financial assets and projects. The measure used for this type of risk is the
beta (β) coefficient, defined as the covariance of the asset (or project) returns with the market
returns divided by the variance of the market returns. Using the project betas, it is possible to
incorporate the systematic risk in the project NPV through the use of a risk-adjusted discount
rate, calculated according to the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM). According to the
CAPM, if rf is the risk-free discount rate, β is the project beta and E(rm ) is the expected
market return, then the correct risk-adjusted rate will be:
r = rf + β [E(rm ) − rf ]
(5)
For more details on the calculation of project betas and risk-adjusted discount rates, see [4].
The adjustment of the discount rate works very well for the NPV, but not for the other
equivalent worth methods. In fact, the use of such a risk-adjusted discount rate in the other
equivalent worth methods will not correctly adjust for the project risk. To deal with this
problem we suggest the adjustment of the cash flows, instead of the adjustment of the discount
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
5
rate, by using certainty equivalents of the cash flows ([4], chapter 9). Specifically, r f being the
risk-free discount rate and r being the risk-adjusted discount rate, the period t cash flow is
adjusted to its certainty equivalent,
CE = CFt ·
1 + rf
1+r
t
(6)
and then the risk-free discount rate is used. For the NPV, it is indifferent to adjust the discount
rate or the cash flows. However, for the other methods, the adjustment of cash flows will allow
the correct comparison of projects with different systematic risk.
Rate of return methods measure the rate at which the invested capital will grow if the
project is pursued. The most widely used rate of return method is the internal rate of return
(IRR). This rate can be defined as the discount rate for which the NPV equals zero, and
corresponds to the yield-to-maturity on a bond. It can be calculated by solving the following
equation:
T
X
CFt
(7)
t =0
t=0 (1 + IRR)
Other methods from the rate of return class include the external rate of return (ERR) and
the marginal return on invested capital (MRIC). Both these methods consider an explicit
reinvestment rate. The ERR is the rate for which the future worth of the initial investment
equals the future worth of the other cash flows compounded, at the reinvestment rate, to the
end of the project. Using I0 to represent the initial investment, we can define:
T
P
CFt (1 + r)T −t
t=1
(1 + ERR)T
= I0
(8)
The MRIC is defined in [9]. Two kinds of cash flows are considered - capital cash flows, used
to finance the project, and operating cash flows, generated by the project. Capital cash flows
are discounted, at the reinvestment rate, to the beginning of the project and operating cash
flows are compounded, at the same reinvestment rate, to the end of the project. The MRIC
is the rate at which the present value of the capital cash flows should be compounded so that
it would equal the future value of the operating cash flows at the end of the project. So, the
MRIC can be defined as:
T
X
t=0
CCFt
=
(1 + r)t
T
P
OCFt (1 + r)T −t
t=1
(1 + M RIC)T
(9)
where CCFt is the capital cash flow for period t and OCFt is the operating cash flow for period
t.
The most significant ratio methods can be defined as the quotient between the present
value of the returns and the present value of the investment. The most widely used ratio
method is the profitability index (PI), which is defined as the quotient between the present
value of the future cash flows generated by the project and the initial investment:
PI =
T
P
t=1
CFt
(1+r)t
I0
(10)
6
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
Other ratio methods can be defined as the ratio between the present value of the returns and
the present value of the investment. The benefit-cost ratio (B/C ratio), for instance, is the
quotient between the present value of all cash flows, excluding the initial investment and the
salvage value, and the difference between the initial investment and the present worth of the
salvage value. If we use SVT to represent the salvage value of the project, we can define:
B/C =
T
P
t=1
CFt
(1+r)t
I0 −
−
SVT
(1+r)T
(11)
SVT
(1+r)T
Payback methods calculate how long it takes to recover the invested capital. These methods
include the payback period and the discounted payback period. The payback period is the
number of years required for the accumulated project cash flows to equal the initial investment.
The discounted payback period is similar to the payback period, except that it considers the
discounted cash flows instead of the raw cash flows. So, we can define:
(
Payback = min k :
k
X
CFt ≥ I0
t=1
(
Discounted Payback = min k :
k
X
t=1
)
CFt
≥ I0
(1 + r)t
(12)
)
(13)
Accounting methods consider profitability from an accounting perspective. This class includes
the return on original investment (ROOI, a.k.a. original book method) and the return on
average investment (ROAI, a.k.a. average book method), among others. The ROOI is the
quotient between the average yearly accounting profit, which excludes depreciation, and the
investment made in the project. The ROAI is the quotient between the average yearly accounting profit and the average book value (average value of the difference between investment
and depreciation) during the project life. Using APt to represent accounting profit in period
t and BVt to represent book value in period t, we can define:
T
P
APt
t=1
ROAI =
T
T
P
(14)
BVt
t=0
T +1
T
P
APt
t=1
ROOI =
T
I0
(15)
A further description of most of these financial methods can be found in [11,12]. [4] and
[10] also describe some of these methods, discussing its advantages and drawbacks and also
discussing the calculation of the discount or compounding rate needed by some of them.
3
Mathematical definitions and results
This section provides some mathematical results used to find out which attributes can and
which ones cannot be used together as criteria. We consider that, in order to have a correct
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
7
structure for the decision problem, we want the set of criteria to be a coherent family of criteria
[3]. As was said before, this means that the set of criteria must be exhaustive, cohese and nonredundant. Exhaustiveness means that all relevant criteria are included in the set of criteria.
So, if any two alternatives are equal in all criteria they must be indifferent for the DM, or else
we must conclude that there is at least one relevant issue that is not properly accounted for by
the set of criteria. Cohesion means that if two alternatives, A and B, are equal in all criteria
but one, and A is better than B according to that criterion, then A must be preferred to B. A
set of criteria is non-redundant if the removal of any criterion causes that set to be no longer
both exhaustive and cohese. We will now mathematically define these conditions and we will
show that two attributes that rank projects identically will be redundant.
Assumptions
Let A={a1 , a2 , . . . , an } be the set of projects and F={g1 , g2 , . . . , gm } the set of attributes
used as criteria. gk (ai ) will be the performance of project ai according to attribute gk . Let us
also assume, without loss of generality, that a larger value in a given attribute is always better
than a smaller one.
Definitions The symbols P and I will be used as comparison operators: ai P aj means that
ai is considered to be preferred to aj and ai I aj means that ai and aj are considered to be
indifferent.
We will consider that, in order to be a coherent family of criteria, the set F must meet the
following exhaustiveness, cohesion and non-redundancy conditions:
(Exhaustiveness)
∀ai ,aj ∈A, (gk (ai )=gk (aj ), ∀gk ∈F) ⇒ ai I aj
(Cohesion)
∀ai ,aj ∈A, ∀gl ∈F, (gk (ai )=gk (aj ), ∀gk ∈F\{gl }∧ gl (ai ) >gl (aj )) ⇒ ai P aj
(Non-redundancy)
∀gp ∈F, ∃ai ,aj ∈A: {[(gk (ai )=gk (aj ), ∀gk ∈F\{gp })∧(ai P aj ∨ aj P ai )] ∨
[∃gl ∈F\{gp }:gk (ai )=gk (aj ), ∀gk ∈F\{gp ,gl }∧gl (ai ) >gl (aj )∧(aj P ai ∨ ai I aj )]}
(16)
(17)
(18)
The first part of expression (18) means that if any criterion gp is removed then F will no
longer meet the exhaustiveness condition; the second part of that expression means that if any
criterion gp is removed then F will no longer meet the cohesion condition.
Theorem (attribute redundancy):
Let us assume that, for two attributes gr and gs , we have:
∀ ai ,aj ∈A, gr (ai ) >gr (aj ) ⇒ gs (ai ) >gs (aj )
(19)
If the criteria set F includes both gr and gs then F is not a coherent family of criteria
because, if both the exhaustiveness and cohesion conditions are met, then the non-redundancy
condition is not met. Specifically, gr can be removed from F without the exhaustiveness and
cohesion conditions ceasing to hold. We thus say that gr is redundant.
8
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
Corollary: If two attributes rank the projects identically, then they will be redundant (only
one of them should be used as criterion).
Theorem proof:
We will show that (a) if F meets the exhaustiveness condition, then F\{gr } also meets the
exhaustiveness condition and (b) if F meets the cohesion condition, then F\{gr } also meets the
cohesion condition. This will show that gr can be removed from F without the exhaustiveness
and cohesion conditions ceasing to hold, thus gr is redundant.
Let us start by proving (a). (19) says that gr (ai ) >gr (aj )
⇒ gs (ai ) >gs (aj ), thus
gr (aj ) >gr (ai ) ⇒ gs (aj ) >gs (ai ). This means that we may only have gs (ai )=gs (aj ) when
gr (ai )=gr (aj ). So:
∀ ai ,aj ∈A, gs (ai )=gs (aj ) ⇒ gr (ai )=gr (aj )
(20)
Also:
gk (ai )=gk (aj ), ∀gk ∈F\{gr } ⇒ gs (ai )=gs (aj )
(since gs ∈F\{gr })
⇒ gr (ai )=gr (aj ) (using (20))
(21)
And so:
gk (ai )=gk (aj ), ∀gk ∈F\{gr }
⇒ gk (ai )=gk (aj ), ∀gk ∈F
⇒
(using (21))
a i I aj
(22)
(because F meets the exhaustiveness condition)
(22) means that F\{gr } meets the exhaustiveness condition, proving (a).
Let us now prove (b). We will prove that, if F meets the cohesion condition (if (17) holds)
then F\{gr } will also meet the cohesion condition, meaning that for any projects a i and aj :
∀gl ∈F\{gr }, (gk (ai )=gk (aj ),∀gk ∈F\{gr ,gl }∧gl (ai ) >gl (ak )) ⇒ ai P aj
(23)
We will start by showing that (23) holds for all gl ∈F\{gs ,gr }. We will thus prove that,
for gl ∈F\{gs ,gr }, if gk (ai )=gk (aj ),∀gk ∈F\{gr ,gl }∧gl (ai ) >gl (ak ) then ai P aj .
Since gk (ai )=gk (aj ), ∀gk ∈F\{gr ,gl }, and gl ∈F\{gs ,gr }, then we have gs (ai )=gs (aj ) and,
by (20) we have gr (ai )=gr (aj ). So:
gk (ai )=gk (aj ), ∀gk ∈F\{gr ,gl }∧gl (ai ) >gl (aj )
⇒
⇒
gk (ai )=gk (aj ), ∀gk ∈F\{gl }∧gl (ai ) >gl (aj )
ai P aj
(since the cohesion condition holds)
(24)
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
9
To complete the proof, we will show that (23) holds for gl =gs . From (19) we can say that
gs (ai ) ≤gs (aj ) ⇒ gr (ai ) ≤gr (aj ) and, consequently:
gs (ai ) >gs (aj ) ⇒ gr (ai ) ≥gr (aj )
(25)
Using (25) we get, for gl =gs :
gk (ai )=gk (aj ), ∀gk ∈F\{gr ,gs }∧ gs (ai ) >gs (aj ) ⇒ gr (ai ) ≥gr (aj )
(26)
Let us analyse the expression (26). It says that ai and aj are equal in all criteria except
gs and, possibly, gr . Since F meets the cohesion condition, if gr (ai )=gr (aj ), then we have ai
P aj (because gs (ai ) >gs (aj ). If ai is also better than aj in gr , then ai is also considered to be
preferred to aj . So:
gk (ai )=gk (aj ), ∀gk ∈F\{gr ,gs }∧ gs (ai ) >gs (aj )
⇒ a i P aj
(27)
We showed that (23) holds for all attributes gl ∈F\{gr }. So, if F meets the cohesion
condition, F\{gr } also meets the same condition. (22) shows that if F meets the exhaustiveness
condition, then F\{gr } also meets the same condition. This means that, when (19) holds, gr
will be redundant, so the theorem proof is complete.
The corollary of this theorem can now be used to find redundant attributes. Whenever
two different attributes rank projects identically, they shall not be used together as criteria,
since they will be redundant.
4
On the simultaneous use of different financial attributes
In this section we will try to find out which financial attributes can, and which ones cannot, be
used together as criteria. For that purpose we will initially consider financial attributes from
the same class, and then we will consider attributes from different classes. In this analysis we
will assume that we want the set of criteria to be a coherent family of criteria, and also to be
based on non-contradictory assumptions or concepts.
We will want the set of criteria to be not only a coherent family of criteria, but also to be
based on non-contradictory assumptions or concepts. We acknowledge that, in the presence of
risk, it may be worthwhile to consider the behaviour of the project under different scenarios
(as will be discussed in section 5). However, the data and methods used in each scenario
should not include contradictory assumptions or concepts, so that each scenario represents a
consistent possibility of project behaviour.
In the following discussion, we will only consider the financial methods presented in section
2, which include the most common financial methods. We believe our conclusions are extensible
to other methods, if these methods can be properly classified into one of the five classes we are
considering. In the analysis of financial attribute redundancy, we will not discuss whether or
not two attributes happen to rank the projects identically for a particular set of projects. We
10
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
will only consider that two attributes are redundant if they always rank projects identically.
This way, our results will be independent of any particular set of projects, and will still be
valid when some projects are removed from or added to the initial set.
To start with, we will address the simultaneous use of different financial attributes from
the equivalent worth class. Several constraints must be met by the methods from this class,
so that they can be properly applied. One example: the projects being compared should have
the same discount rate1 [11]. It is easy to prove that, when properly applied, all equivalent
worth methods rank projects identically. Let us consider the NPV and the CW. We will
assume that the discount/reinvestment rate belongs to the interval ]-1,+∞[, in which it has
economic meaning, and that the projects being compared have the same discount rate, even if
it is necessary to use certainty equivalent cash flows to achieve that. So, the CW will be equal
to the NPV divided by the perpetuity factor,
∞
P
t=1
1
.
(1+r)t
Since, for r≤0, the perpetuity factor
is +∞, the CW is only defined for r>0, in which case the perpetuity factor equals 1r . So, we
must assume r>0, in which case:
NPV(ai ) > NPV(aj )
⇔
⇔
NPV(ai )·r > NPV(aj )·r
CW(ai ) > CW(aj )
(28)
So, the NPV and the CW rank projects identically. Park and Sharp-Bette [10], chapter
7, show that the NPV, the AW and the FW rank projects identically. Thus, according to
the non-redundancy demand of a coherent family of criteria, at most one attribute from the
equivalent worth class should be used as criterion. The interpretation of the NPV provides
some advantages over the other equivalent worth attributes, so the NPV will usually be used.
However, special circumstances may advise the use of a different attribute.
We will now consider the rate of return methods. It is well known that different rate of
return methods may rank the same projects differently. That is because the results obtained
depend on the reinvestment assumptions and on the implicit concepts of investment and return
for each method. While the IRR assumes that the profits are reinvested at a rate equal to the
IRR, the ERR and the MRIC consider an explicit reinvestment rate. The ERR differs from
the MRIC on the concepts of investment and return. While the MRIC considers investment to
be all the capital cash flows, the ERR considers investment to be only the initial investment.
As different rate of return methods can yield contradictory results, we cannot say that rate
of return attributes are redundant. However, in general only one should be used, chosen
according to the DM’s reinvestment assumptions and concepts of investment and return. If
more than one rate of return attribute is used in the evaluation process, then contradictory
assumptions or concepts will be simultaneously involved.
Like the rate of return methods, ratio methods may also rank the same projects differently.
That is because they also assume different concepts of investment and return. While the PI
assumes investment to be the initial investment and all the other cash flows to be return,
the B/C ratio assumes investment to be the difference between the initial investment and its
salvage value, and return to be all the other cash flows excluding the salvage value. Thus,
1
The adjustment of cash flows, suggested in section 2, allows us to use the same discount rate for all the
projects, even when the project risk is different.
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
11
as different ratio methods may rank projects differently, we cannot say that their results are
redundant. However, only one ratio attribute should be usually used, chosen according to the
DM’s concepts of investment and return.
Accounting methods differ in what they consider relevant about the investment. While the
ROOI assumes that the whole value of the investment (the whole book value) matters, the
ROAI assumes that it is the average book value, after the yearly depreciation, that matters.
So, these methods can yield different results, according to the type of depreciation associated
with each project, and thus they are not redundant. However, a DM will usually want to use
at most one accounting attribute, according to what he/she thinks is more significant about
the investment: the whole book value or the average book value. Moreover, because these
methods do not take the time value of money into account, it is arguable that a DM will
consider them relevant. Accounting attributes should only be used when accounting issues are
considered important.
Payback methods may rank the same projects differently, and lead to different accept/reject
decisions. That is because while the discounted payback period takes the time value of money
into account, the payback period does not. This means they are not redundant, but usually
at most one of them will be used, according to whether or not the time value of money is
considered important. A DM will usually consider the time value of money relevant and will
thus prefer the discounted payback period.
We will now consider the simultaneous use of attributes from different classes. To start
with, we will try to figure out which perspective, or dimension, of the profitability does each
class address. The equivalent worth class addresses the absolute value of the project, accounting methods address the accounting profitability and payback methods address the time it
takes to recover the initial investment, or the liquidity recovery speed. As for the rate of
return and ratio classes, we can see that for each ratio method we can find out or define a rate
of return method that is equivalent in the sense that it ranks projects in the same way and
always leads to the same accept/reject decisions. The opposite is also usually true 2 . As an
example, we can see that the PI is equivalent to the ERR, thus they are redundant. For the
MRIC, we can define an equivalent ratio method (let us call it Modified Profitability Index,
MPI) as:
MPI =
T
P
t=1
T
P
t=0
OCFt
(1+r)t
(29)
CCFt
(1+r)t
where OCFt is the operating cash flow in period t, CCFt is the capital cash flow in period t, r
is the discount rate (equal to the MRIC reinvestment rate) and T is the horizon period. Once
more, if we assume that the rate r belongs to the interval ]-1,+∞[, in which it has economic
meaning, and that this reinvestment rate is equal for both projects, we have:
MRIC(ai ) > MRIC(aj ) ⇔ 1 + MRIC(ai ) > 1 + MRIC(aj )
2
For each rate of return method that uses an external rate to resolve all the cash flows into two cash flows,
we can define a ratio method that is equivalent. This is the case of the ERR and the MRIC.
12
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
⇔
v
v
u T
u T
uP
uP
T
−t
T −t
u
u
u t=1 OCFt (aj ) · (1 + r)
u t=1 OCFt (ai ) · (1 + r)
T
T
u
>u
u
u
T
T
P
P
t
t
CCFt (aj )
CCFt (ai )
t=0
⇔ (1 + r)T
T
P
t=1
T
P
t=0
⇔
T
P
t=1
T
P
t=0
OCFt (ai )
(1+r)t
CCFt (ai )
(1+r)t
(1+r)t
OCFt (ai )
(1+r)t
t=0
> (1 + r)T
CCFt (ai )
(1+r)t
>
T
P
t=1
T
P
t=0
OCFt (aj )
(1+r)t
T
P
t=1
T
P
t=0
(1+r)t
OCFt (aj )
(1+r)t
CCFt (aj )
(1+r)t
CCFt (aj )
(1+r)t
⇔ MPI(ai ) > MPI(aj )
(30)
So, the MRIC and the MPI rank projects identically. Park and Sharp-Bette [10], chapter
7, show that some rate of return and ratio methods, including the ERR and the PI, rank
projects identically. It would also be easy to define a rate of return method equivalent to the
B/C ratio. This relation between rate of return and ratio methods led us to the conclusion that
they would probably address the same profitability dimension. And, in fact, they both address
the relation between the return and the investment. Thus, as both classes address the same
dimension, we should usually use at most one attribute from both these two classes. As for
the other classes, since they address different profitability dimensions, attributes from different
classes can be simultaneously used as criteria, given that they are not based on contradictory
assumptions or concepts. Table 1 summarises these results.
In this section we dealt with the simultaneous use of different financial attributes as criteria.
We concluded that a DM will usually want to use at most one financial attribute from a single
class, and that a DM may use together financial attributes from different classes, but he/she
will usually want to use at most one attribute from both the ratio and rate of return classes.
5
On the selection of financial methods
In this section we will try to establish a set of guidelines to help DMs choose the financial
methods best suited to their specific situations. First, we will consider that the different
decision situations are defined according to five characteristics: degree of quantification, capital
availability for the investments, degree of risk and uncertainty, interdependencies between
investments and existence of previously undertaken investments. We will try to define how
each of these characteristics shall be considered in the investment selection process. Next, we
will consider different financial methods, and define in which situations shall each method be
used.
The degree of quantification defines whether or not financial methods can be used to
evaluate the investments. In fact, financial methods cannot be used unless quantitative data
about the investment costs and returns are available. The specific needs depend on the chosen
methods, and can vary from the project cash flows (required by the NPV and IRR, for instance)
to more detailed accounting data (required by accounting methods). So, when quantitative
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
13
Table 1: Simultaneous use of different financial attributes, assuming that a coherent family of criteria
is wanted.
Class
Attributes considered
Equivalent Worth
NPV
FW
AW
CW
IRR
ERR
MRIC
Rate of Return
Ratio
PI
B/C Ratio
Payback
Payback
Discounted Payback
Accounting
ROOI
ROAI
Simultaneous use
(same class)
Just one attribute.
Simultaneous use
(different classes)
Attributes from all the
other classes can be simultaneously used.
Just one attribute,
chosen according to
the DM’s reinvestment
assumptions and concepts of investment
and return.
Just one attribute,
chosen according to
the DM’s reinvestment
assumptions and concepts of investment
and return.
Just one attribute,
chosen according to
the DM’s perceived
importance of the time
value of money.
Just one attribute,
chosen according to
the DM’s concept of
investment.
Attributes from all the
other classes except ratio can be simultaneously used.
Attributes from all the
other classes except
rate of return can be simultaneously used.
Attributes from all the
other classes can be simultaneously used.
Attributes from all the
other classes can be simultaneously used.
14
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
data are not available, different methods (other than financial) must be used to evaluate the
investments. In this paper we will not address the evaluation of investment projects in the
absence of quantitative information.
Capital availability for the investments is, perhaps, the most important characteristic to be
accounted for when selecting the financial method(s) to be used (when quantitative data are
available), so we will discuss it in some detail. We will start by making some considerations
about management goals and NPV application. It is usually considered that the management
goal should be the maximisation of the company value. The company value is maximised when
all the investment projects with a positive NPV are undertaken, so many authors consider that
the NPV should be the preferred method to evaluate investment projects (see, for instance, [4]).
However, the use of NPV has some implicit assumptions - it assumes that markets are efficient
and that the intermediate cash flows can be reinvested at the discount rate in investments with
a similar systematic risk. About the first assumption, Brealey and Myers [4] say the NPV will
only be weakened when the company owners cannot access an efficient capital market. About
the second assumption, we think that, if the discount rate is properly calculated, it will usually
be met. Even if one of these assumptions does not hold, it is not always certain the existence
of a better method other than the NPV for the considered situation (although in some specific
cases better methods can be found).
From what was said we can conclude that, when unlimited capital is available for the
investments, the NPV should be the preferred method. Now, the following question can be
made: will any other methods be appropriate for this situation? In the previous section it
was said that all equivalent worth methods will yield equivalent results when properly applied,
so any other equivalent worth method can be used instead of the NPV. Methods from other
classes will not always lead to value maximisation, so they will not usually be as appropriate
for this situation as equivalent worth methods. However, there may be circumstances that do
not advise the use of the NPV nor the use of any other equivalent worth method. One of these
circumstances, which was previously referred in this section, has to do with the unavailability
of proper quantitative data and, when this happens, non-financial attributes should be used.
Other circumstances have to do with the NPV assumptions (which are also implicit to the
other equivalent worth methods). For example, if the reinvestment assumption does not hold,
then maybe we can find a method from other class that conforms the reinvestment situation 3 .
When it is considered that equivalent worth methods should not be used, rate of return and
ratio methods should be preferred to payback and accounting methods, since the former do
usually lead closer to value maximisation than the latter.
We will now suppose that the available capital for the investments is limited and known.
In this situation, it is seldom possible to undertake all investment projects with a positive
NPV, because the capital needed to finance all those investments may exceed the available
capital. Thus, the management should usually aim to build a portfolio of projects with an
aggregate NPV as high as possible. If all the available investment projects are known (which
is what usually happens when companies are preparing their annual investment plan), NPV
maximisation may be achieved by solving a mathematical programming problem. The variables of this problem will be the projects, their coefficients in the objective function will be the
projects NPVs and the constraints will be the capital limitations for the considered periods 4 .
3
Another possible solution to this problem may be the definition of a new equivalent worth method , based
on an existing one (possibly the NPV), that will assume a different reinvestment situation.
4
Such a problem can consider several periods, with capital limitations in each period.
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
15
See [10], chapter 8, for a survey of some mathematical programs for the optimal selection of a
set of projects.
Notice that any other equivalent worth method could be used instead of the NPV to build
this mathematical program. Also notice that, in some circumstances, the NPV assumptions
may not be met and, thus, methods from the equivalent worth class will be rendered inappropriate. When equivalent worth methods cannot be applied, one may think the use of a
mathematical program to maximise an aggregate rate of return or an aggregate ratio as the
best approach. However, rate of return and ratio attributes are not additive, resulting probably
in a complex non-linear mathematical programming problem. We think that a heuristic approach could consist in ordering the profitable projects according to an adequate rate of return
or ratio attribute, and choosing the more profitable projects until no other profitable project
can be chosen without going beyond the available amount of capital. Asquith and Bethel [2]
argue that, if not all positive NPV projects are funded, then the use of such a heuristic may
also be preferable to the use of a NPV-based rule when forecast biases are present in the cash
flow estimates and information about these biases is costly to obtain.
Sometimes it is known that the available amount of capital is not unlimited, but the limit
is not known. An ordering of the investment projects according to their profitability will be
wanted in this situation, with non-profitable projects being commonly excluded from that
ordering. Usually an ordering will be wanted such that, if projects are chosen accordingly, the
aggregate NPV will be maximised. Notice that the NPV will not be a good ordering criterion.
If we were to order projects according to the NPV, a project with a high NPV but needing a
very large investment might be considered better than other projects with only slightly lower
NPVs and much smaller investment required. As the available capital is limited, the latter
projects should be preferred to the former, so the ordering obtained through the use of NPV
would not lead to the maximisation of the aggregate NPV. In this situation, it would be better
to order projects according to an attribute from either the rate of return class or the ratio class.
Since methods from these classes evaluate the relation between the return and the investment,
projects with a higher return for each unit of invested capital will be rated higher. Thus, value
maximisation may be approximated if projects are ordered by using such an attribute.
When the available capital for investment projects is limited (known or unknown), it
may happen that the available amount is to be used not only with the investment proposals
currently known but also with possible investments to be proposed in a future period. As an
example, consider a company that has just raised a reasonable amount of capital and knows it
will be very difficult to raise more capital in the near future. Notice that the uncertainty about
which investment projects will be proposed in the future can occur both when the amount of
available capital is known and when it is not known. An NPV-based ordering and selection
of investment projects will be inappropriate in this situation, and a better selection process
may be achieved with a rate of return or ratio method. We think this process should consist
in the determination of a hurdle rate (or hurdle ratio) and in the selection of all investment
projects having higher rates than that hurdle rate on the financial attribute chosen to make the
decision. Historical data about past investment proposals considered by the company should
be used to determine the hurdle rate, when available. This hurdle rate should be periodically
re-examined according to the investments that have been proposed since its last calculation.
The degree of risk and uncertainty is not usually relevant to the choice of the financial
methods. However, it will be important to the selection process, both because it may determine
16
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
whether or not risk analysis should be performed and because risk should be incorporated in
the evaluation of the projects. If the situation faced by the DMs is close to certainty, risk
can usually be neglected. On the other hand, when the situation is not close to certainty, risk
analysis should be performed on the investment projects. The risk analysis tools should be
chosen according to the available data. Monte Carlo simulation may give accurate information
about the statistical distribution of the financial attributes, but it cannot be used unless there
are available data about the probability distributions of the relevant variables and a detailed
model of the investment projects is built accordingly [4]. Under some assumptions about
the distribution and statistical independence of the relevant variables, the variance can be
calculated for some financial attributes, and it can be used as a measure of the total project
risk [8]. Sensitivity, scenarios and break-even analysis demand less data than Monte Carlo
simulation and may provide useful information about the investments [4]. Scenario analysis
may be particularly useful, since it allows the DM to assess how the project will behave
under different circumstances. Each scenario will be defined by a set of assumptions, and
will represent a consistent possibility of project behaviour. It is thus possible that different
methods make sense in different scenarios of the same project, according to the assumptions
of those scenarios.
There are also several methods to incorporate risk in project evaluation. Some of them, like
the certainty equivalent method that was referred in section 2, are based on the adjustment
of the cash flows. Others, like the use of the CAPM, are based on the incorporation of risk
in the discount or compounding rates (when discounting or compounding based methods are
being used), or in the hurdle rate (when rate of return methods are being used). When some
sequential decisions must be made according to the outcomes of various events, decision trees
may be used to represent and evaluate the project. Recently, Option Pricing Theory has gained
a wide acceptance in the evaluation of investment projects. Option Pricing Theory provides
another tool for the calculation of the project NPV when an active management of the project
may influence its value, for example by reducing losses when the outcome is unfavourable
or by increasing profits when the outcome is favourable. When options are involved, both
the traditional discounted cash flow analysis (as performed by expression (1)) and the use of
decision trees may fail to correctly incorporate risk in the value of the project [14] and option
analysis may provide more accurate project values (see [4,14,15], for example, for more details).
Although both option valuation and decision trees are primarily used for the calculation of
the project NPV, other methods that can be based on the project value may also be adapted
to these types of valuations.
When a multicriteria evaluation of investment projects is being performed, risk also can
be incorporated through one or more attributes. Some financial attributes are sometimes used
as risk proxies - in a NPV based evaluation, some rate of return or payback attributes can be
used as risk proxies. For a complete description of some risk analysis and risk incorporation
techniques, see [4,7,15]. For multicriteria models that incorporate risk, see [6] and the chapter
3 of [7].
Interdependencies are usually typified as synergies (positive or negative), mutual exclusion
and technical dependence. We can say there are synergies between investments A and B when
the financial attributes of A change depending on whether or not B is pursued. Investments
A and B are mutually exclusive if the investments cannot be both pursued – that is, if one of
them is pursued, the other cannot be. Finally, we say that A is technically dependent on B if
A cannot be pursued unless B is pursued.
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
17
Interdependencies can be dealt with mathematical programming, in a similar way as the
one referred when we considered that the available capital was limited and known. However,
when we are dealing with non-additive financial attributes such a program is complex, and it
may be difficult to solve. When this happens, it is often useful to change all interdependencies
into mutual exclusion. When synergies exist between two investment projects, A and B, we can
turn these two investment projects into three mutually exclusive projects: project A, project
B and project AB, the latter of which consists in pursuing both projects A and B. Also, when
A is technically dependent on B, we can consider two mutually exclusive projects: B and AB,
the latter of which consists in pursuing both projects A and B. All interdependencies can be
thus turned into mutual exclusion, usually easier to deal with. For example, if a selection
process consists in ordering all projects according to an attribute, and then selecting projects
according to that order, it is very easy, after each project is selected, to seek and exclude all
the projects mutually exclusive with the selected project. Combinatorial analysis can also be
a very effective tool to deal with interdependencies.
The selection process may be affected by the existence of a portfolio of previously undertaken investment projects. If such a portfolio does exist, it may or may not be possible to
abandon the previously undertaken projects.
The existence of previously undertaken projects that can be abandoned may be dealt
with by considering these projects at the same level of the newly proposed projects. When
re-evaluating existing projects, care should be taken not to consider unrecoverable costs or
past benefits, and to properly consider their present salvage values as opportunity costs (the
costs of not selling the assets needed to continue the projects). These present salvage values
correspond to the investment cost in new projects. After this, the process may proceed as if
there were no previously undertaken projects.
If the previously undertaken projects cannot be abandoned, then it is not necessary to
re-evaluate these projects. However, some care should be taken in the selection process,
because it will still be necessary to consider the interdependencies between existing projects
and new projects, as well as the capital requirements of existing projects. Interdependencies
may eliminate some new projects (when there is mutual exclusion), or change the financial
attributes of some of them (when there are synergies). When the available capital for the
investments is limited, the capital requirements of existing projects must be subtracted from
the available amount. After this, the selection process may proceed normally.
Thus far we have considered the decision situations defined by a set of five characteristics,
and we have explained how should each of those characteristics affect the investment selection
process. We argued that equivalent worth attributes should usually be used, and that rate
of return and ratio attributes should be used in particular situations instead of equivalent
worth attributes. Some questions may now be made, concerning whether or not accounting
and payback methods should ever be used. We will now address this issue.
Firstly, we will consider accounting methods. Only by chance these methods will lead to
aggregate NPV maximisation. This means that they should only be used when the DMs’
goal is different from that. So, when will DMs use accounting methods ? The only answer
we have to this question has to do with the way the company’s results are made available to
stakeholders, which is usually in the form of accounting statements. If accounting methods are
used, it may be possible to present better accounting results and it is possible that stakeholders
will be happier and, thus, it may be easier for the company to raise money and managers may
18
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
get better rewards. However, there are two severe drawbacks to this strategy. The first is that
it is a short term strategy - in the long term, accounting results will have a higher growth when
decisions are made to maximise the company value than when accounting methods are the only
criteria to select investments. The second is that intelligent and well informed stakeholders
will look beyond accounting results to get a clearer picture of the company, and this picture
will be more favourable if the management is aiming to maximise the company value than if
it is aiming to maximise short term accounting results.
We will now turn to payback methods. Some reasons may be presented for the use of these
methods. One of these reasons may be the existence of catastrophic or political risks that
may cause the company to lose, at any moment, the assets on which it invested, and so the
company may want to recover the invested capital as soon as possible. We do not think this
is always valid, because these risks can be accounted for, either through a proper adjustment
of the discount rate or through an adjustment of the predicted cash flows, when equivalent
worth, rate of return and ratio methods are used.
Another reason has to do with the need of quickly obtaining liquidity, when it is difficult
to raise capital either for new investment projects or for financial engagements of the company
(the need to pay interests or principal in existing debts, for instance). Notice that such
situations will be related to capital markets imperfections. We think that, in these situations,
the use of mathematical programming to maximise the aggregate NPV according to some
constraints that have to do with liquidity necessities will provide better results than the use
of payback methods, if data are available. However, in these situations, we cannot find any
reason to oppose the use of a payback attribute along with an equivalent worth attribute in a
multicriteria evaluation.
We will present another reason that is also related with possible capital markets imperfections. When the owners of the company may need money at any time and cannot access an
efficient capital market either to raise money for their needs or to sell their stakes in the company, they may want the company to have high liquidity as often as possible. It can be argued
that, in this situation, payback methods will provide the best results to satisfy the company
owners wishes. Nevertheless we think that the use of mathematical programming to maximise
the aggregate NPV, according to a set of constraints that represent the possible needs of the
company owners, may provide better results. Once again, in this situation we cannot find any
reason to oppose the use of a payback attribute along with an equivalent worth attribute in a
multicriteria evaluation.
In this section we have considered that the decision situations are defined by a set of
characteristics, and we have explained how should each of those characteristics affect the
investment selection process. We concluded that equivalent worth attributes should usually
be used, and that rate of return and ratio attributes should be used in particular situations
instead of equivalent worth attributes. Then, we tried to find some situations in which the
use of accounting or payback methods might be appropriate. We concluded that accounting
methods might be used to achieve good short-term accounting results, but not to maximise
long-term accounting results. We considered the use of payback methods to account for the
company’s or its owners’ liquidity needs (particularly when capital markets are imperfect) and
also when the company faces political or catastrophic risks. We argued that equivalent worth
methods (eventually within a mathematical programming problem) are best suited for those
situations, but we could not find any reason to oppose the use of a payback attribute along
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
19
with an equivalent worth attribute in a multicriteria evaluation, in those situations.
6
Conclusions
This paper addressed the analysis and evaluation of investment projects within a multicriteria
framework. In this framework, all the properties, or characteristics, of the investments are
modelled as attributes. The decision criteria are chosen from the attribute set. In order to
have a correct structure for the decision problem, we defined that the set of criteria should be
a coherent family of criteria, and should not include contradictory assumptions.
We started with a presentation of the most common methods for project evaluation. In
this presentation, we classified the methods into five classes, following a similar classification
from [11,12]. Then we mathematically defined the conditions that must be met by the set of
criteria in order to be a coherent family of criteria, and presented a mathematical result that
states that two criteria that order projects identically will be redundant.
The first problem we dealt with was to find out which financial attributes can, and which
ones cannot, be used together as criteria. We concluded that attributes from the same class
either rank projects identically or are based in contradictory assumptions, so a DM will usually
use at most one attribute from a single class. Attributes form different classes address different
perspectives, or dimensions, of the profitability, with the exception of the rate of return and
ratio classes, which both address the relation between the return and the investment. We also
stated that, for each ratio method, it is possible to define a rate of return method that ranks
projects identically, and that the converse is also usually true. So, according to our framework,
a DM may simultaneously use attributes from different classes, but he/she will usually want
to use at most one attribute from both the classes of ratio and rate of return methods.
Then, we tried to establish a set of guidelines to help DMs choose the financial methods
best suited to their specific situations. We considered a set of characteristics of the decision
situation – degree of quantification, capital availability for the investments, degree of risk and
uncertainty, interdependencies between investments and existence of previously undertaken
investments - and analysed how these characteristics affect the investment selection process.
The degree of quantification defines whether or not financial methods can be used. When
unlimited capital is available, or when the available capital is limited and known, equivalent
worth methods should usually be used. However, when the available capital is limited and
the limit is unknown, or when the available capital must also be used in future projects not
yet known, rate of return and ratio methods may be a better choice, even if the ultimate
goal is the maximisation of aggregate NPV. In the presence of risk, it will be important to
incorporate the risk in the project evaluation, and to perform risk analysis. We briefly referred
some methodologies for risk analysis and for the incorporation of risk in project evaluation.
We explained that interdependencies could be dealt with through the use of mathematical
programming and combinatorial analysis. Finally we explained that, if a portfolio of previously
undertaken projects exists, these projects should be re-evaluated, and their interdependencies
with new projects and effect in the available capital (if the available capital is limited) must
be considered in the evaluation process.
Since the analysis of the characteristics of the decision situation seemed to never recommend the use of accounting and payback methods, we also tried to define in which situations
20
P.C. Godinho, A.R. Afonso, J.P. Costa / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 1-20
might these methods be used. We concluded that accounting methods might be used to achieve
good short-term accounting results, but not to maximise long-term accounting results. We considered some situations in which the use of payback methods seemed appropriate. Analysing
these situations, we always concluded that equivalent worth methods (eventually within a
mathematical programming problem) might be best suited to those situations. However, we
could not find any reason to oppose the use of a payback attribute along with an equivalent
worth attribute in a multicriteria evaluation, in those situations.
7
References
[1] Afonso, A.R., Godinho, P.C. and Costa, J.P., Estruturação dos Critérios de Avaliação e Selecção
de Projectos no Âmbito de um Sistema de Apoio à Decisão (in Portuguese), Portuguese Journal
of Management Studies, IV (1999) 267-289.
[2] Asquith, D. and Bethel, J.E, Using Heuristics to Evaluate Projects: the Case of Ranking Projects
by IRR, The Engineering Economist, 40 (1995) 287-294.
[3] Bana e Costa, C., Structuration, Construction et Exploration d’un Modèle Multicritère d’Aide à
la Décision (in French), PhD Thesis, Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon, Portugal (1992).
[4] Brealey, R. and Myers, S., Principles of Corporate Finance, 6th edition, McGraw-Hill (2000).
[5] Fahrni, P. and Spatig, M., An Application-Oriented Guide to R&D Project Selection and Evaluation Methods, R&D Management, 20 (1990) 155-171.
[6] Godinho, P.C. and Costa, J.P., A Note on the Use of Bicriteria Decision Trees in Capital Budgeting, Global Business and Economics Review, 4 (2002) 147-158.
[7] Hertz, D.B. and Thomas, H., Risk Analysis and its Applications, 1st Edition, John Wiley and
Sons (1983).
[8] Hillier, F.S., The Derivation of Probabilistic Information for the Evaluation of Risky Projects,
Management Science, 9 (1963) 443-457.
[9] McDaniel, W.R., McCarty, D.E. and Jessel, K.A., Discounted Cash Flow with Explicit Reinvestment Rates: Tutorial and Extension, The Financial Review, 23 (1988) 369-385.
[10] Park, C.S. and Sharp-Bette, G.P., Advanced Engineering Economics, 1st Edition, John Wiley
and Sons (1990).
[11] Remer, D.S. and Nieto, A.P., A Compendium and Comparison of 25 Project Evaluation Techniques. Part 1: Net Present Value and Rate of Return Methods, International Journal of Production Economics, 42 (1995) 79-96.
[12] Remer, D.S. and Nieto, A.P., A Compendium and Comparison of 25 Project Evaluation Techniques. Part 2: Ratio, Payback and Accounting Methods, International Journal of Production
Economics, 4 (1995) 101-129.
[13] Roy, B., Multicriteria Methodology for Decision Aiding, Kluwer Academic Press, Dordrecht
(1996).
[14] Trigeorgis, L. and Mason, S.P., Valuing Managerial Flexibility, Midland Corporate Finance Journal, Spring (1987) 14-21.
[15] Trigeorgis, L., Real Options: Managerial Flexibility and Strategy in Resource Allocation, The
MIT Press (1996).
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
21
Planeamento de Rotas num Sistema de Recolha de
Desperdı́cios de Madeira
Cláudio Manuel Martins Alves
∗
∗
José Manuel Valério de Carvalho
∗
Departamento de Produção e Sistemas, Universidade do Minho
{claudio,vc}@dps.uminho.pt
Abstract
In this paper, we analyze a new vehicle routing problem, the Prize Collecting Vehicle
Routing Problem with Service Restrictions (PCVRPsr), which arises in wood-waste collection. It is a problem with a homogeneous fleet and a unique depot, in which the visit to
some clients in not compulsory, but conditioned by the total needs of waste. We propose a
formulation for this problem, which comes from a three-index vehicle flow formulation for
the Vehicle Routing Problem.
To optimize the plan, we explore methods based on decomposition. We analyze, in
particular, the Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition applied to this formulation, and a branchand-price scheme to find integer solutions.
An algorithm was developed to obtain the computational results discussed at the end
of the paper. In the branch-and-price tree, we applied a method for deriving lower bounds
for the bin-packing problem, based on dual feasible functions, that makes the process more
efficient.
Resumo
Neste artigo, analisa-se um novo problema de planeamento de rotas, o Prize Collecting
Vehicle Routing Problem with service restrictions (PCVRPsr), sugerido por um caso de
recolha de desperdı́cios de madeira. É um problema onde a frota é homogénea, o depósito
único e em que a visita a alguns clientes não é obrigatória, mas condicionada pelas necessidades totais de desperdı́cios. Propõe-se uma formulação para este problema que deriva de
um modelo de fluxo de três ı́ndices para o problema de planeamento de rotas de veı́culos.
Para a optimização do plano de rotas, exploraram-se métodos de decomposição. Analisase, em particular, a aplicação do método de decomposição de Dantzig-Wolfe à formulação
proposta e, para a obtenção de soluções inteiras, o método de partição e geração de colunas
(branch-and-price).
Foi desenvolvido um algoritmo com o qual se obtiveram os resultados computacionais
que analisamos na parte final do artigo. No algoritmo de pesquisa em árvore, foi aplicado
um método de determinação de limites inferiores para o problema de empacotamento,
baseado em funções duais válidas, que torna o processo mais eficiente.
c 2004 Associação Portuguesa de Investigação Operacional
22
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
Keywords: Routing, Transportation, Integer Programming
Title: Vehicle Routing in a Wood Waste Pickup System
1
Introdução
O sistema de recolha em estudo é constituı́do por um conjunto de unidades distribuı́das
(fábricas de serração, superfı́cies comerciais, produtores de mobiliário) que geram desperdı́cios
de madeira como fruto da sua actividade produtiva e por um fabricante de aglomerados que se
encarrega de recolher com os seus próprios meios aquilo que para ele representa uma matéria
prima barata. Nesse contexto, um dos problemas que enfrenta o fabricante consiste em determinar um plano económico de recolhas atendendo às condições especı́ficas do seu sector.
O fabricante tem um duplo objectivo. Por um lado, recolher os desperdı́cios necessários à
sua laboração. Por outro, assumir plenamente o seu papel de agente ecológico, garantindo o
serviço aos clientes cujos nı́veis de desperdı́cios acumulados estejam acima de um determinado
patamar. Distinguem-se assim duas classes de clientes: os que têm que ser obrigatoriamente
visitados e aqueles que só o são se as necessidades periódicas do fabricante não puderem ser
satisfeitas com os primeiros. Desta forma, um cliente com um nı́vel de desperdı́cios baixo pode
não ser visitado. Do ponto de vista económico, o planeamento visa a minimização dos custos
variáveis de operação dos veı́culos, considerados proporcionais à distância total percorrida
(como acontece frequentemente na prática, assume-se que as matrizes de distâncias e tempos
de trânsito obedecem ao princı́pio de desigualdade triangular).
Para tal, o fabricante dispõe de uma frota virtualmente ilimitada de veı́culos de igual
capacidade e de um depósito único. As descargas são exclusivamente efectuadas nesse depósito,
onde se iniciam e terminam todas as rotas. A duração de cada rota é naturalmente limitada à
duração de um turno de trabalho. Os clientes, as unidades cujos desperdı́cios de madeira são
recolhidos, não impõem qualquer restrição à operação dos veı́culos. Um veı́culo pode visitar
um cliente a qualquer momento do dia, procedendo de imediato à recolha, com a única garantia
do levantamento da totalidade dos desperdı́cios disponı́veis. Dessa forma, no horizonte de um
planeamento, um cliente é visitado por apenas um veı́culo.
No problema clássico de planeamento de rotas de veı́culos, designado na literatura anglosaxónica por Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP), todos os clientes têm de ser visitados. No Prize
Collecting Travelling Salesman Problem introduzido por Balas [3], essa condição é relaxada:
um cliente pode não ser visitado incorrendo-se por isso numa penalização contabilizada directamente no custo total da solução. No problema em estudo, não visitar um cliente com
um nı́vel baixo de desperdı́cios implica uma economia imediata dos custos de deslocação até
esse cliente. Contudo, ao abdicar dos seus desperdı́cios, incorre-se numa penalização indirecta
igual ao custo da visita a outro cliente do mesmo tipo, visita que passa a ser necessária em
virtude das necessidades do fabricante. Os prémios que define o PCTSP correspondem agora
aos nı́veis de desperdı́cios de alguns clientes. Por essas razões, designaremos o problema por
Prize Collecting Vehicle Routing Problem with service restrictions (PCVRPsr). As restrições
de serviço referem-se à imposição de serviço aos clientes com contentores cheios.
Na Secção 2, apresentamos um modelo genérico de fluxo de três ı́ndices para o VRP.
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
23
O modelo de fluxo de três ı́ndices para o PCVRPsr, introduzido na Secção 3, deriva desse
modelo genérico. Na Secção 4, aplica-se uma decomposição de Dantzig-Wolfe a esse modelo,
e são definidos o problema mestre e o subproblema. Na Secção 5, apresenta-se a estratégia
usada no método de partição e geração de colunas. Na Secção 6, são mostrados resultados
computacionais relativos a instâncias de teste com diferentes caracterı́sticas, e, finalmente, na
Secção 7, são retiradas algumas conclusões sobre a aplicação desta abordagem a este novo
problema.
2
Modelo de Fluxo de Três Índices para o VRP
O VRP pode ser definido numa rede cujos elementos representam informação no espaço e no
tempo ou simplesmente no espaço. Neste trabalho, recorremos a uma rede caracterizada por
nodos que representam localidades a qualquer instante de tempo e por arcos que traduzem
exclusivamente movimentos no espaço.
Define-se o grafo G = ( V, A), em que V representa o conjunto dos nodos e A o conjunto
dos arcos orientados. Seja N = {1, ..., n} o conjunto dos clientes onde existe um contentor
susceptı́vel de ser recolhido. O depósito é representado pelos nodos o e d, que o distinguem
enquanto primeira origem e destino final dos veı́culos. Um arco (i, j) não terá nunca por
origem o nodo d ou por destino o nodo o. Os conjuntos V e A ficam completamente definidos
por V = N ∪ { o, d} e A = {N ∪ { o} × N ∪ {d}}.
A cada cliente i está associada uma quantidade pi de desperdı́cios de madeira disponı́veis
para recolha. Assume-se que po = pd = 0. Entre cada par de nodos i e jexiste um tempo de
trânsito tij no qual se inclui o tempo de serviço ao cliente i. Temos ainda que tij = tji , ∀i, j ∈ V ,
e tij ≤ tih + thj , ∀i, j, h ∈ V .
Um arco (i, j), com i, j ∈ N , define uma sequência válida de recolhas nos clientes i e j. Os
arcos (o, j) e (j, d) representam respectivamente o primeiro e último movimento de qualquer
veı́culo, precedido ou seguido por uma recolha no cliente j. Quanto ao arco (o, d), na prática,
ele corresponde a não sair do depósito. Uma rota consiste finalmente numa sequência de
recolhas atribuı́das a um veı́culo da frota. Seja Ko conjunto desses veı́culos. Todos os veı́culos
têm igual capacidade Q e tempo máximo de trânsito T.
A cada arco (i, j) está associado um custo unitário cij , igual à menor distância, directa ou
indirecta, entre os nodos i e j. De notar que cod = 0. Tal como para a matriz de tempos de
trânsito, a matriz de distâncias é simétrica e verifica o princı́pio de desigualdade triangular.
Os custos fixos relativo à utilização de veı́culos (necessariamente igual para todos eles), se
existirem, são incluı́dos nos custos coj , j ∈ N , dado que cada veı́culo sai uma única vez do
depósito. Esses custos são particularmente importantes nos casos em que se pretende minimizar
o número de veı́culos usados.
Sem perda de generalidade, assume-se que todos os parâmetros são inteiros não-negativos.
O modelo de fluxo de três ı́ndices [10] que adoptaremos para o VRP, e a partir do qual
formularemos um modelo para o PCVRPsr, deriva de uma formulação proposta em [6, 7, 8]
para o VRP com janelas temporais (VRPTW), para o qual são impostos intervalos de tempo
admissı́veis para as visitas. As variáveis Xijk , (i, j) ∈ A, k ∈ K, são variáveis de fluxo que
tomam o valor 1 se o arco (i, j) pertencer à rota do veı́culo k e 0 caso contrário. As variáveis
24
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
Lki e Tik , i ∈ V, k ∈ K, representam, após a passagem pelo nodo i, a carga do veı́culo k e
a duração do seu trajecto desde que partiu do depósito, respectivamente. Os veı́culos saem
vazios do depósito, i.e. Lko = 0, ∀k ∈ K.
X
min.
k∈ K
X
(i,j )
cij Xijk
(1)
∈ A
sujeito a
X
X
k∈ K j ∈ N ∪
X
j ∈ N ∪
X
i ∈ N ∪
X
Xijk −
{o}
i ∈ N ∪
X
i ∈ N ∪
Xijk (Tik
Xijk = 1,
∀i∈N
(2)
k
Xoj
= 1,
∀k∈K
(3)
k
Xji
= 0,
∀ k ∈ K, ∀ j ∈ V \{o, d}
(4)
k
Xid
= 1,
∀k∈K
(5)
∀ k ∈ K, ∀ (i, j) ∈ A
(6)
∀ k ∈ K, ∀ i ∈ V
(7)
∀ k ∈ K, ∀ (i, j) ∈ A
(8)
∀ k ∈ K, ∀ i ∈ V
(9)
{d}
{d}
{d}
{o}
+ tij − Tjk ) ≤ 0,
0 ≤ Tik ≤ T,
Xijk (Lki
+
pi − Lkj ) ≤ 0,
0 ≤ Lki ≤ Q,
Xijk ≥ 0,
∀ k ∈ K, ∀ (i, j) ∈ A.
(10)
Claramente, sempre que o problema (1)-(10) for possı́vel, existirá uma solução óptima inteira
[7]. Contudo, essa formulação é não linear e define um espaço de soluções não convexo. A
formulação (1)-(10) pode ser linearizada substituindo as restrições (6) e (8) pelas equações
(11) e (12) e adicionando a condição de integralidade (13):
Tik + tkij − Tjk ≤ (1 − Xijk )M ,
Lki
+ pi −
Lkj
∀ k ∈ K, ∀ (i, j) ∈ A
(11)
Xijk )Q,
∀ k ∈ K, ∀ (i, j) ∈ A
(12)
Xijk binário,
∀ k ∈ K, ∀ (i, j) ∈ A.
(13)
≤ (1 −
M representa um valor suficientemente grande para que as restrições sejam redundantes para
Xijk = 0.
A função (1) representa o custo total das rotas. A restrição (2) garante a visita de todos os
clientes por um único veı́culo. Um veı́culo k não utilizado corresponde a um veı́culo que sai do
k = 1. O trajecto
depósito-origem o e regressa directamente ao seu depósito-destino d, i.e. X od
de um veı́culo k é descrito pelas restrições de conservação de fluxo (3)-(5). As restrições (6)
e (7) garantem que a duração máxima de cada rota não seja excedida enquanto as restrições
(8) e (9) garantem que a capacidade dos veı́culos não seja também excedida. Existem formas
alternativas de definir as restrições de capacidade e duração que conduzem a formulações com
um número bastante inferior de variáveis e restrições. Contudo, essa aparente ineficiência
faz-se sem prejuı́zo do método de resolução adoptado e que apresentaremos mais adiante.
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
3
25
Modelo de Fluxo de Três Índices para o PCVRPsr
O PCVRPsr consiste numa generalização do VRP com restrições adicionais relativas à recolha
de uma quantidade mı́nima de desperdı́cios de madeira .
O fabricante de aglomerados necessita de ns unidades de desperdı́cios de madeira. Por
seu lado, os clientes não admitem guardar mais de nc unidades desse material. Acima das nc
unidades, um cliente tem de ser visitado; abaixo, poderá ou não sê-lo, consoante as necessidades
do fabricante. Seja N1 o conjunto de clientes do primeiro tipo (os clientes cheios) e N2 o
conjunto de clientes do segundo tipo (os clientes semi-cheios). Essas condições, que designamos
por restrições de serviço, distinguem o nosso problema do que seria um PCVRP clássico, no
qual não é feita nenhuma distinção entre clientes. Se fizermos nc = min pi , obtém-se um VRP
i∈N
P
clássico. Com nc =
pi , o problema reduz-se a um PCVRP clássico.
i∈N
Se existirem clientes cheios, apenas uma parte das necessidades do fabricante terá de ser
satisfeita
Seja ns v essa quantidade. Temos que ns v =
P através dos clientes semi-cheios.
P
ns −
pi . Claramente, se ns ≤
pi , o problema reduz-se a um VRP clássico.
i∈N1
i∈N1
Baseados no modelo (1)-(13), podemos formular o PCVRPsr da seguinte forma:
X
X
min.
cij Xijk
k∈ K (i,j ) ∈ A
(14)
sujeito a
X
X
X
X
k∈ K j ∈ N ∪
k∈ K j ∈ N ∪
X
k∈ K
X
i∈N2
pi
X
Xijk = 1,
∀ i ∈ N1
(15)
Xijk ≤ 1,
∀ i ∈ N2
(16)
{d}
{d}
Xijk ≥ ns v
(17)
j∈N ∪{d}
(3)-(5), (7) e (9)-(13)
A restrição (2) desdobra-se agora nas restrições (15) e (16). A primeira impõe a visita
de todos os clientes cheios enquanto a restrição (16) relaxa essa condição no caso dos clientes
semi-cheios. Em (17) garante-se a recolha das ns v unidades através dos clientes semi-cheios.
A dimensão do problema condiciona fortemente a sua resolução. Como referimos no final
da Secção anterior, é possı́vel reduzir a dimensão do modelo reformulando as restrições de
capacidade e duração através de uma única inequação por veı́culo, como é feito usualmente.
Evitava-se assim o recurso às variáveis Tik e Lki . A economia é importante, mas a dimensão do
problema continua considerável. A formulação proposta nesta Secção define |K|×((N +1) 2 −N )
variáveis de fluxo, |K| × N variáveis Tik e um igual número de variáveis de carga Lki . O maior
número de restrições do modelo está concentrado em (11) e (12). Em cada conjunto, o número
de restrições ascende a |K| × ((N + 1)2 − N ).
26
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
12
7
1 hora
50 mins
1
3
1h 20 mins
1 h 10 mins
4
2
1h 10 mins
2 horas 30 mins
2 horas
5
3
1 h 30 mins
9
1 hora
30 mins
7
Figura 1: Solução válida para a instância do Exemplo 1.
Exemplo 1 Considere uma instância do PCVRPsr com 10 clientes, 5 veı́culos, cujo grafo
completo é parcialmente definido na Figura 1. As necessidades periódicas de recolha são de
50 toneladas. A capacidade dos veı́culos é de 30 toneladas e a duração das rotas é limitada a
1 dia. O nı́vel limite de stock é de 5 unidades. Qualquer cliente com um nı́vel de stock acima
dessas 5 unidades é considerado cliente cheio, e tem consequentemente de ser visitado. Na
Figura 1, o depósito, enquanto origem e destino final, é representado pelos quadrados a preto.
Os clientes cheios são representados pelos cı́rculos. O valor perto dos sı́mbolos indica a carga
respectiva de cada cliente. A figura apresenta uma solução válida para essa instância na qual
dois veı́culos são usados para servir os clientes com 12,7,5,7 e 9 unidades de desperdı́cios. As
10 unidades em falta são recolhidas em três outros clientes.
Para essa instância, a formulação desta Secção tem 655 variáveis e 1161 restrições. Com
as simplificações sugeridas para as restrições de capacidade e duração, o número de variáveis
passaria para 555, enquanto o número de restrições caı́ria para 75.
É possı́vel derivar diversos casos especiais notáveis a partir do PCVRPsr. Se fixarmos
o limite nc de stock tolerado no menor valor de stock possı́vel, relaxarmos as restrições de
capacidade e duração e limitarmos o problema a um único veı́culo, obtém-se um problema
de caixeiro viajante. O problema de empacotamento resulta da fixação de nc no seu valor
mı́nimo, da relaxação da restrição de duração e das seguintes alterações dos custos: c kij =
1, k ∈ K, i = o(k), j ∈ N e ckij = 0 caso contrário. Ambos os problemas são NP-difı́ceis [11],
o que faz do PCVRPsr um problema também NP-difı́cil.
O problema que consiste em determinar se existe uma solução válida para determinada
instância do PCVRPsr, quando o número de veı́culos é livre, é um problema de fácil resolução.
Basta associar um veı́culo a cada cliente cheio e completar, eventualmente, as necessidades,
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
27
associando sequencialmente um veı́culo a cada cliente semi-cheio. No pior dos casos, este
procedimento requer n operações. Se o número de veı́culos for fixo, o mesmo problema é
NP-completo. Por essa razão, muitos dos algoritmos desenvolvidos no âmbito dos problemas
de planeamento de rotas assumem que o número de veı́culos é livre. Esta conclusão, válida
também para o VRPTW que é um caso especial do PCVRPsr, é um corolário do seguinte
resultado obtido no caso de um único veı́culo sem limite de capacidade [14]:
Teorema 3.1 O problema de decisão que consiste em saber se determinada instância do problema do caixeiro viajante com janelas temporais tem solução é NP-completo, mesmo quando
os tempos de trânsito são simétricos.
4
Decomposição de Dantzig-Wolfe
Aplicando o método de decomposição de Dantzig-Wolfe [5] ao modelo da Secção anterior,
é possı́vel deixar as restrições de capacidade e duração das rotas para um subproblema de
caminho mais curto com restrições adicionais, definindo-se um problema mestre de cobertura
de conjuntos.
4.1
Problema Mestre
Dada a formulação da Secção anterior para o PCRVPsr, a decomposição que propomos define
o problema mestre a partir das restrições (10)-(17) com a respectiva função objectivo (14)
inalterada e corresponde a um problema de partição de conjuntos com restrições adicionais.
O subproblema é composto pelas restrições (3)-(5), (11), (7), (12) e (9)-(13) e consiste originalmente em |K| problemas idênticos de caminho mais curto sem ciclos com restrições de
capacidade e duração, dos quais apenas um é efectivamente considerado.
O poliedro definido pelas restrições do subproblema é limitado. Assim, as variáveis de fluxo
Xijk podem ser expressas como uma combinação convexa e não negativa dos pontos extremos
desse poliedro, que são caminhos no grafo G = ( V, A). Se Xijp representar o valor do fluxo
no arco (i, j) de um ponto extremo p ∈ Ω do poliedro do subproblema (com Ω a representar o
conjunto de todos os seus pontos extremos), teremos que:
X
Xijk =
λkp Xijp , ∀k ∈ K, ∀(i, j) ∈ A
p∈Ω
com as seguintes restrições:
X
λkp = 1,
∀k ∈ K
p∈Ω
λkp ≥ 0
∀k ∈ K, ∀p ∈ Ω
É possı́vel associar a cada caminho p ∈ Ω um conjunto de informação. Assim, oPnúmero de
vezes que um caminho pvisita um cliente i e que designaremos por aip é igual a
Xijp .
j ∈ N ∪ {d}
P
cij Xijp
Numa solução válida, aip ∈ {0, 1}. O custo total cp de um caminho pé de
(i,j ) ∈ A
unidades. Quanto ao volume lp de desperdı́cios provenientes de clientes semi-cheios que são
28
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
recolhidos ao longo de um percurso p, temos que lp =
P
pi
P
Xijp . Fazendo ainda
i∈N2 j∈N ∪{d}
P k
λp , podemos rescrever o problema mestre da seguinte forma:
λp =
k∈K
min.
X
λ p cp
(18)
p∈Ω
sujeito a
X
λp aip = 1,
∀ i ∈ N1
(19)
X
λp aip ≤ 1,
∀ i ∈ N2
(20)
p∈Ω
p∈Ω
X
λp lp ≥ ns v,
(21)
p∈Ω
λp binário, ∀p ∈ Ω
(22)
Da formulação de fluxos em arcos original passamos a uma formulação equivalente com fluxos
em caminhos. Devido à estratégia de partição escolhida (Subsecção 5.1), adicionaram-se ao
modelo duas variáveis Xc e Xd iguais respectivamente ao custo total da solução e ao número
de veı́culos efectivamente usados.
X
λ p cp = X c
(23)
p∈Ω
X
λp = X d
(24)
p∈Ω\{{(o,d)}}
Para reduzir problemas de estabilidade numérica associadas ao modelo de partição de conjuntos com restrições adicionais (18)-(24) que foram detectados na resolução de problemas com
estrutura semelhante [6], e pelo facto do subproblema poder, como veremos na próxima Subsecção, gerar colunas com ciclos (aip ≥1), optou-se por um modelo de cobertura de conjuntos
relaxando a restrição (19):
X
λp aip ≥ 1, ∀ i ∈ N1
(25)
p∈Ω
Mostra-se facilmente que o conjunto de soluções do problema de cobertura de conjuntos é
idêntico ao do problema de partição de conjuntos, devido à propriedade de desigualdade triangular [1].
A Figura 2 ilustra a estrutura do problema mestre. O problema é inicializado com um
número restrito de colunas e resolvido através do método de geração de colunas. Quando
a procura dos clientes cheios é suficiente para cobrir as necessidades do fabricante, apenas
são geradas rotas de ida e volta entre esses clientes e o depósito (os restantes clientes são
obviamente excluı́dos do modelo). Caso contrário, adiciona-se uma rota por cada cliente
semi-cheio na ordem crescente dos seus ı́ndices até que seja garantida a satisfação total das
necessidades. A variável artificial Art foi incluı́da para garantir a validade dos problemas em
qualquer nodo da árvore de pesquisa. O seu custo Mé muito elevado e os seus coeficientes nas
restrições (25) e (20) igual à unidade.
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
Xc
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
-1
0
Clientes cheios
Clt. semi-cheios
Necessidades
N.o de veı́culos
Custo total
Xd
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
-1
0
0
λ1
a11
...
A|N 1|1
a|N 1|+1,1
...
a|N 1|+|N 2|,1
l1
1
c1
c1
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
λ|Ω|
a1|Ω|
...
A|N 1||Ω|
a|N 1|+1,|Ω|
...
a|N 1|+|N 2|,|Ω|
ln
1
cn
cn
29
≥
≥
≥
≤
≤
≤
≥
=
=
1
1
1
1
1
1
ns v
0
0
Figura 2: Quadro Simplex do problema de cobertura de conjuntos com restrições adicionais.
4.2
Subproblema
O Problema de Caminho Mais Curto Sem Ciclos e com Restrições de Capacidade e Duração
(PCMCSCRCD) que resulta de uma simplificação da formulação (3)-(5), (11), (7), (12) e (9)(13), escolhida para o subproblema, e que não possui a propriedade da integralidade, é NPdifı́cil, e, em geral, de difı́cil resolução. Por esse motivo, recorremos a uma formulação relaxada
do PCMCSCRCD na qual se elimina a condição de elementaridade imposta aos caminhos. O
problema continua a ser um problema NP-difı́cil mas para o qual são conhecidos algoritmos
pseudo-polinomiais. Na solução inteira óptima do problema mestre, onde o overcovering dos
clientes nunca ocorrerá, as colunas associados aos caminhos com ciclos serão todas nulas.
Pretende-se encontrar caminhos cujas colunas associadas no problema mestre tenham custo
reduzido negativo. Designem-se por π i, π l ,π c e π d as variáveis duais do problema mestre restrito
associadas às restrições (25) e (20) para cada cliente i∈N e às restrições (21), (23) e (24),
respectivamente. O custo reduzido c0p de um caminho p ∈ Ω é dado por:
X
πi aip − πl lp − πc cp − πd
c0p = cp −
i∈N1 ∪N2
É possı́vel, por substituição dos parâmetros aip , lp e cp e alguns arranjos de termos, chegar à
seguinte equação para o custo reduzido do caminho p expresso em ordem aos custos dos arcos
de G:
P
P
P
P
c0p =
(cij − πi − πc cij )Xijp +
(cij − πi − πc cij − πl pi )Xijp +
i∈N1 j∈N ∪{d}
i∈N2 j∈N ∪{d}
P
(coj − πc coj − πd )Xojp + (cod − πc cod − πd )Xodp
+
j∈N
Os custos dos arcos do subproblema, os custos marginais, baseiam-se nos custos originais e
são calculados da seguinte forma:
c0ij
c0ij
c0ij
c0ij
= cij
= cij
= cij
= cij
− πi − πc cij
− πi − πc cij − πl pi
− πc cij − πd
− πc cij − πd
se
se
se
se
i ∈ N1
i ∈ N2
i = o e j∈ N
i=oej=d
30
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
O subproblema consiste assim numa relaxação do seguinte PCMCSCRCD:
X
min.
c0ij Xij
(i,j ) ∈ A
(26)
sujeito a
X
Xoj = 1,
{d}
j ∈ N ∪
X
i ∈ N ∪
Xij −
{o}
(27)
X
i ∈ N ∪
X
Xji = 0,
∀ j ∈ V \{o, d}
(28)
{d}
Xid = 1,
{o}
Ti + tij − Tj ≤ (1 − Xij )M ,
(29)
i ∈ N ∪
∀ (i, j) ∈ A
(30)
∀i∈V
(31)
∀ (i, j) ∈ A
(32)
∀i∈V
(33)
Xij ≥ 0,
∀ (i, j) ∈ A
(34)
Xij binário,
∀ (i, j) ∈ A.
(35)
0 ≤ Ti ≤ T,
Li + pi − Lj ≤ (1 − Xij )Q,
pi ≤ Li ≤ Q,
(36)
O subproblema é resolvido através de um algoritmo de programação dinâmica de complexidade
pseudo-polinomial, também usado em [6] para o problema muito semelhante de caminho mais
curto com restrições de capacidade e janelas temporais.
5
Pesquisa de Soluções Inteiras: Método de Partição e Geração
de Colunas
O modelo do PCVRPsr não possui a propriedade da integralidade. A solução óptima inteira
pode ser obtida através do método de partição e geração de colunas (branch-and-price) que
consiste numa combinação do método de partição e avaliação sucessivas (branch-and-bound )
com o método de geração de colunas [4]. Em cada nodo da árvore de pesquisa, o limite inferior
dado pela solução óptima da relaxação linear do PCVRPsr é calculada através do método de
geração de colunas.
5.1
Estratégias de Partição
Se as partições baseadas nas variáveis de decisão do problema mestre podem resultar na regeneração das colunas correspondentes, no caso do problema em estudo, e, de modo geral, no caso
dos problemas de planeamento de rotas formulados nos termos da decomposição de DantzigWolfe, mostra-se que essa partição não é sequer praticável [2]. No lugar de uma partição
nos caminhos, efectuou-se uma partição nas variáveis originais X ij que correspondem a fluxos
em arcos. Cada ramo da árvore de pesquisa resulta da adição das restrições X ij =1 e Xij =0.
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
31
Como essas variáveis não fazem parte da formulação do problema mestre, é necessário derivar
um procedimento equivalente na formulação de cobertura de conjuntos que apresentámos na
Secção anterior.
As modificações são executadas na matriz de custos do problema. Para garantir que o arco
(i, j) não faz parte de nenhuma solução óptima (Xij =0), fixa-se um valor elevado ao respectivo
custo cij e eliminam-se do problema mestre as colunas que correspondam a caminhos que
passam por esse arco.
Para garantir a presença do arco (i, j) na solução óptima do problema, penalizam-se todos
os arcos que saem do nodo i e todos aqueles que terminam em j, excepto o arco (i, j), fixando
em valores elevados os custos correspondentes. O custo das colunas que incluem esses arcos
é actualizado ao mesmo tempo que o valor da função objectivo do problema mestre. Dessa
forma, espera-se que uma rota seja forçada a visitar o cliente j imediatamente após o cliente
i.
Essa estratégia só faz sentido quando i e j são clientes cheios. Para esses casos, um fluxo
fraccionário num caminho que atravessa os clientes i e j implica a existência de outros caminhos
que os visitam com fluxos igualmente fraccionários e passando por arcos diferentes de (i, j)
(se não existisse fluxo em quaisquer outros arcos incidentes em i e j, sem contar com o arco
(i, j), o fluxo Xij seria igual a 1 e não chegaria a ser escolhido para a partição). Com as
penalizações introduzidas, a solução óptima deixa efectivamente de o ser porque tem arcos
com custos elevados. A cobertura dos clientes i e j só pode ser garantida pelo arco (i, j), o
que obriga assim o seu fluxo a assumir o valor Xij =1. O mesmo acontece quando apenas um
dos clientes é cliente cheio.
Nos casos em que i e j são clientes semi-cheios, o esquema que apresentámos não garante
por si só que o fluxo no arco (i, j) seja mesmo unitário. Possivelmente, poderá mesmo ser
nulo se o cliente i não pertencer à solução óptima do novo problema (os custos de todos
os arcos incidentes em jtêm valores elevados à excepção
P do arco (i, j)). Lembramos que os
clientes semi-cheios são sujeitos a restrições do tipo
λp aip ≤ 1, podendo, na relaxação do
p∈Ω
problema inteiro, atravessá-los um fluxo total fraccionário. Se na solução óptima do problema
de partida todos os arcos que saem de i e todos os arcos que terminam em jtiverem fluxo
nulo, as transformações feitas na matriz de custos não terão qualquer efeito na solução óptima
do novo problema. Os clientes i e jterão de passar a ser explicitamente considerados como
clientes cheios, o que implica substituir as restrições correspondentes do tipo ”≤”por restrições
de cobertura usuais do tipo ”≥”. Genericamente, esse procedimento foi adoptado sempre que
a partição envolvia um cliente semi-cheio.
Uma partição do tipo Xij =1 resulta numa agregação dos clientes i e j. A criação de um
novo problema onde Xij =1 só pode ser feita se a soma das duas cargas não exceder a capacidade
dos veı́culos e o tempo de trânsito entre eles também não for superior ao limite de duração
imposto. Caso uma dessas restrições fosse violada e fosse, mesmo assim, criado o problema
onde Xij =1, o problema resultaria numa solução de custo muito elevado, previsivelmente
não atractiva. É necessário ainda tomar em consideração as agregações efectuadas a nı́veis
superiores na árvore de pesquisa. Assim, se um cliente l, por exemplo, tiver já sido agregado
ao cliente i, a partição Xij =1 só será possı́vel se a soma das cargas de i, j e l for inferior à
capacidade dos veı́culos. O mesmo se aplica no caso das durações. Esses testes são inseridos
na regra de selecção, inspirada em [6].
32
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
As partições baseiam-se ainda nas variáveis de custo total Xc e do número de veı́culos
usados Xd , introduzidas especialmente para esse efeito na formulação do problema mestre.
5.2
Limite Inferior do Problema de Empacotamento para Detecção de Nodos Impossı́veis
Em alguns nodos da árvore de pesquisa, a partição efectuada a partir de X d , na qual se impõe
um limite superior ao número de veı́culos, pode conduzir a um problema inválido. A detecção
oportuna dessa situação permite evitar operações de processamento inúteis. Para tal, bastaria
comparar um limite inferior ao número de veı́culos necessários com o limite superior imposto
pela partição.
Esse limite inferior é dado pelo limite inferior para a solução do problema de empacotamento das cargas dos clientes cheios (ou que se vão tornando cheios em virtude da regra de
partição) nos veı́culos de capacidade limitada, e pode ser calculado com base numa função
dual válida apresentada em [9]. Considere, sem perda de generalidade, um problema de empacotamento normalizado, onde a capacidade dos contentores é unitária e as cargas distribuı́das
entre 0 e 1. Uma função u :[0,1] → [0,1] é uma função dual válida se para qualquer conjunto
S de números reais não negativos x se verificar:
X
X
x≤1⇒
u(x) ≤ 1
x∈S
x∈S
É válida a seguinte proposição enunciada em Fekete e Schepers (1998):
Proposição 5.1 Se I = (x1 , ..., xn ) for uma instância do problema de empacotamento e u
uma função dual válida, então o limite inferior para a instância modificada do problema de
empacotamento u(I) = (u(x1 ), ..., u(xn )) é também um limite inferior para I.
O cálculo de um limite inferior para o problema de empacotamento definido a partir das
cargas dos clientes cheios passa pelo cálculo de limites inferiores para o problema de empacotamento transformado através de uma função dual válida. Um limite inferior trivial para um
problema de empacotamento I = (x1 , ..., xn ) normalizado é dado por:
& n
'
X
xi
L1 (I) =
i=1
As funções duais válidas apresentadas por Fekete e Schepers (1998) são técnicas de arredondamento das cargas cujo objectivo consiste em aumentar o mais possı́vel o valor das cargas
para assim obter limites inferiores de melhor qualidade. Consideramos apenas uma delas:
u(k) :[0, 1] → [0, 1]
x,
x 7→
b(k + 1)xc k1 ,
se x(k + 1) ∈ Z
caso contrário
Calculam-se limites para diferentes valores de k ∈ Z. No final, o limite inferior para o
número de veı́culos corresponderá ao maior desses valores. Outros limites inferiores para o
problema de empacotamento podem ser encontrados em [13].
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
33
Os limites inferiores são calculados antes que seja tomada uma decisão de partição baseada
em Xd e sempre que tenha havido nova agregação de cargas. Os cálculos tomam evidentemente
em conta essa agregação, o que implica a gestão de estruturas de dados adicionais que permitam
o acesso a uma imagem corrigida do grafo do problema. Por exemplo, dois clientes que tenham
sido agregados passam a contar por um único nodo com uma carga associada igual à soma
das cargas dos clientes. É necessário registar essa informação em cada nodo da árvore de
pesquisa por forma a garantir que futuras agregações sejam feitas tendo em atenção agregações
previamente realizadas.
Inicialmente, apenas se conhece um número restrito de clientes que irão ser visitados (os
clientes cheios). O limite inferior para o número de veı́culos necessários só pode ser calculado
com base nas suas cargas. Consequentemente, para baixos nı́veis de profundidade na árvore
de pesquisa, não são de esperar limites de muito boa qualidade. Contudo, quanto maior for
a profundidade, maior será o número de clientes semi-cheios que passam para o grupo dos
clientes cheios, e melhor será o limite inferior. Por outro lado, se as restrições de capacidade
dos veı́culos forem menos restritivas do que as restrições de duração das rotas, dificilmente o
limite chegará a ser efectivo. O Exemplo 2 ilustra o cálculo deste limite inferior.
Exemplo 2 Considere uma instância particular do PCVRPsr com 5 clientes e na qual o nı́vel
limite de stock foi fixado no menor valor aceitável (VRP). A capacidade dos veı́culos é de 10
unidades de carga. Para ilustrar como se pode
obter limites inferiores de melhor qualidade
n
P
xi , em que xi é a carga normalizada do cliente
do que o limite inferior trivial L1 =
i=1
i, vamos usar a função dual válida com k =3. As cargas individuais de cada cliente são,
respectivamente, iguais a 5, 5, 4, 3 e 3. O valor do limite inferior para o número de veı́culos
calculado no primeiro nodo da árvore de pesquisa é de 2 veı́culos (o mesmo que L 1 ). O processo
seguido para o seu cálculo foi sintetizado na tabela seguinte:
Cliente i
1
2
3
4
5
pi
5
5
4
3
3
x i =pi/10
0.5
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.3
x i (k+1)
2
2
1.6
1.2
1.2
u (3) ( x i )
0.5
0.5
1/3
1/3
1/3
2
De facto, é possı́vel empacotar os 2 itens com peso 5 num veı́culo e os itens com pesos 4, 3 e
3, repectivamente, noutro veı́culo. Essa solução pode não corresponder ao empacotamento que
se verifica na solução óptima do PCVRPsr. Constitui, contudo, um limite inferior ao número
de veı́culos necessários.
Admite-se que a solução óptima da relaxação linear do problema mestre tem um número
fraccionário de veı́culos compreendido entre 2 e 3 e que, no ramo onde foi inserida a restrição
Xd ≤2, é escolhido o arco (2, 3) para a próxima partição. Para um dos problemas novos
que deveria ser criado, aquele onde X23 =1, a configuração das cargas passaria a ser a que se
representa na tabela seguinte:
34
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
Cliente i
1
2e3
4
5
pi
5
9
3
3
O limite L1 continua a ser igual a 2. Recorrendo à função dual válida, o limite inferior que
se obtém nesse caso passa a ser aproximadamente 2.17 veı́culos, conforme se ilustra no quadro
seguinte:
Cliente i
1
2e3
4
5
pi
5
9
3
3
x i =p i /10
0.5
0.9
0.3
0.3
x i (k+1)
2
3.6
1.2
1.2
u (3) ( x i )
0.5
1
1/3
1/3
2.17
Claramente esse valor entra em conflito com os dois veı́culos máximos impostos pela anterior restrição de partição. Identificada essa situação, apenas o problema onde X 23 =0 é
considerado.
6
Resultados Computacionais
As instâncias de teste foram geradas aleatoriamente, segundo distribuições uniformes e intervalos de valores predefinidos. As instâncias geradas podem ser divididas em três grupos.
Num primeiro grupo, a sombreado escuro na Tabela 1, estão as instâncias que representam
problemas estritamente de prize collecting (PCVRP). Não possuem nenhum cliente cheio pelo
que as visitas aos clientes visa apenas cobrir as necessidades periódicas. A sombreado claro
na mesma tabela encontram-se as instâncias que possuem pelo menos um cliente semi-cheio (e
pelo menos um cliente cheio), e cujas necessidades não são totalmente cobertas pelas cargas
dos clientes cheios. Nessa situação, um conjunto de clientes semi-cheios terá mesmo de ser
visitado. No último grupo, temos as instâncias cujas necessidades são cobertas pelas cargas
dos clientes cheios. Essas instâncias definem VRPs de dimensão igual ou inferior a N .
Apresentam-se apenas as instâncias com 15 e 25 clientes nas quais as capacidades dos
veı́culos e o limite imposto à duração das rotas são factores efectivamente restritivos e para
as quais foi possı́vel obter uma solução óptima em tempos razoáveis. Para instâncias de
PCVRPsr com mais de 50 clientes, geradas segundo o mesmo processo aleatório, observa-se
uma degradação considerável dos tempos de resolução. A duração máxima imposta às rotas,
que define uma espécie de janela temporal dentro da qual se deve efectuar uma visita num
cliente, é geralmente larga e dificulta a resolução do subproblema de programação dinâmica.
A Tabela 1 resume as principais caracterı́sticas das 27 instâncias utilizadas.
O primeiro problema mestre restrito é definido segundo uma adaptação da estratégia ”um
cliente – um veı́culo”ao caso dos PCVRPsr. Ao fim de cada resolução do subproblema, são
inseridas, se existirem, mais que uma coluna atractiva. O problema mestre é resolvido através
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
35
Tabela 1: Instâncias de Teste.
N
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
Número
de
clientes
semi-cheios
0
15
15
0
0
0
15
0
1
13
15
0
8
0
6
5
15
0
25
21
0
0
25
0
8
14
19
Carga
dos
clientes
cheios
53
0
0
231
54
30
0
35
60
8
0
45
28
177
29
187
0
61
0
36
60
57
0
379
58
91
156
Carga
dos
clientes
semi-cheios
0
139
53
0
0
0
54
0
2
33
216
0
24
0
12
45
248
0
391
105
0
0
499
0
16
94
286
Necessidades
Necessidades
Residuais
45
44
42
67
38
20
35
7
27
23
101
25
35
99
34
101
78
28
386
49
21
46
104
46
66
139
260
0
44
42
0
0
0
35
0
0
15
101
0
7
0
5
0
78
0
386
13
0
0
104
0
8
48
104
Capacidade
dos
veı́culos
9
23
9
41
8
2
8
5
8
7
41
8
8
34
6
38
44
5
45
14
4
4
47
32
7
17
41
do Simplex primal. O algoritmo de programação dinâmica não gera nenhum caminho que
tenha ciclos de ordem inferior ou igual a dois. A estratégia de pesquisa usada foi do tipo
”primeiro em profundidade”.
Nas tabelas de resultados adiante apresentadas, regista-se na primeira coluna o ı́ndice da
instância, conforme a ordem definida na Tabela 1. A segunda coluna identifica a dimensão da
instância, caracterizada pelo número de clientes. A terceira coluna representa o número de
veı́culos efectivamente usados na solução óptima inteira. A quarta coluna regista o número
de colunas geradas no processo de optimização da relaxação linear do problema mestre. As
três colunas seguintes indicam os valores obtidos no método de partição e geração de colunas
(número total de colunas geradas ao longo da árvore de pesquisa, número de nodos e profundidade máxima alcançada). Os tempos de execução são registados nas três colunas seguintes,
distinguindo-se o tempo gasto na resolução do problema mestre da raı́z da árvore de pesquisa e
o tempo gasto nos restantes nodos e indicando o tempo total. As duas últimas colunas indicam
o valor da solução óptima fraccionária da relaxação linear do problema inteiro original e a sua
solução óptima inteira. Os resultados foram obtidos num computador com processador Intel
Pentium II, frequência de relógio de 450Mhz e 64 Mbytes de memória RAM, usando o CPLEX
6.0 [12].
36
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
Na Tabela 2, apresentam-se os resultados obtidos para as instâncias que possuem pelo
menos um cliente cheio e um cliente semi-cheio, e cujas necessidades residuais são não nulas.
A Tabela 3 apresenta uma sı́ntese idêntica de resultados para as instâncias da Tabela 1 que
são VRPs clássicos.
Para as instâncias representadas na Tabela 2, observa-se um tempo médio de resolução da
relaxação linear da ordem dos 42% do tempo total usado na resolução do problema inteiro. Para
as instâncias da Tabela 3, esse valor sobe para os 61.6%. Esta situação sugere a necessidade do
recurso a heurı́sticas para a inicialização do problema mestre mais sofisticadas do que aquela
que foi usada.
A diferença entre as duas percentagens de tempo é ainda apoiada pela diferença sensı́vel
que existe entre os intervalos de integralidade para os dois casos. Para as instâncias da Tabela
2, o intervalo médio de integralidade é de 5.4% (sendo o maior de 17,2% para a instância
n.o 2), enquanto que para as instâncias listadas na Tabela 3 esse valor é de apenas 0.9% (o
maior fica-se pelos 3,3% para a instância 8). A percentagem de tempo gasto no método de
partição e geração de colunas, para o segundo caso, decresce em consequência da diminuição
do intervalo de integralidade a pesquisar. Uma conclusão imediata consiste em reconhecer
a perda de qualidade do limite inferior fornecido pelo modelo de cobertura com restrições
adicionais quando aplicado a instâncias que representam PCVRPsr que tenham pelo menos
um cliente semi-cheio a visitar. O aumento do intervalo médio de integralidade justifica em
grande parte os 58% do tempo total de execução gastos no método de partição e geração de
colunas na resolução das instâncias da Tabela 2.
Quando as instâncias do PCVRPsr têm um rácio entre as necessidades residuais e a carga
total dos clientes semi-cheios muito elevado (próximo dos 100%), o intervalo de integralidade
tende a diminuir. A relação entre as cargas dos clientes semi-cheios e as necessidades residuais
influenciou em alguns casos o desempenho do algoritmo. Constatou-se de facto que os tempos
de resolução pioravam em algumas instâncias onde as proporções de clientes semi-cheios com
cargas baixas e necessidades residuais elevadas eram importantes.
A transformação das instâncias da Tabela 2 em instâncias de VRPs confirmam as conclusões
que tirámos há pouco em relação ao aumento do intervalo médio de integralidade. Com essa
transformação, o intervalo médio decresceu significativamente, passando dos 5.4% para os
1.2%.
Na Tabela 4, listam-se os resultados obtidos para as instâncias de VRPs obtidas a partir
das instâncias da Tabela 2. Comparando os tempos de resolução das instâncias do PCVRPsr
(Tabela 2) com os tempos de resolução das suas correspondentes transformações em VRPs
(Tabela 3), observa-se que, em 6 casos apenas, as instâncias do primeiro grupo levaram mais
tempo a serem resolvidas. Em 5 desses casos, o intervalo de integralidade para as instâncias do
PCVRPsr era maior do que aquele obtido para as instâncias do VRP. Contudo, outros casos
há em que apesar do intervalo de integralidade ser maior, o tempo de resolução dos PCVRPsr
é menor. É o caso, por exemplo, da instância n.o 2. Para os restantes 8 casos, os tempos de
resolução das instâncias do PCVRPsr é menor.
Novamente, verificamos que a maior parcela do esforço computacional, medida em função
do tempo de processamento, é despendida em fases distintas da resolução. Para as instâncias
do PCVRPsr o tempo continua a concentrar-se nas iterações do método de partição e geração
de colunas, enquanto que para as instâncias do VRP o tempo é maioritariamente gasto na
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
25
25
25
25
25
25
2
6
5
4
3
5
6
2
22
5
3
11
9
7
cols
RL
6
13
14
19
5
31
28
17
4
8
19
65
44
44
cols
MPGC
2
30
29
11
0
2
9
0
0
0
1
0
25
31
nodos
MPGC
25
125
199
2
8
150
89
67
0
5
47
43
29
312
prof.
11
19
22
1
5
20
18
18
0
3
14
16
10
24
tempo
RL
51.41
1.71
0.33
0.72
0.06
0.11
0.43
86.4
0.04
0.11
0.71
6.21
0.28
5.16
tempo
MPGC
5.72
2.80
5.60
0.49
0.22
2.63
1.54
70.36
0.00
0.22
2.04
1.10
0.82
17.25
tempo
total
57.13
4.51
5.93
1.21
0.28
2.74
1.97
156.76
0.04
0.33
2.75
7.31
1.10
22.41
solução
RL
659.60
4777.33
3107.50
2259.92
1834.81
3446.33
4472.17
1346.90
16900.00
3295.29
1098.70
8842.00
7352.00
5496.15
solução
inteira
797.00
5194.00
3586.00
2266.00
1861.00
3606.00
4689.00
1487.00
16900.00
3353.00
1266.00
8888.00
7397.00
5562.00
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
Veı́c.
37
Tabela 2: Resultados computacionais para as instâncias do PCVRPsr com necessidades residuais.
2
3
7
10
11
13
15
17
19
20
23
25
26
27
N
6
7
7
15
8
9
6
6
6
13
20
16
13
cols
MPGC
8
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
0
2
0
4
12
nodos
MPGC
2
0
12
0
11
2
2
40
2
83
2
74
57
prof.
1
0
7
0
5
1
1
16
1
15
1
12
14
tempo
RL
32.35
0.11
0.61
0.05
0.06
0.06
16.70
3.57
34.27
0.11
0.06
0.05
24.55
tempo
MPGC
1.98
0.00
0.38
0.00
0.16
0.05
0.05
3.36
17.52
2.31
0.05
1.76
4.94
tempo
total
34.33
0.11
0.99
0.05
0.22
0.11
16.75
6.93
51.79
2.42
0.11
1.81
29.49
solução
RL
6138.00
6801.00
6254.00
11870.0
5804.50
7202.50
6029.83
4551.00
4703.00
10697.00
17879.00
14606.00
10692.00
solução
inteira
6139.00
6801.00
6352.00
11870.00
6005.00
7248.00
6107.00
4663.00
4763.00
10791.00
17911.00
14644.00
10752.00
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
25
25
25
25
cols
RL
56
30
46
0
28
23
58
64
23
73
20
54
83
38
Veı́c.
Tabela 3: Resultados computacionais para as instâncias do PCVRPsr sem necessidades residu-
ais(VRPs).
1
4
5
6
8
9
12
14
16
18
21
22
24
N
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
39
resolução da relaxação linear. De facto, em quase todos os casos, a resolução da relaxação
linear foi mais rápida para as instâncias do PCVRPsr do que para as instâncias do VRP. A
única excepção é a instância 5.
O efeito do limite inferior do problema de empacotamento foi avaliado para os casos mais
favoráveis do PCVRPsr que correspondem a instâncias do VRP. O que se observa para as
restantes instâncias é uma degradação progressiva da eficácia em função do número de clientes
semi-cheios. Nesses casos, o limite inferior só consegue actuar a partir de determinados nı́veis
de profundidade, quando o conjunto de clientes cheios começa a ganhar maior preponderância.
Os resultados que apresentamos nas Tabelas 5 e 6 correspondem à aplicação do nosso algoritmo
às instâncias iniciais da Tabela 1 transformadas em instâncias do VRP. Parte da Tabela 5 foi
já apresentada na Tabela 4.
São nove as instâncias que viram o seu tempo total de resolução diminuir. Em média, se
considerarmos todas as instâncias, a economia no tempo total de resolução é de 4.9% (para
a instância 26 o tempo é reduzido em quase 50%; se retirarmos essa instância a média passa
para 3.15%). Se tomarmos em consideração apenas as instâncias em que o limite inferior é
útil, a economia sobe para os 14.8%. Esse valor é significativo, comprovando a vantagem da
utilização de limites inferiores para o problema de empacotamento no problema de VRP.
7
Conclusões
Neste artigo, explorámos um novo problema de planeamento de rotas, o Prize Collecting
Vehicle Routing Problem with service restrictions (PCVRPsr). O problema aparece como
uma generalização de um Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) clássico, no qual se relaxa em parte
a condição de visita obrigatória aos clientes. Distiguem-se assim dois grupos de clientes: os
clientes cheios com nı́veis de desperdı́cios acima de determinado limite e os clientes semicheios com nı́veis abaixo desse limite. A visita aos clientes semi-cheios só é efectuada se as
necessidades do fabricante não puderem ser satisfeitas com base nos desperdı́cios dos clientes
cheios.
Formulou-se um modelo matemático de fluxo de três ı́ndices, ao qual se aplicou a decomposição de Dantzig-Wolfe, que resultou num problema mestre de partição de conjuntos com
restrições adicionais, relaxado posteriormente num modelo de cobertura de conjuntos, e num
subproblema de caminho mais curto sem ciclos e com restrições de capacidade e duração, que
acabamos por resolver relaxando a condição de elementaridade dos caminhos. Para a pesquisa
de soluções inteiras, recorreu-se ao método de partição e geração de colunas. Calcularam-se
também limites inferiores para o problema de empacotamento, baseados em funções duais
válidas, para a detecção antecipada de nodos impossı́veis na árvore de pesquisa, o que resultou
em economias de tempo apreciáveis no problema de VRP.
Verificou-se um aumento sensı́vel do intervalo de integralidade fornecido pelo modelo de
cobertura de conjuntos aplicado a instâncias do PCVRPsr com pelo menos um cliente semicheio a visitar. Para as instâncias do VRP, que são casos especiais do PCVRPsr, esse intervalo
era sensivelmente menor. Futuras abordagens deverão procurar formulações mais fortes que
resultem em intervalos de integralidade reduzidos. Quanto à relaxação linear inicial, os tempos
de resolução foram em geral bem menores no caso do PCVRPsr mas poderiam ser certamente
reduzidos recorrendo-se a heurı́sticas para obtenção do primeiro problema mestre restrito.
40
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
25
25
25
25
25
25
7
6
7
6
11
8
7
6
22
21
11
11
13
12
cols
RL
46
50
39
59
10
40
30
52
6
11
78
125
67
92
cols
MPGC
11
3
0
4
0
4
0
23
0
0
97
14
25
36
nodos
MPGC
61
2
0
70
5
11
10
31
0
0
139
34
318
73
prof.
17
1
0
13
3
6
6
12
0
0
16
10
21
15
tempo
RL
63.27
4.73
0.77
1.20
0.06
0.11
0.22
198.94
0.05
0.12
1.76
10.82
0.28
6.70
tempo
MPGC
16.64
1.37
0.00
1.93
0.05
0.49
0.33
14.94
0.00
0.00
9.23
4.89
17.41
5.72
tempo
total
79.91
6.10
0.77
3.13
0.11
0.60
0.55
213.88
0.05
0.12
10.99
15.71
17.69
12.42
solução
RL
4478.50
5613.00
5893.00
5276.67
9584.50
5569.50
5766.67
5889.00
18088.00
17821.00
9629.50
9659.50
11194.00
10713.20
solução
inteira
4751.00
5661.00
5893.00
5401.00
9782.00
5574.00
5819.00
5973.00
18088.00
17821.00
9890.00
9680.00
11289.00
10755.00
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
Veı́c.
Tabela 4: Resultados computacionais para as instâncias do PCVRPsr transformadas em VRPs.
2
3
7
10
11
13
15
17
19
20
23
25
26
27
N
6
7
6
7
7
15
7
8
10
6
11
6
8
6
7
7
6
13
22
21
20
16
11
13
11
13
12
Cols
MPGC
8
11
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
4
7
0
0
23
2
0
0
0
4
97
12
14
25
36
Nodos
MPGC
2
61
2
0
12
0
0
11
7
70
5
2
11
40
10
2
31
83
0
0
2
74
139
57
34
318
73
prof.
1
17
1
0
7
0
0
5
4
13
3
1
6
16
6
1
12
15
0
0
1
12
16
14
10
21
15
tempo
RL
32.35
63.27
4.73
0.11
0.61
0.05
0.77
0.06
0.06
1.20
0.06
16.70
0.11
3.57
0.22
78.93
198.94
0.11
0.05
0.12
0.06
0.05
1.76
24.55
10.82
0.27
6.70
tempo
MPGC
1.98
16.64
1.37
0.00
0.38
0.00
0.00
0.16
0.11
1.93
0.05
0.05
0.49
3.36
0.33
0.00
14.94
2.31
0.00
0.00
0.05
1.76
9.23
4.94
4.89
17.41
5.72
tempo
total
34.33
79.91
6.10
0.11
0.99
0.05
0.77
0.22
0.17
3.13
0.11
16.75
0.60
6.93
0.55
78.93
213.88
2.42
0.05
0.12
0.11
1.81
10.99
29.49
15.71
17.68
12.42
solução
RL
6138.00
4478.50
5613.00
6801.00
6254.00
11870.00
5893.00
5804.50
7654.83
5276.67
9584.50
6029.83
5569.50
4551.00
5766.67
5924.50
5889.00
10697.00
18088.00
17821.00
17879.00
14606.00
9629.50
10692.00
9659.50
11194.00
10713.20
solução
inteira
6139.00
4751.00
5661.00
6801.00
6352.00
11870.00
5893.00
6005.00
7695.00
5401.00
9782.00
6107.00
5574.00
4663.00
5819.00
5960.00
5973.00
10791.00
18088.00
17821.00
17911.00
14644.00
9890.00
10752.00
9680.00
11289.00
10755.00
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
cols
RL
56
46
50
30
46
0
39
28
31
59
10
58
40
64
30
58
52
73
6
11
20
54
78
83
125
67
92
para as instâncias da Tabela 1 transformadas em instâncias do VRP.
Veı́c.
41
Tabela 5: Resultados computacionais (sem recurso ao limite inferior do problema de empacotamento)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
N
nodos
MPGC
2
61
2
0
12
0
0
10
7
70
5
1
10
35
9
1
31
82
0
0
2
74
139
56
34
313
73
prof.
1
17
1
0
7
0
0
5
4
13
3
1
6
16
6
1
12
15
0
0
1
12
16
14
10
21
15
Tempo
RL
32.35
63.27
4.73
0.11
0.61
0.05
0.77
0.05
0.06
1.20
0.06
16.70
0.11
3.62
0.22
78.82
198.94
0.11
0.05
0.06
0.06
0.05
1.76
24.77
10.77
0.28
6.7
tempo
MPGC
1.98
16.64
1.37
0.00
0.38
0.00
0.00
0.17
0.11
1.93
0.05
0.00
0.39
3.16
0.33
0.00
14.94
2.20
0.00
0.00
0.05
1.76
9.23
2.53
4.83
8.40
5.72
tempo
total
34.33
79.91
6.10
0.11
0.99
0.05
0.77
0.22
0.17
3.13
0.11
16.70
0.50
6.78
0.55
78.82
213.88
2.31
0.05
0.06
0.11
1.81
10.99
27.3
15.6
8.68
12.42
solução
RL
6138.00
4478.50
5613.00
6801.00
6254.00
11870.00
5893.00
5804.50
7654.83
5276.67
9584.50
6029.83
5569.50
4551.00
5766.67
5924.50
5889.00
10697.00
18088.00
17821.00
17879.00
14606.00
9629.50
10692.00
9659.50
11194.00
10713.20
solução
inteira
6139.00
4751.00
5661.00
6801.00
6352.00
11870.00
5893.00
6005.00
7695.00
5401.00
9782.00
6107.00
5574.00
4663.00
5819.00
5960.00
5973.00
10791.00
18088.00
17821.00
17911.00
14644.00
9890.00
10752.00
9680.00
11289.00
10755.00
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
6
7
6
7
7
15
7
8
10
6
11
6
8
6
7
7
6
13
22
21
20
16
11
13
11
13
12
cols
MPGC
8
11
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
1
9
0
0
23
0
0
0
0
4
97
16
14
14
36
42
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
cols
RL
56
46
50
30
46
0
39
28
31
59
10
58
40
64
30
58
52
73
6
11
20
54
78
83
125
67
92
para as instâncias da Tabela 1 transformadas em instâncias do VRP.
Veı́c.
Tabela 6: Resultados computacionais (com recurso ao limite inferior do problema de empacotamento)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
N
C.M. Alves, J.V. Carvalho / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 21-43
43
Agradecimentos
Gostarı́amos de agradecer ao revisor as sugestões e comentários que ajudaram a tornar mais
claro este artigo.
8
Referências
[1] Alves, C.M., Planeamento de rotas de veı́culos em sistemas de recolha/distribuição, Dissertação
de Mestrado em Engenharia Industrial, Especialidade de Logı́stica e Distribuição, Universidade
do Minho, 126 pp., Dezembro de 2000.
[2] Ahuja, R., T. Magnanti e J. Orlin, Network Flows: Theory, Algorithms and Applications,
Prentice-Hall (1993).
[3] Balas, E., The Prize Collecting Traveling Salesman Problem, Networks 19 (1989), pp. 621-636.
[4] Barnhart, C., E. Johnson, G. Nemhauser, M. Savelsbergh e P. Vance, Branch-and-price: Column
Generation for Solving Huge Integer Programs, Operations Research 46 (1998), pp.316-329.
[5] Dantzig G. B. e P. Wolfe, Decomposition Principle for Linear Programs, Operations Research 8
(1960), pp. 101-111
[6] Desrochers, M., J. Desrosiers e M. Solomon, A New Optimization Algorithm for the Vehicle
Routing Problem with Time Windows, Operations Research 40 (1992), pp. 342-354.
[7] Desrosiers, J., F. Soumis e M. Desrochers, Routing with Time Windows by Column Generation,
Networks 14 (1984), pp. 545-565
[8] Desrosiers J., Y. Dumas, M. Solomon e F. Soumis, Time Constrained Routing and Scheduling,
Handbooks in OR & MS 6 (1995), pp. 35-139.
[9] Fekete, S. e J. Schepers, New Classes of Lower Bounds for Bin-Packing Problems, Lecture Notes
in Computer Science 1412 (1998).
[10] Fisher, M.L. e R. Jaikumar, A Generalized Assignment Heuristic for Vehicle Routing, Networks
11, (1981), pp. 109-124.
[11] Garey, M. e D. Johnson, Computers Intractability, W.H. Freeman and Company (1979), San
Francisco, USA.
[12] Ilog, Inc., Using the CPLEX Callable Library, Version 6.0 (1998).
[13] Martello, S. e P. Toth, Knapsack Problems: Algorithms and Computer Implementations, John
Wiley and Sons (1990).
[14] Savelsbergh, M., Local Search in Routing Problems with Time Windows. Annals of Operations
Research 4 (1985), pp. 285-305.
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
45
Uma Heurı́stica Composta para a Determinação de
Rotas para Veı́culos em Problemas com Janelas
Temporais e Entregas e Recolhas
Ana Moura
∗
∗ ‡
José F. Oliveira
† ‡
ESTiG - Escola Superior de Tecnologia e Gestão, Instituto Politécnico de Bragança
[email protected]
†
‡
FEUP - Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto
[email protected]
INESC Porto – Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores do Porto
Abstract
In this paper a new heuristic for the vehicle routing problem is presented. This algorithm was applied to a problem originated from a Portuguese alimentary products distribution company. This company has many clients and more then 130 deliveries per day
for all products. When considering these figures, the vehicle routing problem becomes too
much complex to be manually solved. The necessity of automatization naturally arises.
This new multi-phase heuristic has a constructive phase, a local optimisation phase and
a pos-optimisation phase, and aims the minimization of the sum of the routes total time.
Additional constraints to the vehicle routing problem, driven by the particular company
that motivated this work, are considered. In particular time-windows both for the drivers
and for the clients and pick-up together with deliveries are considered.
Resumo
Neste artigo apresenta-se uma nova heurı́stica para a determinação de rotas para
veı́culos, aplicada a uma empresa portuguesa de distribuição de produtos alimentares.
Esta empresa é detentora de uma grande carteira de clientes, realizando perto de cento e
trinta entregas diárias de vários tipos de produtos. A necessidade da automatização do
processo de determinação das rotas dos veı́culos surge naturalmente neste contexto.
Esta nova heurı́stica composta tem uma fase construtiva, uma fase de optimização
local e uma fase de pós-optimização, sendo o objectivo a minimização do tempo total dos
percursos. São ainda incorporadas restrições adicionais derivadas da aplicação concreta
que motivou o presente trabalho. Em particular são consideradas janelas temporais, quer
para os condutores/veı́culos quer para os clientes, e recolhas de vasilhame em simultâneo
com as entregas de mercadorias.
c 2004 Associação Portuguesa de Investigação Operacional
46
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
Keywords: Vehicle routing problem, Time-windows, Pick-up and delivery, Multiple travelling salesman problem, heuristics
Title: A multi-phase heuristic for the delivery pick-up vehicle-routing problem with time-windows
1
Introdução
O problema de distribuição apresentado pela empresa, e que esteve na base do desenvolvimento
deste algoritmo, pode ser formulado como um problema de planeamento de rotas para veı́culos
com janelas temporais (VRPTW). Este problema é uma generalização do problema de rotas
para veı́culo (VRP) e consiste na determinação de n rotas para n veı́culos, onde uma rota é
definida como um percurso que tem inı́cio num armazém, visita por uma determinada ordem
um sub-conjunto de clientes, cada um dentro de um intervalo de tempo especı́fico (janelas
temporais), retornando finalmente ao mesmo armazém.
Existem ainda várias restrições adicionais, tanto da parte dos clientes como da parte da
empresa e dos veı́culos, que tornam este problema mais complexo. Existem diversos artigos
publicados nesta área, e variadas formas de obter soluções muito perto do óptimo, no entanto
poucos consideram simultaneamente o leque alargado de restrições com que neste problema
especı́fico se lida. Referências relevantes são os trabalhos de Laporte, onde se apresenta algoritmos exactos e aproximados para o VRP [6], e onde se faz um resumo das várias heurı́sticas
para o VRP, divididas em heurı́sticas clássicas e heurı́sticas modernas [7].
Uma abordagem clássica à resolução do VRP passa pela sua modelização como um problema de caixeiro viajante múltiplo (m-TSP), onde cada um dos veı́culos é um caixeiro viajante
que tem de visitar um determinado número de clientes com diferentes localizações geográficas,
diferentes pedidos de entrega e recolha e ainda diferentes janelas temporais. Na literatura
encontram-se vários métodos de abordagem para estes problemas. Por exemplo, Laporte [8]
apresenta alguns dos algoritmos exactos e aproximados até então desenvolvidos para aplicação
ao TSP, considerando TSP simétricos e que satisfazem a desigualdade triangular. Outros autores ([1],[9] e [10]) apresentam heurı́sticas de melhoramentos aplicadas a uma solução inicial
admissı́vel. Estas heurı́sticas baseadas nos princı́pios do r-OPT e Or-OPT (procedimentos de
melhoria aplicados a soluções já existentes) melhoram a solução inicial através de movimentos
de trocas ou inserções em rotas ou entre rotas. Helsgaun [4] descreve uma implementação da
heurı́stica Lin-Kernighan, defendendo que é um dos métodos com mais sucesso para o TSP
simétrico.
Quando se consideram entregas e recolhas, Gendreau et al [3] descreve uma nova heurı́stica
para o problema do caixeiro viajante com entregas e recolhas (TSPPD), baseada em pesquisa
tabu. No domı́nio das heurı́sticas de construção de percursos, Johnson e McGeoch [5] obtiveram resultados teóricos bastante interessantes. Relativamente às heurı́sticas de pesquisa
local 2-Opt e 3-Opt, os mesmos autores analisam o seu comportamento, apresentando uma
descrição e resultados computacionais.
A consideração conjunta de janelas temporais e entregas e recolhas é feita em [2]. Contudo,
neste caso, e ao contrário do problema abordado neste artigo, as entregas são feitas numa
primeira metade do percurso e as recolhas na segunda.
47
Pósconstrução
Construção
Optimização
(rotas
individuais)
Fase 2
Fase 1
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
Optimização
(várias rotas)
Figura 1: Fases da Heurı́stica Composta
No que diz respeito à organização do presente artigo, na secção 2 é descrito o problema de
uma forma sucinta, passando-se de seguida à sua modelização e formulação matemática (secção
3). Posteriormente é descrita a heurı́stica composta desenvolvida (secção 4). Esta heurı́stica
está dividida em duas fases (Figura 1). A primeira fase corresponde à construção das rotas
e divide-se em duas subfases, uma construtiva propriamente dita e outra de pós-construção.
A segunda fase corresponde a uma heurı́stica de melhoramento, que por sua vez também se
encontra dividida em duas subfases, uma de optimização local, executada em cada uma das
rotas individualmente, e outra com trocas entre as várias rotas, incluindo uma componente
aleatória.
Por fim (secção 5 e 6), são apresentados resultados computacionais obtidos pela heurı́stica
composta quando aplicada a vários exemplos e retiradas algumas conclusões.
2
Descrição do Problema
A empresa faz a distribuição de produtos alimentares, tendo a recepção e expedição de mercadorias centralizada em duas plataformas, uma no Porto e outra em Lisboa. A sua distribuição
é efectuada por veı́culos subcontratados, de acordo com as suas necessidades diárias e de forma
a satisfazer as encomendas.
O planeamento das rotas dos veı́culos está obrigatoriamente dependente das encomendas
existentes, que naturalmente condicionam o número de veı́culos necessários para a distribuição
diária e os percursos correspondentes. Estes veı́culos são escolhidos de acordo com quatro
factores: os tipos de produtos a entregar, as localizações dos clientes relativamente aos tipos
de acessos, as capacidades máximas e as dimensões fı́sicas de cada veı́culo.
Existem três tipos de veı́culos para o transporte que variam em tamanho e caracterı́sticas.
O mais pequeno tem uma capacidade de 10 Toneladas (transporta os produtos em contentores
de pequena dimensão), o seguinte de 15 Toneladas (com sistema de frio e que transporta os
produtos em paletes) e o de maior dimensão de 19 Toneladas (onde a carga de uma maneira
48
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
geral é transportada a granel). No que diz respeito aos tipos de produtos distribuı́dos pela
empresa em questão, podemos dizer que estão divididos em cinco categorias: congelados,
frescos, mercearias (não alimentares e alimentares), bebidas e batatas. O tipo de produto
restringe à partida os tipos de veı́culos que podem ser utilizados para um dado transporte.
Conjugando o tipo de produtos a entregar com a localização geográfica do cliente, que define
a sua acessibilidade por cada tipo de veı́culo, fica univocamente definido o tipo de veı́culo a
usar para fazer as entregas a esse cliente, uma vez que é polı́tica da empresa utilizar sempre
para cada cliente o tipo de veı́culo admissı́vel com maior capacidade (i.e. sendo possı́vel usar
um veı́culo de 15 Toneladas ou um de 19 Toneladas, opta-se pelo veı́culo de 19 Toneladas).
Desta forma os clientes ficam divididos em escalões, correspondendo cada escalão a um tipo
de veı́culo.
Uma vez que às diferentes áreas geográficas correspondem diferentes velocidades médias
dos veı́culos, torna-se necessário trabalhar com tempos de deslocação em vez de distâncias.
Consequentemente, a cada cliente é atribuı́da uma velocidade de acesso que corresponde à velocidade média com que os veı́culos se deslocam na respectiva área geográfica. Esta caracterı́stica
faz com que neste problema não se verifique a desigualdade triangular.
Restrições existentes para a definição das rotas:
Existem várias restrições que têm que ser consideradas na elaboração das rotas:
1. Capacidade da frota, tendo em consideração que existem entregas de encomendas e
recolhas de vasilhames nos clientes;
2. Dimensão e tonelagem dos veı́culos, que condicionam a acessibilidade dos mesmos;
3. Janelas temporais relativas aos horários dos motoristas, sendo estas janelas duplas por
efeito da hora para almoço;
4. Janelas temporais relativas aos clientes, para a recepção das encomendas;
5. Velocidades médias diferentes, para os veı́culos, conforme a zona geográfica.
3
Modelização e Formulação Matemática do Problema
Conforme foi descrito anteriormente, o problema que se pretende modelizar considerará os
vários pedidos de entrega de um determinado tipo de produto, para vários clientes de diferentes
(ou da mesma) área geográfica. Assim ter-se-á uma lista de clientes para serem visitados uma
e uma só vez, cada um por um único veı́culo. Garantindo que todos os pedidos desses clientes
não excedem a capacidade de um determinado veı́culo, deve-se escolher uma sequência para
visitar esses clientes, fazendo as entregas e recolhas necessárias, retornando ao ponto de origem
(armazém) e percorrendo o caminho total no menor tempo possı́vel. São também conhecidas
as distâncias geométricas entre o armazém e cada um dos clientes e entre os vários clientes,
sabendo-se assim todos os tempos de percurso entre o armazém e clientes e entre cada par de
clientes.
O problema é formulado sobre um grafo G(N, T ), sendo N o conjunto dos clientes mais o
armazém e T as ligações entre os vários clientes e entre estes e o armazém. Estas arestas são
caracterizadas pelos tempos de deslocação.
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
49
Será considerado um conjunto de veı́culos diferentes V = {1, 2, ..., v}, um conjunto de
clientes de um dado escalão C = {1, 2, ..., c} e o armazém A. O armazém é representado por
dois nós A = {0, n + 1}. Nenhum arco termina no nó 0 e nenhum arco tem origem no nó n + 1.
Todos os percursos terão inı́cio no nó 0 e terminam no nó n + 1. O conjunto de todos os nós
N = {0, 1, 2, ..., c, n + 1}, corresponde à união dos conjuntos clientes C e armazém A. A cada
arco do grafo (i, j) , i 6= j, é associada uma distância dij , que corresponde à distância entre
clientes, e um tempo de percurso tijv , que corresponde ao tempo que um determinado veı́culo
v leva a deslocar-se entre os clientes e entre clientes e armazém. Existe ainda um tempo de
serviço tsiv que corresponde ao tempo que o veı́culo v demora a fazer a entrega no cliente
i, e um tempo de deslocação tdijv que corresponde à soma do tempo de percurso entre dois
clientes (ou entre o último cliente da rota e o armazém) com o tempo de serviço no cliente i,
tudo relativamente ao veı́culo v. O tempo de deslocação e o tempo de percurso são obtidos
através das seguintes expressões seguintes:
• Entre vários clientes, clientes e armazém e armazém e clientes, o tempo de deslocação, é
dado por:
tdijv = tsiv + tijv [minutos] i, j ∈ N, v ∈ V
• O tempo de percurso tijv , é calculado pela seguinte expressão:
tijv =
dij ∗60
V elM edv
[minutos] i, j ∈ N, v ∈ V
onde V elM ed é a velocidade de deslocação do veı́culo em km/h, para a área geográfica
dos clientes. Nos casos em que os clientes i e j se encontram em áreas geográficas
diferentes, a velocidade de deslocação do veı́culo entre eles é a média das velocidades de
deslocação nas duas zonas geográficas. No caso de i = 0 (partindo do armazém) toma-se
ts0v = 0.
Cada veı́culo tem uma determinada capacidade qv (com v ∈ V ), que não pode ser excedida,
e a cada cliente corresponde um determinado pedido pi (com i ∈ C). Cada veı́culo tem ainda
associada uma janela temporal [0, kv ] , v ∈ V , sendo Kv as horas de trabalho dos motoristas.
Para cada cliente, o inı́cio da entrega deve estar dentro de uma janela temporal, [a i , bi ] , i ∈
C. Um veı́culo pode chegar a um cliente antes do inı́cio da sua janela temporal e esperar até
que seja possı́vel efectuar as entregas, mas não pode chegar depois do fim da janela temporal.
Como estamos perante um caso de entregas e recolhas, é necessário ter em atenção quando
um determinado cliente tem vasilhame para ser recolhido. Assim, ri com i ∈ C é o vasilhame
a ser recolhido num cliente.
Assume-se que todos os dados, qv , ri , pi , dij , tijv , tsiv ai , bi , têm valores positivos. Finalmente
assume-se também que este modelo não satisfaz a desigualdade triangular, i.e.,
∃h,i,j∈N ∃v∈V : dij > dih + dhj ∨ tijv > tihv + thjv .
Como variáveis de decisão, ter-se-á:
1. As variáveis xijv , definidas ∀i, j ∈ N, ∀v ∈ V com i 6= j, i 6= n + 1, j 6= 0, que tomam o
valor 1 se o veı́culo v se deslocar do nó i para o nó j, e o valor 0 se não se deslocar.
50
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
2. As variáveis siv , definidas ∀i ∈ N, ∀v ∈ V , que nos indicam o instante de tempo em que
um veı́culo v, v ∈ V , inicia o serviço no cliente i, i ∈ C. Assume-se que s0v = 0, ∀v ∈ V ,
e sn+1,v que nos indica o tempo de chegada do veı́culo v ao armazém.
Para um determinado número de veı́culos, o objectivo é definir rotas cujo tempo total de
percurso seja mı́nimo. Matematicamente podemos modelizar este problema da seguinte forma:
min
X
sn+1,v
(1)
xijv = 1 ∀i ∈ C
(2)
v∈V
X X
v∈V j∈N
X
xijv ≤ |S| − 1
S ⊂ C, 2 ≤ |S| ≤ n + 2 ∀v ∈ V
(3)
i.j∈S
X
i∈C

max (pi , ri ) ×
X
X
j∈N

xijv  ≤ qv
∀v ∈ V
x0jv = 1 ∀v ∈ V
(4)
(5)
j∈N
X
i∈N
xihv −
X
xhjv = 0 ∀i ∈ C, ∀v ∈ V
(6)
j∈N
X
xi,n+1,v = 1 ∀v ∈ V
(7)
i∈N
siv + tdijv − M (1 − xijv ) ≤ sjv , ∀i ∈ N, ∀j ∈ N, ∀v ∈ V, M → +∞
ai ≤ siv ≤ bi
∀i ∈ N, ∀v ∈ V
sn+1,v ≤ kv
xijv ∈ {0, 1}
(8)
(9)
∀v ∈ V
(10)
∀i ∈ N, ∀j ∈ N, ∀v ∈ V
(11)
siv ≥ 0 ∀i ∈ N, ∀v ∈ V
(12)
A restrição (2) garante que a cada cliente é atribuı́do um e um só veı́culo e que de cada cliente
só se sai para um outro cliente ou para o armazém. A restrição (3), impede a formação de
ciclos. Note-se que a separação do armazém num nó origem 0 e num nó destino n+1, leva a que
não sejam admissı́veis ciclos de qualquer comprimento. A restrição (4) é relativa à capacidade
do veı́culo, garantindo que nenhum veı́culo visita mais clientes do que os permitidos pela sua
capacidade. Esta restrição não só tem em consideração os pedidos dos clientes, como também
considera os vasilhames existentes nos clientes e que é necessário recolher. As restrições (5, 6 e
7), são restrições de fluxo que garantem que cada veı́culo parte do nó 0, só sai de um nó h se lá
tiver entrado previamente e que termina o percurso no nó n+1. A restrição (8) garante-nos que
se a ligação de i para j for escolhida para o veı́culo v (xijv = 1) então não se inicia o serviço
em j antes de lá se chegar. Se xijv = 0 a restrição fica não activa. A restrição (9) garante-nos
que todas as janelas temporais são respeitadas. A restrição (10) impõe uma duração máxima
para a rota de cada veı́culo, kv , motivada pelo horário de trabalho dos motoristas.
Este modelo tem como base o modelo do problema do caixeiro viajante (TSP), embora com
várias restrições adicionais. Por outro lado, a consideração de vários veı́culos em simultâneo
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
51
leva à consideração de m caixeiros (correspondendo a cada um dos veı́culos), que se localizam
numa determinada cidade (o Armazém) – esta assunção é importante por causa das janelas
temporais – e têm de visitar um determinado conjunto de cidades C (que corresponde aos
clientes). Partindo do armazém, o objectivo é visitar todas as cidades e retornar à cidade de
origem, percorrendo o menor caminho possı́vel, aqui medido em termos de tempos de percurso.
4
Heurı́stica Composta para a Determinação de Rotas para
Veı́culos
Foi desenvolvida uma heurı́stica composta com duas fases. A primeira fase consiste numa
heurı́stica construtiva. Este algoritmo baseia-se no algoritmo do vizinho mais próximo, sendo
a noção de proximidade dada pela ordenação dos clientes na lista de candidatos. Vários
critérios de ordenação foram implementados e testados. Por sua vez este algoritmo construtivo
está dividido em duas subfases. A primeira subfase (Tabela 2) constrói rotas completas para
cada escalão, considerando todas as restrições adicionais mencionadas na secção 2. Para cada
um dos escalões, o inı́cio da determinação de uma rota toma em consideração as ligações do
armazém a todos os clientes do escalão. Encontrando o primeiro cliente que satisfaça todas
as restrições insere-o em primeiro lugar no conjunto C ∗ (conjunto correspondente a uma rota)
e retira-o do conjuntoC. Em seguida, para os clientes seguintes candidatos à rota, considera
sempre as ligações do último cliente (Ln ) inserido em C ∗ com todos os outros do conjuntoC.
Estas listas de ligações correspondem aos tempos de ligação entre cada um dos clientes com
todos os outros, incluindo o armazém.
Sempre que se insere um cliente na rota são verificadas as restrições de capacidade e
das janelas temporais, além de se verificar também as condições de paragem do algoritmo,
nomeadamente: o tempo máximo de trabalho dos motoristas e C = {}, i.e., já não existirem
mais clientes no conjunto C.
Para esta fase construtiva foram considerados quatro métodos distintos de ordenação dos
dados, i.e., ordenação dos clientes nas listas de ligação:
1. Tempos de deslocação;
2. Tempos de percurso;
3. Tamanho das janelas temporais.
4. Tamanho das janelas temporais agrupadas por intervalos de tempo.
Para se validarem as restrições de capacidade dos veı́culos e as restrições das janelas temporais
dos clientes, foram também desenvolvidas duas rotinas especı́ficas que são invocadas pelo algoritmo construtivo sempre que um cliente é inserido na rota. A sua função é, respectivamente:
1. Verificar se a capacidade máxima dos veı́culos foi atingida ou ultrapassada.
2. Verificar se foram violadas: as janelas temporais dos clientes, a hora de saı́da dos veı́culos
do armazém, o tempo máximo que um veı́culo pode esperar em cada um dos clientes (30
minutos) antes do inı́cio da sua janela temporal, a hora de almoço dos motoristas.
52
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
// Algoritmo construtivo
Inicio:
Para cada escalão fazer
Enquanto (Elementos escalão != 0)
Elimina Elementos da Melhor Rota;
Condição verdadeira = Calcula Rota;
Se(Melhor Rota > 0)
Guarda Melhor Rota;
Retira Elementos Lista Escalão;
Senão
Guarda Elementos não Inseridos;
Fim Se
Fim Enquanto
Fim Para
Fim
//Calcula Rota
Inicio:
Se (rota Vazia)
Para cada ligação do armazém fazer
Se (Cliente pertence ao escalão)
Acrescenta Cliente à Rota;
Condição verdadeira = Calcula Rota;
Se (condição verdadeira)
Retorna (verdadeiro);
Senão
Retira Cliente da Rota;
Fim Se
Fim Se
Fim Para
Senão
Se (validaCapacidade &&
validaJanelasTemporais)
Retorna (falso);
Fim Se
Se (Rota é melhor que a melhor guardada)
Guarda Rota como a melhor;
Fim Se
Se (tamRota==numClientes ou
Tempo trabalho motorista>12horas)
Retorna (verdadeiro);
Fim Se
Para cada ligação do último Cliente na Rota fazer
Se (Cliente pertence ao escalão e Cliente não
pertence à Rota)
Acrescenta Cliente à rota;
Condição verdadeira = CalculaRota;
Se (verdadeiro)
Retorna (verdadeiro);
Senão
Retira Cliente da Rota;
Fim Se
Fim Se
Fim Para
Fim Se
Retorna (falso);
Fim
Figura 2: Primeira subfase do algoritmo construtivo.
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
53
Cn
Não Insere na posição 0
Arm
C1
C2
C3
C4
(a)
Cn
Insere na posição 1
Arm
C1
C2
C3
C4
Cn
C2
C3
(b)
Arm
C1
C4
(c)
Figura 3: Inserção de um elemento.
Uma vez que nesta primeira subfase, não é garantida a inserção de todos os clientes nas rotas,
foi necessário considerar uma segunda subfase na heurı́stica construtiva. Assim foi criado um
algoritmo pós-construtivo (Figura 3) que, no caso de existirem ainda clientes não inseridos,
tenta um a um inseri-los em todas as posições de todas as rotas, testando sempre todas as
restrições associadas à rota respectiva.
Depois de construı́das as rotas passa-se para a segunda fase da heurı́stica composta. Esta
é uma fase de melhoramentos das rotas obtidas, i.e. diminuição dos tempos totais de percurso.
Assim, com base na heurı́stica 2-OPT para optimização local, foram desenvolvidos dois algoritmos que executam trocas de nós vizinhos em cada uma das rotas previamente construı́das.
Para cada uma das trocas efectuadas é necessário preceder à verificação das seguintes
restrições: capacidade dos veı́culos, janelas temporais dos clientes e horário de trabalho dos
motoristas. Esta optimização local é também executada em duas subfases, i.e. em primeiro
lugar é aplicada a cada uma das rotas individualmente (Figura 4) e só depois efectuando trocas
de clientes entre as várias rotas, agora incorporando uma componente aleatória.
Sempre que no fim da primeira subfase se consegue efectuar alguma troca entre clientes, é
de imediato aplicado o algoritmo pós-construtivo anteriormente mencionado. Caso contrário
avança-se para a segunda subfase do algoritmo de melhoramentos.
Como se pode verificar no pseudocódigo da Figura 4, em cada uma das rotas selecciona-se
o primeiro cliente e tenta-se trocá-lo com todos os outros (Tabela 4). Sempre que se tenta
uma troca, é necessário verificar se as restrições não são violadas. Caso se verifiquem todas
as restrições e o novo tempo total da rota obtido seja inferior ao tempo total da rota inicial,
então a troca é considerada. Caso contrário, i.e., se alguma das restrições não for validada
ou se o tempo novo for superior ou igual ao tempo inicial, então o cliente volta à sua posição
inicial passando-se ao cliente seguinte.
Novamente, sempre que uma troca é aceite e se ainda existirem clientes não inseridos do
mesmo escalão da rota que está a ser melhorada, é chamado o algoritmo pós-construtivo que
tenta inserir mais algum cliente. De facto, tendo a ordem de visita aos clientes sido alterada
poderá ser possı́vel inserir mais um cliente na rota.
Neste segundo passo do algoritmo de melhoramentos são efectuadas trocas de vários clientes
de uma rota com os restantes clientes de rotas diferentes, embora do mesmo escalão. O número
de clientes de cada rota, que vão sofrer alterações nas suas posições, é aleatório. Contudo a
54
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
// Algoritmo de melhoramento individual
Inicio:
Para cada escalão fazer
Para cada rota fazer
Fazer
Condição verdadeira =Optimiza Uma Rota;
Enquanto (Verdadeiro)
Retira Listas Vazias de Elementos NãoInseridos;
Fim Para
Fim Para
Fim
// Optimiza Uma Rota
Inicio:
Para cada elemento da rota fazer
Inserir Elementos Não Inseridos;
Fim Para
Para cada elemento da rota fazer
Cliente i;
Cliente sucessor de i;
Troca i com sucessor de i;
Se(validaCapacidade &&validaJanelasTemporais)
Se (tempoPercursoTotalNovo<tempoPercursoTotal)
retorna (verdadeiro);
Fim Se
Fim Se
Troca sucessor de i com i;
Fim Para
retorna (falso);
Fim
Figura 4: Algoritmo de optimização local para rotas individuais.
Troca Válida
Arm
C1
C2
C3
C4
C1
C3
C4
C1
C3
C4
(a)
Não há trocas válidas
Arm
C2
(b)
Próximo elemento da lista
Arm
C2
(c)
Figura 5: Troca entre clientes.
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
55
Escalão 1
1ª posição aleatória
(cliente C13)
Arm
C11
C12
C13
C14
Rota 1
Troca válida
Arm
C21
C22
C23
C24
Rota 2
Figura 6: Troca do primeiro cliente.
Escalão 1
1ª posição aleatória
(Cliente C24)
Arm
C11
C12
C24
C14
C22
C23
C13
Rota 1
Arm
C21
Rota 2
Figura 7: Troca aceite.
distribuição de probabilidade não é uniforme: há uma probabilidade de 0.45 de ser trocado um
número de clientes que se situa entre 1/4 e 1/2 do número total de clientes da rota, enquanto a
probabilidade de serem trocados menos de 1/4 dos clientes ou mais de metade é de 0.55. Depois
de determinado o número de clientes a ser trocados por rota, define-se também, de uma forma
aleatória e dentro da própria rota, quais os clientes que vão estar sujeitos às trocas.
Para cada um desses clientes, escolhido ao acaso, são efectuadas trocas com todos os outros
clientes das restantes rotas do mesmo escalão (Figura 5). Para cada uma das trocas efectuadas
são sempre validadas as restrições, para que a troca seja considerada admissı́vel. A troca será
aceite se, para além de admissı́vel, verificar ainda a seguinte condição: a soma dos tempos
totais das duas rotas em questão, depois da troca efectuada, deve ser inferior à soma dos
tempos totais das duas mesmas rotas antes da troca.
Se esta condição for verificada então a troca é efectuada (Figura 6). Caso contrário, os
clientes são mantidos nas suas posições iniciais nas respectivas rotas e a execução do algoritmo
continua até que não existam mais posições nem rotas para executar trocas.
De acordo com o exemplo das Figura 5 e 7, verifica-se que sendo uma troca aceite o
algoritmo reinicia-se tentando-se trocar esse cliente (no exemplo o cliente C24 que pertence
agora à Rota 1), com todos os outros clientes das outras rotas do escalão, tentando desta
forma obter uma rota melhor que a anterior. Quanto o cliente seleccionado já não puder ser
efectivamente trocado, esta rotina termina com a melhor rota até então encontrada e passa ao
passo seguinte. No passo seguinte executa-se o algoritmo de optimização (Figura 4) para uma
rota, tentando desta forma optimizar as duas rotas alteradas. Além disso tenta também inserir
56
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
Escalão 1
2ª posição aleatória
(Cliente C11)
Arm
C11
C12
C24
C14
C22
C23
C13
Rota 1
Arm
C21
Rota 2
Figura 8: Novo cliente.
quaisquer elementos não inseridos que eventualmente ainda existam (Figura 8). Seguidamente
escolhe aleatoriamente um outro cliente e retoma todo o processo (Figura 7) até que já não
existam mais clientes em nenhuma rota para efectuar trocas.
Verifica-se que no final da execução deste algoritmo se obtêm sempre reduções significativas
dos tempos totais dos percursos.
Se no final da execução global do algoritmo ainda existir algum cliente não inserido, duas
medidas poderão ser tomadas. A primeira é a re-execução do algoritmo, que tem tempos de
execução muito pequenos, e tentar desta forma obter um resultado em que todos os clientes sejam inseridos, uma vez que a segunda subfase da segunda fase do algoritmo tem uma
componente aleatório na selecção dos clientes a serem trocados entre as várias rotas. Alternativamente, poderá ser criada uma nova rota (com um novo veı́culo) para esse ou esses
clientes.
5
Resultados obtidos
Para cada um dos métodos de ordenação dos dados apresentados neste artigo, foram efectuados testes utilizando instâncias com 50, 100 e 150 clientes. Mesmo quando o número de
clientes é igual, todas as instâncias diferem no que diz respeito às localizações dos clientes,
às encomendas, aos tipos de acesso, etc. Estas diferenças são fundamentais para retirar conclusões acerca dos resultados obtidos pelos quatro métodos de ordenação quando aplicados na
heurı́stica composta desenvolvida. Para cada um destes exemplos e para cada um dos métodos
de ordenação dos dados a heurı́stica foi executada 20 vezes, obtendo-se assim resultados diferentes para o total dos tempos de percurso. Os valores apresentados correspondem às médias
obtidas para cada uma das execuções da heurı́stica composta e para cada um dos exemplos.
Os resultados obtidos são analisados segundo quatro vectores diferentes:
1. Tempo total dos percursos
Os melhores tempos obtidos (Tabela 9) são relativos ao método de ordenação de dados
pelo tamanho das janelas temporais agrupadas em intervalos de tempo e o pior dos casos
para o método de ordenação pelos tempos de deslocação.
2. Número de clientes não inseridos nas rotas
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
// Algoritmo de Pós-Optimização
Inicio:
Para cada escalão fazer
Para cada rota fazer
Gera Número de Clientes Aleatórios;
Para cada número de clientes aleatórios fazer
Gera Um Cliente Aleatório;
Para cada rota fazer
Se rota é diferente da rota do cliente aleatório
Fazer
Condição verdadeira = Optimização
entre Rotas;
Enquanto (verdadeiro)
Fazer
Condição verdadeira = Optimização Uma
Rota (do Cliente Aleatório);
Enquanto (verdadeiro)
Retira Listas Vazias de Elementos Não
Inseridos;
Fazer
Condição verdadeira = Optimização
Uma Rota (outra Rota);
Enquanto (verdadeiro)
Retira Listas Vazias de Elementos Não
Inseridos;
Fim Se
Fim Para
Fim Para
Fim Para
Fim Para
Fim
// Optimização entre Rotas
Inı́cio:
TempoTrabalho=TtrabalhoRota(do cliente aleatório)
+TtrabalhoRota;
Para cada elemento da rota fazer
Troca Cliente Aleatório com Cliente da rota;
TempoTrabalhoNovo=TtrabalhoNovo da rota do
cliente aleatório+TtrabalhoNovo da rota;
Se (validaCapacidade &&validaJanelasTemporais)
Se (TempoTrabalhoNovo<TempoTrabalho)
retorna (verdadeiro);
Fim Se
Fim Se
Troca Cliente da rota com Cliente Aleatório;
Fim Para
retorna (falso);
Fim
Figura 9: Algoritmo para troca de clientes aleatórios entre rotas.
57
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
Ordenação por Tempo de
Deslocação
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
Ordenação por Tempo de Percurso
Média
tempos
totais
Ordenação pelo Tamanho JT
Melhor
tempo
Minutos
58
Ordenação pelo Tamanho JT
Agrupadas em Intervalos Tempo
Figura 10: Tempos médios e Melhor dos tempos totais.
6
Ordenação por Tempo de
Deslocação
5
4
Ordenação por Tempo de
Percurso
3
2
Ordenação pelo Tamanho
JT
1
0
Nº médio de Rotas por escalão
Ordenação pelo Tamanho
JT Agrupadas em
Intervalos Tempo
Figura 11: Número de rotas / Número veı́culos.
Para algumas instâncias, e independentemente do método de ordenação de dados escolhido, verificou-se a existência de clientes não inseridos na fase construtiva da heurı́stica,
sendo estes sempre inseridos posteriormente na fase de melhoramento.
3. Número de rotas (número de veı́culos)
Os piores resultados obtiveram-se para o método tamanho das janelas temporais ordenadas (Figura 10), obtendo-se com os outros três métodos valores muito próximos ou
mesmo, na maior parte dos casos, iguais.
4. Tempos de execução do algoritmo
Os tempos de execução dependem bastante das localizações dos clientes, associadas às
respectivas janelas temporais. Em média são necessários 50 segundos para os casos com
50 clientes e 1min30seg para os casos com 150 clientes, não sendo no entanto esta relação
linear. Comparando os tempos de processamento entre os quatro métodos de ordenação
(Figura 11), verifica-se que no caso do tempo de deslocação ordenado e no tempo de
percurso ordenado, obtêm-se resultados mais rapidamente que no caso dos outros dois
métodos.
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
59
Ordenação por Tempo de
Deslocação
70
68
66
64
62
60
58
56
54
52
Ordenação por Tempo de
Percurso
Ordenação pelo Tamanho JT
Tempos
processamento
(seg)
Ordenação pelo Tamanho JT
Agrupadas em Intervalo s
Tempo
Figura 12: Tempos de processamento.
6
Conclusões
Neste artigo apresenta-se uma heurı́stica composta para a determinação de rotas para veı́culos,
que foi desenvolvida para uma empresa de distribuição de produtos alimentares. A primeira
fase da heurı́stica é construtiva, baseia-se no algoritmo do vizinho mais próximo e utiliza uma
métrica de acordo com quatro métodos de ordenação de dados: tempos de percurso, tempos
de serviço, janelas temporais e janelas temporais por intervalos de tempo.
A segunda fase da heurı́stica está dividida em duas subfases baseadas no algoritmo 2OPT. Na primeira fase faz-se uma optimização local considerando individualmente cada rota,
enquanto na segunda subfase se procede a uma optimização local com trocas entre as várias
rotas. Esta última subfase incorpora uma componente aleatória.
O principal objectivo da empresa era acomodar um crescente número de clientes sem
alterar o número de veı́culos utilizados na distribuição diária, uma vez que recorria a veı́culos
subcontratados e o contrato permitia flexibilidade na gestão das rotas. Por outro lado a
empresa procurava responder melhor às alterações de última hora nas encomendas dos clientes.
O sistema informático onde a heurı́stica descrita neste artigo foi implementada tornou estes
objectivos possı́veis pela conjugação dos bons resultados obtidos com esta heurı́stica composta
(melhores que o anterior planeamento manual) com os baixos tempos de processamento. Por
comparação com os resultados dos planeamentos manuais anteriores podemos afirmar que a
heurı́stica composta produz resultados bastante satisfatórios, quer em termos de tempo total
dos percursos quer em termos de tempo de processamento.
7
Referências
[1] Croes, A., “A method for solving travelling salesman problem”, Operations Research (1958), 6,
791-812.
[2] Derigs, U., and Metz, A., “A matching-based approach for solving a delivery pick-up vehiclerouting problem with time constraints”, OR Spektrum, (1992) 14 (2), 91-106.
[3] Gendreau, M., Laporte, G., and Vigo, D., “Heuristics for the travelling salesman problem with
pickup and delivery”, Computers & Operations Research, (1999) 26, 699-714.
60
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
[4] Helsgaun, K., “An effective implementation of the Lin-Kernighan travelling Salesman heuristic”,
European Journal of Operational Research, (2000) 126(1), 106-130.
[5] Johnson, D., and McGeoch, L., “The Traveling Salesman Problem: a case study in local optimization”, Local Search in Combinatorial Optimization, E.H.L. Aarts and J.K. Lenstra (eds.),
Wiley, N.Y., (1995), 215-310.
[6] Laporte, G., “The vehicle routing problem: An overview of exact and approximated algorithms”,
European Journal of Operational Research, (1992), 59(2), 345-358.
[7] Laporte, G., Gendreau, M., Potvin, J., and Semet, F., “Classical and modern heuristics for the
Vehicle routing problem”, International Transactions in Operational Research, (2000) 7, 285-300.
[8] Laporte, G., “The travelling salesman problem: An overview of exact and approximated algorithms”, European Journal of Operational Research, (1992), 59(2), 231-248.
[9] Lin, S., “Computer solutions to the travelling salesman problem”, Bell System Technical Journal,
(1965) 44, 2245-69.
[10] Lin, S., and Kernighan, B., “An effective heuristic algorithm for the travelling salesman problem”,
Operations Research, (1973) 21, 498-516.
Anexo
Neste exemplo existem 50 clientes, com encomendas de vários tipos de produtos, e três tipos de veı́culos
diferentes. Os resultados apresentados são relativos a dois dos quatro métodos de ordenação de dados.
O primeiro método - ordenação pelo tempo de deslocação, é o método que se obteve piores resultados,
em termos do total dos tempos de percurso dos veı́culos. O segundo método apresentado - ordenação
pelo tamanho das janelas temporais agrupadas por intervalos de tempo, é o método que apresentou
melhores resultados.
É de salientar, que nos resultados da fase construtiva do primeiro método existe um cliente pertencente ao escalão 3 que não foi inserido na rota. Sendo posteriormente inserido na fase de optimização.
1. Ordenação por tempo de deslocação
Fase 1 – Construtiva
Número Clientes
Hora de Saı́da do Armazém
Hora de Chegada ao Armazém
Hora Almoço
Tempo de Percurso Total
Carga Total (Kg)
Fase 2 – Optimização local
Número Clientes
Hora de Saı́da do Armazém
Hora de Chegada ao Armazém
Hora Almoço
Tempo de Percurso Total
Carga Total(Kg)
Escalão 1
Rota 1
Rota 2
11
6
6h50
6h42
17h19
16h39
12h40 às 12h14 às
13h40
13h14
9h23
8h57
12170
5290
Escalão 2
Rota 1
Rota 2
14
5
6h56
5h35
18h59
14h12
12h18 às 12h06 às
13h18
13h06
11h03
7h37
9930
3931
Escalão 3
Rota 1
12
6h48
20h06
12h18 às
13h18
12h17
15050
Escalão 1
Rota 1
Rota 2
11
6
6h56
6h42
16h48
16h39
12h09 às 12h14 às
13h09
13h14
8h52
8h57
12170
5290
Escalão 2
Rota 1
Rota 2
14
5
6h56
5h35
18h46
14h12
12h18 às 12h06 às
13h18
13h06
10h50
7h37
9930
3931
Escalão 3
Rota 1
13
6h48
20h35
12h18 às
13h18
12h46
15210
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
61
Ordem de visita aos clientes:
30
26
Escalão 1
Construção
33
27
30
26
18
3
Escalão 1
Optimização
33
27
31
31
6
32
5
18
Rota 1
3
32
5
6
Rota 1
1
1
Rota 2
19
Rota 2
2
28
19
29
4
2
28
29
4
20
20
8
11
35
12
10
40
25
7
36
22
Escalão 2
Construção
39
8
11
35
38
12
10
37
34
40
25
7
36
22
38
37
34
24
24
23
23
Rota 2
Rota 1
Rota 2
Rota 1
41
9
21
17
Escalão 2
Optimização
39
41
9
21
44
14
17
43
Rota 1
43
13
47
Escalão 3
Optimização
44
14
46
46
13
Escalão 3
Construção
47
42
42
Rota 1
50
50
45
45
49
16
48
15
48
49
16
15
2. Ordenação pelo tamanho das Janelas Temporais agrupadas em intervalos de tempo:
Fase 1 - Construtiva
Número Clientes
Hora de Saı́da do Armazém
Hora de Chegada ao Armazém
Hora Almoço
Tempo de Percurso Total
Carga Total (Kg)
Escalão 1
Rota 1
Rota 2
11
6
5h56
6h42
17h19
16h39
12h40 às 12h14 às
13h40
13h14
9h23
8h57
1217
5290
Escalão 2
Rota 1
Rota 2
14
5
6h56
6h00
18h59
14h37
12h18 às 12h04 às
13h18
13h04
11h03
7h37
9930
3931
Escalão 3
Rota 1
Rota 2
11
3
6h48
6h11
19h26
11h58
12h18 às
13h18
11h37
4h46
14550
760
62
A. Moura, J.F. Oliveira / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 45-62
Fase 2 – Optimização Local
Número Clientes
Hora de Saı́da do Armazém
Hora de Chegada ao Armazém
Hora Almoço
Hora Almoço
Tempo de Percurso Total
Carga Total (Kg)
Escalão 1
Rota 1
Rota 2
11
6
6h39
6h42
16h16
14h02
12h47 às 12h03 às
13h47
13h03
8h37
6h20
11005
6455
Escalão 2
Rota 1
Rota 2
14
5
6h00
6h56
18h20
11h28
12h10 às
13h10
11h20
3h32
9862
3999
Escalão 3
Rota 1
Rota 2
11
3
6h48
6h17
17h24
10h33
12h14 às
13h14
9h36
3h15
14520
790
Ordem de visita aos clientes:
30
26
30
Escalão 1
Construção
33
27
26
Escalão 1
Optimização
33
27
31
31
18
3
18
3
6
32
5
6
32
5
Rota 1
Rota 1
1
1
Rota 2
Rota 2
19
2
28
19
29
2
28
29
4
4
20
20
Escalão 2
Construção
8
11
35
10
40
22
24
25
12
7
36
39
11
34
38
Escalão 2
Optimização
8
35
37
10
40
22
24
25
12
7
36
23
34
38
39
37
23
Rota 2
Rota 2
Rota 1
Rota 1
41
41
9
9
21
21
Escalão 3
Construção
14
17
14
17
44
46
Escalão 3
Optimização
44
46
43
43
Rota 1
13
Rota 1
13
47
42
42
Rota 2
50
49
16
15
47
Rota 2
45
48
49
16
15
50
48
45
J.M. Valente, R.A. Alves / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 63-71
63
A note on polynomially-solvable cases of common
due date early-tardy scheduling with release dates
Jorge M. S. Valente
∗
∗
Rui A. F. S. Alves
∗
Faculdade de Economia, Universidade do Porto
{jvalente, ralves}@fep.up.pt
Abstract
In this paper we consider the single machine scheduling problem with integer release
dates and the objective of minimising the sum of deviations of jobs’ completion times from
a common integer due date. We present an efficient polynomial algorithm for the unit
processing time case. We also show how to calculate in polynomial time the minimum
non-restrictive due date for the general case.
Keywords: scheduling, early-tardy, common due date, unit processing times, release dates
1
Introduction
The scheduling problem considered in this paper can be stated as follows. A set of n independent jobs {J1 , J2 , · · · , Jn }, each with a possibly different integer release date rj , a common
integer due date d and a processing time pj , has to be scheduled without preemptions on
a single machine that can handle at most one job at a time. The objective is to minimise
the
Pn sum of the absolute deviations of the jobs’ completion times from the common due date
j=1 |Cj − d|, where Cj is the completion time of job Jj . In the classification scheme proposed by Lawler,
P Lenstra, Rinnooy Kan and Shmoys [6], this problem can be represented as
1 |dj = d, rj | |Cj − d|. Scheduling models with both earliness and tardiness costs are particularly appealing, since they are compatible with the philosophy of just-in-time production.
The model is also made more realistic by the existence of different release dates, since in most
real production settings the orders are released to the shop floor over time (and not all simultaneously). Therefore, the problem considered has several potential practical applications.
The identical release dates version of this problem with a non-restrictive
Pdue date (i.e.,
a due date that does not constrain the optimal schedule cost) - 1 |dj = dnr | |Cj − d| - can
be solved in O (n log n) time by algorithms presented by Kanet [5] and Bagchi, Sullivan and
c 2004 Associação Portuguesa de Investigação Operacional
64
J.M. Valente, R.A. Alves / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 63-71
P
Chang [1]. Hall, Kubiak and Sethi [4] proved that the restrictive version 1 |dj = dr | |Cj − d|
is N P −hard. Models with different release dates have been addressed by Nandkeolyar, Ahmed
and Sundararaghavan [7], Sridharan and Zhou [8] and Bank and Werner [3]. P
Nandkeolyar,
Ahmed and Sundararaghavan [7] consider the single machine problem 1 |rj | cj |dj − Cj |,
where cj and dj are, respectively, the cost per unit time and the due date of Jj . They present
several heuristics, developed in a modular fashion. Sridharan and Zhou [8] present a decision
theory based approach for a more general problem where the cost per unit time is allowed
to be different according to whether the job is early or tardy. Bank and Werner [3] consider
a model with unrelated parallel machines, a common due date and earliness and tardiness
costs that may differ between jobs. They present several constructive and iterative heuristics.
It should be pointed out that there are a large number of papers considering earliness and
tardiness penalties. Only the papers above are reviewed because they consider problems that
are closest to ours. For more information on problems with earliness and tardiness costs, the
interested reader is referred to Baker and Scudder [2], who present a comprehensive survey of
early/tardy scheduling.
In section 2 a O (n log n) algorithm for the problem with unit processing times
1 |pj = 1, dj = d, rj |
X
|Cj − d|
is presented. A polynomial algorithm
for calculating the minimum non-restrictive value of d
P
in the general case 1 |dj = d, rj | |Cj − d| is also given in section 3.
2
An algorithm for problem 1 |pj = 1, dj = d, rj |
P
|Cj − d|
In this section a O (n log n) algorithm for the problem with unit processing times is presented.
Several lemmas and theorems are first developed. These lemmas and theorems characterize
the structure of an optimal solution. The algorithm then simply schedules the jobs in such a
way that the lemmas and theorems are satisfied (hence optimally).
Lemma 1 There exists an optimal sequence where each Cj is integer.
Proof. Any feasible schedule with non integer Cj ’s can be transformed into a feasible sequence,
of lower or equal cost, where all Cj ’s are integer. Starting from d and scanning left, take the
first job, if any, with a non integer Cj < d such that there exists idle time to the right of
that job. Move that job to the right until it is blocked by another job or it completes at an
integer time, whichever occurs first. Any such movement will decrease the cost of the schedule.
Repeat until no such jobs exist. Perform a similar scan to the right of d, this time moving
jobs to the left (such a move is always feasible because each job has an integer r j and we stop
as soon as an integer start time is reached, if the job is not blocked before). Again, any such
movement decreases the schedule cost. At this time, at most one group of jobs performed
consecutively with no idle time in between (or possibly just a single job) starts and completes
at non integer times that encompass d. Let A and B denote the sets of jobs in that group
that complete after and before d, respectively. If |A| > |B|, move the block backwards until
an integer start time is reached. The schedule cost will decrease, since the earliness of each
J.M. Valente, R.A. Alves / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 63-71
65
job in B increases by the amount of backwards movement but the tardiness of each job in A
decreases by that same amount. If |A| < |B|, move the block forward instead. If |A| = |B|,
move either forward or backward. The new schedule has all integer C j and its cost is lower or
the same.
This lemma allows us to focus on unit time slots that begin at integer times, since there
exists an optimal sequence where jobs are scheduled in n of those slots. This result also
indicates that the problem could
be formulated as a weighted bipartite matching problem,
and therefore solved in O n3 time, but a more efficient approach is possible. The next
lemma identifies the best possible schedule.
Lemma 2 Any feasible sequence
the jobs are scheduled in the n consecutive time
in which
slots in the time range d − n2 , d + n2 is also optimal.
Proof. No slot in this range has a cost higher than n2 . Since any slot not in this time range
has a cost that is at least as high as this value, the jobs are indeed scheduled in the n least
cost slots and the sequence is therefore optimal.
Assume, for the remainder of this section, that jobs have been renumbered in non decreasing
order of their release dates. Let ECj be the earliest possible completion time of job j when
jobs are considered for processing in increasing index order. Let EC = EC n denote the earliest
possible completion time of the job with the largest index. Also note that, according to their
definition, all ECj ’s must be different.
to schedule the jobsinthe n consecutive time slots in the time range
Lemma
n 3 It isn possible
d − 2 , d + 2 if and only if EC ≤ d + n2 .
Proof. If EC > d + n2 then obviously atleast one job cannot be completed up to d + n2 . If
EC ≤ d + n2 , any job with ECj > d − n2 can be scheduled to complete at its ECj while the
remaining jobs can be arbitrarily assigned to the still empty time slots in the optimal range.
That assignment is clearly feasible, since the start time of each of those jobs is being delayed.
The next theorem identifies the minimum non-restrictive due date.
Theorem 4 The due date d is non-restrictive when d ≥ EC −
n
2
.
Proof. Lemma 2 identifies
the best possible schedule. From lemma 3, that schedule is feasible
only if d ≥ EC − n2 .
The next lemmas provide further characteristics of an optimal solution that will be used
in the algorithm.
Lemma 5 If EC > d +
optimal sequence.
n
2
, all jobs will be scheduled in the time range d − n2 , EC in an
66
J.M. Valente, R.A. Alves / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 63-71
Proof. It is clear that all slots in the range have
a lower cost than any slot that starts at or
n
later than EC. Also jobs with ECj > d − 2 can once again be scheduled to complete at
their ECj while the
remaining
n jobs can be arbitrarily assigned to the still empty time slots in
n
the range d − 2 , d + 2 , thereby decreasing their cost.
Lemma 6 There exists an optimal schedule in which all jobs with ECj ≥ d are scheduled to
complete at their ECj .
Proof. Consider the slots with a completion time equal to ECj , for ECj ≥ d. If a job with
ECj ≥ d is completed later than its ECj , and the slot with a completion time equal to ECj is
free, one can simply move that job into this slot (thereby decreasing its cost, since it will be
completed earlier). Also, any feasible schedule in which any slot with a completion time equal
to ECj , for ECj ≥ d, is occupied by a job with ECj < d (an offending job) can be converted
into an equal cost sequence in which all such slots are filled with jobs with ECj ≥ d. For
each of those slots, any offending job is simply swapped with the job whose ECj is equal to
that slot’s completion time. These swaps do not change the schedule cost and feasibility is
maintained (the release date of the offending job is not larger than that of the job with which
it is swapped, since its ECj is lower, so it can also be feasibly scheduled in its destination
slot). After all such swaps are performed, only jobs with ECj ≥ d use those slots, though they
are not necessarily in ECj order (jobs are considered in increasing order of their indexes when
calculating the ECj ’s, so some jobs can feasibly be scheduled before their ECj ). If that is the
case, reordering the jobs according to their ECj will not alter cost nor feasibility. Therefore,
all jobs with ECj ≥ d can be optimally scheduled to complete at their ECj .
Lemma 6 assigns optimal slots for jobs with ECj ≥ d, so all that remains is to optimally
schedule the remaining jobs in the available slots. The next lemma considers those jobs.
Lemma 7 Given that jobs with ECj ≥ d are scheduled according to lemma 6, the remaining
jobs should be scheduled in the available slots that are closest to d (i.e., the lowest cost slots).
Proof. It simply needs to be proved that such a schedule is feasible, since it is clearly optimal.
Let |B| be the number of jobs with ECj < d (and therefore of necessary slots). The earliest
possible completion time of the available slots that are closest to d is d − 1, d − 2, · · · , d − |B|.
The latest possible ECj ’s of the remaining jobs are also d − 1, d − 2, · · · , d − |B|, so they can be
feasibly assigned to the least cost slots. Since any other case involves later slots and/or earlier
ECj ’s, it is always feasible to schedule the remaining jobs in the least cost available slots. An
easy way for an algorithm to ensure feasibility is to simply consider jobs in decreasing order
of their ECj .
An algorithm that schedules jobs in such a way that the previous lemmas are satisfied is
now presented. The algorithm uses a min heap of free time slot ranges and their associated
minimum cost (the cost of the best slot in that range), which serves as the key for pushing
and popping elements from the heap.
J.M. Valente, R.A. Alves / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 63-71
67
Algorithm 1
Step 1: Sort and renumber jobs in non decreasing order of rj .
Step 2: Calculate ECj for all jobs.
Step 3: If EC < d + n2 , push range EC, d + n2 on heap.
Step 4: For each job, in decreasing order of ECj , do:
If ECj ≥ d
schedule j to complete at its ECj ;
if j > 1, push range [ECj−1 , ECj − 1] on heap;
Else
schedule j to complete at its ECj or at the best available free time slot on the
heap (whichever has a lower cost; ties can be broken arbitrarily); in the latter
case update the range that included that slot and re-insert it on heap;
if j > 1, push on heap:
range [ECj−1 , ECj − 1] if j completes at its ECj ;
range [ECj−1 , ECj ] if j was scheduled at the best available free time slot on
the heap.
In the previous algorithm ranges are obviously only pushed on the heap when the upper
limit is higher than the lower limit. Updating a time range that ends at or before d or begins
at or after d simply involves increasing its minimum cost by one and decreasing its finish time,
or increasing its start time, respectively, by one time unit (thereby eliminating its previously
best slot). Only one range that contains d as an interior point can be generated. When such
a range is updated, it’s divided into the two separate ranges that result from eliminating the
time slot which finishes at d. Step 1 takes O (n log n) time and Step 2 O (n) time. Step 3 can
be done in constant time. In Step 4, the For loop is executed n times. In each iteration pushing
or popping the heap takes O (log n) time and scheduling the job and updating time ranges
(when necessary) takes O (1) time. Therefore, the complexity of the algorithm is O (n log n).
Theorem 8 Algorithm 1 generates an optimal schedule.
Proof. The theorem follows from the previous lemmas. Jobs with ECj ≥ d are scheduled
as in lemma 6. The algorithm
pushes all available time slots with completion time not later
n
than max EC, d + 2
on the heap and jobs with ECj < d are
on the best of
nscheduled
those slots, as established in lemma 7. Note thatwhen
EC
≤
d
+
,
jobs
with
ECj ≥ d are
2
scheduled to finish inside the optimal range d − n2 to d + n2 . The remaining jobs will also
be scheduled
inside
this range, since the algorithm will push its slots into the heap (note that
range EC, d + n2 is pushed on the heap).
In table 1 an example for Algorithm 1 is presented; assume d = 7. The jobs are already
renumbered in non decreasing order of rj . In step 2 the following ECj ’s are calculated:
EC1 = 1; EC2 = 3; EC3 = 4; EC4 = 6 and EC5 = 8. The due date is in this case nonrestrictive, since EC ≤ d + n2 (8 ≤ 7 + 2). In step 3 the range [8, 9] (cost: 2) is pushed on
68
J.M. Valente, R.A. Alves / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 63-71
Table 1: Algorithm 1 example.
index
rj
1
0
2
2
3
2
4
5
5
7
the heap. In step 4 the jobs are scheduled in decreasing index order. Since EC5 ≥ d, job 5
is scheduled in the slot [7, 8] and range [6, 7] (cost: 0) is pushed on the heap. Job 4 is then
considered, and EC4 < d. If job 4 is scheduled to complete at EC4 = 6 its cost will be 1; if it
is scheduled in the best slot available on the heap, its cost is 0. Therefore, job 4 is scheduled
in the slot [6, 7] and range [4, 6] (cost: 1) is pushed on the heap. Job 3 is the next job to be
scheduled, and EC3 < d. If job 3 is scheduled to complete at EC4 = 4 its cost will be 3; if
it is scheduled in the best slot available on the heap (slot [5, 6]), its cost is 1. Job 3 is then
scheduled in the slot [5, 6], and both the updated range [4, 5] (cost:2) and the new range [3, 4]
(cost: 3) are inserted in the heap. The remaining jobs will then be scheduled
slots [8, 9]
n in the
n and [4, 5]. The algorithm schedules the jobs in the optimal range d − 2 , d + 2 , in this
case [4, 9].
3
Calculating the minimum non-restrictive
common due date
P
for the general case 1 |dj = d, rj | |Cj − d|
With different release dates, the due date d will be non-restrictive when the optimal schedule
for the non-restrictive version of the problem with equal release dates is feasible, since clearly
no better schedule can be generated. Therefore, the minimum value of the common due date
d for which that schedule is feasible must be found. Throughout this section assume that the
jobs have been renumbered in non decreasing order of pj . An optimal schedule for the nonrestrictive version of the problem with equal release dates can be determined by the following
procedure presented by Kanet [5]. Let B be a sequence of jobs to be scheduled without
idle time such that the last job in B is completed at d. Let A be a sequence of jobs to be
scheduled without idle time such that the first job in A starts at d. An optimal schedule for the
problem with identical release dates consists of B followed by A, given that those sequences
are generated by the following rule: assign jobs alternately, and in their index order, to the
beginning of B and end of A, starting with B if n is odd and A otherwise. The minimum nonrestrictive common due date
P for the problem with equal release dates, which will be denoted
as ∆r=0 , is then ∆r=0 = j∈B pj .
The minimum non-restrictive due date when different release dates are allowed will now be
considered. When all jobs share a common release date r, the smallest non-restrictive common
due date will simply be ∆r=0 + r. If jobs have different release dates as well as different
processing times, one can determine the start time of each job in the schedule generated
by Kanet’s procedure (assuming all release dates equal to zero) and calculate the maximum
violation of a release date (i.e., the maximum positive difference between a job’s release date
and its start time in the Kanet schedule). The minimum non-restrictive common due date
could then be obtained by adding that maximum violation to ∆r=0 . When different jobs
have identical processing times, the situation is more complicated. Since processing times are
not unique, ties occur when renumbering the jobs in non decreasing order of p j , and several
different Kanet schedules may be generated, each leading to a possibly different maximum
J.M. Valente, R.A. Alves / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 63-71
69
violation of a release date. Therefore, when renumbering jobs, ties must be broken in such
a way that the resulting Kanet schedule minimizes the maximum violation of a release date.
The following algorithm generates the minimum non-restrictive value of the common due date
d (denoted by ∆) when release dates are allowed to be different, and different jobs may have
identical processing times. If all release dates are identical, the algorithm is equivalent to
Kanet’s procedure. Let pA and pB denote, respectively, the sum of the processing times of the
jobs currently assigned to A and B. Jobs are added to the beginning of B and to the end of
A and the first job is to be assigned to B (A) if the number of jobs n is odd (even).
Algorithm 2
Step 1: Sort and renumber jobs in non decreasing order of pj ; break ties by choosing job
with lower rj .
Step 2: Set pA , pB and ∆ to 0.
Step 3: Consider jobs in increasing index order:
If pj is unique
If j is the first job to be assigned, assign j to B (A) if n is odd (even); otherwise
assign j to B (A) if last job was assigned to A (B).
If j is added to B
let ∆j = rj + pj + pB ;
If ∆j > ∆, set ∆ = ∆j ;
pB = p B + p j ;
Else
let ∆j = rj − pA ;
If ∆j > ∆, set ∆ = ∆j ;
pA = p A + p j ;
Else
let c be the number of jobs with that pj ;
c
c
2 jobs are assigned to A (B) and 2 to B (A) if last job was assigned to B (A);
the jobs assigned to B are those with lower rj , and are assigned in non increasing
order of rj ;
the jobs assigned to A are those with higher rj , and are assigned in non decreasing
order of rj ;
update ∆j , pA and pB as above.
The complexity of the algorithm is O (n log n), since Step 1 takes O (n log n) time, Step 2
takes constant time and Step 3 requires O (n) time.
Theorem 9 Algorithm 2 generates the minimum non-restrictive value for d.
Proof. The algorithm clearly generates a sequence that is optimal for the problem with equal
rj . Any d < ∆ leads to an infeasible schedule, since at least one job will not be available at its
70
J.M. Valente, R.A. Alves / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 63-71
Table 2: Algorithm 2 example.
index
pj
rj
1
5
0
2
7
6
3
7
8
4
8
7
5
10
5
optimal start time. However, when several jobs have identical pj , several optimum sequences
exist for the problem with equal rj (those jobs will have to go into certain positions, but several
assignments are possible). When this happens, the algorithm assigns the jobs with lower r j to
the earlier slots. Therefore, it needs to be shown that any other assignment does not lead to a
lower ∆. Take any pair of jobs i and j such that ri < rj but j is scheduled before i. Assume
that j is in B and i is in A. When ∆ is being calculated, we have ∆1j = rj + pj + pB and
∆1i = ri − pA , and ∆1j > ∆1i . If those jobs were swapped, we would have ∆2i = ri + pi + pB
and ∆2j = rj − pA . Since ∆2i < ∆1j and ∆2j < ∆1j , the value of ∆ cannot be higher after the
swap. A similar reasoning applies when both jobs are in the same set. So swapping jobs until
they are in rj order will not increase ∆.
In table 2 an example for Algorithm 2 is presented. Jobs have already been renumbered
in non decreasing order of pj , with ties broken by lower rj . In step 3 the jobs are considered
in increasing index order. The first job’s pj is unique, and job 1 is assigned to B since n is
odd. The algorithm then calculates ∆1 = 0 + 5 + 0 = 5. Since ∆1 > ∆ = 0, the algorithm
sets ∆ = ∆1 = 5 and then updates pB = 5. Jobs 2 and 3 have identical processing times. Job
3 (with the higher rj ) is then assigned to A, while job 2 (with the lower rj ) is assigned to B.
The algorithm calculates ∆3 = 8 − 0 = 8, and sets ∆ = ∆3 = 8 and pA = 7. When job 2 is
assigned to B, ∆2 = 6 + 7 + 5 = 18. Since ∆2 > ∆ = 8, the algorithm sets ∆ = ∆2 = 18 and
then updates pB = 5 + 7 = 12. The processing time of job 4 is unique, and this job is assigned
to A. Since ∆4 = 7 − 7 = 0, ∆ is not changed, while pA is updated to 15 (7+8). Finally, job 5
is assigned to B and ∆5 = 5 + 10 + 12 = 27. Therefore, ∆ is set at 27, which is the minimum
non-restrictive due date.
Acknowledgement
The authors would like to thank an anonymous referee for several helpful comments that were
used to improve this paper.
References
[1] Bagchi, U., Sullivan, R., and Chang, Y. Minimizing mean absolute deviation of completion
times about a common due date. Naval Research Logistics Quarterly 33 (1986), 227–240.
[2] Baker, K. R., and Scudder, G. D. Sequencing with earliness and tardiness penalties: A review.
Operations Research 38 (1990), 22–36.
[3] Bank, J., and Werner, F. Heuristic algorithms for unrelated parallel machine scheduling with
a common due date, release dates, and linear earliness and tardiness penalties. Mathematical and
Computer Modelling 33 (2001), 363–383.
J.M. Valente, R.A. Alves / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 63-71
71
[4] Hall, N., Kubiak, W., and Sethi, S. Earliness-tardiness scheduling problems, ii: Deviation of
completion times about a restrictive common due date. Operations Research 39 (1991), 847–856.
[5] Kanet, J. Minimizing the average deviation of job completion times about a common due date.
Naval Research Logistics Quarterly 28 (1981), 643–651.
[6] Lawler, E. L., Lenstra, J. K., Rinnooy Kan, A. H. G., and Shmoys, D. B. Sequencing
and scheduling: Algorithms and complexity. In Logistics of Production and Inventory, Handbooks
in Operations Research and Management Science, pp. 445-522, S. C. Graves, A. H. G. Rinnooy
Kan, and P. H. Zipkin, Eds. North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1993.
[7] Nandkeolyar, U., Ahmed, M. U., and Sundararaghavan, P. S. Dynamic single-machineweighted absolute deviation problem: Predictive heuristics and evaluation. International Journal
of Production Research 31 (1993), 1453–1466.
[8] Sridharan, V., and Zhou, Z. A decision theory based scheduling procedure for single machine
weighted earliness and tardiness problem. European Journal of Operational Research 94 (1996),
292–301.
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
73
Desempenho do método de Newton truncado em
optimização não linear sem restrições
Ana I.P.N. Pereira
∗
†
∗
Edite M.G.P. Fernandes
†
Departamento de Matemática, Instituto Politécnico de Bragança
[email protected]
Departamento de Produção e Sistemas, Universidade do Minho
[email protected]
Abstract
Newton’s method for unconstrained nonlinear optimization can be a demanding iterative process. Combining Krylov iterative methods with different termination criteria for
the inexact solving of the Newton system, a linear or a curvilinear search technique and
monotone and nonmonotone globalization criteria, we manage to define a set of truncated
Newton algorithms. Computational experiments were carried out in order to evaluate the
performance of the defined algorithms.
Resumo
O método de Newton para a resolução de um problema de optimização não linear sem
restrições pode originar um processo iterativo exigente. Combinando métodos iterativos
de Krylov com diferentes critérios de terminação para a resolução inexacta do sistema
Newton, uma técnica de procura que pode ser linear ou curvilı́nea e critérios de globalização monótonos e não monótonos, conseguimos definir um conjunto de algoritmos do
método de Newton truncado. Foram realizadas experiências computacionais para avaliar
o desempenho dos diferentes algoritmos.
Keywords: Unconstrained optimization, truncated Newton’s method, nonmonotone stabilization technique.
Title: Performance of the truncated Newton method in unconstrained nonlinear optimization
c 2004 Associação Portuguesa de Investigação Operacional
74
1
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
Introdução
Um problema de optimização de uma função real de n variáveis reais sem restrições pode
ser formulado como
minn f (x)
(1)
x∈IR
em que f : IRn → IR se supõe não linear nas variáveis e duas vezes continuamente diferenciável.
Um ponto de estacionaridade é um ponto que anula o vector gradiente da função f . Se
num ponto de estacionaridade a matriz Hessiana for definida positiva então o ponto é um
minimizante local. Denotaremos por g (x) o vector gradiente da função f, em x, e por H (x)
a matriz Hessiana, ou das segundas derivadas, de f em x.
O método de Newton é um processo iterativo que gera uma sucessão de aproximações {x k }
a um ponto de estacionaridade de f usando, em cada iteração k, uma aproximação quadrática
da função f em torno de um ponto xk . Mais precisamente, xk+1 é o resultado das seguintes
operações:
• obter o vector pk , solução do sistema
H (xk ) p = −g (xk ) ,
(2)
• afectar xk+1 = xk + pk .
Denotaremos o sistema linear em (2) por sistema Newton e designaremos a sua solução,
quando única, por direcção Newton.
A popularidade do método de Newton deve-se à sua rápida convergência, à fácil codificação quando as derivadas são simples ou quando se recorre a ferramentas de diferenciação
automática de funções e ao facto de ser invariante quando se aplica algum esquema de escalonamento das variáveis [2], [3], [14], [18], [19], [20] e [24].
Alguns aspectos menos positivos estão relacionados com o facto da convergência ser local e
com a necessidade de resolver o sistema (2) em cada iteração. A primeira limitação é facilmente
ultrapassada com a introdução de uma técnica de globalização no algoritmo. Quanto ao sistema
Newton, poderá não se justificar a sua resolução exacta quando a aproximação x k se encontra
afastada do ponto de estacionaridade ou quando o número de variáveis é elevado. Nestes casos,
pode optar-se pela resolução inexacta do sistema recorrendo a métodos iterativos.
Este artigo tem como objectivo fazer um estudo comparativo do desempenho de algumas
variantes do método de Newton que surgem da combinação de critérios de globalização, estratégias de procura de aproximações à solução e métodos iterativos para a resolução inexacta
do sistema Newton.
O artigo está estruturado do seguinte modo. Na Secção 2 são apresentadas duas técnicas
de procura unidimensional, uma monótona e a outra não monótona, para a globalização dos
algoritmos. A apresentação é feita separadamente para as estratégias de procura linear e
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
75
procura curvilı́nea de aproximações à solução. Na Secção 3 descrevem-se quatro métodos
iterativos, baseados em espaços de Krylov, para a resolução inexacta do sistema Newton.
Os resultados obtidos da implementação das diversas variantes do método de Newton são
apresentados na Secção 4 e a Secção 5 contém as conclusões.
2
Técnicas de globalização
Seleccionámos a técnica de procura unidimensional para a globalização dos algoritmos.
Dada uma direcção de procura, este tipo de técnica calcula um escalar, λ, que representa
o comprimento do passo a efectuar ao longo da direcção, de modo a que o valor da função
objectivo diminua de uma forma desejada.
Um critério de procura monótono exige uma redução significativa do valor da função objectivo em todas as iterações para garantir convergência para um minimizante. Por outro lado, ao
forçar este comportamento, seleccionando quando necessário valores de λ menores que a unidade, a convergência pode abrandar especialmente na presença de vales profundos e estreitos
[2] e [9]. Assim, parece mais vantajoso implementar um critério de procura que permita um
aumento do valor da função objectivo em certas iterações, conservando a convergência global.
Este tipo de critério é denominado por não monótono [9].
As aproximações à solução do problema (1) podem ser obtidas com base numa única
direcção de procura ou através de uma combinação de duas direcções. No primeiro caso, a
procura diz-se linear e no segundo, curvilı́nea.
2.1
Procura linear
O método de Newton com procura linear consiste em definir uma sucessão de aproximações
{xk } através da fórmula recursiva xk+1 = xk + λk pk , onde pk é a solução exacta ou aproximada
do sistema Newton e λk é um escalar positivo escolhido de forma a satisfazer um conjunto de
condições. Estas condições devem proporcionar a convergência global do método ao mesmo
tempo que não devem impedir a escolha de λk = 1 na proximidade de um minimizante local
onde a matriz Hessiana é definida positiva. Deste modo, o método assume assimptoticamente
as boas propriedades locais do método de Newton.
Apresentam-se de seguida dois grupos de condições. As condições de Wolfe e as de Goldstein
[20], que definem um critério monótono, e as condições de Grippo, Lampariello e Lucidi [10]
que caracterizam um critério não monótono com estabilização do passo.
2.1.1
Critério monótono
As condições seguintes, conhecidas por condições de Wolfe, asseguram um decréscimo
monótono dos valores da função objectivo ao longo do processo iterativo e são suficientes
para assegurar a convergência global do método. Assim, o escalar positivo λ k deve satisfazer:
1
T
f (xk + λk pk ) ≤ f (xk ) + γλk g (xk ) pk , γ ∈ 0,
(3)
2
76
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
1
g (xk + λk pk ) pk ≥ ηg (xk ) pk , η ∈
,1
2
T
T
.
(4)
A condição (3), conhecida por condição de Armijo, obriga a que f (x k+1 ) seja significativamente menor do que f (xk ) . A condição (4), conhecida por condição de curvatura, evita que
λk seja demasiado pequeno. Se pk for uma direcção descendente então a existência de λk está
assegurada e a convergência global do método de Newton com procura linear está garantida
[2, pp. 120].
Resultados análogos de convergência global também podem ser obtidos se a condição (4)
for substituı́da por
1
T
,1
(5)
f (xk + λk pk ) ≥ f (xk ) + ηλk g (xk ) pk , η ∈
2
(veja-se [20, pp. 490]). As condições (3) e (5) são conhecidas por condições de Goldstein e têm
a vantagem de não necessitar do cálculo do gradiente g (xk + λk pk ).
2.1.2
Critério não monótono com estabilização do passo
O critério não monótono com estabilização do passo não força uma redução dos valores
da função objectivo em todas as iterações. De facto, o passo pode ser automaticamente
aceite, sem avaliar a função objectivo no novo iterando, se o teste de estabilização definido
por kpk k ≤ ∆k for satisfeito, para alguma sucessão {∆k } que converge para zero. Este teste
tem como objectivo verificar se os iterandos estão a convergir ou se a convergência tem que
ser forçada por um procedimento de procura não monótono [10].
Este procedimento usa na condição de Armijo um valor de referência F j , em vez de f (xk ),
f (xk + λk pk ) ≤ Fj + γλk g (xk )T pk
(6)
em que Fj é o maior valor que a função atinge num número pré-determinado de iterações
anteriores. A condição (6) pode ser vista como uma generalização da condição (3), no sentido
de que permite o aumento do valor da função sem afectar as propriedades de convergência [9,
pp. 709].
2.2
Procura curvilı́nea
A direcção Newton pk pode não ser uma direcção descendente e, por isso, pode não existir
λk que satisfaça qualquer das condições apresentadas anteriormente. Para obviar esta dificuldade, Goldfard [5] e McCormick [16] propuseram uma variante do método de Newton que
define xk+1 não só à custa da direcção Newton pk mas também à custa de uma direcção de
curvatura negativa sk , quando detectada. Moré e Sorensen [17] propõem duas técnicas para o
cálculo da direcção sk .
O método de Newton com procura curvilı́nea consiste em definir xk+1 = xk + λ2k pk + λk sk ,
com λk um escalar positivo a satisfazer um conjunto de condições, das quais destacamos o
critério monótono proposto por Moré e Sorensen [17] e o critério não monótono com estabilização do passo proposto por Ferris, Lucidi e Roma [4].
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
2.2.1
77
Critério monótono
As condições seguintes são conhecidas por condições de Goldstein modificadas de segunda
ordem e envolvem as duas direcções previamente calculadas pk e sk
f xk +
λ2k pk
f xk +
λ2k pk
γλ2k
(7)
ηλ2k
1 T
1
T
g (xk ) pk + sk H (xk ) sk , η ∈
,1 .
2
2
(8)
+ λk sk ≤ f (xk ) +
+ λk sk ≥ f (xk ) +
1
H (xk ) sk
g (xk ) pk + sT
2 k
T
1
, γ ∈ 0,
2
Quando o par de direcções (pk , sk ) verifica certas propriedades, estas condições garantem
a convergência para um ponto de estacionaridade de f onde a Hessiana é semidefinida positiva
[17, pp. 15].
2.2.2
Critério não monótono com estabilização do passo
Na sequência do que foi referido em 2.1.2, a condição generalizada que corresponde a (7)
para a aceitação de λk é neste caso dada por
f xk +
λ2k pk
+ λ k sk ≤ F j +
γλ2k
1 T
T
g (xk ) pk + sk H (xk ) sk ,
2
em que Fj é o valor de referência. Na procura curvilı́nea, o teste de estabilização baseia-se na
condição kpk k + ksk k ≤ ∆k . As propriedades de convergência de um algoritmo baseado nas
condições enunciadas são apresentadas em Ferris, Lucidi e Roma [4, pp. 124].
3
Métodos iterativos de Krylov
A utilização de um método iterativo para calcular uma aproximação à direcção Newton
origina o método de Newton inexacto. A condição de paragem do método iterativo deve
basear-se no tamanho do vector resı́duo, dado por
r = Hk p + gk
em que Hk = H (xk ), gk = g (xk ) e p é a direcção Newton efectivamente calculada. Controlando
o vector resı́duo, é possı́vel estabelecer um equilı́brio entre a exactidão com que o sistema
Newton é resolvido e o número de operações realizadas em cada iteração. Seleccionámos para
este artigo quatro métodos iterativos baseados em espaços de Krylov.
3.1
Método dos gradientes conjugados
Um dos métodos mais conhecidos para resolver sistemas lineares é o método dos gradientes
conjugados (veja-se Golub e Van Loan [6], Greenbaum [8], Hackbusch [11] e Kelley [13]).
78
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
Se p0 for uma aproximação inicial à solução do sistema Newton, a sucessão de aproximações
é obtida através da fórmula recursiva pj+1 = pj + aj dj , onde o coeficiente aj é determinado
por forma a minimizar a norma−Hk do erro (r̄j+1 = −Hk−1 gk − pj+1 )
aj =
hrj , dj i
,
hdj , Hk dj i
e a direcção dj+1 é actualizada por dj+1 = rj+1 + bj dj , sendo bj um coeficiente que se obtém
resolvendo a equação hdj+1 , dj iHk = 0, ou seja
bj = −
hrj+1 , Hk dj i
.
hdj , Hk dj i
Este método requer poucos recursos informáticos. Além do armazenamento da matriz H k ,
que é constante ao longo do processo iterativo, exige apenas o cálculo e o armazenamento de
quatro vectores em cada iteração. O método dos gradientes conjugados é eficiente se a matriz
for simétrica e definida positiva. Quando a matriz Hk é indefinida, o método pode falhar. No
entanto, existem variantes do método dos gradientes conjugados que incorporam esquemas de
segurança para identificar matrizes indefinidas (veja-se Dembo e Steihaug [1] e Gould, Lucidi,
Roma e Toint [7]).
3.2
Processo de Lanczos
O processo de Lanczos não exige que a matriz dos coeficientes do sistema seja definida
positiva, sendo pois um bom ponto de partida para o desenvolvimento de métodos iterativos
para a resolução de sistemas indefinidos. Com base numa matriz simétrica, o processo de
Lanczos reduz a matriz dos coeficientes do sistema a uma matriz tridiagonal ou pentagonal
(Greenbaum [8] e Paige e Saunders [21]).
Consideremos uma aproximação à solução do sistema Newton (2) na forma p j = Vj zj onde
Vj = [v1 v2 ...vj ] é uma matriz ortogonal de dimensão n × j. Os vectores vi , i = 1, ..., j, são
obtidos pelo processo de Lanczos através da equação
βi+1 vi+1 = Hk vi − αi vi − βi vi−1 , com i = 1, 2, ...
em que v0 = 0, v1 = − kggkk k , β1 = kgk k, αi = viT Hk vi e βi+1 ≥ 0 deve ser escolhido de modo a
que kvi+1 k = 1.
Do problema min krj k2B , onde rj = gk + Hk Vj zj é o vector resı́duo da aproximação pj ,
z∈IRj
conclui-se que um ponto de estacionaridade zj satisfaz o seguinte sistema linear VjT Hk BHk Vj zj =
−VjT Hk Bgk que é equivalente a (2).
Dependendo da escolha da matriz B, assim se obtêm sistemas equivalentes ao sistema
inicial. Se B = Hk− , onde Hk− representa a inversa generalizada da matriz Hk , obtém-se o
sistema tridiagonal
Tj zj = β1 e1 , com pj = Vj zj ,
(9)
onde Tj é uma matriz simétrica e tridiagonal de dimensão j, com Ti,i = αi , i = 1, ..., j e
Ti+1,i = Ti,i+1 = βi+1 , i = 1, ..., j − 1. O vector e1 designa o primeiro vector da base canónica.
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
79
Este sistema linear tem solução única se e só se Tj for não singular. Quando a matriz B é a
identidade, obtém-se o sistema pentagonal
2
2
Tj + βj+1
ej eT
(10)
j zj = Tj β1 e1 , com pj = Vj zj .
Neste caso, o número de condição da matriz do sistema (10) poderá ser maior do que o
número de condição da matriz do sistema inicial (2), que pode ser um inconveniente quando
Hk for mal condicionada [21, pp. 619].
3.3
Método dos gradientes conjugados segundo Paige e Saunders
Esta versão do método dos gradientes conjugados baseia-se no processo de Lanczos e foi
proposta por Paige e Saunders [21] no âmbito da resolução de um sistema linear simétrico e
definido positivo.
Se a matriz Hk for definida positiva, a matriz Tj de (9) também o é, pois os seus valores
próprios estão entre o maior e o menor valor próprio da matriz H k [21]. Quando a matriz Tj é
definida positiva, o sistema (9) pode ser resolvido pela decomposição Cholesky, T j = Lj Dj LT
j,
em que Lj é uma matriz bidiagonal inferior com elementos unitários na diagonal principal e
Dj uma matriz diagonal com elementos positivos.
O método dos gradientes conjugados segundo Paige e Saunders é baseado na resolução do
sistema (9) através da decomposição Cholesky da matriz Tj . Assim, a sucessão de aproximações
à direcção Newton é obtida na forma pj = Vj zj onde o vector zj é calculado através do seguinte
sistema
L j Dj L T
j zj = β 1 e1 .
A actualização das matrizes factorizadas é simples uma vez que L j e Dj são respectivamente
as submatrizes principais de Lj+1 e Dj+1 . O cálculo dos elementos lj+1 , da posição (j + 1, j)
da matriz Lj+1 , e dj+1 da matriz Dj+1 , faz-se através das igualdades
lj+1 =
βj+1
e dj+1 = αj+1 − βj+1 lj+1 .
dj
Esta versão é matematicamente equivalente ao método dos gradientes conjugados, embora
a abordagem ao nı́vel computacional seja ligeiramente diferente. Como facilmente se constata,
esta versão requer que a matriz Hk seja definida positiva para que a decomposição Cholesky
exista e assim garantir estabilidade numérica do processo iterativo [21, pp. 621].
3.4
Método symmlq
Esta apresentação do método symmlq (de symmetric LQ decomposition) tem como base o
trabalho de Paige e Saunders [21].
Quando a matriz do sistema é indefinida, pode usar-se o método symmlq para resolver o
sistema (2). Este método é baseado na resolução do sistema (9) através da decomposição LQ
da matriz Tj . Seja Tj = L̄j Qj a decomposição ortogonal da matriz Tj , onde L̄j é uma matriz
triangular inferior composta por três diagonais e Qj uma matriz ortogonal.
80
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
Substituindo Tj pela decomposição ortogonal, obtém-se o sistema
L̄j Qj zj = β1 e1 com pj = Vj zj .
(11)
Também neste caso, a actualização da matriz L̄j se faz com relativa facilidade. A submatriz
principal de ordem j de L̄j+1 é uma matriz Lj que difere de L̄j no
q elemento ῑj da posição
(j, j) . A relação entre ῑj e o correspondente elemento de Lj é ιj =
2 .
ῑ2j + βj+1
Tal como o método dos gradientes conjugados, o método symmlq minimiza a norma−l 2 do
erro mas num espaço diferente de Krylov [8]. Além disso, quando a matriz do sistema é definida
positiva o método symmlq gera a mesma solução que o método dos gradientes conjugados.
3.5
Método minres
O método minres (de minimum residual ) [8] e [21] pode ser aplicado a sistemas simétricos
indefinidos e é baseado na resolução do sistema (10) e na decomposição L̄j Qj de Tj .
A matriz dos coeficientes do sistema (10) é pentagonal e pelo menos semidefinida positiva.
Utilizando a decomposição L̄j Qj de Tj , obtém-se
T
2
T
T
Tj2 + βj+1
ej eT
j = L̄j L̄j + (βj+1 ej ) (βj+1 ej ) = Lj Lj ,
com L̄j = Lj Dj , onde Dj = diag(1, ..., 1, cj ) e cj = ῑj /ιj . Assim, o sistema (10) é equivalente
a
Lj LT
j zj = β1 L̄j Qj e1 com pj = Vj zj .
3.6
Critérios de terminação
Não parece razoável terminar os métodos iterativos acima descritos para a resolução do
sistema Newton, apenas quando a solução exacta for encontrada. Em vez disso, deve usar-se
um critério de terminação. Este critério inclui condições que, sendo verificadas, garantem que
a aproximação é adequada face ao progresso do algoritmo.
Quando se introduz um critério de terminação para parar o processo iterativo antes de
atingir a solução exacta do sistema Newton, diz-se que o processo foi truncado e o método
de Newton resultante é conhecido por método de Newton truncado (NT). A aproximação à
solução passa a ser denotada por pk , onde k designa o ı́ndice da iteração do método de Newton.
Neste sentido, pk é a direcção utilizada para determinar uma nova aproximação ao ponto de
estacionaridade da função f .
Apresentam-se de seguida os três critérios implementados neste trabalho.
Critério de Terminação 1
Um dos critérios de terminação limita os resı́duos, em termos relativos, por uma constante
positiva previamente fixada, ξ, ou seja, as iterações terminam quando
kgk + Hk pj k
≤ξ ,
kgk k
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
81
sendo pj uma aproximação à direcção Newton. Se ξ for suficientemente pequeno, a aproximação
pj está muito próxima da direcção Newton e a exactidão com que o sistema Newton é resolvido
mantém-se constante ao longo do processo iterativo.
Critério de Terminação 2
São bem conhecidas as propriedades de convergência do método de Newton na vizinhança
da solução. Longe de um ponto de estacionaridade parece não haver justificação para calcular
a solução exacta do sistema Newton. Assim, parece existir uma relação directa entre o trabalho
necessário para calcular a direcção de procura e a proximidade a um ponto de estacionaridade.
Um critério que tem em consideração esta relação, baseia-se na condição
krj k
1
≤ min
, kgk kt ,
kgk k
k
para algum 0 < t ≤ 1 [1], para a paragem do processo iterativo. Desta escolha resulta que
na proximidade de um ponto de estacionaridade a exactidão com que o sistema é resolvido é
maior.
Critério de Terminação 3
Uma aproximação à direcção Newton também pode ser avaliada através da grandeza do
vector resı́duo. Lucidi e Roma [15] propõem a seguinte condição como critério de terminação
no cálculo de uma aproximação à solução do sistema Newton
1
1
krj k ≤ τ min 1, kgk k max
,
,
k + 1 e τkn
onde τ > 0. Este critério tem caracterı́sticas, em parte, semelhantes ao segundo. O resı́duo
mantém-se constante longe de um ponto de estacionaridade da função e tende para zero à
medida que se avança no processo iterativo e kgk k → 0.
4
Estudo computacional
Os resultados apresentados nesta secção foram obtidos com base num número limitado de
testes e fornecem algumas indicações sobre o desempenho das diversas variantes apresentadas.
O computador utilizado foi um Pentium II, Celeron a 466Mhz com 64Mb de RAM. A
linguagem de programação foi o Fortran 90 sobre o sistema operativo MS-DOS.
Foi usado um conjunto de dez problemas de optimização com e sem restrições nas variáveis,
de pequena dimensão, que inclui problemas bem conhecidos e de difı́cil resolução. Os problemas
com restrições nas variáveis foram transformados em problemas sem restrições através da
função de penalidade l2 em que o parâmetro de penalidade foi mantido constante ao longo
do processo iterativo. Os problemas sem restrições (S 201, S 256 e S 257) foram retirados de
Schittkowski [23] e os com restrições foram retirados de Hock e Schittkowski [12] (HS 006 com
parâmetro de penalidade 1 e 10, HS 007 com parâmetro de penalidade 1 e 100 e HS 027 com
parâmetro de penalidade 1) e de Grippo, Lampariello e Lucidi [10] (função Maratos com o
parâmetro de penalidade 1 e 100).
As experiências computacionais realizadas tinham como objectivo identificar:
82
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
• uma técnica eficiente e robusta para calcular uma aproximação à direcção Newton através
da combinação de um métodos iterativo, para a resolução do sistema Newton, com um
dos critérios de terminação descritos na Subsecção 3.6;
• um critério de procura unidimensional, monótono ou não monótono, para a globalização
do algoritmo;
• uma estratégia de procura, linear ou curvilı́nea, para gerar as aproximações x k à solução
do problema.
Para a resolução inexacta do sistema Newton foram usados os seguintes métodos: gradientes conjugados (gc), gradientes conjugados baseado no processo de Lanczos (gc-PS), symmlq
e minres.
Optou-se por apresentar um resumo dos resultados de modo a tornar mais fácil a sua análise
e interpretação. As tabelas completas podem ser consultadas em Pereira [22]. Considerámos
que um problema é resolvido quando se obtém uma aproximação a um ponto de estacionaridade
em que kg (xk )k ≤ 10−6 , em menos de 100 iterações.
A ordem entre as comparações efectuadas é a seguinte: comparação entre os métodos
iterativos para a resolução do sistema Newton, comparação entre os critérios de procura unidimensional monótono e não monótono com estabilização do passo e comparação entre a procura
linear e a curvilı́nea.
4.1
Comparação entre os métodos iterativos
Para identificar o método iterativo e o critério de terminação mais adequados à resolução
inexacta do sistema Newton, considerámos os seguintes valores:
• Critério de Terminação 1 (C-1): ξ = 10−7 ;
• Critério de Terminação 2 (C-2): t = 1 (indicado por Dembo e Steihaug [1]);
• Critério de Terminação 3 (C-3): τ = 10−1 (indicado por Lucidi e Roma [15]).
Cada método iterativo para a resolução do sistema Newton foi testado com os três critérios
de terminação e com as estratégias de globalização monótona e não monótona com estabilização
do passo. A Tabela 1 apresenta, de um total de vinte testes, o número de casos bem sucedidos. O número vinte surge da combinação dos dez problemas com as duas estratégias de
globalização.
Pode concluir-se que, em termos de robustez, os melhores critérios de terminação a usar
nos métodos iterativos são o C-1 e o C-3.
Para analisar a eficiência, considerou-se o número de iterações externas (iterações que o
método de Newton truncado necessita para atingir uma aproximação a um ponto de estacionaridade com uma certa precisão) e o número total de iterações internas (iterações necessárias
para a resolução do sistema Newton por um método iterativo com um determinado critério de
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
83
Tabela 1: Métodos iterativos de Krylov (número de casos resolvidos).
C-1
C-2
C-3
gc
20
13
20
gc-PS
20
13
20
symmlq
20
13
20
minres
20
16
20
Tabela 2: Métodos iterativos de Krylov (número de iterações).
gc
C-1
C-2
C-3
No Ext.
No Int.
124
114
111
370
248
314
gc-PS
No Int.
124
368
114
248
111
314
No Ext.
symmlq
No Int.
124
378
116
259
111
319
No Ext.
minres
No Int.
124
374
121
263
111
314
No Ext.
terminação). Os resultados acumulados do número de iterações externas (N o Ext.) e internas
(No Int.), na resolução comum de seis problemas, são dados na Tabela 2.
Dos testes efectuados, verifica-se que com o Critério de Terminação 3 atinge-se a solução em
menos iterações externas. O Critério de Terminação 2 é o que exige menos iterações internas.
No entanto, face aos resultados da Tabela 1, podemos concluir que o critério C-3 é o mais
adequado para a resolução inexacta do sistema Newton.
4.2
Critério monótono versus critério não monótono com estabilização
Nas estratégias de globalização do algoritmo, definidas na Secção 2, considerámos os seguintes parâmetros η = 0.9 e γ = 10−4 . Também usámos na estratégia não monótona com
estabilização do passo os valores sugeridos por Ferris, Lucidi e Roma [4].
Vejamos agora de que maneira a escolha da técnica de globalização influencia a eficiência e
a robustez dos métodos NT. Relativamente à robustez, apenas os métodos gc, gc-PS e symmlq,
quando combinados com o Critério de Terminação 2, possuem diferenças no número total de
problemas resolvidos, que se traduzem apenas num caso. Na Tabela 3, são apresentados os
resultados acumulados relativos ao número de iterações externas e cálculos da função (N o F.),
com base em seis problemas que foram resolvidos simultaneamente por todas as variantes.
Em termos do número de chamadas à função, para o cálculo do comprimento do passo, as
Tabela 3: Métodos iterativos de Krylov (critério monótono).
gc
C-1
C-2
C-3
No Ext.
No F.
62
56
55
372
171
191
gc-PS
No F.
62
372
56
171
55
199
No Ext.
symmlq
No F.
62
372
58
196
55
197
No Ext.
minres
No F.
62
372
60
190
56
198
No Ext.
84
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
Tabela 4: Métodos iterativos de Krylov (critério não monótono com estabilização do passo).
gc
C-1
C-2
C-3
No Ext.
No F.
62
58
56
9
9
9
gc-PS
No F.
62
9
56
8
56
9
No Ext.
symmlq
No F.
62
9
58
8
56
9
No Ext.
minres
No F.
62
9
61
8
55
9
No Ext.
Tabela 5: Resultados obtidos com procura curvilı́nea (número de casos resolvidos).
C-1
C-2
C-3
gc-PS
20
19
20
symmlq
20
18
20
minres
20
19
20
melhores variantes do método NT são aquelas que utilizam o Critério de Terminação 2 e os
métodos gc e gc-PS. A Tabela 4 contém o mesmo tipo de resultados, mas agora obtidos com
o critério não monótono com estabilização.
A variação no número de chamadas à função é pouco significativa. Comparando os resultados das Tabelas 3 e 4, verifica-se que o critério não monótono reduz de uma forma significativa
o número de chamadas à função sem contudo aumentar o número de iterações externas.
4.3
Procura linear versus procura curvilı́nea
Como referido na Subsecção 2.2, o método NT baseado numa procura curvilı́nea recorre ao
cálculo de duas direcções: a de Newton e uma de curvatura negativa. Quando existe, a direcção
de curvatura negativa pode ser calculada com base na matriz Tj do processo de Lanczos [15].
Neste contexto, apenas foram utilizados o método dos gradientes conjugados segundo Paige e
Saunders, o symmlq e o minres. A Tabela 5 apresenta o número de casos resolvidos por cada
um dos métodos.
As implementações baseadas nos Critérios de Terminação 1 e 3 são as mais robustas.
Comparando as Tabelas 1 e 5, verifica-se que as variantes do método NT baseadas na procura
curvilı́nea resolveram maior ou igual número de casos do que as mesmas variantes baseadas
numa procura linear. Dos cinco problemas resolvidos simultaneamente pelos três métodos
resultaram os valores acumulados apresentados na Tabela 6, para a procura linear, e na Tabela
7, para a procura curvilı́nea.
Verificou-se que, em alguns problemas, as variantes com procura curvilı́nea convergem para
soluções diferentes das obtidas com a procura linear. Tal facto, deve-se ao uso da direcção
de curvatura negativa. Analisando as Tabelas 6 e 7, conclui-se que a procura curvilı́nea exige
um maior número de iterações externas e internas do que a procura linear. Separando os
resultados por técnica de globalização, apresentam-se na Tabela 8 os resultados acumulados
obtidos pela estratégia monótona e na Tabela 9 os obtidos pela estratégia não monótona com
estabilização do passo.
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
85
Tabela 6: Resultados obtidos com procura linear (número de iterações).
No
C-1
C-2
C-3
gc-PS
Ext. No Int.
98
264
91
199
89
234
No
symmlq
Ext. No Int.
98
274
86
196
89
237
No
minres
Ext. No Int.
98
270
98
214
89
234
Tabela 7: Resultados obtidos com procura curvilı́nea (número de iterações).
gc-PS
Ext. No Int.
140
348
144
282
145
352
No
C-1
C-2
C-3
symmlq
Ext. No Int.
140
358
142
280
145
352
No
minres
Ext. No Int.
140
354
148
297
143
348
No
Tabela 8: Resultados baseados numa procura curvilı́nea (critério monótono).
gc-PS
No Int.
73
180
78
153
76
183
No Ext.
C-1
C-2
C-3
symmlq
No Int.
73
185
77
152
76
183
No Ext.
minres
No Int.
73
183
76
153
75
181
No Ext.
Tabela 9: Resultados baseados numa procura curvilı́nea (critério não monótono com estabilização do passo).
gc-PS
No Int.
67
168
66
129
69
169
No Ext.
C-1
C-2
C-3
symmlq
No Int.
67
173
65
128
69
169
No Ext.
minres
No Int.
67
171
72
144
68
167
No Ext.
86
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
É interessante verificar que a estratégia não monótona com estabilização do passo converge
em menos iterações externas do que a estratégia monótona, quando implementadas no âmbito
de uma procura curvilı́nea.
5
Conclusões
Um método de Newton truncado surge quando se resolve o sistema Newton por um método
iterativo e se usa um critério de terminação para truncar o processo iterativo e obter uma
aproximação à direcção Newton. Neste artigo, foram implementados quatro métodos iterativos baseados em espaços de Krylov e três critérios diferentes de terminação destes processos
iterativos. Para a globalização dos algoritmos, foram usados dois critérios de procura unidimensional, um monótono e outro não monótono que inclui uma condição de estabilização
do passo. Além disso, a sucessão de aproximações à solução foi ainda gerada através de uma
procura linear e de uma procura curvilı́nea.
A combinação destes diferentes procedimentos gera as diferentes variantes do método de
Newton para a resolução de um problema de optimização não linear sem restrições. As experiências computacionais realizadas com base nas variantes apresentadas servem para identificar a combinação mais eficiente e robusta dos procedimentos acima enunciados.
Em termos de conclusões finais, e em relação ao número de iterações externas, os melhores
resultados foram obtidos pelas variantes do método NT que se baseiam numa procura linear e
que usam o Critério de Terminação 3. A escolha do critério de globalização, entre monótono e
não monótono com estabilização do passo, é imediata uma vez que a implementação do critério
não monótono traduz-se numa redução do número de chamadas à função, sem aumentar o
número de iterações externas. Embora a procura curvilı́nea tenha resolvido no global um
número maior de problemas, o número de iterações externas também aumentou. Um outro
aspecto menos positivo da implementação deste tipo de procura reside na necessidade de
calcular o menor valor próprio e o correspondente vector próprio [15] para determinar a direcção
de curvatura negativa, quando a matriz dos coeficientes do sistema Newton não é semidefinida
positiva. Durante os testes efectuados, poucas vezes houve necessidade de calcular a direcção
de curvatura negativa.
Para concluir e com base nos testes realizados, a variante do método de Newton truncado
mais eficiente e robusta combina uma procura linear, os métodos symmlq ou minres com o
Critério de Terminação 3 e uma estratégia não monótona com estabilização do passo.
Agradecimento
As autoras gostariam de agradecer ao revisor as sugestões enviadas que muito contribuı́ram
para a clarificação dos temas analisados neste artigo.
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
87
Referências
[1] R. S. Dembo e T. Steihaug, Truncated-Newton Algorithms for Large-Scale Unconstrained Optimization, Mathematical Programming, Vol. 26, pp. 190-212, 1983.
[2] J. E. Dennis Jr e R. B. Schnabel, Numerical Methods for Unconstrained Optimization and Nonlinear Equations, Prentice-Hall Inc., New Jersey, 1983.
[3] E. M. G. P. Fernandes, Computação Numérica, 2a edição, Universidade do Minho, 1998.
[4] M. C. Ferris, S. Lucidi e M. Roma, Nonmonotone Curvilinear Line Search Methods for Unconstrained Optimization, Computational Optimization and Applications, Vol. 6, pp. 117-136, 1996.
[5] D. Goldfarb, Curvilinear Path Steplength Algorithms for Minimization which Use Directions of
Negative Curvature, Mathematical Programming, Vol. 18, pp. 31-40, 1980.
[6] G. H. Golub e C. F. Van Loan, Matrix Computations, The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1983.
[7] N. I. M. Gould, S. Lucidi, M. Roma e P. L. Toint, Solving the Trust-Region Subproblem Using the
Lanczos Method, SIAM Journal on Optimization, Vol. 9, No 2, pp. 504-525, 1999.
[8] A. Greenbaum, Iterative Methods for Solving Linear Systems, SIAM, 1997.
[9] L. Grippo, F. Lampariello e S. Lucidi, A Nonmonotone Line Search Technique for Newton’s
Method, SIAM Journal on Numerical Analysis, Vol. 23, pp. 707-716, 1986.
[10] L. Grippo, F. Lampariello e S. Lucidi, A Class of Nonmonotone Stabilization Methods in Unconstrained Optimization, Numerische Mathematik, Vol. 59, pp. 779-805, 1991.
[11] W. Hackbusch, Iterative Solution of Large Sparse Systems of Equations, Applied Mathematical
Sciences, 95, Springer-Verlag, 1994.
[12] W. Hock e K. Schittkowski, Test Examples for Nonlinear Programming Codes, Springer-Verlag,
1981.
[13] C. T. Kelley, Iterative Methods for Linear and Nonlinear Equations, Frontiers in Applied Mathematics, Vol. 16, SIAM, 1995.
[14] C. T. Kelley, Iterative Methods for Optimization, Frontiers in Applied Mathematics, SIAM, 1999.
[15] S. Lucidi e M. Roma, Numerical Experiences with New Truncated Newton Methods in Large Scale
Uncontrained Optimization, Computational Optimization and Applications, Vol. 7. pp 71-87, 1997.
[16] G. P. McCormick, A Modification of Armijo’s Step-size Rule for Negative Curvature, Mathematical
Programming, Vol. 13, pp. 111-115, 1977.
[17] J. J. Moré e D. C. Sorensen, On the Use of Directions of Negative Curvature in a Modified Newton
Method, Mathematical Programming, Vol. 16, pp. 1-20, 1979.
[18] S. G. Nash e A. Sofer, Linear and Nonlinear Programming, McGraw-Hill, 1996.
[19] J. Nocedal e S. J. Wright, Numerical Optimization, Springer Series in Operations Research, 1999.
[20] J. M. Ortega e W. C. Rheinboldt, Iterative Solution of Nonlinear Equations in Several Variables,
Academic Press Inc., New York, 1970.
[21] C. C. Paige e M. A. Saunders, Solution of Sparse Indefinite Systems of Linear Equations, SIAM
Journal on Numerical Analysis, Vol. 12, No 4, pp. 617-629, 1975.
88
A.I. Pereira, E.M. Fernandes / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 73-88
[22] A. I. P. N. Pereira, Estudo e Desempenho do Método de Newton Truncado em Optimização, Tese
de mestrado, Universidade do Minho, 2000.
[23] K. Schittkowski, More Test Examples for Nonlinear Programming Codes, Lectures Notes in Economics and Mathematical Systems, Springer-Verlag, 1987.
[24] M. A. Wolfe, Numerical Methods for Unconstrained Optimization, Van Nostrand Reinholds Company, 1978.
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
89
Suavização da Fronteira DEA: o Caso BCC
Tridimensional
João Carlos C. B. Soares de Mello
Luiz Biondi Neto
∗
Eliane Gonçalves Gomes
Marcos Pereira Estellita Lins
†
§
Depto. de Engenharia de Produção – Universidade Federal Fluminense – Brasil
[email protected]
†
‡
‡
∗
Embrapa Monitoramento por Satélite – Brasil
[email protected]
Depto. de Eletrônica e Telecomunicações – Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro – Brasil
[email protected]
§
Programa de Engenharia de Produção – Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro – Brasil
[email protected]
Abstract
The multipliers DEA model has multiple optimal solutions in the extreme-efficient
DMUs. This fact is a drawback in several applications, particularly when we need to know
the tradeoffs and in Cross-Evaluation. We propose a solution using the geometric representation of DEA envelope model. In this representation the frontier is piece-wise linear,
meaning that for the extreme-efficient DMUs there is no tangent plan to the DEA frontier,
as these DMUs are the cusps of the faces. The solution consists in changing the original
frontier by another with continuous partial derivatives in every point and being as close as
possible to the original one. We obtained a smoothed frontier with similar properties to the
original, but with tangent plans at all points. The multipliers are obtained from the tangent
plans equations. We present the general case theoretical development, which makes use of
a non-metric topology based on the generalisation of the arch length, whose minimisation
leads to a non-exactly soluble variational problem. Approximate solutions are obtained by
the Ritz variational method. We present the particular case of the three-dimensional DEA
BCC model, applied to the evaluation of Brazilian airlines companies.
Resumo
O modelo dos multiplicadores em DEA admite múltiplas soluções óptimas nas DMUs
extremo-eficientes. Este facto acarreta dificuldades em várias aplicações, em especial
quando há necessidade do conhecimento de razões de substituição (tradeoffs) e em Avaliação Cruzada. Neste artigo é proposta uma solução para este problema, com o uso da
c 2004 Associação Portuguesa de Investigação Operacional
90
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
representação geométrica obtida do modelo do envelope. Nesta representação a fronteira
é linear por partes, o que significa que nas DMUs extremo-eficientes não existe plano tangente à fronteira DEA, por serem estas DMUs os vértices das faces. Através da substituição
da fronteira original por uma outra com derivadas contı́nuas em todos os pontos e o mais
próximo possı́vel da original, é obtida uma fronteira com propriedades semelhantes à original, mas com planos tangentes em todos os pontos. Da equação destes planos calculam-se
os coeficientes do modelo dos multiplicadores. É apresentado o desenvolvimento teórico
para o caso geral, que usa uma topologia não métrica baseada na generalização do comprimento de arco, cuja minimização conduz a um problema variacional sem solução exacta.
Soluções aproximadas são obtidas pelo método variacional de Ritz. É exemplificado o caso
particular do modelo DEA BCC tridimensional, aplicado à avaliação de companhias aéreas
brasileiras.
Keywords: DEA, Variational Methods, Smoothed Frontier, Airlines Evaluation
Title: A smoothed frontier for the 3-dimensional BCC-DEA model
1
Introdução
A Análise de Envoltória de Dados (Data Envelopment Analysis – DEA) foi desenvolvida por
Charnes, Cooper e Rhodes (1978) para determinar a eficiência de unidades productivas (Decision Making Units – DMUs), onde não seja predominante ou não se deseja considerar somente o aspecto financeiro. A metodologia DEA permite avaliar a eficiência de cada DMU
considerando-se os recursos de que dispõe (inputs) e os resultados alcançados (outputs).
Os modelos DEA clássicos, como modelos de programação matemática, apresentam sempre
formulações duais. Existem, assim, duas formulações equivalentes para DEA (Cooper et al.,
2000). De forma simplificada, pode-se dizer que uma das formulações (modelo do Envelope)
define uma região viável de produção e trabalha com uma distância de cada DMU à fronteira
desta região. A outra formulação (modelo dos Multiplicadores) trabalha com a razão de somas
ponderadas de produtos e recursos, sendo a ponderação escolhida de forma mais favorável a
cada DMU, respeitando-se determinadas condições.
As duas formulações, como problemas duais que são, fornecem, evidentemente, a mesma
eficiência para cada DMU. No entanto, além da eficiência, outras informações podem ser extraı́das dos modelos citados. O modelo do envelope fornece os coeficientes de ponderação de
cada DMU eficiente (denominados λi ) na formação da DMU virtual que serve de benchmark
para cada DMU ineficiente. Dada uma determinada orientação, esses coeficientes são determinados de forma única para cada DMU. É de especial interesse observar o que ocorre nas
DMUs eficientes: elas são o seu próprio benchmark e, assim, o PPL do envelope fornece valor 1
para o λ referente a essa DMU e zero para todas os demais. Tem-se assim um PPL altamente
degenerado.
Já o modelo dos multiplicadores fornece os coeficientes de ponderação que cada DMU
atribui a cada input e output. O facto de cada DMU atribuir valores diferentes a esses multiplicadores é a essência de DEA. Cada DMU tem a liberdade de valorizar aquilo em que é
melhor, ignorando as variáveis em que o seu desempenho não é bom. Qualquer modelo DEA
deve preservar, em menor ou maior grau, essa liberdade.
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
91
Existem várias interpretações para os multiplicadores (também denominados “pesos”). A
mais comum afirma que cada peso é um indicador da importância que uma DMU atribui à
variável correspondente na determinação da sua eficiência. Essa interpretação só é válida, sem
cálculos adicionais, se as variáveis forem previamente normalizadas.
Economicamente, os multiplicadores podem ser interpretados de duas formas. A primeira
interpretação é como componentes da razão de ponderação entre as variáveis (tradeoffs), ou
seja, quanto uma DMU deve aumentar em um input quando outro diminui de uma unidade,
ou quanto um aumento de um input deve provocar de aumento em um output. Uma interpretação ainda mais importante é que os multiplicadores são pesos sombra (shadow prices)
normalizados (Coelli et al., 1998). Essa interpretação é bastante útil para determinar preços
de quantidades sem valor de mercado, bastando para tal conhecer o custo efectivo de alguma
das variáveis. Com esse conhecimento, os preços sombras normalizados transformam-se em
preços não normalizados. Reinhard et al. (2000) usam essa abordagem para calcular o preço
da poluição em um estudo sobre eficiência ambiental. Cabe ressaltar mais uma vez que para
cada DMU existe um conjunto de pesos diferentes, o que significa que os preços calculados
para certa DMU são válidos apenas para ela.
O uso prático das interpretações dos multiplicadores esbarra em uma dificuldade inerente ao
PPL do modelo dos multiplicadores. De facto, o teorema das folgas complementares também
permite afirmar que os multiplicadores são os coeficientes da equação do hiperplano tangente
à fronteira no ponto de projecção da DMU (Lins e Angulo-Meza, 2000). Ora, as DMUs
eficientes (mais propriamente, as extremo-eficientes) formam os vértices da fronteira e nelas,
por não existirem derivadas, não existe hiperplano tangente, embora exista uma infinidade de
hiperplanos suporte. A Figura 1 ilustra essa situação para o caso de um input e um output.
Tem-se, portanto, uma infinidade de multiplicadores para cada DMU extremo-eficiente, todos
eles conduzindo à eficiência 1 para essas DMUs. Portanto, além de cada DMU ter liberdade
para determinar os seus próprios pesos (o que é desejável), para as DMUs que devem servir
de exemplo, como detentoras de boas práticas de gestão, é impossı́vel saber quais os pesos que
elas efectivamente atribuı́ram a cada variável. A determinação da importância de cada input
e output, ou o cálculo de pesos sombra, fica assim comprometido quando se lida com DMUs
extremo-eficientes.
A ausência de valores únicos para os pesos das DMUs extremo-eficientes tem ainda consequências de natureza diferente. Do ponto de vista teórico, impede o cálculo de derivadas
direccionais em toda a fronteira. Do ponto de vista prático é um obstáculo ao uso de DEA
como ferramenta auxiliar em problemas multicritério. Em certas situações é desejável em um
problema multicritério atribuir pesos aos critério sem julgamentos de valor do decisor (por
exemplo, quando vários decisores não chegam a acordo). DEA seria uma óptima ferramenta
para isso, não fosse o facto de que não são conhecidos os pesos atribuı́dos por algumas DMUs.
É óbvio que se o número de DMUs extremo-eficientes for pequeno em relação ao total do
número de DMUs, pode-se ignorar os pesos atribuı́dos pelas extremo-eficientes e trabalhar
apenas com os pesos atribuı́dos pelas demais DMUs (Lins et al., 2003; Soares de Mello et al.,
2002 [27]).
O problema da não unicidade dos multiplicadores para as DMUs extremo-eficientes foi
várias vezes abordado, mas com soluções deficientes. Charnes et al. (1985) já haviam reconhecido esse problema, quando propuseram o uso arbitrário de um valor único para as derivadas
através do cálculo de uma média ponderada, baseado nos baricentros das hipersuperfı́cies con-
92
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
O
CCR
C
B
E’’
E’’’
A
E’
BCC
E
D
I
Figura 1: Representação das fronteiras BCC e CCR para o caso bidimensional.
correntes. Esse método apresenta várias desvantagens. Entre elas a necessidade de conhecer
as equações de todas as faces (o que exige um algoritmo de complexidade NP – Fukuda, 1993),
a existência de variações bruscas devido à descontinuidade das derivadas e a impossibilidade
de ser aplicado em DMUs que marquem o inı́cio da região Pareto ineficiente, ou que sejam
adjacentes a uma face de dimensão incompleta (Olesen e Petersen, 1996).
Talvez por todas essas desvantagens, o método não costuma ser usado. Muitos autores
fazem análises que ignoram o problema ou, quando muito, após referencia-lo usam os valores da
1a solução óptima encontrada pelo algoritmo implementado (Thanassoulis, 1993; Chilingerian,
1995).
Em algumas situações especı́ficas são possı́veis soluções parciais. Doyle e Green (1994)
introduzem o conceito de formulações agressiva e benevolente no seu modelo de avaliação
cruzada. O modelo de super-eficiência (Andersen e Petersen, 1993), apesar de não apresentar
esse problema, apresenta, no entanto, outras desvantagens. Em primeiro lugar não limita as
eficiências ao intervalo [0,1]. Além disso, elimina uma restrição diferente no PPL de cada DMU,
o que significa dizer que a fronteira eficiente apresenta uma configuração diferente dependendo
da DMU analisada.
Segundo Rosen et al. (1998), os valores dos multiplicadores podem variar entre o valor
calculado com base na derivada à esquerda e o calculado com base na derivada à direita. Esses
autores afirmam ser impossı́vel contornar essa multiplicidade de valores e fazem a proposta de
um quadro SIMPLEX modificado para calcular os limites de variação dos multiplicadores.
A impossibilidade referida por Rosen et al. (1998) decorre da natureza linear por partes
da fronteira DEA. Soares de Mello et al. (2001, 2002 [28]) mostram que é possı́vel contornar
essa impossibilidade mediante a substituição da fronteira DEA original por outra que tenha
propriedades semelhantes, mas continuamente diferenciável. Entre as propriedades mantidas,
está a atribuição de eficiência unitárias às DMUs extremo-eficientes do modelo DEA original. A
técnica, discutida em termos gerais e exemplificada para casos de duas dimensões, consiste em
suavizar a fronteira DEA original, respeitando as propriedades básicas de DEA: convexidade,
monotonicidade crescente dos inputs com os outputs, mesmas DMUs eficientes e atribuição de
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
93
pesos diferentes por cada DMU.
O principal problema dessa técnica é que, do modo como foi apresentada, servia apenas
para casos bidimensionais, de pouca importância prática. Este artigo expande os resultados
obtidos por Soares de Mello et al. (2001, 2002 [28]) ao estudar o caso de suavização da fronteira
DEA para o modelo BCC tridimensional, fazendo uso do mesmo referencial teórico.
O modelo que será aqui apresentado permite determinar valores únicos para os multiplicadores usados por cada DMU eficiente. Além disso, preserva a fronteira tão próximo quanto
possı́vel da original e, evidentemente, mantém a liberdade de cada DMU determinar os seus
próprios multiplicadores.
Um conceito essencial aos desenvolvimentos teóricos é o de proximidade entre superfı́cies,
que é um conceito topológico. Assim, no item 2 apresentam-se os aspectos topológicos do
problema de suavização. No item 3 resumem-se os métodos variacionais usados. No item
4 é exposta a teoria geral de suavização, apresentando-se a formulação para o caso BCC
tridimensional no item 5. Foi realizado um caso de estudo sobre eficiência de companhias
aéreas brasileiras, que é mostrado no item 6. Seguem-se as conclusões (item 7) e as referências
bibliográficas.
2
Topologia da Suavização
As métricas funcionais clássicas lidam normalmente com distâncias entre os valores das funções.
No entanto, no problema de suavização da fronteira DEA é de extrema importância a distância
entre as derivadas, cujo tratamento pelas métricas funcionais clássicas é bastante complexo. É
necessário estabelecer uma forma de determinar proximidade entre funções, que não seja uma
das formas tradicionais e que seja útil no problema de suavização da fronteira DEA.
No caso bidimensional, a região da fronteira que contém 2 DMUs eficientes consecutivas
é um segmento de reta. Como o segmento de reta é o menor comprimento de arco entre
dois pontos, qualquer outra curva que ligue os 2 pontos terá um comprimento de arco maior,
tanto maior quanto mais se afastar do segmento. Além disso, quanto mais oscilar em torno
do segmento (o que significa a existência de derivadas de valor bem diferente da inclinação
da reta suporte do segmento) maior também será o comprimento de arco. Assim, definir se
a fronteira suavizada está na vizinhança da fronteira original usando as diferenças entre seus
comprimentos de arco significa considerar tanto o valor da função quanto o da sua derivada.
Como a fronteira original é composta só de segmentos de reta não é necessário calcular a
diferença de comprimento de arco entre a fronteira original e a fronteira suavizada; basta
minimizar o comprimento de arco da fronteira suavizada que garante-se a proximidade dela
com a original.
Na Figura 2 observa-se que uma função h obtida de f por simetria em relação ao segmento
de reta que une as duas DMUs eficientes, tem o mesmo comprimento de arco de f , ou seja, duas
funções distintas com diferença nula de comprimento de arco. Portanto, o comprimento de
arco não gera uma métrica, embora gere uma topologia não métrica (D’Ambrósio, 1977). Não
se deve falar em distância entre duas fronteiras, mas apenas em proximidade, ou pertinência
a uma vizinhança.
Os mesmos argumentos podem ser generalizados para problemas de dimensão superior,
94
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
y
y = f(x)
b
a
1+
df
dx
2
dx =
2
b
1+
a
dh
dx
dx
y = h(x)
a
b
x
Figura 2: Invariância de comprimento de arco na simetria.
substituindo-se segmento de reta por uma região do hiperplano e integral simples por integral
múltiplo.
O espaço gerado através dessa topologia tem a caracterı́stica de não ser Hausdorff separável
(Hausdorff, 1949). Nesse tipo de espaço pode não ser possı́vel distinguir dois elementos pelas
propriedades topológicas, o que obrigará a restrições adicionais ao problema de minimização
do comprimento de arco, de forma a evitar soluções indesejáveis.
3
Métodos Variacionais
Enquanto a programação matemática trata de calcular valores de variáveis independentes que
optimizam uma função, o Cálculo das Variações visa determinar funções que optimizam uma
“função de funções” ou funcional (Boyer, 1978; Elsgolts, 1980; Soares de Mello, 1987; Smith,
1998).
Rx
Formalizando o conceito anterior, considere-se I[y] = x12 F (x, y, y 0 )dx, onde y = f (x),
f (x1 ) = a e f (x2 ) = b. O valor deste integral (que tem o nome de funcional) varia para cada
função escolhida. Pode existir determinada função para a qual o integral assuma um valor
mı́nimo.
A busca da função que minimiza o funcional é feita por meio da resolução de uma equação
diferencial ordinária. Essa equação é uma condição necessária para a existência de mı́nimo e
pode ser obtida por dois métodos encontrados em, entre outros, Elsgoltz (1980) e Soares de
Mello (1987). Aplicando-se um desses métodos, obtém-se a equação (I).
Fy −
d
0
dx Fy
=0
(I)
Essa equação, conhecida como Equação de Euler-Lagrange (Elsgolts, 1980), deve ser resolvida com as condições de contorno apropriadas.
O resultado anterior pode ser generalizado para o caso de ter-se I[U (x 1 , x2 , ..., xn )] =
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
R
95
∂U ∂U
∂U
R F (x1 ,x2 , ..., xn , U, ∂x1 , ∂x2 , ..., ∂x2 )dR,
com as condições de contorno adequadas (geralmente
prescrição do valor de U ou de suas derivadas na fronteira da região de integração).
Os mesmos métodos, usados junto com o teorema de Gauss (Soares de Mello et al., 1987),
conduzem à equação (II).
Fu −
n
P
i=1
∂
∂F
∂xi ( ∂Uxi )
=0
(II)
Essa é a versão n-dimensional da Equação de Euler-Lagrange, que deve ser resolvida com
as condições de contorno apropriadas.
Devido à sua não linearidade, a equação de Euler-Lagrange só tem solução analı́tica em
alguns casos particulares. Para resolver os problemas em que não é possı́vel determinar a
solução exacta surgiram os chamados métodos directos ou métodos variacionais. De forma
geral, esses métodos consistem em restringir o conjunto no qual procura-se a solução para
o problema variacional: consideram-se candidatas à solução apenas alguns tipos especiais de
funções, e não qualquer função com derivadas de segunda ordem. A solução encontrada será
um ótimo no conjunto considerado embora não seja um ótimo global.
Entre os métodos directos podem-se citar os métodos de Ritz (Smith, 1998), que para o
particular de funcionais com funções de uma variável independente do tipo I [y (x)] =
Rcaso
x1
F
(x, y, y0)dx, o funcional toma valores apenas para todas as funções do tipo (III), em vez
x0
de assumir valores para quaisquer funções y (x).
ym =
n
P
αi wi (x)
(III)
i=1
As funções w1 (x), w2 (x), ..., wn (x) são previamente escolhidas e denominam-se funções
aproximantes. Os αi são números reais e para cada sequência destes números obtém-se uma
função ym (x). Essas funções devem satisfazer às mesmas condições de contorno (restrições)
do problema variacional original.
Substituindo-se y e y0 por ym e y0m no funcional I e calculando-se o integral, obtém-se uma
função I (α1 , α2 , ..., αn ). Uma condição suficiente para a optimização dessa função é dada pelo
sistema de equações (IV).
∂I
∂αi
= 0, ∀αi , i = 1, 2, ..., n
(IV)
Calculados os αi obtém-se um ym (x) que é uma solução aproximante para o problema
proposto.
É possı́vel escolher wi como sendo potências de x, de tal forma que ym seja um polinómio.
Em Soares de Mello (1987) são vistos vários exemplos de uso deste método com polinómios
quadráticos e é mostrado que eles apresentam bons resultados na solução das equações de
Laplace e Poisson.
Os resultados aqui apresentados podem ser generalizados para dimensões superiores, bastando utilizar funções aproximantes com várias variáveis independentes e integrais múltiplos.
96
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
4
Formulação Geral do Modelo de Suavização
Serão considerados modelos DEA com apenas 1 output, nos quais a suavização consiste em procurar uma função que minimize o comprimento de arco (ou sua generalização n-dimensional),
que contenha as DMUs Pareto eficientes e que tenha derivadas parciais de segunda ordem
em todos os pontos. Por facilidade computacional, pode-se minimizar o quadrado do comprimento de arco, sem alterar o resultado. Então, após determinar as DMUs extremo-eficientes
no modelo DEA clássico, a suavização é obtida pelo problema variacional (V).
R
P ∂F 2
min L =
1+
dS
∂xi
R
i
sa (V)
o
n
~ j = output X
~ j , ∀X
~ :X
~ é DMU Pareto eficiente
~j ∈ E = X
F X
~ =X
~j
~ j ∃ ∂F X
∀X
∂xi
Na última restrição de (V) é particularmente importante garantir a existência das derivadas nos pontos correspondentes às DMUs extremo-eficientes, por serem estes os pontos de
descontinuı́dade das derivadas na fronteira original. Isto pode ser conseguido com a imposição
de derivadas laterais iguais no caso de se usar aproximantes diferentes em cada região da
fronteira, ou escolhendo um único aproximante para toda fronteira que tenha derivadas em
todo seu domı́nio. Esse P
é um problema de Cálculo das Variações, que tem como equação de
∂2F
2
= 0.
Euler–Lagrange ∇ F =
∂x2
i
i
A última equação é a bem conhecida equação de Laplace n-dimensional (Farlow, 1993),
que deve ser resolvida, se possı́vel, com as condições de contorno adequadas. Como a topologia
usada não garante a separação de Hausdorff são necessárias condições de contorno adicionais
para bem caracterizar o problema. Essas condições adicionais serão obtidas das propriedades
de cada modelo DEA usado.
4.1
Modelo BCC com um output
A existência de apenas um output permite escrever O = f (I). Para garantir que f é realmente
uma função, seu gráfico não pode apresentar regiões verticais, ou seja, não haverá regiões
Pareto ineficientes na fronteira suavizada.
O facto do modelo ser BCC (Banker et al., 1984) significa que a fronteira é convexa o que,
2
como corolário do Teorema do Valor Médio (Swokowski, 1995), obriga a que ∂∂xF2 ≤ 0. Com
i
esta restrição adicional obtém-se o Teorema da Inexistência de Solução Óptima.
Teorema da Inexistência de Solução Óptima
O problema de suavização da fronteira com uma topologia baseada no comprimento de arco
em um modelo BCC com um output ou não tem sentido, ou não tem solução.
Prova:
1. As derivadas segundas são sempre nulas. Neste caso a fronteira é um hiperplano que
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
97
contém todas as DMUs eficientes. A fronteira original já tem as caracterı́sticas de suavidade e o problema não tem sentido.
2. Em pelo menos um ponto uma das derivadas segundas é negativa. Como neste ponto as
outras derivadas segundas são negativas ou nulas, a sua soma é negativa, o que contraria
a equação de Laplace.
P ∂2F
P 2
−ai < 0, e ∇2 F = 0, ou seja, o problema
=
Simbolicamente, ∃ai 6= 0 : ∇2 F =
∂x2
é impossı́vel.
i
i
i
É necessário interpretar o que significa a impossibilidade do problema. O problema proposto é determinar a fronteira suave que melhor se aproxima da fronteira original, usando
uma topologia baseada no comprimento de arco. Afirmar que o problema é impossı́vel significa dizer que não existe solução que “melhor se aproxima”. Dada uma fronteira suave,
sempre será possı́vel determinar uma outra (e, portanto, uma infinidade) que seja uma melhor
aproximação da original. O facto de não ter a melhor aproximação não impede que existam
boas aproximações, que poderão ser calculadas usando métodos variacionais, em especial uma
adaptação do método de Ritz (Smith, 1998). Esse método consiste em substituir a procura
da melhor função de todas pela procura da melhor função de uma classe particular de funções
chamadas aproximantes.
O cálculo das funções aproximantes usa uma abordagem oposta à do método dos Elementos
Finitos (Reddy, 1993), na qual existe uma superfı́cie desconhecida a ser aproximada por um
conjunto de funções polinomiais, justapostas em pontos convenientes. Na suavização da fronteira DEA existem as funções polinomiais, justaposta em pontos previamente determinados
pelos dados do problema, a serem substituı́das por uma função diferenciável desconhecida.
4.2
Modelo CCR com um output
Neste modelo a condição de convexidade é substituı́da pela proporcionalidade: aumentos
pro
~
porcionais nos inputs provocam um aumento proporcional no output. Ou seja, F k · X =
~ , o que significa que F tem que ser homogénea de grau 1 (Coelli et al., 1998). Como
k·F X
~ · ∇F
~ = nF , ou, como n
tal, deve respeitar o teorema de Euler para funções homogéneas: X
~
~
= 1, X · ∇F = F . Esta restrição impede uma livre escolha de aproximantes que são, obrigatoriamente, funções homogéneas de 1o grau. Entretanto, este caso foge ao escopo deste
artigo.
5
Suavização do Modelo DEA BCC Tridimensional (2 inputs
e 1 output
Em Soares de Mello et al. (2001) usou-se um aproximante polinomial de 2 o grau para cada
região da fronteira (caso bidimensional), ou seja, havia uma correspondência biunı́voca entre
aproximantes e faces Pareto eficientes. Isso foi possı́vel graças à determinação geométrica das
faces eficientes. Em casos de maior dimensão, a determinação das faces exige um algoritmo de
complexidade NP, o que pode inviabilizar o uso de aproximantes especı́ficos.
98
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
Tabela 1: Relação entre o número de DMUs extremo-eficientes e o grau do polinómio.
Número de DMUs extremo-eficientes
3–5
6–9
10 – 14
15 – 20
21 – 27
......
Grau do polinómio
2
3
4
5
6
......
Mesmo em problemas em que a inviabilidade prática não ocorra, outras razões não recomendam o uso de aproximantes especı́ficos para cada face:
• A dificuldade de garantir a continuidade da fronteira nas arestas, mesmo que esteja
garantida a continuidade nos vértices.
• A geometria da fronteira pode acarretar um número de restrições de igualdade maior
que o número de variáveis de decisão, fornecidas por um polinómio de 2 o grau.
• A existência de faces de dimensão não completa pode impedir o cálculo de derivadas nos
vértices, o que impede a imposição de restrições de suavidade.
Assim, adoptou-se um aproximante polinomial único para toda fronteira. Com isso, pode
ocorrer a necessidade de trabalhar com funções polinomiais de grau mais elevado. Por exemplo,
se houver a necessidade do uso de um polinómio de grau 4, ter-se-ia a equação (VI), na qual
x e y são os inputs e Z é o output.
Z = a + bx + cy + dx2 + exy + f y 2 + gx3 + hx2 y + ixy 2 + jy 3 + kx4 + lx3 y + mx2 y 2 + nxy 3 + oy 4
(VI)
A Tabela 1 mostra a relação que deve existir entre o número de DMUs extremo-eficientes
e o grau do polinómio para a escolha do aproximante em cada caso real, de modo que seja
garantido que o número de restrições de igualdade seja inferior ao número de variáveis de
decisão (coeficientes do polinómio). As restrições de igualdade garantem que a fronteira suavizada contenha todas as DMUs extremo-eficientes, embora possa não conter DMUs eficientes
que não sejam “cantos” da fronteira. A exclusão dessas DMUs é para evitar inviabilidades no
problema de suavização (Soares de Mello et al, 2001).
A formulação (VII) representa o modelo DEA tridimensional suavizado. A função objectivo
é dada pelo integral duplo, onde ymin , xmin , ymax e xmax representam o menor e o maior valor
de cada input. A restrição (VII.1) garante que as DMUs extremo-eficientes estejam contidas
na fronteira suavizada. As restrições (VII.2) e (VII.3) garantem a monotonicidade crescente
da fronteira. A convexidade é garantida por (VII.4) e (VII.5). Estas seriam desnecessárias
caso todas as DMUs fossem projectadas, no modelo DEA BCC clássico, em região Pareto
eficiente; caso contrário, torna-se necessário garantir que nenhuma DMU seja projectada em
região decrescente da fronteira.
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
min
(
xR
max ymax
R
xmin ymin
1+
sa
Z(xef i , yef i ) = Zef i
∂Z
∂x (xmax , ymax ) ≥ 0
∂Z
∂y (xmax , ymax ) ≥ 0
∂2Z
≤ 0, ∀x, y
∂x2
∂2Z
≤ 0, ∀x, y
∂y 2
∂Z 2
∂x
+
∂Z
∂y
2 dydx
99
)
(VII.1)
(VII.2)
(VII.3)
(VII.4)
(VII.5)
(VII)
Dependendo do grau do polinómio pode ser impossı́vel determinar os valores mais gerais
possı́veis dos coeficientes que garantam o cumprimento das restrições (VII.4) e (VII.5) para
todos os valores de x e y. É possı́vel garantir o cumprimento dessas restrições impondo-se
uma restrição ainda mais forte, a saber, todos os termos do polinómio devem ser convexos.
Isto é garantido na equação (VIII.4), que substitui as equações (VII.4) e (VII.5). O modelo
(VIII) representa, assim, a formulação geral do modelo DEA BCC tridimensional suavizado,
com garantia de convexidade.
)
(
2 xR
max ymax
R
2
+ ∂Z
dydx
1 + ∂Z
min
∂x
∂y
xmin ymin
sa
Z(xef i , yef i ) = Zef i
∂Z
∂x (xmax , ymax ) ≥ 0
∂Z
∂y (xmax , ymax ) ≥ 0
d, f, g, h, i, ... ≤ 0
(VIII.1)
(VIII.2)
(VIII.3)
(VIII.4)
(VIII)
Observe-se que, uma vez que a função Z é polinomial, o integral duplo presente na função
objectivo pode ser calculado como função quadrática dos coeficientes polinomiais. Dado que as
restrições são lineares, o problema de suavização é um problema de programação quadrática.
Esse problema foi resolvido em tempo desprezável pelos softwares mais comuns. Em alguns
casos de pequena dimensão foi resolvido manualmente em tempo relativamente curto.
6
Caso de Estudo: Companhias Aéreas Brasileiras
O modelo apresentado no item 5 será aplicado a um caso de estudo retirado de um trabalho sobre avaliação de eficiência de companhias aéreas brasileiras (Gomes et al., 2001), que
apresenta três modelos de cálculo de eficiência. Um desses modelos, chamado de Eficiência
de Vendas, usa dois inputs e um output, a saber, Pessoal que trabalha em vendas, Número
de Passageiros.Km oferecido durante o ano e Número de Passageiros.Km pago durante o ano,
respectivamente.
As unidades avaliadas são as companhias aéreas regulares brasileiras, nos anos de 1998,
1999 e 2000. Considera-se que uma companhia em um determinado ano é uma DMU diferente
da mesma companhia em outro ano. Além disso, companhias que formam grupos económicos
foram consideradas como DMUs individuais e uma DMU representando o grupo, contemplando
um total de 70 DMUs. Por exemplo, as companhias Nordeste, Rio Sul e Varig compõe o Grupo
Varig, gerando 4 DMUs em cada um dos perı́odos analisados.
100
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
Tabela 2: Valores de inputs e output para as DMUs extremo-eficientes.
DMUs extremo-eficientes
Grupo VARIG 1998
ITAPEMIRIM 1998
PASSAREDO 1998
TAF 2000
VARIG 1998
VASP 1998
Pessoal de vendas
3814
2
29
9
3387
427
Pax.Km oferecido
45361622
1773
786974
2254
40690342
17240645
Pax.Km pago
29139588
732
530792
1289
26751161
9794282
Tabela 3: Valores mı́nimos e máximos de cada input.
Mı́nimo
Máximo
DMU
Pessoal de Vendas
ITAPEMIRIM
2
REGIONAL
1998
Grupo
3814
VARIG
1998
DMU
Pax.Km oferecido
ITAPEMIRIM
1773
REGIONAL
1998
Grupo
45361622
VARIG
1998
A Tabela 2 traz os valores de inputs e output para as DMUs extremo-eficientes, que foram
determinadas com o modelo DEA BCC clássico. Foram desconsideradas as companhias que
apresentaram resultado distorcido por fazerem as vendas através de terceiros, ou seja, valor
zero para o input Pessoal de vendas.
Como este é um modelo tridimensional com 6 DMUs extremo-eficientes, de acordo com a
Tabela 1, a função aproximante é um polinómio de 3o grau com duas variáveis independentes.
Uma vez conhecidos os resultados do modelo DEA BCC clássico e com o uso dos valores
das Tabelas 2 e 3, é possı́vel formular o problema de suavização, que é apresentado em (IX).
Comparando-se com a formulação geral (VIII), x representa o input Quantidade de pessoal de
vendas, y o input Passageiros.Km oferecido, z é o output Passageiros.Km pago.
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
101
Tabela 4: Valor das variáveis de decisão do problema de suavização para o caso de estudo.
Variável de decisão
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
min
3814
R 45361622
R
2
sa 
1773
h
b + 2dx + ey + 3gx2 + 2hyx + iy 2
Valor
-536,629000
32,561460
0,678490
0,000000
0,000164
-1,2·10−8
0,000000
-2,2·10−8
0,000000
0,000000
2
+ c + ex + 2f y + hx2 + 2ixy 2
2 i
dy dx

a
 b 
 


 c 
2, 91 · 107



 d   732

 

 e   5, 31 · 105 

=
A·

 f   129

 

 g   2, 68 · 107 


 h 
9, 79 · 106


 i 
j
d, f, g, h, i, j ≤ 0
b + 7628d + 4, 54 · 107 e + 4, 36 · 107 g + 3, 46 · 1011 h + 2, 06 · 1015 i ≤ 0
c + 3814e + 9, 07 · 107 f + 1, 45 · 107 h + 1, 57 · 1019 i ≤ 0
onde

38144, 54 · 107 1, 45 · 107 1, 73 · 1011 2, 06 · 1015 5, 55 · 1010 6, 60 · 1014 7, 85 · 1018 9, 33 · 1022 2, 91 · 107
 2177343, 55 · 103 3, 14 · 106 87, 09 · 103 6, 29 · 106 5, 57 · 109 7, 32 · 102

 297, 87 · 105 8412, 28 · 107 6, 19 · 1011 2, 44 · 104 6, 62 · 108 1, 80 · 1013 4, 87 · 1017 5, 31 · 105

 92254812, 03 · 104 5, 08 · 106 7291, 83 · 105 4, 57 · 107 1, 15 · 1010 1, 29 · 103

 33874, 07 · 107 1, 15 · 107 1, 38 · 1011 1, 66 · 1015 3, 89 · 1010 4, 67 · 1014 5, 61 · 1018 6, 74 · 1022 2, 68 · 107
4271, 72 · 107 1, 82 · 105 7, 36 · 109 2, 97 · 1014 7, 79 · 107 3, 14 · 1012 1, 27 · 1017 5, 12 · 1021 9, 79 · 106




=A



(IX)
Esse, como qualquer problema de suavização em DEA, é um problema de programação
quadrática, cuja solução fornece os valores dos coeficientes do polinómio de 3 o grau que representa a fronteira suavizada. Esses valores são apresentados na Tabela 4. Deve-se referir
que, para obter explicitamente o problema de programação quadrática, foi necessário calcular
o integral duplo em um software de computação algébrica.
O gráfico da fronteira suavizada, válido na região (xmin , ymin ), (xmax , ymax ), é apresentado
na Figura 3.
102
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
Figura 3: Fronteira suavizada para o caso de estudo.
Com as derivadas da função que representa a fronteira suavizada é possı́vel calcular um
valor único para os pesos dos inputs e do output. Com esses valores, pode-se computar a
contribuição de cada input na formação do input virtual de cada DMU eficiente.
Os pesos são calculados a partir da formulação clássica dos multiplicadores (modelo (X)),
na qual x e y representam os inputs e z o output.
max Ef f = uz0 − u∗
sa
vx0 x0 + vy0 y0 = 1
vxk xk + vyk yk + uk zk − u∗k ≤ 0, ∀k
u ≥ 0, vx ≥ 0, vy ≥ 0 e u∗ irrestrito
(X)
Ao usar a interpretação geométrica dos multiplicadores (Lins e Angulo-Meza, 2000) e a
equação do plano tangente a uma superfı́cie, obtêm-se as equações (XI) e (XII), que fornecem
os valores únicos para os multiplicadores.
vxk =
∂Z
(xk ,yk )
∂x
∂Z
xk ∂x (xk ,yk )+yk ∂Z
(xk ,yk )
∂y
(XI)
vyk =
∂Z
(xk ,yk )
∂y
∂Z
xk ∂x (xk ,yk )+yk ∂Z
(xk ,yk )
∂y
(XII)
Das equações (XI) e (XII) obtém-se as participações de cada input na formação do input
virtual, apresentadas na Tabela 5.
Os resultados da Tabela 5 mostram que a maioria das DMUs atinge seu ı́ndice de eficiência
atribuindo maior “importância” ao input Passageiros.Km oferecido. Como o numerador do
modelo DEA aparece Passageiros.Km pago, os resultados aqui apresentados mostram que o
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
103
Tabela 5: Participações dos inputs na formação do input virtual.
DMUs
extremo-eficientes
Grupo VARIG 1998
ITAPEMIRIM 1998
PASSAREDO 1998
TAF 2000
VARIG 1998
VASP 1998
Participação de
Pessoal de Vendas
0,000
0,052
0,009
0,162
0,117
0,131
Participação de
Pax.Km oferecido
1,000
0,948
0,991
0,838
0,883
0,869
Tabela 6: Multiplicadores de cada variável de input para cada DMU.
DMUs
extremo-eficientes
Grupo VARIG 1998
ITAPEMIRIM 1998
PASSAREDO 1998
TAF 2000
VARIG 1998
VASP 1998
Peso do input
Pessoal de Vendas (A)
6,1·10−20
2,6·10−2
3,0·10−4
1,8·10−2
3,4·10−5
3,1·10−4
Peso do input
Pax.Km oferecido (B)
2,2·10−8
5,3·10−4
1,3·10−6
3,7·10−4
2,2·10−8
5,0·10−8
A
B
0,0
48,4
241,5
48,4
1587,1
6087,6
load factor (factor de ocupação) é uma legı́tima preocupação das companhias que operam na
escala óptima.
Além da importância de cada input, a Tabela 6 mostra os multiplicadores de cada variável
para cada DMU. Como já mencionado, eles representam preços sombra normalizados. Se for
conhecido o custo real de um dos inputs, o custo do outro pode ser determinado pela razão entre
os preços sombra. A coluna que apresenta o quociente entre os multiplicadores (A/B) permite
a obtenção dessa informação de forma rápida. Observa-se que o custo sombra unitário do input
“Pessoal de vendas” é bem maior que o custo sombra do input “Passageiro.Km oferecido”. Essa
conclusão só não pode ser aplicada ao Grupo VARIG 1998, já que essa DMU marca o inı́cio
da região Pareto ineficiente.
Informações desse tipo são importantes não somente para que cada DMU analise a sua
estrutura de preços e práticas gerenciais, mas também para que órgãos reguladores investiguem
possı́veis casos de dumping ou, pelo contrário, de preços abusivos.
7
Conclusões
Foi apresentada neste artigo uma metodologia para resolver o problema de determinação de
pesos únicos em modelos DEA. A metodologia proposta tem como base a substituição da
fronteira DEA original (linear por partes) por outra suavizada (com derivadas contı́nuas).
104
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
Em relação às propostas de outros autores para tratar do mesmo problema, a suavização da
fronteira apresentou as seguintes vantagens:
• Fornece um valor único para os multiplicadores de cada DMU, em vez de um intervalo
de variação, como em Rosen et al. (1998).
• Embora para cada DMU o vector de multiplicadores passe a ser unicamente determinado,
cada DMU tem os multiplicadores mais apropriados às suas caracterı́sticas. Essa é uma
propriedade ausente de outro modelo que tenta resolver o mesmo problema: a avaliação
cruzada de Doyle e Green (1994). Esse método é equivalente à adopção de pesos rı́gidos
para todas as DMUs (Anderson et al., 2002), o que contraria um preceito básico de
DEA. A metodologia de suavização, ao preservar a liberdade de cada DMU escolher os
seu vector de multiplicadores, mantém-se fiel aos preceitos básicos de DEA.
• Fornece uma variação gradual dos multiplicadores, sem as descontinuidades do método
proposto por Charnes et al. (1985). Nesse método, ao percorrer-se a fronteira encontramse variações grandes nos multiplicadores para variações infinitesimais dos vectores de
outputs e inputs, o que é uma situação pouco natural.
• Ao contrário do método de Charnes et al. (1985), não necessita da determinação de
todas as faces adjacentes a cada DMU extremo-eficiente. Assim, após conhecer as DMUs
extremo-eficientes, em vez de um problema NP, basta resolver um simples problema de
programação quadrática.
Ainda em comparação com o método de Charnes et al. (1985), para a suavização não é problemática a existência de faces de dimensão não completa. Essas faces, que surgem com
frequência (Gonzalez-Araya, 2002) impedem o uso de métodos baseados em propriedades
geométricas.
Em relação ao modelo de super-eficiência, a maior vantagem é existir uma única fronteira
eficiente, independentemente da DMU que se esteja a analisar.
Em relação aos métodos de suavização correntes em programação não linear (Koohyun
e Yong-Sik, 1998; Gal, 1992), como o método da perturbação infinitesimal, o método aqui
proposto apresentou as seguintes vantagens (Soares de Mello, 2002):
• Interfere o menos possı́vel com o ponto de descontinuidade das derivadas, pela própria
natureza das restrições do problema de programação quadrática. Refira-se que essa
propriedade, irrelevante em programação matemática, é de extrema importância em
DEA.
• Não necessita das equações da região a ser suavizada, apenas das coordenadas dos pontos
de descontinuidade das derivadas, o que é conseguido devido à natureza linear por partes
da fronteira original.
• É baseado numa formulação topológica precisa, que permite definir com rigor o conceito
de proximidade entre a fronteira original e a suavizada.
O modelo de suavização apresenta cálculos relativamente simples para problemas de pequena
dimensão (número de inputs, outputs e DMUs extremo-eficientes). O aumento da dimensão
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
105
leva a um aumento da do número de cálculos algébricos. Como as várias etapas dos cálculos
são realizadas em programas diferentes, e a etapa mais demorada é a transposição de dados
entre eles, torna-se evidente a vantagem de desenvolver um software especı́fico para o problema
da suavização.
O caso investigado apresentou valores dı́spares para os vários coeficientes do polinómio
de suavização. Tal facto deveu-se à grande amplitude de variação dos valores dos inputs,
bem como a escala extremamente diferente em que eram medidos. Uma prévia normalização
poderia reduzir essa disparidade.
Fazem-se necessários desenvolvimentos para o caso de múltiplos inputs e outputs, e para
modelos com retornos constantes de escala (CCR). Esses modelos apresentam a dificuldade
adicional da invariância dos retornos de escala, o que leva a funções homogéneas de grau zero
e impede o uso de aproximantes polinomiais.
Por fim, deve ser mencionado que o modelo de suavização permite eliminar dois dos grandes
problemas em DEA: regiões Pareto ineficientes e faces de dimensão não completa. O primeiro
devido à existência de uma restrição de monotonicidade, e o segundo pelo facto de a fronteira
ser descrita por uma única equação polinomial.
8
Referências Bibliográficas
[1] Andersen, P., Petersen, N.C., A procedure for ranking efficient units in data envelopment analysis,
Management Science 39 (10) (1993) 1261-1264.
[2] Anderson, T.R., Hollingsworth, K., Inman, L., The Fixed Weighting Nature of A Cross-Evaluation
Model, Journal of Productivity Analysis 17 (3) (2002) 249-255.
[3] Banker, R.D., Charnes, A., Cooper, W.W., Some models for estimating technical scale inefficiencies in Data Envelopment Analysis, Management Science 30 (9) (1984) 1078-1092.
[4] Boyer, C.B., História da Matemática, Edgard Blücher Ltda., São Paulo (1978).
[5] Charnes, A., Cooper, W.W., Golany, B., Seiford, L., Stutz, J., Foundations of data envelopment
analysis for Pareto-Koopmans efficient empirical production functions, Journal of Econometrics
30 (1985) 91-107.
[6] Charnes, A., Cooper, W.W., Rhodes, E., Measuring the Efficiency of Decision-Making Units,
European Journal of Operational Research 2 (1978) 429-444.
[7] Chilingerian, J.A., Evaluating physician efficiency in hospitals: a multivariate analysis of best
practices, European Journal of Operational Research 80 (1995) 548-574.
[8] Coelli, T., Rao, D.S.P., Battese, G.E., An Introduction to Efficiency and Productivity Analysis,
Kluwer Academic Publishers (1998).
[9] Cooper, W.W., Seiford, L.M., Tone, K., Data Envelopment Analysis: A Comprehensive Text
with Models, Applications, References and DEA-Solver Software. Kluwer Academic Publishers,
USA (2000).
[10] D’Ambrósio, U., Métodos da Topologia - Introdução e Aplicações, Livros Técnicos e Cientı́ficos
Editora S.A, Rio de Janeiro (1977).
[11] Doyle, J., Green, R., Efficiency and cross-efficiency in DEA: Derivations, meanings and uses,
Journal of the Operational Research Society 45 (5) (1994) 567-578.
[12] Elsgolts, L., Differential Equations and the Calculus of Variations, Mir Publishers, Moscow
(1980).
106
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
[13] Farlow, S.J., Partial Differential Equations for Scientists and Engineers, Dover Books on Advanced Mathematics, Dover Publications (1993).
[14] Fukuda, K., cdd.c: C Implementation of the Double Description method for computing all vertices
and extremal rays of a convex polyhedron given a system of linear inequalities, Department of
Mathematics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne, Switzerland (1993).
[15] Gal, T., Weakly redundant constraints and their impact on postoptimal analyses in LP, European
Journal of Operational Research 60 (3) (1992) 315-326.
[16] Gomes, E.G., Soares de Mello, J.C.C.B., Serapião, B.P., Lins, M.P.E., Biondi, L.N., Avaliação
de Eficiência de Companhias Aéreas Brasileiras: Uma Abordagem por Análise de Envoltória
de Dados. In: Setti, J.R.A., Lima Júnior, O.F. (Eds.), Panorama Nacional da Pesquisa em
Transportes 2001, Campinas, SP, Novembro 2 (2001) 125-133.
[17] Gonzalez-Araya, M.C., Uma metodologia para projetar DMUS em facets eficientes de maior
dimensão, XXXIV Simpósio Brasileiro de Pesquisa Operacional – SBPO, Rio de Janeiro, RJ,
Brasil, Outubro (2002).
[18] Hausdorff, F., Grundzüge der Mengenlehre, Chelsea Publishing Company, New York (1949).
[19] Koohyun, P., Yong-Sik, S., Iterative bundle-based decomposition for large-scale nonseparable
convex optimization, European Journal of Operational Research 111 (3) (1998) 598-616.
[20] Lins, M.P.E., Angulo-Meza, L., Análise Envoltória de Dados e perspectivas de integração no
ambiente de Apoio à Decisão, Editora da COPPE/UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil (2000).
[21] Lins, M.P.E., Gomes, E.G., Soares de Mello, J.C.C.B., Soares de Mello, A.J.R., Olympic ranking
based on a Zero Sum Gains DEA model, European Journal of Operational Research 148 (2)
(2003) 85-95.
[22] Olesen, O.P., Petersen, N.C., Indicators of III conditioned data sets and model misspecification
in data envelopment analysis: and extended facet approach, Management Science 42 (2) (1996)
205-219.
[23] Reddy, J.N., Introduction to the Finite Element Method, McGraw-Hill (1993).
[24] Reinhard, S., Lovell, C.A.K., Thijssen, G.J., Environmental efficiency with multiple environmentally detrimental variables estimated with SFA and DEA, European Journal of Operational
Research 121 (2000) 287-303.
[25] Rosen, D., Schaffnit, C., Paradi, J.C., Marginal rates and two dimensional level curves in DEA,
Journal of Productivity Analysis 9 (3) (1998) 205-232.
[26] Smith, D.R., Variational Methods in Optimization, Dover Books on Mathematics, Dover Publications (1998).
[27] Soares de Mello, J.C.C.B., Gomes, E.G., Biondi, L.N., Modelo DEA com restrições aos pesos
para estabelecer uma classificação olı́mpica, Anais do XXV Congresso Nacional de Matemática
Aplicada e Computacional, Nova Friburgo, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, Setembro (2002).
[28] Soares de Mello, J.C.C.B., Lins, M.P.E., Gomes, E.G., Construction of a smoothed DEA frontier,
Pesquisa Operacional (2002) (a publicar).
[29] Soares de Mello, J.C.C.B., Lins, M.P.E., Gomes, E.G., Estimativa de planos tangentes à fronteira
DEA em DMUs extremo-eficientes, Anais do XXXIII Simpósio Brasileiro de Pesquisa Operacional
– SBPO, Campos do Jordão, SP, Brasil, Novembro (2001).
[30] Soares de Mello, J.C.C.B., Métodos variacionais em condução de calor, Tese de Mestrado, Coordenação de Pós-Graduação em Matemática, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, Brasil
(1987).
J.C. Mello et al. / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 89-107
107
[31] Soares de Mello, J.C.C.B., Suavização da fronteira DEA com o uso de métodos variacionais, Tese
de Doutorado, Programa de Engenharia de Produção, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro,
Brasil (2002)
[32] Swokowski, E.W., Cálculo com Geometria Analı́tica, Makron Books do Brasil Editora Ltda., Rio
de Janeiro (1995).
[33] Thanassoulis, E., A comparison of regression analysis and data envelopment analysis as alternative methods of performance assessment, Journal of the Operational Research Society 44 (11)
(1993) 1129-1144.
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
109
Análise factorial aplicada a métricas da paisagem
definidas em FRAGSTATS
Paula Couto
∗
∗
Grupo de Análise de Sistemas Ambientais (GASA) – Universidade Nova de Lisboa
[email protected]
Abstract
A programme for spatial analysis based on a grid of pixels (FRAGSTATS 3.0) was
used and the results of the analysis of 50 maps of land occupation using this programme
were presented. 33 metrics of the landscape’s structure were used and the properties
of the metrics for various landscapes (maps of land occupation in Continental Portugal)
were investigated. The metrics of the landscape’s structure describe the size and form
of the landscapes, the abundance of each type of spot and the spatial distribution of
similar or different spots. To overcome the ambiguity of individual metrics and behavioural
peculiarities, a varied factorial approach was adopted to describe and compare landscape
structures. An analysis of main components for the 33 metrics and 50 landscapes was
carried out. The first five factors explain 91.2% of the variation. These factors can be
interpreted as an average of compaction of the spot, image texture (distribution of the
pixels and proximity), landscape area, number of classes, area-perimeter relation (fractional
measures).
Resumo
Um programa de análise espacial baseado numa grelha de pixeis (FRAGSTATS 3.0) foi
usado e os resultados da análise de 50 mapas de ocupação do solo usando esse programa
são apresentados. Foram usadas 33 métricas da estrutura da paisagem e investigadas as
propriedades das métricas para diversas paisagens (mapas de ocupação de solo de Portugal Continental). As métricas da estrutura da paisagem descrevem o tamanho e forma
das paisagens, a abundância de cada tipo de mancha e a distribuição espacial de manchas
similares ou dissimilares. Para ultrapassar a ambiguidade de métricas individuais e peculiaridades do seu comportamento, foi adoptada uma aproximação factorial multivariada
para descrever e comparar estruturas da paisagem. Foi executada uma análise de componentes principais para as 33 métricas e 50 paisagens. Os primeiros cinco factores explicam
91.2% da variação. Estes factores podem ser interpretados como média da compactação
da mancha, textura da imagem (distribuição dos pixeis e adjacência), área da paisagem,
número de classes, relação área - perı́metro (medidas fractais).
c 2004 Associação Portuguesa de Investigação Operacional
110
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
Keywords: Landscape structure, Factorial approach, Fragstats
Title: Factorial Analysis applied to landscape metrics defined in FRAGSTATS
1
Introdução
Uma variedade de questões ecológicas requerem presentemente o estudo de largas regiões e
a compreensão da heterogeneidade espacial. A investigação na análise de padrões espaciais
e a sua comparação pode melhorar a habilidade para simular fenómenos em grande escala,
caracterizar modelos espaciais e gerir recursos naturais ao nı́vel da paisagem (Turner et al.
1989(a)).
Embora existam muitas interpretações diferentes do termo “paisagem” todas as definições
de paisagem incluem invariavelmente uma área contendo um mosaico de manchas ou elementos
da paisagem que interagem e são relevantes para o fenómeno em estudo. O padrão detectado
em qualquer mosaico ecológico está relacionado com ambos, extensão e grão (Forman e Godron
1986, Turner et al. 1989(b), Wiens 1989). A extensão é a área global sujeita a investigação ou a
área incluı́da no interior da fronteira da paisagem e grão é o tamanho das unidades individuais
de observação.
A ecologia da paisagem envolve o estudo de padrões da paisagem, a interacção entre manchas no interior do mosaico da paisagem, e a forma como padrões e interacções mudam no
tempo. Considera ainda o desenvolvimento e dinâmica da heterogeneidade espacial e os seus
efeitos nos processos ecológicos. A ecologia da paisagem pode ser analisada considerando três
caracterı́sticas da paisagem (Forman e Godron 1986):
Estrutura – trata-se das relações espaciais entre ecosistemas distintos ou elementos presentes; mais especificamente, a distribuição de energia, materiais, e espécies, em relação a
tamanhos, formas e configurações dos ecosistemas.
Função – corresponde a interacções entre elementos espaciais, ou seja, as transferências
de energia, materiais e espécies ao longo das componentes dos ecosistemas.
Mudança – trata-se da alteração na estrutura e função do mosaico ecológico no tempo.
A estrutura da paisagem e a função da paisagem estão intimamente relacionados porque,
ao longo do tempo, um influencia o outro (Forman e Godron 1981, Forman e Godron 1986,
Turner et al. 1989(b)). Em particular, a função da paisagem é influenciada por padrões
espaciais e temporais de temperatura, nutrientes e organismos. Ao contrário a estrutura da
paisagem é influenciada pelo fogo, vento, colonização, competição e intervenção humana.
A ecologia da paisagem baseia-se no facto de os padrões espaciais da paisagem influenciarem
fortemente os processos ecológicos. A habilidade para quantificar a estrutura da paisagem é
um pré-requisito para o estudo da função e mudança da paisagem. Por este motivo muito
ênfase tem sido dada ao desenvolvimento de métodos que quantificam a estrutura da paisagem
(O’Neill et al. 1988, Turner 1990, Turner and Gardner 1991).
Turner et al. 1989(a) dá-nos uma revisão de várias aproximações para a análise e com-
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
111
paração de padrões espaciais. Essa revisão inclui várias medidas como dimensão fractal, probabilidade de menor vizinhança, ı́ndice de contágio, orla, previsibilidade espacial e ajustamento
com múltipla resolução. Posteriormente têm surgido na literatura uma grande quantidade de
métricas; métricas de área, forma, contraste, contágio e diversidade.
Assim, embora a literatura esteja repleta de métricas para descrever o padrão espacial,
existem no entanto apenas duas componentes – composição e configuração, e apenas poucos
aspectos de cada uma delas. As métricas muitas vezes medem múltiplos aspectos desse padrão.
Muitas destas métricas estão de facto correlacionadas entre si (i.e. medem aspectos similares
ou idênticos do padrão da paisagem) porque existem poucas medidas primárias que podem
ser extraı́das das manchas (tipo de mancha, área, orla e tipo de vizinhança) e a maioria das
métricas derivam destas medidas primárias. Algumas métricas são redundantes porque são
formas alternativas de representar a mesma informação básica( ex. tamanho médio da mancha
e densidade da mancha). Em outros casos, as métricas podem ser empiricamente redundantes;
não porque medem o mesmo aspecto do padrão da paisagem, mas porque para paisagens
particulares em investigação diferentes aspectos do padrão da paisagem estão estatisticamente
correlacionados.
Nesta investigação pretendeu-se responder a duas questões importantes: (1) quantos factores independentes do padrão da paisagem e estrutura são medidos pelas métricas tı́picas da
paisagem? (2) quais as métricas ou combinação de métricas são escolhidas para quantificar
cada um desses factores? Partindo de um largo conjunto de métricas, calculadas para um
conjunto de mapas de ocupação de solo, uma análise factorial multivariada é aplicada para
identificar um conjunto de factores independentes.
2
Materiais e Métodos
2.1
Mapas
Foram seleccionados e rasterizados 50 mapas de ocupação do solo de Portugal Continental
cedidos no formato vectorial pelo Centro Nacional de Informação Geográfico (CNIG). Através
do programa IDRISI os mapas foram transformados para formato ASCII (de forma a ser
aceite pelo FRAGSTATS). A selecção dos mapas foi feita de forma a cobrir diferentes regiões
fisiográficas (figura 1, tabela 1). Cada mapa corresponde a uma área de 160 Km 2 numa escala
de 1/25000. No formato raster os mapas têm uma extensão de 400x640 pixeis (excepto o mapa
109 com uma extensão de 400x87,mapa 122 com 400x665, mapa 133 com 400x505 e mapa 143
com 400x507) com um tamanho de grão de 25m. Cada pixel é classificado como uma das 69
classes definidas (tabela 2).
2.2
2.2.1
Métricas da paisagem
Nı́veis
As manchas formam a base de mapas categóricos. Dependendo do método para obter as
manchas eles podem ser composicionalmente caracterizados em termos das variáveis medidas
no interior delas. Isso pode incluir valor médio (ou moda, central ou max) e heterogeneidade
112
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
Figura 1: Representação de Portugal Continental e das zonas seleccionadas no estudo.
Tabela 1: Enumeração dos mapas por zonas do paı́s.
Grande Porto
109
110
111
112
113
122
123
124
125
133
134
135
136
143
144
Zonas do paı́s
Serra da Estrela Grande Lisboa
211
404
212
417
213
418
222
419
223
429
224
432
225
433
233
441
234
442
235
453
236
454
455
464
466
Alto Alentejo
456
457
458
459
460
467
468
469
470
471
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
Tabela 2: Classes de ocupação de solo para Portugal Continental.
1
2
Áreas artificiais
11 Espaço Urbano
111 Tecido Urbano contı́nuo
112 Tecido Urbano descontı́nuo
113 Outros espaços fora do tecido urbano consolidado
12 Infraestruturas e Equipamentos
121 Zonas industriais e comerciais
122 Vias de comunicação
123 Zonas portuárias
124 Aeroportos
125 Outras infraestruturas e equipamentos
13 Improdutivos
131 Pedreiras, saibreiras, minas a céu aberto
132 Lixeiras, descargas industriais e depósitos de sucata
133 Estaleiros de construção civil
134 Outras áreas degradadas
14 Espaços verdes artificiais
141 Espaços verdes urbanos (florestais)
142 Espaços verdes (não florestais) para actividades desportivas e de lazer
Áreas agrı́colas
21 Terras aráveis - Culturas anuais
211 Sequeiro
212 Regadio
213 Arrozais
214 Outros (estufas, viveiros, etc)
22 Culturas permanentes
221 Vinha
222 Vinha + Pomar
223 Vinha + Olival
224 Vinha + Cultura anual
23 Pomar
231 Citrinos
232 Pomoideas
233 Prumoideas ( sem a amendoeira )
234 Amendoeiras
235 Figueiras
236 Alfarrobeiras
237 Outros pomares
238 Mistos de pomares
239 Olival
24 Outras arbustivas
241 Medronheiro
242 Outras arbustivas
25 Prados permanentes
251 Prados e lameiros
26 Áreas agrı́colas heterogéneas
261 Culturas anuais + Vinha
262 Culturas anuais + Pomar
263 Culturas anuais + Olival
264 Sistemas culturais e parcelares complexos
265 Áreas principalmente agricolas c/espaços naturais importantes
27 Territórios agro - florestais
271 Culturas anuais + Espécie florestal
272 Espécie florestal + Culturas anuais
113
114
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
Tabela 2: Continuação.
3
4
5
6
Floresta
31 Folhosas
311 Sobreiro
312 Azinheira
313 Castanheiro bravo
314 Castanheiro manso
315 Carvalho
316 Eucalipto
317 Outras folhosas
32 Resinosas
321 Pinheiro bravo
322 Pinheiro manso
323 Outras resinosas
Meios semi-naturais
41 Ocupação arbustiva e herbácea
411 Pastagens naturais pobres
412 Vegetação arbustiva baixa-matos
413 Vegetação esclerofitica-carrascal
414 Vegetação arbustiva alta e floresta degradada ou de transição
415 Áreas descobertas sem ou com pouca vegetação
416 Olival Abandonado
417 Praia, dunas, areais e solos sem cobertura vegetal
418 Rocha nua
419 Zonas incendiadas recentemente
Meios aquáticos
51 Zonas húmidas continentais
511 Zonas pantanosas interiores e paúls
52 Zonas húmidas marinhas
521 Sapais
522 Salinas
523 Zonas interditais
Superfı́cies com água
61 Áreas continentais
611 Cursos de água
612 Lagoas e albufeiras
62 Águas marı́timas
621 Lagunas e cordões litorais
622 Estuários
623 Mar e Oceano
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
115
interna (variância, intervalo).
No entanto, em muitas aplicações, assim que as manchas são estabelecidas, a heterogeneidade do interior das manchas é ignorado. As métricas de padrões da paisagem em vez disso
focam-se na distribuição espacial das manchas. Enquanto que manchas individuais possuem
relativamente poucas caracterı́sticas espaciais (ex. área, perı́metro e forma), colecções de manchas podem ter uma variedade de propriedades agregadas. Estas propriedades dependem se
a agregação é em relação a uma simples classe (tipo de mancha) ou múltiplas classes, e se a
agregação é no interior de uma subregião da paisagem ou ao longo da paisagem.
Comummente, métricas da paisagem podem ser definidas em três nı́veis:
1. Métricas ao nı́vel da mancha são definidas para manchas individuais e caracterizam a
configuração espacial e o contexto das manchas. Em muitas aplicações, estas métricas
da paisagem servem primeiramente como base computacional para outras métricas da
paisagem. Algumas vezes as métricas de mancha podem ser importantes e informativos
em investigações ao nı́vel da paisagem.
2. Métricas ao nı́vel da classe são integradas em relação a todas as manchas de um dado
tipo. Essas métricas podem ser obtidas por média simples ou média pesada que tenha
em conta a área da mancha. Existem propriedades adicionais ao nı́vel da classe que
resulta da configuração única das manchas ao longo da paisagem. Em muitas aplicações
o interesse principal é a quantidade e distribuição de um tipo particular de mancha.
(3) Métricas ao nı́vel da paisagem são integradas em relação a todos os tipos de mancha
ou classes em relação a toda a paisagem. Como as métricas de classe , estas métricas podem
ser obtidas por simples média ou média pesada ou podem reflectir propriedades do padrão.
Em muitas aplicações, o primeiro interesse é o padrão (i.e. composição e configuração) da
paisagem total.
2.2.2
Categorias
O termo “métricas da paisagem” refere-se exclusivamente a ı́ndices desenvolvidos para padrões
de mapas categóricos. Métricas da paisagem são algoritmos que quantificam caracterı́sticas
espaciais especificas de manchas, classes de manchas, ou inteiro mosaico da paisagem.
Estas métricas definem-se em duas categorias: as que quantificam a composição do mapa
sem referência aos atributos espaciais, ou as que quantificam a configuração espacial do mapa,
requerendo informação espacial para os seus cálculos (McGarigal et al. 1995, Gustafson 1998).
A composição é facilmente quantificada e refere-se a caracterı́sticas associadas com a
variedade e abundância de tipos de manchas no interior da paisagem. Porque a composição
requer integração em relação a todos os tipos de manchas as métricas de composição são
definidas ao nı́vel da paisagem. Existem muitas medidas quantitativas de composição da
paisagem, incluindo a proporção da paisagem em cada tipo de mancha, riqueza, uniformidade
e diversidade da mancha.
As principais medidas de composição são:
116
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
• Proporção da abundância para cada classe.
• Riqueza – corresponde ao no de diferentes tipos de mancha.
• Uniformidade – é abundância relativa de diferentes tipos de mancha.
• Diversidade – as medidas de diversidade tipicamente combinam duas componentes de
diversidade: riqueza, que se refere ao número de classes presentes, e uniformidade, que
se refere á distribuição da área entre classes. Exemplos de ı́ndices de diversidade são
Shannon’s (Shannon e Weaver 1949), Simpson’s (Simpson 1949) e Simpson modificado
(Pielou 1975). As componentes de riqueza e uniformidade também podem ser medidas
independentemente (Romme 1982).
• Domı́nio - o domı́nio é o complemento de uniformidade (uniformidade = 1 - domı́nio),
indicando a extensão em relação ao qual o mapa é dominado por uma ou poucas classes
(O’Neill et al. 1988) e tem sido usado largamente na investigação ecológica.
A configuração espacial das propriedades do sistema é mais difı́cil de quantificar e tem
como objectivo a descrição das caracterı́sticas espaciais de manchas individuais ou as relações
espaciais entre múltiplas manchas. Outras métricas avaliam as propriedades de vizinhança
sem referência a manchas, usando apenas as representações do pixel.
As caracterı́sticas de mancha de uma paisagem inteira são muitas vezes consideradas como
um sumário estatı́stico (por exemplo, média, mediana, variância e distribuição da frequência)
para todas as manchas da classe (Baskent and Jordan 1995). Quando a configuração de um
tipo de mancha singular é de particular interesse, a análise é conduzida como mapa simples
binário, onde existem apenas duas classes, a classe de interesse e as outras classes combinadas.
Os principais aspectos da configuração são:
• Tamanho da mancha e densidade – A medida mais simples de configuração é o tamanho
da mancha, que representa o atributo fundamental da configuração espacial da mancha.
Muitas métricas da paisagem incorporam directamente informação acerca do tamanho
da mancha ou são afectadas por este.
• Complexidade da forma da mancha – A complexidade da forma relaciona-se com a
geometria das manchas, se tendem a ser simples e compactas, ou irregulares e convolutas.
A forma é um atributo espacial difı́cil de capturar numa métrica pelo número infinito de
possı́veis formas de mancha. Assim, as métricas de forma geralmente correspondem a
um ı́ndice geral da complexidade da forma em vez de atribuir um valor para uma única
forma.
As medidas mais comuns da complexidade da forma estão baseadas na quantidade de perı́metro
por unidade de área, usualmente indexados em termos da razão perı́metro – área, como seja a
dimensão fractal.
A interpretação varia de acordo com as várias métricas da forma, mas em geral, altos
valores significam maior complexidade da forma.
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
117
Outros métodos têm sido propostos como raio de giração (Pickover 1990), contiguidade
(LaGro 1991),ı́ndice de linearidade (Gustafson e Parker 1992), elongação e ı́ndices de deformidade (Baskent e Jordan 1995). Mas estes ı́ndices não têm sido muito usados (Gustafson
1998).
• Isolamento/Proximidade – Isolamento e proximidade refere-se á tendência para as manchas estarem relativamente isoladas no espaço em relação a outras manchas da mesma
classe. Como a noção de isolamento é vaga, existem muitas medidas possı́veis dependendo de como a distância é definida entre manchas da mesma classe. Se dij é a distância
de menor vizinhança da mancha i a outra mancha j do mesmo tipo, então o isolamento
médio das manchas pode ser sumarizado simplesmente como a distância de menor vizinhança média para todas as manchas.
Alternativamente, isolamento pode ser formulado em termos de ambos, o tamanho e a proximidade de vizinhança de manchas vizinhas, interiores a uma vizinhança local á volta de cada
mancha, usando o ı́ndice de isolamento de Whitcomb et al. (1981) ou ı́ndice de proximidade de
Gustafson e Parker (1992). O tamanho de vizinhança é especificado pelo utilizador e de acordo
com o processo ecológico em consideração. O ı́ndice original de proximidade foi formulado para
considerar apenas manchas da mesma classe no interior de uma vizinhança especifica.
• Contraste – Contraste refere-se á diferença relativa entre tipos de manchas. Pode ser
calculado como densidade de orla com peso de contraste, onde cada tipo de orla (i.e.
entre cada par de tipos de manchas) está associado um peso de contraste.
• Contágio e difusão – Contágio refere-se á tendência de tipos de manchas estarem espacialmente agregadas. Contágio ignora as manchas per se e mede a extensão em relação
á qual pixeis de classes similares são agregados. A difusão, por outro lado, refere-se
á mistura de manchas de diferentes tipos e é baseada inteiramente na adjacência de
manchas.
Existem diferentes aproximações para medir contágio e justaposição. Um ı́ndice popular que
inclui ambas dispersão e difusão é o ı́ndice de contágio baseado na probabilidade de encontrar
um pixel do tipo i junto a um pixel do tipo j (Li e Reynolds 1993). Este ı́ndice aumenta de
valor quando a paisagem é dominada por poucas e largas manchas (i.e. contı́guas) e diminui
de valor quando aumenta a subdivisão e difusão de tipos de manchas. Este ı́ndice sumariza
a agregação de todas as classes e providencia uma medida de agrupamento geral de toda a
paisagem.
2.3
Fragstats
Fragstats é um programa de análise de padrões espaciais para mapas categóricos elaborado
por Kevin McGarigal e Barbara Marks da Universidade de Oregon. Trata-se, na versão raster,
de um programa em C, que aceita ficheiros de imagens ASCII, ficheiros de imagens de 8 e
16 bits, ficheiros Arc/Info, ficheiros de imagens Erdas e ficheiros de imagens IDRISI. O tipo
de paisagem a analisar é definido pelo utilizador e pode ser qualquer fenómeno espacial. O
Fragstats quantifica a composição e configuração espacial das manchas no interior da paisagem.
118
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
As métricas do Fragstats são definidas como:
• Métricas de área/densidade/orla
• Métricas de forma
• Métricas da área do núcleo
• Métricas de proximidade e isolamento
• Métricas de contraste
• Métricas de contágio/difusão
• Métricas de diversidade
No interior de cada um destes grupos as métricas são agrupadas por mancha, classe e
paisagem (Tabela 3). A fórmula matemática de cada uma das métricas é descrita no Apêndice
1.
Neste estudo foram seleccionadas 33 métricas (tabela 4) por serem consideradas as mais
representativas e estarem disponı́veis na versão FRAGSTATS 3.0.
Ao nı́vel da classe existem dois tipos básicos de métricas: (1) ı́ndices que caracterizam
a quantidade e configuração espacial da classe (2) parâmetros estatı́sticos (providenciam estatı́sticas sumárias das métricas da mancha para a classe em questão). Esses parâmetros
estatı́sticos definidos para todas as métricas da mancha ao nı́vel da classe, são, a média – MN,
média da área pesada – AMN, mediana – MD, intervalo – RA, desvio padrão – SD.
Ao nı́vel da paisagem podemos também definir os mesmos parâmetros estatı́sticos relativos
a uma dada métrica.
2.4
Análise factorial
Pretendeu-se efectuar a análise de dados resultantes do cálculo das métricas apresentadas na
tabela 4 para os 50 mapas, para isso, foi necessário recorrer a técnicas de tratamento de dados que sintetizam a informação de partida. Essas técnicas, cujo o objectivo é puramente
descritivo, permitindo visualizar, num espaço de dimensão reduzida (compatı́vel com a interpretação), os dados de partida, pertencem à famı́lia dos métodos factoriais de análise de dados.
Estes métodos dizem-se factoriais porque extraem, dos dados de partida, as caracterı́sticas estruturais essenciais, designadas por factores (Morrison, 1990).
De entre as técnicas factoriais da análise de dados foi usada a análise em componentes
principais. A análise em componentes principais foi a primeira que, historicamente, se baseou
num tratamento matemático rigoroso (principio dos anos 30). Do facto, após trabalhos de
diferentes investigadores no domı́nio da psicologia quantitativa (em que se pretendia encontrar
os “factores latentes” – tais como “inteligência”, “imaginação”, “criatividade” – subjacentes
aos resultados de uma bateria de testes incidindo sobre um conjunto de indivı́duos), Hotteling
formulou a solução do problema, a partir de uma matriz de similitude ou de distância que
relaciona entre si os resultados dos diferentes testes.
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
Tabela 3: Métricas definidas em FRAGSTATS 3.0.
Métricas de área, densidade e orla
Métricas de mancha
M1
Área da mancha (AREA)
M2
Perı́metro da mancha (PERIM)
M3
Raio de giração (GYRATE)
Métricas de classe
Área total (CA)
C1
C2
Percentagem da paisagem (PLAND)
C3
Numero de manchas (NP)
C4
Densidade da mancha (PD)
C5
Orla total (TE)
C6
Densidade da orla (ED)
C7
Índice da forma da paisagem (LSI)
Índice da maior mancha (LPI)
C8
C9-C14
Parâmetros da área da mancha (AREA-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
C15-C20
Parâmetros do raio de giração (GYRATE-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
Métricas de paisagem
P1
Área total (TA)
P2
Número de manchas (NP)
P3
Densidade da mancha (PD)
P4
Orla total (TE)
P5
Densidade da orla (ED)
P6
Índice da forma da paisagem (LSI)
P7
Índice da mancha mais larga (LPI)
P8-P13
Parâmetros da área da mancha (AREA-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
P14-P19
Parâmetros do raio de giração (GYRATE-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
Métricas de forma
Métricas de mancha
M4
Razão perimetro-área (PARATIO)
M5
Índice da forma (SHAPE)
M6
Dimensão fractal (FRACT)
Métricas de classe
C21
Dimensão fractal perı́metro-área (PAFRAC)
C22-C27
Parâmetros razão perimetro-área (PARATIO-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
C28-C33
Parâmetros do ı́ndice de forma (SHAPE-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
C33-C38
Parâmetros da dimensão fractal (FRACT-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
Métricas de paisagem
P20
Dimensão fractal perı́metro-área (PAFRAC)
P21-P26
Parâmetros razão perı́metro-área (PARATIO-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
P26-P31
Parâmetros do ı́ndice de forma (SHAPE-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
P31-P36
Parâmetros da dimensão fractal (FRACT-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
119
120
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
Tabela 3: Continuação.
Métricas de área do núcleo
Métricas de mancha
Área do núcleo (CORE)
M7
M8
Número de áreas do núcleo (NCA)
M9
Índice de área do núcleo (CAI)
Métricas de classe
C39
Área total do núcleo (TCA)
C40
Percentagem da área do núcleo relativamente á paisagem (CPLAND)
C41
Número de áreas do núcleo disjuntas (NDCA)
C42
Densidade de áreas do núcleo disjuntas (DCAD)
C43-C48
Parâmetros das áreas do núcleo (CORE-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
C49-C54
Parâmetros das áreas do núcleo disjuntas(DCORE-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
C55-C60
Parâmetros áreas do núcleo (CAI-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
Métricas de paisagem
P37
Área total do núcleo (TCA)
P38
Número de áreas do núcleo disjuntas (NDCA)
P39
Densidade de áreas do núcleo disjuntas (DCAD)
P40-P45
Parâmetros das áreas do núcleo(CORE-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
P46-P51
Parâmetros das áreas do núcleo disjuntas (DCORE-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
P52-P57
Parâmetros áreas do núcleo (CAI-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
Métricas de isolamento e proximidade
Métricas de mancha
M10
Índice de proximidade (PROXIM)
M11
Índice de similaridade (SIMILAR)
M12
Distancia euclideana de menor vizinhança (ENN)
Métricas da classe
C61-C66
Parâmetros do ı́ndice de proximidade (PROXIM-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
C67-C72
Parâmetros do ı́ndice de similaridade (SIMILAR-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
C73-C78
Parámetros do ı́ndice de dist. euclideana (ENN-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
Métricas da paisagem
P58-P63
Parâmetros do ı́ndice de proximidade (PROXIM-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
P64-P69
Parâmetros do ı́ndice de similaridade (SIMILAR-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
P70-P75
Parâmetros do ı́ndice de dist. euclideana (ENN-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,-CV)
Métricas de contraste
Métricas da mancha
M13
Índice do contraste da orla (EDGECON)
Métricas da classe
C79
Densidade da orla com peso do contraste (CWED)
Índice do contraste da orla total (TECI)
C80
C81-C86
Parâmetros do ı́ndice do contraste da orla (EDGECON-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,CV)
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
121
Tabela 3: Continuação.
Métricas da paisagem
P76
Densidade da orla com peso do contraste (CWED)
Índice do contraste da orla total (TECI)
P77
P78-P83
Parâmetros do ı́ndice do contraste da orla (EDGECON-MN,-AMN,-MD,-RA,-SD,CV)
Métricas de contágio e difusão
Métricas da classe
C87
Contágio (CONTAG)
C88
Percentagem de adjacências semelhantes (PLADJ)
C89
Índice de difusão e justaposição (IJI)
Métricas da paisagem
P84
Contágio (CONTAG)
P85
Percentagem de adjacências semelhantes (PLADJ)
Índice de difusão e justaposição (IJI)
P86
Métricas de diversidade
Métricas de paisagem
P87
Riqueza das manchas (PR)
P88
Densidade da riqueza das manchas (PRD)
P89
Riqueza relativa das manchas (RPR)
Índice de diversidade de Shannon’s (SHDI)
P90
Índice de diversidade de Simpson’s (SIDI)
P91
Índice de diversidade modificado de Simpson’s (MSIDI)
P92
Índice de uniformidade de Shannon’s (SHEI)
P93
P94
Índice de uniformidade de Simpson’s (SIEI)
P95
Índice de uniformidade modificado de Simpson’s (MSIEI)
122
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
Tabela 4: Métricas seleccionadas no estudo para análise de paisagens.
P8
P52
P84
P40
P39
P46
P5
P70
P31
P14
P86
P7
P6
P92
P95
P38
P2
P20
P21
P3
P85
P87
P88
P58
P89
P26
P90
P93
P91
P94
P1
P37
P4
AREA MN
CAI MN
CONTAG
CORE MN
DCAD
DCORE MN
ED
ENN MN
FRACT MN
GYRATE MN
IJI
LPI
LSI
MSIDI
MSIEI
NDCA
NP
PAFRAC
PARATIO MN
PD
PLADJ
PR
PRD
PROXIM MN
RPR
SHAPE MN
SHDI
SHEI
SIDI
SIEI
TA
TCA
TE
Média da área das manchas
Média das áreas do núcleo
Contágio
Média das áreas do núcleo
Densidade de áreas do núcleo disjuntas
Média das áreas de núcleo disjuntas
Densidade da orla
Média do ı́ndice distância euclideana
Média da dimensão fractal
Média do raio de giração
Índice de difusão e justaposição
Índice da mancha mais larga
Índice da forma da paisagem
Índice de diversidade modificado de Simpson’s
Índice de uniformidade modificado de Simpson’s
Número de áreas do núcleo disjuntas
Número de manchas
Dimensão fractal perı́metro-área
Média da razão perı́metro-área
Densidade da mancha
Percentagem de adjacências semelhantes
Riqueza das manchas
Densidade da riqueza das manchas
Média do ı́ndice de proximidade
Riqueza relativa das manchas
Média do ı́ndice de forma
Índice de diversidade de Shannon’s
Índice de uniformidade de Shannon’s
Índice de diversidade de Simpson’s
Índice de uniformidade de Simpson’s
Área total
Área total do núcleo
Orla total
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
123
Tabela 5: Estatı́sticas descritivas para 33 métricas seleccionadas a partir de 50 mapas.
Variável
Média
Desvio Padrão
AREA MN
CAI MN
CONTAG
CORE MN
DCAD
DCORE MN
ED
ENN MN
FRACT MN
GYRATE MN
IJI
LPI
LSI
MSIDI
MSIEI
NDCA
NP
PAFRAC
PARATIO MN
PD
PLADJ
PR
PRD
PROXIM MN
RPR
SHAPE MN
SHDI
SHEI
SIDI
SIEI
TA
TCA
TE
22.096
11.699
60.206
12.532
5.938
11.871
84.357
424.540
1.104
151.904
62.422
16.721
26.398
1.723
.520
835.7
1055.22
1.369
416.757
7.444
89.409
27.900
.286
197.832
40.435
1.901
2.109
.636
.805
.836
14509.910
6815.170
1202146
17.245
6.283
6.302
13.781
2.456
12.206
32.628
179.511
.007
47.480
5.200
13.634
10.408
.425
.117
403.380
752.990
.012
63.672
5.022
4.094
5.940
.513
273.473
8.608
.104
.364
.091
.084
.084
3552.672
3003.120
550616.3
Coef.
Var
%
78.0
53.7
10.4
109.6
41.3
102.8
38.6
42.2
0.6
31.2
8.3
81.5
39.4
24.6
22.5
48.2
71.3
0.8
15.2
67.4
4.5
21.2
179.3
138.2
21.2
5.4
17.2
14.3
10.4
10.0
24.4
44.0
45.8
Para ajudar a interpretar os factores obtidos é comum usar-se métodos que procedem á
“rotação” dos eixos seleccionados. Vários métodos têm sido propostos para este propósito, um
dos métodos convenientes é o varimax; foi este o método escolhido neste estudo. Os factores
sofrem rotação de forma a maximizar a soma do quadrado das variâncias das quantidades no
interior de cada coluna da matriz de rotação. O propósito é o de produzir valores grandes ou
pequenos e evitar valores intermédios (Kendall, 1980).
3
Resultados e Discussão
São apresentadas estatı́sticas descritivas para as 33 métricas na tabela 5. Os coeficientes de correlação para todos os pares são apresentados na tabela 6. Muitas destas métricas usadas para
124
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
Tabela 6: Matriz de correlação (coeficientes de correlação de Pearson) para as 33 métricas seleccionadas.
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
125
Tabela 7: Resultados da aplicação do método de componentes principais e uso da rotação varimax.
EIXO
VALOR PROPRIO
INERCIA ACUMULADA
AREA MN
CAI MN
CONTAG
CORE MN
DCAD
DCORE MN
ED
ENN MN
FRACT MN
GYRATE MN
IJI
LPI
LSI
MSIDI
MSIEI
NDCA
NP
PAFRAC
PARATIO MN
PD
PLADJ
PR
PRD
PROXIM MN
RPR
SHAPE MN
SHDI
SHEI
SIDI
SIEI
TA
TCA
TE
1
17.081
51.760
.859
.966
.450
.815
-.713
.734
-.862
.903
-.057
.941
.063
.456
-.759
-.159
-.181
-.595
-.785
-.924
-.899
-.844
.861
-.037
-.045
.169
-.037
.420
-.116
-.141
-.210
-.214
.102
.691
-.699
2
6.221
70.611
-.390
-.039
-.859
-.415
.646
-.482
.432
-.215
.075
-.125
.550
-.735
.299
.918
.935
.375
.193
-.025
-.188
.309
-.437
.311
.291
-.737
.311
-.097
.855
.917
.935
.943
-.323
-.585
.195
3
4.040
82.853
-.028
-.014
.182
-.029
-.027
-.063
-.090
-.065
-.279
-.059
-.317
-.279
.535
.0241
-.168
.651
.439
.087
-.015
.0695
-.081
.398
-.732
-.093
.398
-.208
-.0234
-.251
-.0622
.006
.841
.280
.639
4
1.564
87.594
-.113
-.114
-.094
-.102
-.040
-.040
-.112
.080
-.045
-.096
.578
.194
.053
.300
.084
.128
-.022
.064
.050
-.136
.113
.796
-.205
.031
.796
-.051
.494
.220
.170
.110
.200
.146
.047
5
1.187
91.191
-.099
.103
-.010
-.185
.041
-.261
-.119
-.021
.927
.215
.115
-.116
-.154
.007
-.048
-.092
-.306
.228
-.199
-.310
.115
-.088
.249
.0859
-.088
.866
-.008
.050
-.010
.003
-.188
-.101
-.172
126
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
Tabela 8: O valor dos factores associados a cada mapa.
Mapas
109
110
111
112
113
122
123
124
125
133
134
135
136
143
144
211
212
213
222
223
224
225
233
234
235
236
404
417
418
419
429
432
433
441
442
453
454
455
456
457
458
459
460
464
466
467
468
469
470
471
1
-2.26
-4.60
-3.04
-4.70
-3.11
-3.32
-2.91
-2.51
-2.42
-5.46
-3.27
-4.16
-3.14
-3.57
-2.19
-4.12
-3.53
-.58
-4.13
1.25
0.04
-2.50
.07
.51
-2.30
-2.04
1.43
-2.07
3.56
1.97
-1.36
-.01
.50
-.71
-1.17
.74
-2.53
-.69
1.83
.12
-.24
-.14
1.79
-.16
5.02
2.08
1.04
1.56
3.02
3.62
2
5.05
5.77
4.42
5.81
5.23
5.48
5.00
4.73
5.23
6.03
4.31
5.40
5.09
4.86
3.33
4.91
4.77
3.34
4.84
.89
3.57
5.05
1.33
1.18
4.67
4.65
1.54
5.69
1.31
1.21
5.57
4.41
3.56
5.42
5.06
2.18
6.36
5.45
1.53
3.15
3.31
3.66
.32
4.58
.51
1.97
3.25
2.64
.27
.15
Factores
3
-.37
2.41
1.91
2.42
1.86
1.76
1.79
1.77
1.77
1.95
1.97
2.23
1.98
1.48
1.62
2.27
2.14
1.34
2.33
.83
1.24
1.97
.92
1.10
1.84
1.74
1.18
1.87
.72
.84
-.35
1.44
1.20
-1.68
1.46
.72
1.76
1.31
.90
1.22
1.38
1.23
.82
.60
.41
.94
1.02
1.08
.69
.73
4
-.24
2.67
2.51
2.61
2.61
2.95
2.71
2.55
2.75
2.43
2.57
2.72
2.71
2.40
2.27
2.56
2.89
2.62
2.56
2.06
2.73
2.82
2.16
2.15
2.97
2.83
2.92
3.51
2.61
2.43
2.52
3.35
2.72
1.74
3.17
2.43
3.45
3.31
2.19
2.37
2.30
2.60
2.51
2.68
2.32
2.28
2.50
2.26
1.93
1.83
5
1.63
.64
.82
.66
1.01
.85
.94
1.02
1.09
.51
.76
.69
.92
.86
.90
.73
.76
1.21
.69
1.28
1.32
1.07
1.11
1.28
.96
1.04
1.15
1.04
1.05
1.24
1.72
1.21
1.25
2.24
1.21
1.42
1.18
1.31
1.37
1.33
1.32
1.33
1.18
1.67
1.15
1.41
1.41
1.40
1.31
1.22
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
127
Figura 2: Representação dos mapas com o valor mais elevado e mais baixo de factores relativamente
a cada um dos eixos (Tabela 8).
128
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
Figura 2: Continuação.
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
Figura 2: Continuação.
129
130
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
quantificar a heterogeneidade espacial estão correlacionadas e exibem interacção estatı́stica
entre si o que sugere que uma aproximação factorial multivariada de redução de dados pode
conduzir a resultados úteis.
Após a factorização da matriz de correlação pelo método das componentes principais, os
primeiros cinco factores explicam 91.2% da variação para as 33 métricas da paisagem (tabela
7). A tabela 7 apresenta os pesos de cada métrica para cada um dos cinco factores após a
rotação varimax. O primeiro factor apresenta valores elevados para as métricas AREA MN,
CAI MN, CORE MN, DCAD, DCORE MN, ED, ENN MN, GYRATE MN, LSI, NP, PAFRAC, PARATIO MN, PD, PLADJ, TCA, TE. O segundo factor apresenta valores elevados
para CONTAG, LPI, MSIDI, MSIEI, PROXIM MN, SHDI, SHEI, SIDI, SIEI. Para o terceiro
factor as métricas associadas são NDCA, PRD, TA. Para o quarto factor temos as métricas
IJI, PR, RPR. E finalmente para o quinto factor as métricas com maior valor são FRACT MN
e SHAPE MN.
As dimensões existentes podem ser interpretadas pela análise da correspondência entre as
várias métricas e os eixos factoriais. O primeiro eixo é designado por média da compactação
da mancha porque está relacionado com medidas compactação da mancha. O segundo eixo
está relacionado com distribuição dos pixeis e adjacência; estas métricas parecem medir a
textura da imagem. O terceiro eixo está correlacionado com a área da paisagem. O quarto
eixo está correlacionado com o número de classes. O quinto eixo está correlacionado com
medidas fractais, área – perı́metro.
Dez mapas que representam extremos relativamente a cada um dos factores são apresentados na figura 2. A escolha dos mapas foi realizada a partir da análise da tabela 8 que representa
o peso de cada mapa relativamente a cada um dos factores. A figura 2 providencia uma impressão visual dos tipos de padrão e estrutura correspondentes aos vários factores. Os mapas
466 e 133 têm pesos altos e opostos relativamente ao primeiro eixo e mostram diferenciação
na média de compactação das manchas. Os mapas 454 e 471 ilustram diferenças na textura
da imagem. Os mapas 112 e 441 têm diferenças na área da paisagem. Os mapas 417 e 109
têm diferença no número de classes. Os mapas 468 e 133 têm diferenças nas medidas fractais
área – perı́metro.
A análise multivariada pode resultar na transformação de um conjunto de métricas que
combinam múltiplos componentes do padrão num valor singular de forma a reduzir o número
de variáveis. Neste caso pode conduzir á substituição das 33 métricas por 5 métricas. A
escolha das métricas é realizada considerando os valores mais altos para cada um dos factores
(tabela 7). Assim as métricas representativas de cada um dos factores são: ı́ndice de área do
núcleo (CAI MN), ı́ndice de uniformidade de Simpson’s (SIEI), área total (TA), riqueza das
manchas (PR) e dimensão fractal (FRACT MN), respectivamente.
4
Conclusão
A solução proposta é a de descrever os factores fundamentais do padrão espacial que são
independentes e extrair um conjunto de ı́ndices para medir esses factores. Foi realizada uma
análise factorial de 33 ı́ndices do padrão espacial para 50 mapas de ocupação do solo e foram
identificados cinco factores independentes que podem ser interpretados como (a) média da
compactação da mancha (b) textura da imagem (c) área da paisagem (d) número de classes
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
131
(e) medidas fractais perı́metro – área. O padrão factorial sugere que os cinco factores podem
ser adequadamente representados por cinco métricas univariadas: ı́ndice de área do núcleo
(CAI MN), ı́ndice de uniformidade de Simpson’s (SIEI), área total (TA), riqueza das manchas
(PR) e dimensão fractal (FRACT MN).
É provável que outros factores possam ser identificados se considerarmos mapas da paisagem em diferentes escalas (número de classes atribuı́das, tamanho do grão e extensão do
mapa), se considerarmos diferentes métricas adicionais que não estão relacionadas com as
métricas aqui estudadas, ou ainda, se considerarmos diferentes conjuntos de mapas. Estas
observações salientam o uso da análise factorial como uma ferramenta descritiva. Não podemos inferir a partir de uma simples análise factorial todos os factores do padrão da paisagem;
no entanto, a experiência do uso da análise factorial em outros trabalhos, tais como, Riitters
1995 e Rogers 1993, aplicados a diferentes mapas e métricas, sugerem resultados semelhantes.
Assim o grau de confiança no uso destes resultados é maior.
5
Bibliografia
Baskent EZ, Jordan GA, 1995, Characterizing spatial structure of forest landscapes. Can J For
Res 25:1830-1849.
Forman, R.T.T. e M. Godron, 1981, Patches and structural components for a landscape ecology.
BioScience 31: 733-740.
Forman, R.T.T. e M. Godron, 1986, Landscape Ecology. John Wiley and Sons, New York, 619
pp
Gustafson EJ, Parker GR., 1992. Relationship between landcover proportion and indices of
landscape spatial pattern. Landscape Ecology 7:101-110.
Gustafson, E.J., 1998. Quantifying landscape spatial pattern: What is the state of the art.
Ecosystems: 143-156.
Kendall, 1980, Multivariate analysis. Second Edition, Charles Griffin &Company Limited.
LaGro, J., Jr., 1991, Assessing patch shape in landscapes mosaics. Photogrammetric Engineering
and Remote Sensing 57, 285-293.
Li, H. and Reynolds, J.F., 1993. A new contagion index to quantify spatial patterns of landscapes.
Landscape Ecology 8: 155-162.
McGarigal K, McComb WC. 1995. FRAGSTATS: spatial pattern analysis program for quantifying landscape structure. Portland (OR): USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research
station; General Technical Report PNW-GTR-351.
Morrison, D.F., 1990, Multivariate Statistical Methods. Third Edition, McGraw-Hill Inc., New
york NY.
O’Neill, R.V., Krummel, J.R., Gardner, R.H., Sugihara, G., Jackson, B., DeAngelis, D.L., Milne,
B.T., Turner, M.G., Zygmunt, B., Christensen, S.W., Dale, V.H. and R.L. Graham, 1988. Indices
of landscape pattern. Landscape Ecology 1: 153-162.
Pickover CA., 1990, Computers, pattern, chaos and beauty: graphics from an unseen world. New
York: St Martin’s.
Pielou EC., 1975, Ecological diversity. New York: Wiley-Interscience
Riitters KH, O’Neill RV, Hunsaker CT, Wickham JD, Yankee DH, Timmons SP, Jones KB e
Jackson BL, 1995, A factor analysis of landscape pattern and structure metrics. Landscape
Ecology, 11, 197-202
132
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
Rogers, C., 1993, Describing landscapes: indices of structure. M.S. Thesis, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, 170 pp.
Romme WH., 1982, Fire and landscape diversity in Sub-Alpine forests of Yellowstone National
Park. Ecol. Monogr, 52, 199-221.
Shannon, C.E., e Weaver, W., 1949, The mathematical theory of communication (Urbano University of Illinois Press).
Simpson E.H., 1949, Measurement of diversity. Nature, 163, 688.
Turner, M.G. and Gardner, R.H. (editors), 1991. Quantitative Methods in Landscape Ecology.
Springer-Verlag, New York NY.
Turner, M.G., 1990, Spatial and temporal analysis of landscape patterns. Landscape Ecology, 4,
21-30.
Turner, M.G., Costanza, R. and Sklar, F.H., 1989(a). Methods to evaluate the performance of
spatial simulation models. Ecological Modeling 48:1-18.
Turner, M.G., R.V. O’Neill, R.H.Gordon, e B.T.Milne, 1989(b), Effects of changing spatial scale
on the analysis of landscape pattern. Landscape Ecology, 3, 153-162.
Whitcomb, R.F., J.F.Lynch, M.K.Klimkiewwicz, C.S. Robbins, B.L. Whitcomb, and D.Bystrak,
1981, Effects of forest fragmentation on avifauna of the eastern deciduous forest. Forest island
dynamics in man-dominated landscapes. Springer-Verlag, New York.
Wiens, J.A., 1989, Spatial scaling in ecology. Functional Ecol., 3, 385-397.
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
133
Apêndice 1 Fórmulas das métricas definidas em FRAGSTATS
3.0.
(M1) Área damancha
- AREA
(M2) Perı́metro da mancha - PERIM
(M3) Raio de giração - GYRATE
(C1) Área total - CA
1
10,000
AREA = aij
2
aij – área (m ) da mancha ij.
GY RAT E =
Z
P
r=1
hijr
Z
A
(100)
pi – proporção da paisagem ocupada pela mancha
tipo ( classes) i.
aij – área (m2 ) da mancha ij.
A - área total da paisagem (m2 ).
(C4) Densidade da mancha - PD
PD =
1
10.000
aij - área (m2) da mancha ij.
(C3) Número de manchas - NP
N P = ni
aij
j=1
aij
j=1
(C2) Percentagem da paisagem - PLAND
P LAN D = pi =
n
P
CA =
hijr – distância (m) entre a célula ijr ( localizada
no interior da mancha ij) e o centróide da mancha
ij baseada na distância centro da célula a centro da
célula.
Z – número de células na mancha ij
n
P
P ERIM = pij
pij – perı́metro (m) da mancha ij.
ni
A (10, 000)(100)
ni – número de manchas de tipo (classe) i na paisagem
(C5) Orla total - TE
TE =
m
P
eik
ni – número de manchas de tipo (classe) i na paisagem.
A – área total da paisagem (m2 ).
eik – tamanho total da orla entre tipos (classe) de
manchas i e k.
(C6) Densidade da orla - ED
(C7) Índice da forma da paisagem - LSI
ED =
m
P
k=1
.25
eik
k=1
(10.000)
A
m
P
e∗ik
k=1
√
LSI =
A
eik – tamanho total da orla entre tipos de manchas i
e k.
A – área (m2 ) total da paisagem.
e∗ik – tamanho total (m) da orla entre tipos de manchas i e k
A – área total da paisagem
(C8) Índice da maior mancha - LPI
(P1) Área
total -TA
n
max(aij )
LP I =
j=1
A
(100)
aij – área (m2 ) da mancha ij.
A – área (m2 ) total da paisagem.
AT = A
1
10,000
A - área (m2 ) total da paisagem.
(P2) Número de manchas - NP
(P3) Densidade da mancha – PD
NP = N
PD =
N– número total de manchas na paisagem.
N – número total de manchas na paisagem.
A – área (m2 ) total da paisagem.
(P4) Orla total - TE
(P5) Densidade da orla - ED
TE = E
ED =
E – comprimento (m) total da orla na paisagem.
E – total do comprimento (m) da orla na paisagem.
A – área total da paisagem (m2 ).
N
A (10, 000)(100)
E
A (10, 000)
134
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
(P6) Índice da forma da paisagem - LSI
LSI =
(P7) Índice da mancha mais larga - LPI
∗
.25E
√
A
LP I =
max(aij )
(100)
A
E – total do comprimento (m) de orla na paisagem.
A – área total da paisagem (m2 ).
aij – área (m2 ) da mancha ij.
A – área total da paisagem (m2 ).
(M4) Razão perı́metro - área - PARATIO
(M5) Índice da forma - SHAPE
∗
P ARAT IO =
pij
aij
.25pij
√
aij
SHAP E =
pij – perı́metro (m) da mancha ij.
aij – área (m2 ) da mancha ij.
pij – perı́metro (m) da mancha ij.
aij – área (m2 ) da mancha ij.
(M6) Índice da dimensão fractal - FRACT
F RACT =
2 ln(.25pij )
ln aij
pij – perı́metro (m) da mancha ij.
aij – área (m2 ) da mancha ij.
(C21) Dimensão fractal perı́metro–área - PAFRAC
P AF RAC =
n
m P
P
ni
(
ln pij . ln aij
)
i=1 j=1
ni
n
P
2
−
ln p2ij
j=1
pij – perı́metro (m) da mancha ij.
aij – área (m2 ) da mancha ij.
ni – no de manchas na paisagem de classe i.
n
P
ln pij
j=1
n
P
ln pij
j=1
2
n
P
ln aij
j=1
(P20) Dimensão fractal perı́metro–área - PAFRAC
P AF RAC =
N
m P
n
P
(ln pij . ln aij )
2m n
PP
ln pij
i=1 j=1
i=1 j=1
N
n
m P
P
m n
PP
2
ln pij
i=1 j=1
pij – perı́metro (m) da mancha ij.
aij – área (m2 ) da mancha ij.
N – no total de manchas na paisagem.
i=1 j=1
m n
PP
ln aij
i=1 j=1
2
ln pij
(M7) Área donúcleo- CORE
(M8) Número de áreas do núcleo - NCA
(M9) Índice de área do núcleo - CAI
(C39) Área total do núcleo - TCA
CAI =
T CA =
CORE =
acij
1
10,000
acij – área (m2 ) do núcleo da mancha ij com um valor
de buffer especificado (m).
acij
aij (100)
N CORE = ncij
ncij – número de áreas de núcleo disjuntas na mancha
ij baseada do valor do buffer especificado (m).
n
P
j=1
acij
1
10,000
acij – área (m2 ) do núcleo da mancha ij com um valor
de buffer especificado (m).
aij – área (m2 ) da mancha ij.
acij – área (m2 ) do núcleo da mancha ij com um valor
de buffer especificado (m).
(C40)Percentagem da área do núcleo relativamente á paisagem -CPLAND
(C41) Número de áreas do núcleo disjuntas NDCA
CP LAN D =
n
P
N DCA =
acij
j=1
A
(100)
acij – área (m2 ) do núcleo da mancha ij com um valor
de buffer especificado (m).
A – área total da paisagem (m2 ).
n
P
j=1
ncij
ncij – número de áreas do núcleo disjuntas na mancha ij baseada no comprimento do buffer especificado
(m).
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
(C42) Densidade de áreas do núcleo disjuntas
- DCAD
DCAD =
n
P
ncij
j=1
ncij – número de áreas do núcleo disjuntas na mancha ij baseada no comprimento do buffer especificado
(m).
A – área total da paisagem (m2 ).
(P38) Número de áreas do núcleo disjuntas NDCA
N DCA =
m P
n
P
i=1 j=1
T CA =
n
m P
P
(M10) Índice de proximidade - PROXIM
n
P
s=1
aijs
h2ijs
acij
1
10,000
acij – área (m2 ) do núcleo da mancha ij com um valor
de buffer especificado (m).
(P39) Densidade de áreas do núcleo disjuntas
- DCAD
ncij
ncij – número de áreas do núcleo disjuntas na mancha ij baseada no comprimento do buffer especificado
(m).
P ROXIM =
(P37) Área total do núcleo - TCA
i=1 j=1
(10, 000) (100)
A
135
DCAD =
m P
n
P
ncij
i=1 j=1
(10, 000) (100)
A
ncij – número de áreas do núcleo disjuntasna mancha ij
baseada no comprimento do buffer especificado (m).
A – área total da paisagem (m2 ).
(M11) Índice de similaridade - SIMILAR
SIM ILAR =
n
P
s=1
aijs dik
h2ijs
aijs – área (m2) da mancha ijs no interior da vizinhança especificada (m) da mancha ij.
hijs – distância (m) entre mancha ijs (localizada no
interior de uma distância especificada da mancha ij)
e a mancha ij baseada na distância orla a orla.
aijs – área (m2 ) da mancha ijs no interior da vizinhança especificada (m) da mancha ij.
dik – similaridade entre as manchas de tipo i e k.
hijs – distância (m) entre mancha ijs (localizada no
interior de uma distância especificada da mancha ij)
e a mancha ij baseada na distância orla a orla.
(M12) Distância euclideana de menor vizinhança - ENN
(M13) Índice do contraste da orla - EDGECON
EN N = hij
hij – distância da mancha ij á mancha de vizinhança
mais próximacom o mesmo tipo de classe, baseada
na distância orla a orla (a partir do centro da célula
ao centro de outra célula).
(C79) Densidade da orla com peso de contraste - CWED
CW ED =
m
P
(eik .dik )
k=1
(10, 000)
A
eik – comprimento total da orla na paisagem entre
manchas tipo i e k.
dik – peso do contraste da orla entre manchas tipo i
e k.
A – área (m2 ) total da paisagem.
(P76) Densidade da orla com peso do contraste – CWED
CW ED =
m
m
P
P
(eik dik )
i=1 k=i+1
A
(10, 000)
eik – comprimento total da orla na paisagem entre
manchas tipo i e k.
dik – peso do contraste da orla entre manchas tipo i
e k.
A – área (m2 ) total da paisagem.
EDGECON =
m
P
(pijk .dik )
k=1
(100)
pij
pijk – comprimento da orla entre a mancha ij e a
mancha adjacente de tipo (classe) k.
dik - peso do contraste da orla entre manchas tipo i
e k.
pij – perı́metro (m) da mancha ij.
(C80) Índice do contraste da orla total -TECI
T ECI =
m
P
eik dik
k=1
m
P
(100)
e∗ik
k=1
eik – comprimento total da orla na paisagem entre
manchas tipo i e k
e∗ik - total do comprimento da orla na paisagem entre
classes de manchas de tipo i e k
dik – peso do contraste da orla entre manchas tipo i
ek
(P77) Índice do contraste da orla total (TECI)
T ECI =
m
m
P
P
j=1 k=i+1
E∗
eik .dik
(100)
eik – comprimento total da orla na paisagem entre
manchas tipo i e k.
dik – peso do contraste da orla entre manchas tipo i
e k.
E∗ – Total da orla (m) na paisagem.
136
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
(C87) Contágio – CONTAG
gii
m
gik
CON T AG =
P
−2Pi +1
k=1
(100)
2−2Pi
gii – número de ligações entre pixeis de mancha classe
i.
gik – número de ligações entre pixeis de tipos de manchas i e k.
Pi – proporção da paisagem ocupada por manchas
do tipo i.
(C89) Índicede
justaposição
 e
 - IJI
 difusão
−
m
P
 eik   eik 
 ln P

 P
m
m
k=1
eik
IJI =
k=1
ln(m−1)
m
m

(100)



gik
k=1
gii – número de ligações entre pixeis de mancha classe
i.
gik – número de ligações entre pixeis de tipos de manchas i e k.
m
P

eik – comprimento total da orla na paisagem entre
tipos de manchas i e k.
m – tipos de manchas.
(P84) Contágio
 - CONTAG

gii
P LADJ =  P
 (100)
m
(P85) Percentagem de adjacências semelhantes (PLADJ)
eik
k=1
(C88) Percentagem de adjacências semelhantes - PLADJ

gii
i=1
P LADJ =  P
m P
m

gik
i=1 k=1


 (100)
gii – número de ligações entre pixeis de mancha classe
i.
gik – número de ligações entre pixeis de tipos de manchas i e k.
 

P P   gik 

 gik  

 ln(pi ) P
 
(pi ) P
m
m


i=1 k=1
gik
gik




k=1
k=1
CON T AG = 1 +
 (100)
2
ln(m)








gik – número de adjacências entre pixels do tipo i e k.
pi – proporção da paisagem ocupada por manchas tipo i.
m – numero de tipos de mancha (classes).
(P86) Índice de difusão e justaposição - IJI
−
IJI =
m
m
P
P
[( eEik )−ln( eEik )]
i=1 K=i+1
ln(1/2[m(m−1)]
(100)
eik – comprimento total da orla na paisagem entre tipos de manchas i e k.
e – total do comprimento de orla na paisagem.
m – tipos de manchas.
(P87) Riqueza das manchas - PR
(P88) Densidade da riqueza da mancha - PRD
PR = m
P RD = m
A (10.000)(100)m – diferentes tipos
de manchas.
m – no tipos de manchas.
A – área total da paisagem.
(P89) Riqueza relativa das manchas - RPR
RP R =
m
mmax (100)
m – diferentes tipos de manchas.
mmax – máximo número tipos de manchas presentes
na paisagem.
(P91) Índice de diversidade de Simpson’s SIDI
SIDI = 1 −
n
P
i=1
p2i
pi – proporção da paisagem ocupada por um tipo de
mancha i.
(P90) Índice de diversidade de Shannon’s SHDI
SHDI = −
m
P
(pi ln pi )
i=1
pi – proporção da paisagem ocupada por um tipo de
mancha i.
(P92) Índice de diversidade modificado de
Simpson’s - MSIDI
M SIDI = − ln
m
P
i=1
p2i
pi – proporção da paisagem ocupada por um tipo de
mancha i.
P. Couto / Investigação Operacional, 24 (2004) 109-137
(P93) Índice de uniformidade de Shannon’s SHEI
−
SHEI =
m
P
(P94) Índice de uniformidade de Simpson’s SIEI
1−
pi ln(pi )
i=1
ln m
pi – proporção da paisagem ocupada por um tipo de
mancha i.
m – no tipos de manchas diferentes.
137
SIEI =
m
P
p2i
i=1
1
1− m
p – proporção da paisagem
( ) i
ocupada por um tipo de mancha i.
m – no tipos de manchas diferentes.
− ln
(P95) Índice modificado de uniformidade de Simpson’s - MSIEIM SIEI =
pi – proporção da paisagem ocupada por um tipo de mancha
m – no tipos de manchas
m
P
i=1
ln m
p2
i
REVISTA INVESTIGAÇÃO OPERACIONAL
Polı́tica Editorial
Investigação Operacional (IO) é a revista cientı́fica da APDIO - Associação Portuguesa de
Investigação Operacional. A polı́tica editorial da IO é publicar artigos originais e de elevada
qualidade que contribuam para a teoria, metodologia, técnicas e software de Investigação
Operacional e a sua aplicação a diferentes campos. A Revista também publica artigos com
revisões relevantes de temas de IO. Casos de sucesso na aplicação a problemas práticos são
especialmente bem vindos.
Processo de Aceitação
Todos os manuscritos submetidos para publicação são revistos e aceites apenas com base na
avaliação da sua qualidade, importância e adequação à polı́tica editorial. Será responsabilidade
do Editor interpretar a avaliação dos revisores. A contribuição de cada artigo deve estar
claramente evidenciada na Introdução. Critérios como a relação com literatura existente,
comprimento e estilo do artigo são tidos em consideração. Uma indicação clara da viabilidade
de aceitação do artigo é habitualmente dada na primeira fase de revisão do artigo.
Será requerido aos autores de um artigo aceite que transfiram os direitos de autoria para a
APDIO, que assegurará a mais ampla disseminação possı́vel de informação. Os volumes da
Revista são publicados em papel, e distribuı́dos a todos os associados da APDIO, e em formato
electrónico na rede SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online.
Resumos dos Artigos indexados em
IAOR - International Abstracts in Operations Research
Instruções aos Autores
1. Submeter artigos para publicação ao editor principal, de preferência por e-mail em Microsoft Word ou “Portable Document Format” (PDF) para [email protected], ou
por correio normal (quatro cópias) para o seguinte endereço: Prof. Joaquim J. Júdice,
Departamento de Matemática, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade de
Coimbra, Apartado 3008, 3001-454 COIMBRA, Portugal.
2. Lı́ngua. Os artigos devem ser escritos em Português, Inglês ou Espanhol.
3. Os Manuscritos devem ser impressos. Numerar as páginas consecutivamente.
4. A primeira página do manuscrito escrito em português ou em espanhol deve ter a seguinte
informação: (a) Tı́tulo; (b) nome, e-mail e afiliação institucional dos autores; (c) um
resumo; (d) palavras-chave; (e) tı́tulo em inglês (f) um resumo em inglês; (g) palavraschave em inglês; (h) identificação do autor correspondente. Se o manuscrito for escrito em
inglês, a primeira página deve ter a seguinte informação: (a) Tı́tulo em inglês; (b) nome,
e-mail e afiliação institucional dos autores; (c) um resumo em inglês; (d) palavras-chave
em inglês; (e) identificação do autor correspondente.
5. Agradecimentos, incluindo informação sobre apoios, dever ser colocados imediatamente
antes da secção de referências.
6. Notas de rodapé devem ser evitadas.
7. Formulas que são referenciadas devem ser numeradas consecutivamente ao longo do
manuscrito como (1), (2), etc. do lado direito.
8. Figuras, incluindo grafos e diagramas, devem ser numerados consecutivamente em numeração árabe.
9. Tabelas devem ser numeradas consecutivamente em numeração árabe.
10. Referências. Citar apenas as mais relevantes e listar só as que são citadas no texto.
Indicar as citações no texto através de parênteses rectos, e.g., [4]. No final do artigo
listar as referências alfabeticamente por apelido do primeiro autor e numerá-las consecutivamente, de acordo com o seguinte formato: Artigos: autore(s), tı́tulo, nome e volume
da revista (ou livro, mas neste caso incluir o nome dos editores), ano e páginas. Livros:
Autor(es), tı́tulo, editor, ano.
11. Artigos aceites devem ser enviados pelo autor ao editor, de preferência na forma de um
ficheiro fonte em LaTeX com ficheiros EPS para as figuras, juntamente com um ficheiro
PDF ou Postscript. Em alternativa, ficheiros fonte em Word são também aceites. Para
garantir uma boa qualidade gráfica, as figuras devem ser em formato vectorial; formatos
raster como JPG, BMP, GIF, etc. devem ser evitados.
12. Provas dos artigos serão enviadas por e-mail como ficheiros PDF para o autor correspondente. Corrigir as provas cuidadosamente, e restringir as correcções apenas aos pontos
em que as provas diferem do manuscrito. Desvios à versão aceite pelo editor são apenas
possı́veis com a autorização prévia e explı́cita do editor. Trinta separatas de cada artigo
são enviados gratuitamente ao autor correspondente.
Informação sobre a Publicação
Investigação Operacional (ISSN 0874-5161) está registada na Secretaria de Estado da Comunicação Social sob o número 108335. Os volumes da Revista são publicados em papel,
e distribuı́dos a todos os associados da APDIO, e em formato electrónico na rede SciELO Scientific Electronic Library Online. O preço da assinatura anual é de 25 euros. Os volumes
são enviados por correio normal. Informação adicional sobre assinaturas pode ser solicitada
ao Secretariado da APDIO- CESUR, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001
LISBOA, Portugal. Tel. +351 218 407 455 - www.apdio.pt - [email protected]
JOURNAL INVESTIGAÇÃO OPERACIONAL
Editorial Policy
Investigação Operacional (IO) is the scientific journal of APDIO - Associação Portuguesa de
Investigação Operacional (the Portuguese Operational Research Association). The editorial
policy of IO is to publish high quality and original articles that contribute to theory, methodology, techniques and software of Operational Research (OR) and its application to different
fields. It also publishes articles with relevant reviews of OR subjects. Cases of successful
application of OR to practical problems are specially welcome.
Acceptance Process
All manuscripts submitted for publication are refereed and accepted only on the basis of its
quality, importance and adequacy to the editorial policy. It will be the responsibility of the
Editor to interpret the referee’s assessment. The contribution of each paper should be clearly
stated in the introduction. Criteria such as relationship with existing literature, length and
style are taken into account. A clear indication on the suitability of a manuscript is usually
provided after the first round of refereeing. The authors of an accepted paper will be asked
to transfer its copyright to the publisher, which will ensure the widest possible dissemination
of information. The volumes of the journal are published in hardcopies, which are distributed
to all APDIO associates, and in electronic format in SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library
Online.
Articles are abstracted/indexed in
IAOR - International Abstracts in Operations Research
Instructions to Authors
1. Submit papers for publication to the main editor, preferably by e-mail in Microsoft Word
or ”Portable Document Format”(PDF) to [email protected], or by ordinary
mail (four copies) to the following address: Prof. Joaquim J. Júdice, Departamento de
Matemática, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade de Coimbra, Apartado
3008, 3001-454 COIMBRA, Portugal.
2. Language. Papers must be in written in Portuguese, English or Spanish.
3. Manuscripts should be typewritten or typeset. Number the pages consecutively.
4. The first page of the manuscript written in English should contain the following information: (a) Title; (b) names, e-mails and institutional affiliations of the authors; (c) an
abstract; (d) keywords (f) identification of the corresponding author.
5. Acknowledgements, including support information, should be placed prior to the references section.
6. Footnotes should be avoided.
7. Formulas that are referred to should be numbered consecutively throughout the manuscript as (1), (2), etc. on the right.
8. Figures, including graphs and diagrams, should be numbered consecutively in Arabic
numbers.
9. Tables should be numbered consecutively in Arabic numbers.
10. References. Cite only the most relevant references and list only those cited in the text.
Indicate citations in the text by bracketed numbers, e.g., [4]. At the end of the paper
list the references alphabetically by the surname of the first author and number them
consecutively, according to the following formats: Articles: author(s), title, name and
number of the journal (or book, but in this case include the editors names), year, pages.
Books: Author(s), title, publisher, year.
11. Accepted papers are to be sent by the author to the editor, preferably in the form of a
source file in LaTeX and EPS files for the figures together with a PDF or postscript file.
Alternatively, source files in Word are also accepted. To ensure good publishing quality
the figures should be in vector formats; raster formats like JPG, BMP, GIF, etc. should
be avoided.
12. Page proofs will be e-mailed as a PDF file to the corresponding author. Correct proofs
carefully, and restrict corrections to points at which the proof is at variance with the
manuscript. Deviations from the version accepted by the editor are only possible with
the prior and explicit approval of the editor. Thirty offprints of each paper are supplied
free of charge to the corresponding author.
Publication information
Investigação Operacional (ISSN 0874-5161) is registered in the Secretaria de Estado da Comunicação Social under number 108335. The volumes of the journal are published in hardcopies,
which are distributed free of charge to all APDIO associates, and in electronic format in SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online. Subscription price is 25 euros. Issues are sent
by standard mail. Additional subscription information is available upon request from APDIO Secretariat - CESUR, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 LISBOA,
Portugal. Tel. +351 218 407 455 - www.apdio.pt - [email protected]
ISSN: 0874-5161
Investigação Operacional
Volume 24
Apdio
CESUR - Instituto Superior Técnico
Av. Rovisco Pais - 1049 - 001 LISBOA
Telef. 21 840 74 55 - Fax. 21 840 98 84
http://www.apdio.pt
Número 1
Junho 2004
PRETO PRETO MAGENTA = APDIO

Documentos relacionados