File - Conservation Mozambique

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File - Conservation Mozambique
Dugong conservation in the Bazaruto Archipelago National Park; Enhancing protection &
monitoring, and identifying risks & mitigation measures.
EWT In partnership with the Bazaruto Archipelago National Park (2011 – 2014)
Regional Classification:
Endangered in Eastern Africa
Recent evidence put forward by the Convention on Migratory Species (October 2010) suggests
that Dugongs face the risk of extinction within the next 40 years. Dugongs are LISTED globally as
Vulnerable. However, according to the 2013 Second Signatory State Meeting for the MoU on
the Conservation & Management of Dugongs and their Habitat- they are classified as
Endangered in Eastern Africa.
Bazaruto’s Dugongs are considered the last remaining viable population in the Western Indian
Ocean region (south of the Arabian Gulf). Population estimates published in 2012 conclude that
this population numbers in the region of 247 individuals. Further population viability research
conducted by dr a and v & f suggests that, with a stable age structure, and assuming 1/3rd of the
females within the population are breeding, the loss of only two breeding females annually
from the Bazaruto population is equivalent to a 12% loss from the reproductive cohort – a level
of mortality that will initiate steep population decline.
Objective of the Project:




Secure core Dugong herds & habitat in the Bazaruto Archipelago by mitigating major
threats (gill netting) & strengthening existing structures.
Conservation Management Capacity Building
Awareness/ education
Alternative livelihoods for fishing communities
In response to these alarming figures and specific threats identified by over 60 delegates
attending the Maputo International Dugong Workshop in 2009, I developed the Dugong
Emergency Protection Project- as an intervention to reduce Dugong mortality in Bazaruto, EWT
adopted and began funding the Project shortly after.
Since 2012, together with the Administrator of the Parque Nacional - we’ve developed a revised
law enforcement strategy to reduce Dugong mortality in the Parque Nacional by mitigating the
most significant threat to this population- incidental capture in illegal gill nets.
We started off by identifying the Park’s needs and shortfalls, and what resources they required
to mitigate gill net use, and implement an effective LE strategy. In the absence of patrol boats,
fuel, communication networks, surveillance, and measurable law enforcement outputs, we
raised funds to provide and maintain 2 marine patrol vessels, fuel to perform an average of 40
patrols per month, a VHF radio communication system that allows each outpost and mobile
patrol units to relay information, patrol mapping systems, GPS units, and plenty GPS training
The Park now operates what I like to think of as an effective law enforcement department that
could lead Mozambique’s MPA’s towards implementing improved enforcement and
compliance.
Marine Patrol Coverage: June 2013 – February 2014
•
Patrols = 195
•
Coverage = 9,017 Km
•
Infringements = 154
•
Items of illegal equipment confiscated = 2,838
•
Gill nets confiscated = 9
Illegally harvested resources confiscated = 923 Kg
The Park’s improved Marine Patrol coverage from June 2013 to February 2014 is indicated by
the black tracks- representing 195 patrols and 9,017 km of patrol coverage. Each Boat
AVERAGES 1,000kM OF COVERAGE PER MONTH. The red dots are the 154 Infringements
identified and addressed during these 9 months- where 2,838 items of illegal equipment
(including 9 gill nets), and 923 Kg of illegally harvested resources were confiscated.
While Dugongs are observed during Marine Patrols, observation probability is low. Also, Gill
nets used outside the Park Boundaries are not detected by Marine Patrols, since these seldom
range outside the Park’s jurisdictional boundaries.
Which led us to source funding for aerial surveillance and monitoring-which we perform not
only inside, but also outside the Park’s boundaries from Cabo Sao Sebasteao to the mouth of
Rio Save- approximately 140km of coastline IN TOTAL.
Our observations, made by the pilot of a FUEL EFFICIENT Bathawk Ultra-light aircraft and one of
the Park Scouts as a trained observer during 26 hours of surveillance and monitoring (over 6
days) distinguished two Dugong assemblages- one inside the Park, and one near the Nova
Mabone/ Nhyambwe region; constituting 60km of unprotected, unpoliced waters to the north
of the Park.
Findings: Aerial Surveillance
• 60 Km of coastline
• Unprotected
51 hours of our 200 available hours of search effort produced these fisheries distribution
findings. The red dots represent Illegal Gill nets, harvesting of Holothuria/ sea cucumbers is
yellow, and so on… You’ll notice a lot line fishing happening mostly in the southern half of the
Park and towards Vilanculos. This is because netting closure have been enforced for fishers of
the Vilanculos district these past 3 month. Under normal circumstance, seine netting is the
most prevalent fishery, followed by hand line.
.
Fisheries Distribution
Findings
Gill Nets
Seine Nets
Long Lines
Holothuria
Spear Guns
Hand Line
This is a closer look at Nova Mabone area relative to the Save River. This Map demonstrates the
occurrence of Gill nets in proximity to Dugongs- which we find rather worrying. We’re in the
process of consulting with the District Administrator, Maritime officials, and Police of Inhassoro
to develop a set of joint mitigation measures to address this issue. We were informed by these
authorities- that most of these gill nets are used by migrant fishers from the District of Govurro,
and that the most effective way to deal with this issue would be through enforcement.
Nova Mabone
/Nhamabwe
=Gill Nets
= Dugongs
Appeal to ANAC:
A) Expansion of the Parque Nacional
B) Research through a coastal livelihoods assessment & adequate development of
Alternative livelihoods for the affected fishing communities.
C) The development of a National Park sustainability strategy to ensure conservation
interventions are maintained in the long term.
In light of these findings, The EWT would like to put forward an appeal to ANAC for (A) The
expansion of the Parque Nacional do Archipelago do Bazaruto to the Rio Save, in which further
outposts are developed in collaboration with Maritimo, and in which the Park’s revised law
enforcement strategy is applied. (B) Extensive research through a coastal livelihoods
assessment and adequate development of Alternative livelihoods for the affected fishing
communities takes place. And (C) The development of a National Park sustainability strategy to
ensure conservation interventions are maintained in the long term.
An integrated approach to information and specimen management for biodiversity
conservation in central Moçambique
Dr Marc Stalmans, Dr Piotr Naskrecki & Sr Mateus Mutemba
Gorongosa Restoration Project
E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory
FASE 1
xxxx
xxxx
Possivel através de Acordo de Cooperação com USAID/Mozambique
The Vision for E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory
The E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory is a modern scientific facility, one of the first of its kind
in Africa. It offers long-term research and training opportunities in biodiversity documentation,
ecology and conservation biology to Mozambican and visiting researchers and students, and will
help guide restoration efforts of Gorongosa and other protected areas of Mozambique.
Specific goals
1. Baseline biological exploration and documentation to assist with the full restoration and
expansion of Gorongosa
2. Long term surveys and monitoring of Gorongosa biodiversity, with focus on the most
threatened and least explored habitats and organisms
3. Education of Mozambican conservationists and experts in a range of fields of biology
and nature conservation
4. Media and outreach activity to promote conservation and ecotourism in Gorongosa
Biological exploration and documentation
•
The first and most important step in biodiversity conservation is comprehensive
understanding of what we are hoping to protect
•
The E.O. Wilson Lab will document the multicellular biodiversity of Gorongosa NP,
beginning with all vertebrates, key groups of arthropods (insects, arachnids and related
organisms), and all vascular plants
•
The Lab will maintain a synoptic collection of biodiversity of the park; it will collaborate
closely with Mozambique’s national natural history museum and other scientific
institutions
Cheringoma Biodiversity Survey 2013
•
First comprehensive, all-taxa survey of Gorongosa National Park
•
15 scientists and students from Mozambique and other countries
•
Over 1,200 species documented: 54 spp. of mammals, 189 spp. of birds, including up to
29 spp. new to Gorongosa, 80 spp. of frogs and reptiles, most new to Gorongosa
•
At least 15 species of invertebrates new to science
•
Gorongosa Synoptic Collection - insect collection
•
•
Gestão de Dados
Data management
•
Gestão de Dados: Base de Dados da Biodiversidade da Gorongosa
Data management: Gorongosa Biodiversity Database
The database uses the Darwin Core metadata schema,
which is the same schema as the one used by the EOL
and most major biological databases.
•
•
•
Recurso de identificação e aprendizagem / Identification and learning resource
•
All species recorded from the park will be genetically barcoded using standard (mostly
mitochondrial) DNA markers, and the resulting barcodes will be included in the Barcode
of Life Database. This will be done in collaboration with the Canadian Centre for DNA
Barcoding, an institution interested in making Gorongosa one of its focal sites for
exhaustive documentation of genetic diversity of tropical ecosystems.
Criação de Relações de Parceria
Building partnerships
•
Education of conservation leaders and experts
•
Workshops, lectures and field experience for Mozambican and visiting students and
researchers
•
Focus on advanced training in latest knowledge and applied methods of biodiversity
documentation and conservation
•
Development of teaching and research resources
African Entomology Course
Insect biodiversity, ecology, and behavior in
southern African ecosystems
Media and outreach
•
Assistance in production of educational, scientific, and popular media
•
Dissemination of knowledge of Gorongosa, its biodiversity and conservation efforts
•
Collaboration with Gorongosa’s Center for Community Education in education of young
students of the Gorongosa communities
Implications from a vet perspective of the interface wildlife, domestic animals and
Man
*Carlos Lopes Pereira
**Agostinho de Nazaré Mangueze
*Wildlife Conservation Society Moçambique
** Direcção Nacional dos Serviços de Veterinária
Saúde do
ecossistema
Saúde animal
Saúde Humana
Tabor GM(2002). Defining conservation medicine. In: Aguirre AA, Ostfeld RS, Tabor GM, House C, Pearl MC (eds).Conservation Medicine:
Ecological Health in Practice.New York, USA: Oxford University Press; 2002. pp.8–16.
2
HOMEM
62% das infecções
humanas são zoonoses
DOENÇA
ANIMAIS
DOMÉSTICOS
FAUNA
DOENÇA
DOENÇA (indígena)
Zoonoses
•
•
•
•
Doenças exóticas
Tuberculose bovina
Brucelose
Brucelose
Antraz
E. Coli 0157:H7
Raiva
Zoonoses
Tuberculose
Ebola
Influenza aviar
Raiva
SARS
Febre Aftosa
Teileriose (Corridor)
Febre catarral Maligna
Raiva
3
C.Lopes Pereira & A. Nazaré Mangueze Abril 2014
Millions
Zoonoses
•
•
•
•
•
24
23
22
21
20
19
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Cidade de Maputo
Gaza
Inhambane
Niassa
Maputo
Manica
Cabo Delgado
Sofala
Tete
Zambezia
Nampula
0.00
1.00
2.00
3.00
4.00
C.Lopes Pereira & A. Nazaré Mangueze Abril 2014
5.00
4
Áreas de Conservação
15.35% da superfície do
Pais com 801590 Km2
Áreas de
Conservação
No.
Área (km2)
Parques Nacionais
6
33173
Reservas Nacionais
6
47900
Coutadas de Caça
12
42017
Total
24
123090
C.Lopes Pereira & A. Nazaré Mangueze Abril 2014
Conservation áreas 15.35% of the country’s surface 801.590 km²
Impact of disease on the interface
Bovine tuberculosis
Anthrax
Brucellosis
Rabies
Rift Valley Fever
Trypanosomiasis
Impacts on community health
5
Impacto das doenças na interface
Tuberculose bovina,
Antraz
Brucelose
Raiva
Febre do vale do Rift
Tripanossomose
Febre catarral maligna
Febre Aftosa
Peste Suína Africana
Peste Bovina
Peste dos Pequenos
Ruminantes
Esgana canina
Peste bovina
Raiva
Impactos na
saúde da
comunidade
Impactos no
bem estar
(economia) da
comunidade
Impactos na
conservação/
biodiversidade
C.Lopes Pereira & A. Nazaré Mangueze
Abril 2014
6
Doença e agente causador
Associação e interacção animais domésticos
/fauna
Peste Bovina
Morbillivirus
Grande amplitude de hospedeiros ruminantes
domésticos e selvagens. Espécies selvagens são
fracos hospedeiros de manutenção. Mais afectados :
búfalo, Kudu, cefo, facocero. Doença aguda em
bovinos ruminantes selvagens e suínos. Não ocorre
em Moçambique.
Peste dos pequenos ruminantes
Morbillivirus
Hospedeiros: pequenos ruminantes domésticos e
selvagens. A doença cila endemicamente nas
manadas monádicas, e a transumância introduz a
doença nas populações nativas. Persistência do
Vírus na Tanzânia ameaça o norte de Moçambique.
Febre aftosa
Aftovírus
As espécies selvagens não são reservatórios excepto os
búfalos que são portadores persistentes dos vírus SAT 1
e SAT2 Altamente contagiosa e de rápida disseminação
(bovinos suínos, pequenos ruminantes, e animais
selvagens ex: boi cavalo no Serengeti. Tipo O isolado em
búfalos em Moçambique (2010) na Reserva especial de
Marromeu (DNSV-MINAG). Evidência que o virus
circulava em bufalos existe desde 1978 Estava ausente
em 1978 (Ferreira ML e Rosinha 1986). Este virus é
possivelmente originário do Brasil de onde foi
importado através de bovinos infectados no inicio da
década de 70
7
Doença e agente causador
Associação e interação animais domésticos
/fauna
Febre do Vale do Rift
Phlebovírus
Muitas espécies de mosquitos Culex e Aedes podem
transmitir a doença. Não foi identificado reservatório
vertebrado. O reservatório são os ovos do Aedes
resistentes à seca do. Ocorre em Moçambique . Foco
mais recente de grandes proporções ocorreu na
A.Sul em 2010 e o que afectou entre 10000 a 20000
pessoas entre 1974 e 1976.
Peste Suína Africana
Vírus da Peste Suína Africana
Doença dos suídeos domésticos e selvagens. O
hospedeiro de manutenção são as carraças
argasídeos (Ornithodorus spp). Papel secundário
suídeos de vida livre (Facoceros são portadores
assintomáticos do vírus). Presente em Moçambique.
Nova estirpe identificada no Parque Nacional da
Gorongosa (Quembo et al.)
Febre catarral maligna
Herpervirus-1 Alcelaphino
Todas as espécies de de boi cavalo são reservatórios.
Bovinos infectam-se quando expostos ao vírus das
secreções nasais dos vitelos . Fatal para os bovinos e
limitada a áreas onde os bovinos e bois cavalo têm
interação . Os bovinos são hospedeiros finais.
Não há evidência de ocorrer em Moçambique
poucos bois cavalos e interação limitada.
8
Doença e agente causador
Associação e interação animais domésticos
/fauna
Peste Equina Africana
Orbivírus
Endémico na Zebra que é o hospedeiro de
manutenção circulando durante todo o ano. A
prevalência de anticorpos em elefantes é elevada,
mas o papel destes na manutenção do vírus é pouco
provável. Presente em Moçambique
Raiva
Lyssavirus
Ciclo silvático foi descrito em 33 espécies de
carnívoros e 23 de herbívoros na África Subsaariana,
incluindo chacais, texugo do mel, mangusto, raposa
orelhuda e civeta. Transmitido dos animais
selvagens para os domésticos e vice-versa. Fatal nos
mamíferos originou quase a extinção dos cães
selvagens no ecossistema do Massai-Mara -Serengeti
. Kudu na Namíbia mantem o vírus sem a presença
de outras espécies. Incidência a aumentar em
Moçambique
Teileriose ou doença do corredor
Theileria parva sp.
O Búfalo Africano é o reservatório das espécies de
teileria que podem causar doença nos bovinos. Cefo
e Pala-Pala transmitem Teileria sp. que não causa
doença nos bovinos. Os bovinos são hospedeiros
finais e são incapazes de infectar os vectores
intermediários. Presente no sul e centro-noroeste
de Moçambique com impacto económico.
9
Doença e agente causador
Associação e interação animais domésticos
/fauna
Tripanossomose
Espécies de tripanossomas
Os animais selvagens incluindo o elefante ,
rinoceronte, búfalo, facocero, hipopótamo e
vários artiodáctilos são hospedeiros de
manutenção e são tolerantes à infecção,
podendo manter ter altas taxas de infecção com
vários tripanossomas . Os animais domésticos,
equídeos e cães são susceptíveis. Presente em
Moçambique 2/3 do território.
Brucelose
Brucella spp
Não parece ser um problema nos bovídeos
selvagens . Doença difícil de eliminar nos
sistemas pastorais. A prevalência em búfalos
aumentou em Moçambique como resultado de
contacto com bovinos infectados.
Antraz
Bacillus anthracis
Focos de doença documentados na ausência de
animais selvagens. Ocorrência em animais
selvagens se domésticos não está clara. Kudu joga
um papel importante nas epidemias como
amplificador . Ocorrência rara em Moçambique
Esgana
Morbillivirus
Responsável pela morte de grande numero de
leões e outros carnívoros no ecossistema do
Serengeti e Massai Mara em 1994. Doença de
C.Lopes Pereira & A. Nazaré Mangueze
10
risco nos Parques e Reservas em Moçambique
Abril 2014
M. bovis “successful business”
•
Broad host range (all mammals)
•
Infects and settles in the new hosts.
•
It has a moderate ability to survive in the environment.
•
It is passed between domestic and wild animals and from these to man
•
In the late 70s it was confirmed in wild buffalo in Gorongosa National Park. (ML Ferreira
and Rosie 1986) with high prevalence (28.6%) of lesions and confirmed in 9.5% (n = 21)
and 2.1% in Marromeu
•
In Mozambique 54.000 new cases (2013) of human tuberculosis (20% extrapulmonary)
per year to 6.3% fatality and $ 30 Million / year for combat. Second highest rate of MDRTB in SADC.
FAUNA
Caça furtiva
Contacto direto
Ambiente
Turismo
Consumo de leite não Pasteurizado e outros
Produtos (sangue vísceras etc.). Contacto próximo!
HOMEM
Alta prevalência de HIV
Falta de esclarecimento
TUBERCULOSIS
African buffalo
Kudu
Warthog
Lion
Leopard
Calico
Honey Badger
Baboon
Spotted Hyena
Genet
Boar
Impala
Eland
Imbabala
C.Lopes Pereira & A. Nazaré Mangueze
Abril 2014
ANIMAIS
DOMÉSTICOS
Situação desconhecida12
Bovine tuberculosis in Mozambique in the context of reported health events in 2012
Tripanosomose
8
Raiva
9
Cistecercose
11
D. Newcastle
11
PSA
16
Brucelose
22
Stilesiose
26
Fasciolose
29
D.T.C
50
Tuberculose
86
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
16
C.Lopes Pereira & A. Nazaré Mangueze Abril 2014
Tuberculose e brucelose na interface
(Parque Nacional do Limpopo)
Pereira et al., 20071
Rodwell et al 2001)3
+10 anos
Limpopo 2014
n=4158. 0 t+
N= 11935 (34.8%)
0%
+0.98
Prevalência no sul
38.2% (+- 6.3%)
N=54. 1 t+ (falso)
=150 (36%)
+8.06
>8x
+15.68
n=49
SAT1= 39 (79.6%)
SAT2 =35 (71.4%)
SAT 3=38 (77,5%)
1Bovigan em búfalos e intradérmico em bovinos para TB , RBT para Brucelose
2.Bovid Stat-Pak e Bovigan para TB e IDEXX ELISA, intradérmico para bovinos, RBT e ELISA
para Brucelose em búfalos
3. Intradérmico
4. RBT e Fixação de complemento
17
5.Blocking ELISA PCR e isolamento de vírus
Theileriosis (corridor disease)
• Silly Teileria lawrencii Bufalo – bovine Rhipicephalus appendiculatus (East) Rhipicephalus
zambezienis (Southern).
• First record in southern Mozambique in the 60s and 70s (Mapai Mossurize, Manica and
Chimoio)
• Reappears in 2004 Macarretane Chibuto, Gaza Province in southern Mozambique with
significant impact on the region.
• Occurrence was clearly linked to the presence of Buffaloes probably from the Limpopo
National Park.
Teileriose (T. Parva lawrencei em Chaimite
Chibuto, Província de Gaza, Março-Maio de 2005
C.Lopes Pereira & A. Nazaré Mangueze Abril 2014
19
Teileriose (T. Parva lawrencei em Chaimite
Chibuto, Província de Gaza, Março-Maio de 2005
C.Lopes Pereira & A. Nazaré Mangueze Abril 2014
19
Focos de Teileriose em relação a todos os focos de
doenças transmitidas por carraças (2012)
Babesiose
2
Bovinos
1,400.00
1,200.00
Erlichiose
1,000.00
3
800.00
Anaplasmose
600.00
16
400.00
200.00
Teileriose
21
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
0
5
10
15
20
25
C.Lopes Pereira & A. Nazaré Mangueze Abril 2014
20
Doença do Corredor
C.Lopes Pereira & A. Nazaré Mangueze
21
Abril 2014
Abcesso causado por laço
Abcess caused by a
snare
C.Lopes Pereira & A. Nazaré Mangueze
Abril 2014
22
EXTINÇÃO LOCAL DOS CÃES SELVAGENS NO SERENGETI (TANZÂNIA)
Focos de Raiva sucessivos no fim da década de 80 e inicio da década de 90 originaram
a extinção local dos cães selvagens (mabecos)
C.Lopes Pereira & A. Nazaré Mangueze Abril 2014
26
O Impacto da esgana na população de leões do
Serengeti (Tanzânia-1994)
30% dos leões (aprox: 1000)
Chacais, hienas, raposas
orelhudas e leopardos
Rudovick Kazwala , Kazwala
Sokoine University of Agriculture ,(2005)
27
Casos de Raiva no Homem e nos animais
(2003 - 2012)
?
Ano 2012
Raiva animal
9 casos
Raiva Humana
43 óbitos
11997 casos de
mordedura
Fonte: Relatório do anoC.Lopes
2012 da
Direção
Nacional
dos Serviços de Veterinária
Pereira
& A. Nazaré
Mangueze
Abril 2014
28
Raiva humana (2012)
Maputo
0
Tete
2
Manica
2
Niassa
3
Gaza
3
C.Delgado
4
Inhambane
4
Zambezia
6
Nampula
9
Sofala
10
0
2
4
6
Fonte: Relatório do ano 2012 da Direção Nacional dos Serviços de Veterinária
8
10
12
29
Variação da população de cães domésticos e
proprietários de cães na vila de Mbamba ,
Reserva Nacional do Niassa desde 2008
Fonte: Colleen B. 2014
C.Lopes Pereira & A. Nazaré Mangueze
Abril 2014
Rabies
• local silvatic Cycle: (Sub-Saharan Africa)
• 33 species of carnivores
30
• 23 species of herbivores
• Kudu in Namibia keeps the virus without the presence of other species.
Febre do Vale do Rift
Rudovick Kazwala , Kazwala
Sokoine University of Agriculture (2005) ,
32
Medição do risco de diferentes hospedeiros em atuarem como
reservatório de T. brucei rhodesiense agente responsável
pela doença do sono.
Uganda 22.3 x
Serengeti 1.070.000 x
S.C. Welburn, K. Picozzi, M. Kaare, E.M. Fèvre, P.G. Coleman and T. Mlengeya(2005)
33
Infestação com
mosca Tse-Tse
C.Lopes Pereira & A. Nazaré Mangueze
Abril 2014
34
Overview of Bird Conservation Science in Mozambique - the players and key
components
G. Allport, N. Aransay, C. Bento, M. Ngwenyama, M.Taylor
The informal ‘bird’ group
Many others but this group participating here:
•
Gary Allport, BirdLife International
•
Nacho Aransay, Maputo, Mozambique
•
Carlos Bento, Museu de História Natural & AACEM
•
Morris Ngwenyama, Associação Ambiente, Conservação e Educação Moçambique
(AACEM)
•
Martin Taylor, BirdLife South Africa
Organisations
•
BirdLife International – global bird conservation partnership of NGOs
•
BirdLife South Africa – BirdLife Partner in South Africa
•
AACEM – new NGO in Mozambique established with encouragement of BirdLife (and
support from the Critical Ecosystems Partnership Fund (CEPF))
A Worldwide Network
National Non-governmental organisations
Autonomous, self-determined
Committed to bird conservation
Independent but caucus on key issues
Together delivering the BirdLife Strategy
A Worldwide Network
122 countries
Over 2.5 million members; 8 million supporters
Over US$270 million annual budget
Over 1.2 million hectares of reserves
Over 2 million school children
BirdLife’s Global Partnership
•
120 Countries/Territories
– 78 Partners / Partners Designate
– 34 Affiliates
•
•
•
8 Country Programmes
12 Secretariat Offices
The BirdLife Partnership strives to conserve birds, their habitats and global biodiversity,
working with people towards sustainability in the use of natural resources
Science driven:
four areas of strategic operation
1. Save species
2. Conserve sites
3. Safeguard habitats
4. Empower people for positive change
BirdLife South Africa
•
Membership based national NGO
•
Focus on conserving birds
•
Programmes on Red Data Book species, Important Bird Areas, tourism, education
Associação Ambiente, Conservação e Educação Moçambique (AACEM)
•
New organisation
•
Working on engaging people in Mozambique
•
Carlos Bento, President
•
Morris Ngwenyama, Project Officer
Globally Threatened Species
•
Strong science-based Red Listing
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Threatened species action plans
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‘Preventing Extinctions’ programs
Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs)
To document, monitor and effectively protect and manage the world’s most important
places for birds and biodiversity. Needs primary data such as Atlases.
Key Habitats/ Landscapes
Engaging people – citizen science
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How can the different values of biodiversity be expressed and quantified in policyrelevant ways to demonstrate its underpinning of sustainable development?*
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What practical metrics can be developed to use for natural capital in national (and
other) accounting?*
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What are the costs of effective biodiversity conservation and how can these costs best
be met?*
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What actions are needed to improve the status of the most threatened species and
sites, and are the ones underway having any effect? How cost-effective are different
approaches in different contexts?
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How important is improving connectivity between sites of biodiversity importance
(given recent and projected habitat loss), and what are the best mechanisms for doing
so?*
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How significant are important sites for birds for the conservation of other wildlife?
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What other focal taxa best complement birds in identifying the full set of key
biodiversity areas?
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What ecosystem services do important biodiversity sites deliver to people? How can
these be assessed, monitored, and factored into policy to inform better and more
sustainable outcomes for biodiversity and people?*
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What are the causes of population decline in migratory species, especially landbirds, and
what policy measures are needed to address these effectively?
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Where are the global priorities for eradicating or controlling invasive species, given the
potential benefits to native species, and costs/constraints of interventions?
•
How will human responses to climate change interact with direct climate change effects
to impact biodiversity?*
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Which species are under greatest extinction risk from climate change and what
adaptating measures are required?*
•
How can ecosystem-based adaptation for people be best shaped to deliver adaptation
for biodiversity (and vice versa)?*
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What are the best ways to develop, empower and sustain local community groups as
effective agents for conservation?*
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How can we most effectively communicate with, and influence the psychology, values
and behaviour of, people (citizens, business, decision-makers) in favour of biodiversity
conservation?*