SADC SMC1 - South African Navy

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SADC SMC1 - South African Navy
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SADC SMC 1
SOUTHERN AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT
COMMUNITY
STANDING MARITIME COMMITTEE
OF
THE INTERSTATE SECURITY AND DEFENCE
COMMITTEE
SADC SMC 1
ORGANISATION AND CO-OPERATION
The information contained in this publication is for official use only and is not to be communicated
to any person not authorised to receive it.
Any person finding this document should hand it in at a military or Police Establishment within the
country that the book is found. It should be accompanied by a statement giving particulars of how
and where found.
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SADC SMC 1
Letter of Promulgation
1. SADC SMC 1 – Standing Maritime Committee of the Interstate Security and Defence Committee,
Organisation and Co-operation, having been approved by the Standing Maritime Committee of the
ISDSC is hereby promulgated for use by all concerned. It shall be transported, stowed, safeguarded
and accounted for in accordance with agreed security regulations for the handling of controlled
publications.
2. Unauthorised copies of this publication may not be made.
3. Requests for additional copies of this publication are to be motivated and forwarded to SO1 Warfare
Publications at the Navy Office, Department of Defence, Private Bag X104, Pretoria, South Africa,
0001.
4. Mustering Requirements
a. This publication is to be mustered at three monthly intervals and on every occasion of being
transferred to the charge of another responsible person.
b. Page by page musters are to be carried out
i. on receipt;
ii. on insertion of a change;
iii. at three monthly intervals;
iv. on transfer to the charge of another person; and
v. on final return.
5. Proposed changes and amendments are to be forwarded to SO1 Warfare Publications, see paragraph 3
above, for further processing.
(F.A. DOS SANTOS)
CHAIRMAN: STANDING MARITIME COMMITTEE OF THE ISDSC: ADMIRAL
June 2002
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RECORD OF CHANGES, AMENDMENTS AND MUSTERS
Change/
Sigamend
Muster
Date
Print Name
Signature and Rank
Page by Page (PxP) musters are to be recorded in sequence on this page.
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RECORD OF CHANGES, AMENDMENTS AND MUSTERS
Change/
Sigamend
Muster
Date
Print Name
Signature and Rank
Note : Page by Page (PxP) musters are to be recorded in sequence on this page.
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CONTENTS
Chapter
Title
1
Rules of Procedures of the Standing Maritime Committee
2
Standing Maritime Committee: Terms of Reference: Secretariat, Co-ordinators and
Naval Co-ordinating Work Group
3
Standing Maritime Committee Co-operation between Member States: Co-operation
Plans: Guidelines
4
Standing Maritime Committee Co-operation Plans
5
Maritime Search and Rescue Standard Operating Procedure for Mutual Assistance
between SADC Member States
6
Document Configuration Control
7
Standing Operating Procedure for the Movement of a Combined Southern African
Developing Countries Military Task Force from Home Bases to an Area of Deployment
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CHAPTER 1
RULES OF PROCEDURES OF THE STANDING MARITIME COMMITTEE
INDEX
Paragraph
Title
Page No
1001
1002
1003
1004
1005
1006
1007
1008
1009
1010
1011
Name
Mandate
Vision
Aim and Objectives
Functions
Membership
Meetings
Decision-Making
Organisational Structure
Finance
Amendment
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CHAPTER 1
RULES OF PROCEDURES OF THE STANDING MARITIME COMMITTEE
1001
Name
The committee is known as the Standing Maritime Committee (SMC).
1002
Mandate
The establishment of the Standing Maritime Committee follows the mandated decision of the
Inter-State Defence and Security Committee (hereinafter referred to as ISDSC) Seminar held in
Gaborone in March 1995 and validated at the inaugural meeting of the Standing Maritime
Committee in July 1995. It is a sub-committee of the Operations Sub-Sub-Committee.
1003
Vision
The vision of the Standing Maritime Committee is to promote peace and prosperity in the region
through maritime military co-operation.
1004 Aim and Objectives
1. The aim of the Standing Maritime Committee is to achieve an optimum degree of maritime
military co-operation in the Southern African region within the aims and objectives of the ISDSC.
Without detracting from the generality of the aim, the objectives of the Standing Maritime
Committee shall include the following:
a. The provision of mutual maritime security in order to ensure the freedom of sea lines of
communication.
b.
The development and maintenance of maritime capability in the region.
c.
The development of maritime capacity to meet contingencies that require quick response.
1005 Functions
1. The Standing Maritime Committee has as its functions:
a. To promulgate common doctrine and standard procedures for the conduct of combined
maritime exercises and operations.
b. To support regional strategic maritime military planning.
c. To facilitate training, mutual logistic support and utilisation of facilities.
d. To co-ordinate maritime military activities in the functional areas as identified.
e. To co-ordinate the exchange of maritime military expertise, information and technology.
f. To ensure the rights, privileges and obligations of land-locked and transit states in
accordance with United Nations Convention of the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS).
1006 Membership
1. The following rules govern membership:
a. ISDSC Member States. All ISDSC Member States are automatically members of the
Standing Maritime Committee.
b.
Other State Departments and Agencies. Officials of other state departments and agencies
involved in the maritime arena would not have membership of the Standing Maritime
Committee, except that they could be co-opted by work groups that may be established by
this Committee.
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1007 Meetings
1. The following rules govern meetings:
a. Attendance. Chiefs of the navies or delegated officers as directed by the Defence Chiefs will
attend meetings of the Standing Maritime Committee.
1008
b.
Frequency of Meetings. The Standing Maritime Committee will meet at least once per year
and that this meeting will precede the meeting of the Operations Sub-Sub-Committee.
c.
Proceedings. The proceedings and resultant documentation thereof will be in English,
French and Portuguese.
Decision-Making
Decisions of this committee shall be by consensus while unresolved issues shall be referred to the
Operations Sub-Sub-Committee (OSSC).
1009 Organisational Structure
1. The following rules govern the organisational structure:
a. Chair. The chair will rotate in accordance with the rotation of the OSSC chair. In the event
that the designated Member State indicates that it is not in a position to accept the chair, the
SMC will decide on chairmanship between the current chair and the next to-be-designated
member state through a voting process. A simple majority will decide the next chair, in case
of a split vote the chairman will cast the deciding vote.
b.
Secretariat
i.
The permanent mechanism remains in South Africa until the Committee decides that it
can be transferred. The country that provides the mechanism must fund the facility.
ii.
The Member State that has the chair will provide a secretary for the annual meeting.
iii. The host country (which can differ from the Chair State) will provide the facilities and
personnel required to enable the secretariat to function.
c.
Work Groups. Work groups will be constituted for a specific purpose as and when required.
1010 Finance
1. The following rules govern financial aspects:
a. Travel costs to and from venues will be paid for by individual Member States.
b. Accommodation for delegations will be paid for by individual Member States.
c. The host will provide the venue and official transport.
1011
Amendment
All amendments to these rules of procedures or any of its clauses may be proposed by members.
Amendments approved by the SMC will be submitted to the OSSC for ratification.
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CHAPTER 2
STANDING MARITIME COMMITTEE: TERMS OF REFERENCE:
SECRETARIAT, CO-ORDINATORS AND NAVAL CO-ORDINATING
WORK GROUP
INDEX
Paragraph
Title
Page No
2001
2002
2003
SMC Secretariat: Terms of Reference
Naval Co-operation Plan Co-ordinators
Naval Co-ordinating Work Group (NCWG)
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CHAPTER 2
STANDING MARITIME COMMITTEE: TERMS OF REFERENCE:
SECRETARIAT, CO-ORDINATORS AND NAVAL CO-ORDINATING WORK
GROUP
2001 SMC Secretariat: Terms of Reference
1. The availability of a full-time secretary has been one of the factors that have ensured continuity in
the organisation and functioning of the SMC. However, since the Chair of the SMC rotates from
time to time according to its Rules of Procedure, it is necessary to organise the Secretariat so that
it is adaptable to the situation without losing continuity. The above experience has led the SMC
to organise the Secretariat as indicated in the paragraphs following.
2. The SMC Secretary. The "SMC Secretary" forms the permanent mechanism of the SMC to
ensure continuity, especially between the annual conferences. He is appointed by the SMC
according to the Rules of Procedure. It is important that the SMC is his only responsibility. He
remains in his appointment until replaced. He is responsible to the Chair for the following:
a. To ensure the collection, upkeep and distribution of all ISDSC documentation and
publications relating to the SMC.
b.
To monitor the implementation of Committee decisions.
c.
To prepare reports and inputs to ISDSC related authorities and others as instructed by the
Chair.
d.
To advise the Chair regarding proposed actions to ensure that the vision, aims and functions
of the SMC remains current.
e.
To guide and assist the Meeting Secretary for annual conferences,.
3. The Meeting Secretary. The current Chair of the SMC appoints the "Meeting Secretary" from his
staff. The appointment is active for the duration of the annual activities of the SMC. The SMC
Secretary can also be the Meeting Secretary for a specific meeting by pre-arrangement. He is
responsible to the Chair to provide secretarial services to the Chair for promulgating the SMC
activities, recording them and distributing approved minutes and reports (eg work session
reports). An outline of his preparative and executive actions is as follows:
a. Arrange budget and approval for activities, through the Chair.
b.
Inform members of dates, accommodation costs, replies required and any other details.
c.
Determine the preliminary agenda for the meeting in conjunction with the SMC Secretary
and chair, since it largely dictates the contents of the work session.
d.
Finalise the work session content and programme
e.
Hold co-ordinating conferences with the co-ordinator and all relevant personnel to arrange
the following requirements:
i.
Personnel Support: Work session chair and/or facilitator; secretarial team; interpreters
and document translations; media liaison.
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ii.
Logistic Support: Recording and presentation aids (eg computers, printers); document
production aids (eg stationery, photocopiers, binders and binding machines).
f.
Issue local instructions and orders.
g.
Prepare reference documentation for the work session and annual meeting
h.
Distribute reference material and final administrative information to Member States.
i.
Keep notes during work session and produce work session report for annual meeting.
j.
Produce minutes of the annual meeting.
k.
Prepare local reports as required by the Chair.
l.
Provide SMC secretary with the necessary information to finalise any ISDSC reports.
m. Prepare letters of appreciation for the Chair
4. The Activity Co-ordinator. The current Chair also appoints the "Activity Co-ordinator" from his
staff. He is responsible to the Chair for the programming of all activities surrounding the work
session and meeting, all arrangements concerning the visiting delegations and the smooth
execution of the programme. He must work in close conjunction with the Meeting Secretary. An
outline of his preparative and executive actions is as follows:
a. Estimate accommodation requirements and suitable venues for the work session and annual
meeting. Make preliminary reservations.
b.
Determine which functions will be required and where they are to be held, what the financial
implications would be and who will be invited. Send out invitations.
c.
Confirm bookings for accommodation and venues once Member States have confirmed
attendance.
d.
Arrange and co-ordinate the following requirements and support:
i.
All Transport.
ii.
Security.
iii. Functions and excursions.
iv. Catering.
v.
Medical support.
vi. Communication facilities for visitors
vii. Gifts and memento's.
viii. Flags, seating plans, name tallies.
ix. Procedure for confirming member state attendance, and movement details of delegates.
2002 Naval Co-operation Plan Co-ordinators
1. Division of responsibilities for co-operation plans between Standing Maritime Committee (SMC)
Member States.
a.
Co-ordinating responsibilities for naval co-operation were assigned by the SMC as follows:
i. Angola: Search and Rescue.
ii. Mozambique: Force Support.
iii. South Africa: Naval Training, Combined Force Preparation and Naval Control of
Shipping.
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iv. Tanzania: Naval Hydrography.
b.
Co-ordinating States are to appoint co-ordinators for the administration of the naval cooperation plans for which they are responsible.
2. Definition of Plan Co-ordinators. The Plan Co-ordinator for an SMC Co-operation Plan is an
officer appointed by the Member State responsible for a specific plan.
3. Responsibilities of Plan Co-ordinators
a. Co-ordinators are to formulate plans as instructed by their national superiors. They may coopt assistance from one or more of the Member States. Such assistance is to be requested
through the Chair of the SMC.
b.
Proposed co-operation plans and subsequent changes are to be submitted to the Naval Coordinating Work Group for review.
c.
Co-ordinators are to ensure that approved plans are promulgated to all Member States.
d.
Co-ordinators must monitor the progress and success of implementation of approved plans,
reporting to their national superiors.
2003 Naval Co-ordinating Work Group (NCWG)
1. Purposes. The NCWG is established as a standing work group of the SMC, primarily for the
following purposes (the SMC may give the NCWG other tasks if required):
a. Regular review of the establishment and implementation of the SMC Co-operation Plans.
b.
Preparation of the agenda for the annual meeting, as well as recommendations and proposals
regarding agenda items.
2. Composition. The NCWG is constituted as follows:
a. Chairperson. The Chair of the SMC, or an officer delegated by him will be the chairperson
of the NCWG.
b.
Members.
superiors.
One officer from each of the Member States nominated by their national
3. Functions of the Naval Co-ordinating Work Group
a. The NCWG must review the establishment and implementation of co-operation plans
according to the time scales instructed by the SMC.
b.
Plans, changes and implementation recommendations must be submitted for approval by the
SMC.
c.
The NCWG must review the proposed agenda for the annual meeting of the SMC in
conjunction with the SMC Secretary. Recommendations and proposals regarding agenda
items are to be included in the NCWG Report in order to facilitate the work of the SMC.
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CHAPTER 3
STANDING MARITIME COMMITTEE CO-OPERATION BETWEEN
MEMBER STATES: CO-OPERATION PLANS: GUIDELINES
INDEX
Paragraph
Title
Page
3001
3002
3003
3004
3005
3006
Introduction
Guidelines
Operations Tasks
Capabilities and Resources
Reference Documents
Co-operation Plan Format
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CHAPTER 3
STANDING MARITIME COMMITTEE CO-OPERATION BETWEEN
MEMBER STATES: CO-OPERATION PLANS: GUIDELINES
3001 Introduction
1. The Standing Maritime Committee (SMC) has addressed in detail the regional maritime situation
as defined by common interests of security and welfare of the Member States of the Southern
African Development Community (SADC) in its meetings and work sessions. Certain aims,
priorities, pre-requisites and restrictions concerning maritime military co-operation were defined
from these discussions.
2. Attempts to develop co-operation to a practical level must take note of the issues raised. The set
of guidelines contained in this section should therefore, be applied in the formulation of cooperation plans.
3. Co-operation Plans. The SMC Naval Co-operation Plans are a set of plans established to
promote naval co-operation between the Member States of the SADC.
4. Co-ordinating Responsibility. A specific Member State has been given the co-ordinating
responsibility for each Co-operation Plan. Co-ordination is achieved through the Naval Coordinating Work Group of the SMC.
3002 Guidelines
1. Planning. Planning must take cognisance of the vision, aim, objectives and functions of the SMC
as described in Chapter 1 of this publication.
2. Fields of Co-operation. Co-operation plans must be formulated for the following fields of
maritime co-operation:
a. Hydrography.
b. Naval Training.
c. Combined force preparation.
d. Combined force employment.
e. Combined force support.
f. Search and Rescue.
g. Naval Control of Shipping (NCS).
3. Pre-requisites of Co-operation. The pre-requisites that have been identified can be summarised
in the concept of inter-operability. The following pre-requisites governing successful cooperation must be considered in the formulation of co-operation plans:
a. Doctrine and procedures.
b. Command and Control.
c. Communications.
d. A common operations language.
e. Rules of Conduct and Engagement.
f. Information exchange.
g. Liaison.
h. A common legal approach.
i. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs).
4. Priorities. The following aspects identified by the SMC must receive special attention in the
planning and implementation of co-operation:
a. Realisation of the pre-requisites. Plan for inter-operability at the essential and basic levels.
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b.
Emphasis of combined force preparation to be on Peace Support Operations and
Humanitarian Operations.
c.
Exercises with navies in the Southern African region are to be planned to support ISDSC
initiatives and to aim at enhancing inter-operability. Interactions with these navies are to be
based on the doctrine contained in the Multinational Maritime Operations Manuals and
SADC publications eg SADC MPSO 1.
d.
Search and Rescue (SAR), pollution (and other disasters) response and law enforcement cooperation are to be addressed as a matter of importance.
3003 Operations Tasks
1. Force preparation, -employment and -support planning must consider the likely tasks identified
below.
2. Most Likely Tasks in the Short Term
a. Sea lift - troops, equipment, provisions, water, fuel.
b. Refugee evacuation.
c. Search and Rescue.
d. Boarding and Searching.
e. Disaster Response/Relief.
3. Other Tasks concerning Peace Support and Humanitarian Operations
a. Patrols - Buffer Zones, Enforcing embargoes.
b. Interdiction.
c. Naval Control of Shipping.
d. Provision of harbour services.
e. Harbour Protection.
f. MCM, EOD, IEDD.
g. Salvage and Clearance.
h. Lead through operations.
i. Escort.
j. Logistic support to combined forces of the various arms of the services.
4. Implication of Operational Tasks for Planning. These tasks form the basis for determining the
capability gap and to plan training and exercises in terms of combined force preparation
requirements.
3004 Capabilities and Resources
1. Maximum use must be made of existing capabilities and resources to achieve co-operation while
the acquisition of extra or new resources should be minimised in the interest of economy.
2. Co-operation Plans must consider financial implications.
3005 Reference Documents
1. The following documents should be used as reference documents during the formulation of plans:
a. The document "ISDSC/MSSC/4-6 JUN 96 - Maritime Sub-Sub-Committee Work Group",
distributed under file reference VSH/R/311/1, contains useful information on the naval
capabilities and resources found in the region.
b. "Multinational Maritime Operations (MMOPS)" publication dated 1 Sep 96.
c. EXTACs as referred to in the above publication.
d. SADC publications.
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3006 Co-operation Plan Format
1. It is impossible to lay down a rigid format to which all plans should conform. However, to
achieve some standardisation, the format described below should be adopted as far as possible.
a. Complete Documentation. Documents should contain two separate parts, namely:
i. Part 1: Appreciation or Staff Paper. The detailed discussion of the reasoning used to
arrive at the plan. This may be in one of the accepted military methods of an
appreciation or a staff paper. The aim of this section is to provide a detailed basis for
assessment and reviewing of plans.
ii.
b.
Part 2: The Plan. An extraction of Part 1 detailing only the aspects describing
execution of the plan. The purpose of this document is to describe the plan for
implementation purposes.
Plan Format. The plan should be described with "ends", "ways" and "means" as follows:
i. Aims. This states what broad results the plan aims to achieve concerning the field of cooperation. Different aims can be identified for different periods, for example "Short
term", "Medium term", etc.
ii.
Objectives. Objectives form the detailed description of the results to be achieved for
each component part of the plan. Objectives must be measurable and must conclude a
time dimension that can be a specific date or period indication, for example "after 3
years". The objectives form the "ends" of the plan.
iii. Methods. For each objective the method or methods by which it is to be achieved must
be described. The method gives the "ways" in which the plan can be executed.
iv. Resources. For each method of execution, the resources required should be identified.
This should include the financial implications or expenses. The resources describe the
"means" required to execute the plan.
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CHAPTER 4
STANDING MARITIME COMMITTEE CO-OPERATION PLANS
INDEX
Section
Paragraph
Title
Page No
4101
4102
Table 4-1
Naval Training Co-operation Plan Aim of the Naval Training Co-operation Plan
Implementation Plan
Implementation Plan
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4201
4202
Table 4-2
Combined Force Preparation Co-operation Plan Introduction
Implementation Plan
Implementation Plan
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4301
4302
4303
Combined Force Support Co-operation Plan
Aim of the Plan
Data Base
Proposed Actions
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4402
4403
4404
SMC Search and Rescue (SAR) Co-operation Plan
Co-ordinating Country
Aim
Objectives
Plano de cooperacao de busca e salvamento
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4502
4503
4505
4505
4506
Hydrography Co-operation Plan
Situation
Aim
Factors
Courses of Action
Plan
Conclusion
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2
3
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CHAPTER 4
STANDING MARITIME COMMITTEE CO-OPERATION PLANS
SECTION 1 - NAVAL TRAINING CO-OPERATION PLAN
4101
Co-ordinating Country
South Africa has been appointed the co-ordinating Country for this plan that was approved at the
SMC Annual Meeting of August 1997.
4102
Aim of the Naval Training Co-Operation Plan
The aim of the Naval Training Co-operation Plan is to create opportunities for the development
of standard knowledge and skills required for the execution of appropriate combined tasks.
4103
Implementation Plan
The Implementation Plan described in Table 4-1, is based on the premises and guidelines listed in
Chapter 3 of this publication.
Table 4-1
Implementation Plan
Training
Requirement
l.
Communicate in
operational language
Goal/Objective
a
i. Proficiency in "operational"
language regarding
Terminology; Communications
procedures; Brevity Codes.
ii. Language training in English,
Portuguese and French (long
term).
2. Staff Methods
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Combined training in the following
aspects:
i. C2.
ii. Operations appreciation.
iii. Operations planning process.
iv. Conventions of Service
Writing.
v. Orders.
vi. Staff briefings and reports.
vii. Law.
viii.
Voice procedures (for par
1.a.i above).
ix. Accounting procedures.
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Action
b
Compile and publish lexicon
of naval terminology in
English, French and
Portuguese.
ii. Conduct language training
(All).
iii Each Member State provides
opportunities, using agreed
upon publications, to teach
procedure, codes and
terminology.
i.
i.
Member States present own
staff methods training iaw
agreed curriculum used by
RSA to train instructors from
Member States.
ii. Member States arrange
computer literacy training in
word processing,
spreadsheets and presentation
software.
iii. Member States acquire
internet access for
communication with each
other using the SA Navy
Staff College as a centre of
excellence for staff training.
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Table 4-1 (continued)
Implementation Plan
Training
Requirement
3. Interpretation of Law
i.
Goal/Objective
Action
a
b
i. Hold one-week seminar
covering the following
aspects:
International Maritime Law;
LOAC; Naval Planning;
Training; Joint Operations;
Developments in Naval
Warfare.
ii. Advanced/specialised training
may be solved individually by
Member States per own
requirements.
ROE.
ii. International Maritime Law;
Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC).
iii. Common understanding of
implications of respective
national laws on combined
operations.
4. Development
Develop understanding among
members both as a basis and followup of training
efforts.
i. Develop SOP for the
exchange of learners between
Member States.
ii. Member States establish
nodal points for training cooperation and advise RSA of
training needs.
iii. Source potential training
opportunities for facilities and
funds.
iv. Produce annual exchange and
training programme by
August each year.
v. Attachments to other navies
as well as for exercises and
deployments to be arranged as
standard practice and iaw
exchange/training
programme.
vi. Exchange programmes will be
arranged to provide
experiential training.
vii. Produce annual exchange
programmes for instructors to
promote cross pollination by
August.
5. Inter-operability
Training Needs
Determine the combined training
needs and capabilities.
Identify combined interoperability training needs and
draw up plans to bridge the gap
between needs and capabilities.
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SECTION 2 - COMBINED FORCE PREPARATION CO-OPERATION PLAN 4201
Co-ordinating Country
South Africa has been appointed the Co-ordinating Country for this plan that was approved at the
SMC Annual Meeting of August 1997.
4202
Implementation Plan
The Implementation Plan described in Table 4-2, is based on the premises and guidelines listed in
Chapter 3 of this publication.
Table 4-2
Implementation Plan
Factor/Issue
1.
Communications
i.
Goal/Objective
a
Obtain common operational
language.
ii. Address telecommunications
issues:
(a) Levels.
(b) Means.
(c) Equipment compatibility.
(d) Regional frequencies iaw
equipment available.
2.
Doctrine and Publications
3.
Rules of Engagement
(ROE)
4.
Information Exchange
Formalisation and configuration
control of common operations
doctrine and publications is
critical.
A common set of ROE is
required. Rules of Conduct must
form a subset of the ROE.
i. Tactical and Technical
information requirements
exist.
ii. Intelligence regarding law
enforcement at sea aspects
must be exchanged. (Vessel
Monitoring System.)
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Action
b
i. English proposed.
ii. Use "INTEROP" exercises as
the means for evaluation.
iii. Submit issues identified to
the Communications Work
Group for action.
iv. NCWG members to consult
with representatives on other
ISDSC Workgroups re
Communications.
v. SMC propose a network to
improve communications
between OSSC standing
committees and workgroups.
i. MMOPS manuals accepted as
source documents for Naval
co-operation.
ii. Develop own SADC
publications where
applicable.
Use principles given in MMOPS
and SADC MPSO 1
i. Hydrographic Info to be
exchanged in accordance
with accepted procedures.
ii. Other information to be
exchanged by mutual
agreement or on request.
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SADC SMC 1
Table 4-2 (continued)
Implementation Plan
Factor/Issue
Goal/Objective
a
Combined operations C2 doctrine
that is compatible with
international practice must be
developed.
Action
b
Study MMOPS and SADC MPSO
1.
Compatibility in drills and
procedures used in combined
operations, especially peacekeeping operations.
i.
Identify requirements.
ii.
Combined SOPs must be
developed quickly and
exercised regularly. Use the
MMOPS doctrine as a basic
guide and develop SADC
publications.
7.
Equipment
Compatibility
Short term goal is for
communications and combined
seamanship equipment, eg RAS
gear to be compatible.
Survey to be conducted to identify
equipment that may affect
achievement of combined
operations.
8.
i. Ships' visits as foundation for
subsequent exercises.
i.
INTEROP EXERCISE.
ii.
Command Post simulation
exercises must be conducted
separately or in conjunction
with par i. above
5.
Command and Control
6.
SOPs
Combined Exercises
ii. Transparency through mutual
visits and presence of
personnel from Member
States.
iii. To improve inter-operability
through basic exercises.
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SECTION 3 - COMBINED FORCE SUPPORT CO-OPERATION PLAN
4301
Co-ordinating Country.
Mozambique has been appointed the Co-ordinating Country for this plan.
4302 Aim of the Plan
To establish a data base of logistic support available to SADC Military Maritime Forces.
430 3 Data Base
The data base is to be updated annually. Inputs are to be made to Mozambique who will be the
database manager. The database should be computerised on a suitable inter-state military
network in the short to medium term (to be kept at SADC HQ eventually).
430 4 Proposed Actions
1. Ships Taken Up From Trade (STUFT)
a. Member States discuss the use of the standard format with local commercial shipping
operators.
b. Address legal aspects of STUFT.
2.
SOPs are to be drawn up for the following aspects:
a. Water terminals.
b. Movement Control Centre.
3. Exercises should take place regularly to test SOPs and capabilities (scenario to be used - Exercise
"Blue Crane").
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SECTION 4 - SMC SEARCH AND RESCUE (SAR) CO-OPERATION PLAN
4401
Co-ordinating Country
Angola has been appointed the Co-ordinating Country for this plan.
4402
Aim
To co-operate in SAR in line with the International Maritime SAR Organisation and as required
by regional circumstances.
4403 Objectives
1. Promote the establishment of National Rescue Control Centres as required by the IMO.
2. Establish a database of regional assets and their capabilities, as well as organisational and
communication information (eg contact numbers of appropriate authorities.)
3. Establish SOPs for mutual assistance.
4. Combined training and exercises.
5.
Agreements for assistance as mutually arranged.
4404 Plano de cooperacao de busca e salvamento
1. ÍNDICE
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
2.
Estrututa do servico nacional SAR.
Procedimentos operacionais padronizados para operacoes de Busca e salvamento.
Guia de procedimentos gerais.
Acao do MRCC ao receber uma alerta SAR.
Processo SAR (Composicao)
i. Registro de communicado de accidente SAR.
ii. Elementos SAR para a base de dados PP
iii. Narrativa cronologica dos acontecimentos.
Analise dos fatores.
Lista de verificacao.
Busca a salvamento: Zonas dos paises da SADC
i. Áreas regionais criadas para SAR (mapa)
ii. Área nacional de responsabilidade de um estado (mapa).
iii. Área de influencia que cobre a zona regional (mapa)
Base de dados SAR da regiao da SADC
Plano de communicacao para busca e salvamento (SARCOMPLAN) de acordo a ordem
operacional de frequencia.
Acronimos e abreviaturas.
Glossario
ALERFA
Alert Phase
AMVER
Automated Mutual-Assistance Vessel Rescue System
ARCC
Aeronautica Rescue Coordinator Centre
ARSC
Aeronautical Rescue Sub-Center
CES
Coast Earth Staion
CODUMAR
Centro de Orientacao de Doentes Urgentes-Mar
COSPAS-SARSAT
Search and Rescue Satelite-Aided Tracking System
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CRS
CS
CSS
CWU
DETRESFA
DF
DSC
EGC
EPIRB
FIR
GMDSS
GPS
GRT
HEL-H
HEL-M
IAMSAR
ICAO
IMO
IMOSAR
INCERFA
INEM
INMARSAT
LES
LKP
LRG
LW
MCC
MEDEVAC
MEDSAR
MID
MMSI
MRCC
MRG
MRL
MRSC
MSI
NAVTEX
OSC
POLLING
PV
RB
RCC
RU
RSC
RV
SAR
SAREX
SES
SITREP
SMC
SOLAS
SPOC
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SADC SMC 1
Coast Radio Station
Call sign
Coordinator Surface Search
Coast Watching Unit
Distress Phase
Direction Finding (finder)
Digital Selective Calling
Enhanced group Calling
Emergency Position-Indicating Radio Beacon
Flight Information Region
Globa Maritime Distress and Safety System
Global Positioning System
Gross Registered Tonnage
Heavy Helicopter
Medium Helicopter
International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue Manual
International Civil Aviation Organization
International Maritime Organization
International Maritime Organization Search and Rescue Manual
Uncertainty Phase
Instituto Nacional de Emergencia Medica
International Mobile Satellite organization
Land Earth Station
Last Known Position
Long-range Aircraft
Leeway
Mission Control Centre of the COSPAS-SARSAT System
Medical Evacuation
Merchant Ship Search and rescue Manual
Maritime Identification Digits
Maritime Mobile Service Identity
Maritime Rescue Coordinator Centre
Medium Range Aircraft
Maritime Rear Link
Maritime Rescue Sub-centre
Maritime Safety Information
Narrow Band Direct Printing telegraphy system
On-scene Commander
Possibilidade de interrugar todos os terminais de INMARSAT nnuma
determinada area
Pilot Vessel
Rescue Boat
Rescue Coordinator Centre
Rescue Unit
Rescue Sub-centre
Rescue Vessel
Search and Rescue
Search and Rescue Exercise
Ship Earth Station
Situation Report
Sar Mission COORDINATOR
International Convention for the Safety of life at sea
SAR Point of Contact
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SRG
SRR
SRU
SURPIC
TSS
ULR
UT
UTC
VLR
VTS
CEM
FA
NR
CN
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SADC SMC 1
Short-range Aircraft
Search and Rescue Region
Search and Rescue Unit (inclui meios aerios e navais)
Surface Picture
Traffic Separation Scheme
Ultra Long –range Aircraft
Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
Very Long-range Aircraft
Vessel Traffic Service
Navy Commander
Air Force
National Craft
Naval Command
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SADC SMC 1
Guia de procedimentos
I - PROCEDIMENTO GERAL
Ao ser recebido um comunicado do qual se deduza a possibilidade de existência de vidas humanas em
perigo, o Oficial de Serviço ao MRCC deve adoptar o seguinte procedimento:
1.
Abrir um processo SAR conforme o registo de comunicado de acidente em anexo tentando obter
o máximo de informações possíveis do primeiro informador;
2.
Registar a posição ou área do acidente ou incidente. (Ex: posição do alerta Cospas
Sarsat/Inmarsat/Digital Selective Call, área de incerteza em Overdues, posição e azimute em
avistamentos, etc) e verificar as condições meteorológicas na área;
3.
Informar o SAR Mission Coordinator-SMC (nomeado pelo chefe do Centro de Operações)
aguardando instruções. ( O SMC deverá sempre ser posto ao corrente de toda a situação, no
desenrolar da ocorrência SAR);
4.
5.
Iniciar o preenchimento do formato de analise de factores, conforme o exemplo em Anexo;
Consoante a fase de Emergência atribuída pelo SMC assim deverá ser efectuado o respectivo
procedimento:
(1) Fase de Incerteza.
(2) Fase de Alerta.
(3) Fase de Perigo.
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6.
7.
SADC SMC 1
Considerar efectuar a promulgação de Aviso aos Navegantes através do Instituto de Hidrografia
ou Fomento Marítimo, efectuar Avisos a Navegação através da Estação Radio Naval e difundir
um aviso através do Inmarsat (Safety.-Net Warning);
Considerar pedir SURPI a RCC Norfolk (sistema AMVER) ou efectuar Polling na área de
incerteza;
8.
Nas fases de Alerta e Perigo definir o DATUM e a Área de Probabilidade;
9.
Perante a área de probabilidade, efectuar o planeamento da área de busca definindo quais o(s)
meio(s) a envolver na acção SAR, designando o OSC (On Scene Comander) e as áreas de busca
individuais para cada SRU:
(1) Nayjos.(RV,RU,RB) Verificar o posicionamento do navio SAR e a existência de outros
navios nas proximidades (SURPIC-AMVER, Polling, resposta a avisos da E.R.N.). (No caso de
empenho do navio SAR estabelecer MRL e efectuar msg);
(2) Meio Aéreo ÍHEL-H.VLR. SRG)
Proceder de acordo com instruções para colaboração de meios aéreos;
10.
O empenhamento de unidades navais e meios aéreos em acções SAR, carecem de autorização do
SMC. Porém, no caso de evacuações médias consideradas como urgentes, e não permitindo
qualquer delonga, o Oficial de Serviço tem autonomia para empenhar os meios aéreos
necessários, sem prejuízo de informar a cadeia de comando na primeira oportunidade.
11.
Avaliar a necessidade de colaboração de meios de outros RCC;
12.
Obter informações adicionais junto da Lloyd's, RCC do país de registo, entidade detentora da
base de dados GDMSS, MONICAP e Capitanias, conforme aplicável.
13.
Efectuar Sitrep's para passagem da última informação disponível durante a operação SAR e
Sitrep final quando a operação terminar. Os destinatários dos Sitrep's deverão ser: Gabinete do
CEMM, EMM, ZM/MRSC da área, capitania(s) de porto envolvida(s) ou com jurisdição na
área, MRCC originário da informação e/ou do pais da nacionalidade dos sinistrados e outras
entidades a equacionar (MRCCs adjacentes, armadores, embaixadas);
14.
Encerrar a acção SAR de acordo com as instruções do SMC, (depois de adquirida a certeza de
não haver perigo para vidas humanas, ou ser manifestamente impossível existirem
sobreviventes; nos casos de homem ao mar consultar a tabela de sobrevivência no mar);
15.
Quando findar uma operação SAR, deverá ser efectuada uma verificação no respectivo processo,
afim de completar o preenchimento dos vários impressos (registo de comunicado de acidente
SAR, elemento SAR para base de dados, cronologia dos acontecimentos, etc), efectuando o seu
encerramento;
16.
Para efeitos de divulgação interna o Oficial de Serviço ao MRCC deverá enviar um comunicado
jornalístico com o formato indicado, não necessitando para isso de aprovação superior.
17.
Sempre que se venha a verificar que foram emitidos sinais, chamadas ou mensagens de alarme,
de socorro, de urgência ou de segurança falsos ou enganosos, deliberadamente ou por
inadvertência ou deficiência de operação e em que não tenha sido tomadas medidas imediatas,
pela estação infractora, pára o seu cancelamento e comunicação ao centro coordenador, deverá
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ser adoptado o procedimento afim.
PROCEDIMENTOS NA FASE DE INCERTEZA
1.
Abrir um processo SAR (Ver processo SAR), tentando obter o máximo de informações possível
do primeiro informador; consultar a base de dados, no caso de embarcação registado num dos
portos dos países membros da SADC;
2.
Registar a área de incerteza tendo em atenção a área de possibilidade (tomar em linha de conta o
combustível disponível e o espaço de tempo percorrido), e verificar as condições meteorológicas
na área;
3.
Informar o SAR Mission Coordinator-SMC (nomeado pelo Chefe do Centro de Operações)
aguardando instruções. ( O SMC deverá sempre ser posto ao corrente de toda a situação, no
desenrolar da ocorrência SAR);
4.
Considerar confirmar a partida e não-chegada do navio/embarcação com outras entidades;
5.
Investigar junto das capitanias, MRSC ou RCC adjacentes, que se encontram dentro da área de
possibilidade, enviando uma mensagem ou um telex/fax conforme aplicável;
6.
Considerar efectuar a promulgação de Aviso aos Navegantes através do Instituto Hidrográfico
(Fomento Marítimo), efectuar avisos à Navegação através da Estação Radionaval , envio
NAVTEX (até 400NM) e difundir um aviso através do INMARSAT C ( Safety-Net Warning);
7.
Para o preenchimento da Analise de factores, obter informações sobre as intenções do
mestre/capitão do navio (porto de partida, ATD, rota, porto de destino, ETA, área de pesca, etc),
contactando armador, autoridades marítimas do porto de partida/porto de registo;
8.
Procurar estabelecer comunicações com o navio/embarcação através da Estação Radio Naval,
Autoridade Marítima, Lotas e Docas de pesca (estes costumam ter comm's com as embarcações
de pesca na banda do cidadão);
9.
Obter informações adicionais na base de dados, Lloyd's RCC do pais de registo, entidade
detentora da base de dados GMDSS, MONICAP e capitanias, conforme aplicável;
10.
Informar os RCC's ( RCC originador da informação e RCC da nacionalidade da embarcação em
causa) das acções em curso;
11.
Considerar a definição da área provável, Datum e planeamento da área de busca, com base nas
informações de intenções do navio/embarcação desaparecido, (Anexo G);
12.
Considerar o empenho de um meio Aéreo ou Naval;
(l)
Navios (RV.RU.RB);
Verificar o posicionamento SAR e a existencia de outros navios na area (E.R.Ns,
SURPIC)
No caso de empenho do navio SAR, estabelecer MRL e efetuar msg);
(2)
Meio Aereo (HEL-H, VRL, SRG)
Procedimento de acordo com instrucoes para colaboracao de meios aereos.
13.
Informar as capitanias envolvidas de todas as acoes tomadas solicitando as seguintes diligencias:
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SADC SMC 1
(1)
(2)
(3)
14.
Considerar o empenho de UAM/Salva-vidas (RB) disponivel;
Considerar a busca por terra;
Manter contato no porto/doca por forma a informar de imediato caso
embarcacao arribe.
Caso o navio ou embarcacao seja localizado, for a de perigo e sem precisar de qualquer tipo de
assistencia:
(1) Cancelar os avisos aos navegantes Navtex Vital, E.R.N. e Safety-Net Warning;
(2) Efetuar SAR SITREP final com informacao para todos envolvidos, incluindo o
RCC adjacente;
(3) Encerrar o processo SAR.
15.
Apos recepcao da msg-telex de resposta de todas as capitanias, MRSC ou RCCs adjacentes,
sobre o resultado da verificacao das suas areas de resppnsibilidade, informar por telex o RCC
que originou o “Overdue” com informacao para os outros RCCs envolvidos, das acoes tomadas
e seus resultados.
16.
Caso a situacao evolua negativamente, ou que as diligencias anteriormente efetuadas nao tenham
contribuido para esclarecer a situacao e se considere que possam existir pessoas em perigo,
considerar passar a fase de alerta ou mesmo a fase de perigo.
PROCEDIMENTOS NA FASE DE ALERTA
1.
Caso ainda não o tiver feito um processo SAR, obter o máximo de informações possíveis do
primeiro informador; Consultar a base de dados, no caso de embarcação registada em porto
angolano (num dos portos dos países membros da SADC);
2.
Registar a posição ou área do acidente ou incidente. (Ex: posição do alerta Cospas
Sarsat/Inmarsat/Digital Selective Call, posição e azimute em avistamentos, etc) e verificar as
condições meteorológicas na área;
3.
Informar o SAR Mission coordinator-SMC (nomeado pelo Chefe do Centro de Operações)
aguardando instruções. (O SMC deverá sempre de ser posto ao corrente de toda a situação, no
desenrolar da ocorrência SAR);
4.
Preencher o formato de analise de factores (Ver análise de factores).
5.
Procurar estabelecer comunicações com o navio/embarcação através da E.R.N., INMARSAT,
Autoridade Marítima, Lotas e Docas de pesca (estes costumam ter comm's com as embarcações
de pesca na banda do cidadão). (Utilizar lista de verificação );
6.
Considerar efectuar a promulgação de Aviso aos Navegantes através do Instituto Hidrográfico
(Fomento Marítimo), efectuar Avisos á Navegação através de Estação Radio Naval, envio
NAVTEX (até 400NM) e dimndir um aviso através do INMARSAT (Safety-Net Wearning);
7.
Informar o MRSC/Capitanias da área da ocorrência conforme aplicável;
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8.
Obter informações adicionais da Lloyd's, RCC do pais de registo, entidade detentora da base de
dados GDMSS, MONICAP e Capitanias, conforme aplicável;
9.
Considerar a atribuição da coordenação SAR ao MRSC ou Capitania, caso seja na sua área de
jurisdição respectiva ou proximidades, e estejam aptos a receber a coordenação;
10.
Considerar definir a área de probabilidade com base nas informações de intenções do
navio/embarcação desaparecido e ultima posição conhecida, (Anexo G);
11.
Perante a área de probabilidade, efectuar o planeamento da área de busca definindo quais o(s)
meio(s) a envolver na acção SAR, designando o OSC (On Scene Comander) e as áreas de busca
individuais para cada SRU:
(1)
(2)
12.
Navios (RV, RU,RB) Verificar o posicionamento do navio SAR e a existência de
outros navios nas proximidades (SURPI-AMVER, Polling, resposta a avisos da
E.R.N.). (No caso de empenho do navio SAR estabelecer MRL e efectuar msg);
Meio Aéreo (HEL-H,VRL,SRG)
Procedimento de acordo com instruções para colaboração de meios aéreos;
Informar as Capitanias envolvidas de todas as acções tomadas solicitando as seguintes
diligências:
(1) Considerar o empenho de U AM/Salva- vidas (RB) disponíveis;
(2) Considerar proceder a buscas por terra;
(3) Manter contacto no porto/doca por forma a informar de imediato caso a embarcação arribe.
13.
Caso a situação fique resolvida:
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
14.
Cancelar os Avisos aos Navegantes, Navytex Vital, Avisos da E.R.N. e Safety-Net
Warning;
Informar o navio-SAR/outros meios empenhados na acção;
Efectuar Sarsitrep final com informação para os envolvidos, incluindo o RCC
adjacente;
Encerrar o processo SAR.
Caso a situação evolua negativamente e se considere que existem pessoas em perigo grave e
iminente, avance para a fase de perigo.
PROCEDIMENTOS NA FASE DE PERIGO
1.
Se ainda não o tiver feito, abrir um processo para obter o máximo de informações possíveis do
primeiro informador. Consultar a base de dados, no caso de embarcação registada num dos
portos dos países membros da SADC;
2.
Verificar a localização do navio/embarcação em emergência, verificar as condições
meteorológicas na área e localização exacta do navio com missão SAR;
3.
Informar o SAR Mission Coordinator-SMC (nomeado pelo chefe do Centro de Operações)
aguardando instruções. (O SMC deverá sempre ser posto ao corrente de toda a situação, no
desenrolar da ocorrência SAR);
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4.
Definir a responsabilidade de coordenação da acção SAR (efectuar mensagem);
5.
Procurar estabelecer comunicações com o navio/embarcação através da Estação Radio Naval,
INMARSAT, Autoridade Marítima, Lotas e Docas de pesca, e mesmo através de familiares
(estes costumam ter comm's com as embarcações de pesca na banda do cidadão). ( Utilizar lista
de verificação):
6.
Considerar efectuar a promulgação de Aviso aos Navegantes através do Instituto Hidrográfico
(Fomento Mritimo), efectuar Avisos à Navegação através de Estação Radio Naval, envio
NAVTEX (até 400NM) e difundir um aviso através do INMARSAT (Safety-Net Warning);
7.
Procurar estabelecer contacto com o armador/proprietário da embarcação, ou com a família caso
ele esteja embarcado e não exista contacto com a embarcação em perigo;
8.
Preencher o formato de analise de factores;
9.
Definir o D ATUM e a Área de Probabilidade;
10.
Perante a área de probabilidade, efectuar o planeamento da área de busca definindo quais o(s)
meio(s) a envolver na acção SAR, designando o OSC (On Scene Comander) e as áreas de busca
individuais para cada SRU:
(1) Navios (RV.RU.RB) Verificar o posicionamento do navio SAR e a existência de outros
navios nas proximidades (SURPIC-AMVER,Polling, resposta a avisos da E.R.N.). (No aso de
empenho do navio SAR estabelecer MRL e efectuar msg);
(2) Meio Aéreo (HEL-H,VRL,SRG)
Procedimento de acordo com instruções para colaboração de meios aéreos;
11.
Informar o RCC da mesma nacionalidade do navio/embarcação sinistrada e os RCC adjacentes,
das acções em curso, solicitando as informações adicionais necessárias ao desenvolvimento da
operação SAR;
12.
Obter informações adicionais da Lloyd's, RCC do pais de registo, entidade detentora da base de
dados GDMSS, MONICAP e Capitanias, conforme aplicável;
13.
Informar a autoridade marítima da área da ocorrência (Capitania) da situação. Considerar as
seguintes sugestões:
(1) O empenho de U AM/S ai vá-vidas (RB) disponíveis;
(2) Requisição de rebocador(es) ou outros navios/embarcações para acções de salvamento;
(3) Avisar as corporações de Bombeiros;
(4) Avisar hospitais locais, e ambulâncias; ,
(5) Considerar proceder a buscas por terra.
14.
Considerar contactar as autoridades de controlo de trafego aéreo para alertar/obter informações
de aviões em transito na área do sinistro;
15.
Considerar o empenho Destacamento de Mergulhadores Sapadores (DMS) na busca de
náufragos junto à costa;
16.
Considerar o empenho do Destacamento de acções Especiais (DAE) em operações de busca na
orla marítima em falésias e sítios de difícil acesso;
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17.
Notificar por mensagem e por contacto telefónico o EMM no caso de derrames de hidrocarbonetos;
18.
Avaliar a necessidade de colaboração de meios de outros RCC;
19.
Considerar aumentar a prontidão do navio de reserva SAR;
20.
Contactar o(s) Serviço(s) de Emigração e Fronteira no caso de MEDEVAC ou resgate de
cidadãos estrangeiros;
21.
Considerar notificar as autoridades diplomáticas ou consulares do país de registo do
navio/embarcação;
22.
Caso a situação fique resolvida:
(1) Cancelar os Avisos aos Navegantes, Navtex Vital, Avisos da E.R.N. e Safety-Net Warning;
(2) Informar o navio- SAR/outros meios empenhados na acção;
(3) Efectuar Sarstrip final com informação para todos os envolvidos, incluindo os RCC
adjacentes;
(4) Encerrar o processo SAR.
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PROCESSO SAR
Composicao
O processo SAR deve ser composto por:
a.
b.
c.
d.
Registro de Comunicado de Acidente SAR.
Elementos SAR da base de dados.
Narrativa cronologica dos acontecimentos.
Todas as Mensagens, Telex e Fax respeitantes a operacao SAR.
PROCESSO
NR..../……
ID ……/……
CENTRO DE BUSCA E SALVAMENTO DE……………
(MRCC…….)
REGISTO DE COMUNICADO DE ACIDENTE SAR
1. GDH DA RECEPÇÃO DO COMUNICADO -_______Z_________ (MÊS) _______(ANO)
2. FASE DA EMERGÊNCIA - INCERTEZA/ALERTA (riscar o que não interessa)
3. ORIGEM DA INFORMAÇÃO Endereço ____________________________________________________________________________
Contacto telefónico -___________________________________________________________
Outras testemunhas -___________________________________________________________
4. INFORMAÇÃO SOBRE O ACIDENTE:
Posição _______________________________Hora -__________________________
Descrição -____________________________________________________________________
5. UNIDADE SINISTRADA -Tipo -_________________ Nome -_______________________
Nacion. -____________ Ind. Cham. -_____________Comp. -____________ Desloc. -_______
Carga -__________________ MMSI -__________________ Inmarsat A/C -_______________
Proprietário/Agente -____________________________________________________________
Agente em….. ( no Pais onde ocorreu o acidente) -____________________________________
Equipamento emergência a bordo -________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________-_______
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6. PESSOAS A BORDO
Nome do Capitão/Mestre-___________________________________________________________
N° de Tripulantes - _______________________N° de Passageiros -_________________________
Feridos _________________- Mortes -________________________________________________
7. OUTRAS INFORMAÇÕES
Largou de - _______________ATD -_______________ Destino -_______________ETA- ________
Rota prevista -_____________________________________________________________________
Outros destinos possíveis -___________________________________________________________
Autonomia de combustível - '_________________________________________________________
8. COMUNICAÇÕES - Ind. Chamada-______________ Equip. Rádio -_____________________
Hora da última comunicação recebida -_______________ Frequência -_______________________
Estação receptora -_________________________________________________________________
9. ÚLTIMA POSIÇÃO COMUNICADA- ______________GDH -_________________________
Determinado por -__________________________________________________________________
10. CONDIÇÕES METEO NA ÁREA DO INCIDENTE
Vento ______________________Mar___________________Visibilidade_____________________
Nuvens/Tecto _______________________Temperatura da água_____________________________
11. OUTROS ELEMENTOS________________________________________________________
12. ACÇÃO TOMADA SOBRE ESTE COMUNICADO -________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
13. RESULTADOS/CONCLUSÕES DA ACÇÃO SAR -_________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
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ELEMENTOS SAR PARA BASE DE DADOS
N°:
ANO:
MÊS:
DIA:
HORA:
A-TIPO DE OCORRÊNCIA:
TIPO DE ACIDENTE:
DOENÇA/TIP/INC:
MORTE/TIPINC:
HOMEN/MAR/TIP/INC:
OVERDUE/TIP/INC:
OUTRO/TIP/INC:
EMBARCAÇÃO SINISTRADA:
NOME:
PAIS:
CAUSA DO ACIDENTE:
ZONA DE COSTA:
DISTANCIA A COSTA:
LATITUDE:
LONGITUDE:
NAVIO SAR:
HELI:
PB/PBR:
UAM:
AÉREO:
NAVIOS DE GUERRA:
OUTROS/MEIOS:
MORTOS/SINISTRADOS:
DESAPARECIDOS/SINISTRADOS:
FERIDOS SINISTROS:
MORTES/RESGATADOS :
FERIDOS/RESGATADOS:
ILESOS/RESGATADOS:
FONTES DE INFORMAÇÃO:
B-ACÇAO TOMADA:
OBESERVAÇOES:
...
NOTA: A-TIPO DE OCORRÊNCIA: ACIDENTE/INCIDENTE
ACIDENTES: COLISÃO, AFUNDAMENTO ROMBO, INCÊNDIO A
BORDO, ALAGAMENTO, ETC
INCIDENTE:
OVERDUE, COSPAC, DSC,MEDEVAC, HOMEM AO
MAR, DERIVA,ETC..
B - ACÇÃO TOMADA: AVISO AOS NAVEGANTES, NAVTEX, BUSCA AÉREA, EVACUAÇÃO,
ACOMPANHAMENTO,AUXÍLIO, REBOQUE, ETC...
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| NARRATIVA CRONOLÓGICA DOS ACONTECIMENTOS
SERVIÇO DE_____ /______ / PARA______ / ____/_________
PERÍODO (GDH) DE________________ PARA_______________________
________________________________________________________________________
HORA
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LISTA DE VERIFICACAO
1.
Nome do navio/embarcacao;
2.
Indicativo de Chamada Internacional;
3.
Nacionalidade;
4.
Tipo;
5.
Carga;
6.
Comprimento/deslocamento;
7.
Comunicacoes;
8.
Inmarsat: tipo/numero;
9.
Numero de EPIRB’s a bordo/tipo (121.5,243 ou 406Mhz)
10.
Numero de balsas salva-vidas/botes pneumaticos ou outras embarcacoes a bordo;
11.
Numero de tripulantes;
12.
Armador (Identificacao/morada/telefone);
13.
Porto de origem, ETD;
14.
Porto de destino, ETA;
15.
Portos/fundiadouros de escala;
16.
Actividade piscatorial, artes praticadas, zonas onde normalmente pesca, identificacao das boias
utilizadas. Se tencionava larger ou relolher artes, onde e quando (caso embarcacoes de pesca
com paradeiro incognito);
17.
Outras caracteristicas: cor/aspecto superestruturas/numero de maestros;
18.
Descricap do acidente;
19.
Identificacao dos tripulantes evacuados;
20.
Local de recolha do doente ou ferido (em caso de MEDEVAC por heli).
BUSCA E SALVAMENTO: ZONAS DOS PAISES DA SADC
1.
Cada estado da SADC que se encontra na zona litoral, tem uma are de responsabilidade para
busca e salvamentto (SAR) aceite por convencao internacional.
2.
A area maritime total da SADC, pode ser subdividida em zonas regionais para facilitar a
cooperacao SAR especialmente entre os estados costeiros vizinhos, Estas zonas, geralmante ultrapassam
as areas nacionais dos estados a que dizem a respeito. Desta forma, dois tipos de areas poderao ser
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definidos em cada Zona Regional, para cada estado costeiro na zona, nomeadamente:
a.
b.
Area nacional de responsabilidade de um estado;
Area de influencia que cobre o restante da Zona Regional.
3.
Os estados membros da SADC do interland, deverao tambem estar habilitados a prestar apoio
durante os incidents maritimos SAR. Para este proposito foram-lhes tambem atribuidas Zonas Regionais
de cooperacao primaria, a pesar de poderem ajudar qualquer estado membros costeiros onde seja
possivel.
4.
Os estados membros foram divididos nas seguintes Zonas Regionais (ver mapa em anexo):
a.
b.
c.
Zona A: Angola, Republica Democratica do Congo, Namibia e Africa do Sul.
Zona B: Lesotho, Mocambique, Africa do Sul, Suazilandia, Zimbabwe e Tanzania.
Zona C: Malawi, Ilhas Mauricias, Mocambique, Ilhas Seychelles e Tanzania.
Nota: A aparicao da Africa do Sul nas Zonas A e B e Mocambique e Tanzania nas Zonas B e C deve-se a
natureza de acumulacao do acesso a cooperacao SAR.
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CONFIDENCIAL
CÓPIA N°
COMANDANTE DA FORÇA DE MISSÃO
DOIS ZERO
AGOSTO
ORDEM OPERACIONAL DE REFERENCIA-INTEROP
APENDICE V AO ANEXO C
COMUNICACOES DE BUSCA E SALVAMENTO
1.
Generalidades- A acao de Busca e Salvamento pode ser iniciada sempre que se considerar
aprimorado, que numa aeronave, navio a superficie ou submarino, esteja em situacao de
angustia.
2.
Missao-A missao das comunicacoes de Busca e Salvamento e fornecer comunicacoes rapidas e
confiaveis que apoiarao.
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CONFIDENCIAL
CÓPIA N°
COMANDANTE DA FORÇA DE MISSÃO
DOIS ZERO
AGOSTO 2000
ORDEM OPERACIONAL DE REFERENCIA-INTEROP
TABELA A AO APENDICE V DO ANEXO C
PLANO DE COMUNICACOES OPERACIONAIS PARA BUSCA E SALVAMENTO
(SARCOMPLAN)
1.
Plano de frequencies de Busca e Salvamento
a.
Linha
CO1A
CO2A
A02
b.
Circitos de Controle de B e S
Frequencia
281.2 MHZ
4141.0 KHZ
Canal 16
Emisao
VOZ
USB
VOZ
Uso
Control da B e S (primaria)
Control da Be S (secundario)
Control da B e S (se houver outras
Unidades envolvidas que nao sejam
Da M.G.)
Circuitos do senario de B e S
Linha
DOLA
DO1C
101A
GO1A
Q01A
Q01B
Q01C
Frequencia
336.9 MHZ
2484.0KHZ
128.55 MHZ
125.5 MHZ
500 KHZ
2182.0 KHZ
8364 KHZ
Emisao
VOZ
USB
VOZ
VOZ
CW
USB/VOZ
CW
Q01D
Q01E
Q01F
121.5 MHZ
243.0 MHZ
4340 KHZ
VOZ
VOZ
CW
Uso
Cenario (primaria)
Cenario (secundaria)
Controle Aereo (primaria)
Controle Aereo (secundaria)
Chamada emergencia internacional
Chamadas telefone e emergencia intrnl
Bote salva vidas internacional/aviao salva
vidas ou aeronave de sobreviventes.
Emergencia Aviao Internacional
Aviao Militar de emergencia ou Salvacao
Submarino de Seguranca
1.
O commando e controle, as necessidades de comunicacoes do cenario, administracao e dos
navios com a terra.
2.
Responsabilidades- O estabelecimento do centro de Coordenacao do Salvamento (CSS) para
controlar e coordenar as comunicacoes de Busca e Salvamento, e responsabilidade do
Coordenador Nacional de B e S. O Coordenador Nacional de B e S pode designar uma outra
unidade ou official, melhor equipado para levar a cabo tais funcoes, e actuar como coordenador
da Missao de B e S.
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3.
Responsabilidade - O estabelecimento do Centro de Coordenação do ^ Salvamento (CCS) para
controlar e coordenar as comunicações de Busca e i Salvamento, é responsabilidade do
Coordenador Nacional de B e S. O Coordenador Nacional de B e S pode designar uma outra
unidade ou oficial, melhor equipado para levar a cabo tais funções, e actuar como coordenador
da 1 Missão de B e S.
4.
As comunicacoes de B e S serao de acordo com a Tabela A deste Apendice.
a.
b.
c.
5.
Circuitos de controle de B e S- O proposito do circuito do senario de B e S e fornecer
uma linha de comunicacao entre o Coordenador de B e S, o Coordenador da Missao de
B e S (SMC), e o Comandante no terreno (OSC) para o controle e o Comando de todos
os esforcos de B e S. Todas as outras unidades participantes da B e S irao manter uma
observacao e escuta rigorosa nestes circuitos em ordem a ficarem continuamente
atentos ao desenvolvimento das situacoes.
Circuitos do cenario de B e S- O proposito do circuito do cenario do B e S e
forneceruma linha de comunicacoes entre o comandente no terreno e todas as unidades
participantes nn B e S. O Comandante do terreno e a estacao de controle da rede neste
circuitoem ordem a confrontar eficientemente as acoes de B e S feitas pelas unidades
participantes.
Circuitos de administracao da B e S- Os circuits de administracao da B e S sao aquelas
frequencies em que as unidades de B e S podem ser dirigidas a administrar atraves da
missao de B e S, conforme apontado pelo coordenador da Missao de B e S. Os circuitos
de administracao sao normalmente as frequencias de emergencia fixadas.
Comunicacoes adicionais para B e S- Os circuitos de comunicacoes alistados no Apendice II ao
Anexo C estarao prontamente disponiveis para apoiar as necessidades adicionais em
comunicacoes, nao previstas antes.
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CONFIDENCIAL
CÓPIA N°
COMANDANTE DA FORÇA DE MISSÃO
DOIS ZERO
AGOSTO 2000
ORDEM OPERACIONAL DE REFERENCIA-INTEROP
APENDICE VI AO ANEXO C
SEGURANCA DAS COMUNICACOES
1- Seguranca de Comunicacoes (COMSEC)
E protecao das comunicacoes negar o acesso a pessoas nao autorizadas a informacoes valiosas e
a utilizacao enganosa das comunicacoes, para confundir as analise do inimigo.
a.
As tres caracteristicas basicas de um sistema militar de comunicacoes, sao a
confiabilidade, seguranca e velocidade. A confianca de comunicacoes e sempre
considerada a mais importante das tres. O relacionamento entre a velocidade e a
seguranca podem variar. Quando estao envolvidas longas diapasoes, as consideracoes
de seguranca sao geralmente dominantes. Em situacoes taticas, a velocidade das
comunicacoes torna-se a mais importante. Contudo, as medidas de seguranca, devem
sempre ser usadas, quando mais possivel dentro dos constrangimentos da confianca e
rapidas cominicacoes.
b.
A COMSEC e da responsabilidade de qualquer Comandante. Isto inclue um programa
continuo de educacao e treino em procedimentos de COMSEC, avaliacoa de
procedimentos e acoes de remediacao, conforme necessario. Quando nao forem
possiveis levar a cabo, medidas de remediacao, as autoridades superiors devem ser
avisadas das circumstancias e das razoes.
2- Com o objetivo de manter a seguranca, as transmisses radio telefonicas devem seguir as regras basicas
orientadas em todos os circuitos radio telefonicos militares.
1.
2.
Nunca trasmitir sem a propria autoridade.
As seguintes praticas sao especificamente proibidas;
a. Violacao do silencio radio
b. Conversacoa nao official entre operadores
c. Sintonizacoes e testes excessivos
d. Transmissao do sinal pessoal dos operadores
e. Uso nao autorizado de linguagem clara
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CONFIDENCIAL
CÓPIA N°
COMANDANTE DA FORÇA DE MISSÃO
DOIS ZERO
AGOSTO 2000
ORDEM OPERACIONAL DE REFERENCIA-INTEROP
APENDICE II DO ANEXO C
PLANO DE FREQUENCIAS
CIRCUIT
O
A01
A02
B01 A
B01 B
B02 A
B02 B
C01 A
C01 B
C01 C
C02 A
C02 B
D01 A
D01 B
D01 C
E01 A
E01 B
F01 A
F01 B
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DESIGNADO PARA
MODO
FREQUENCIA
Coordenacao reboque no porto
Ponte a ponte
RATT UHF
RATT UHF
RATT UHF
RATT UHF
TATICO
PRIMARIO
UHF-VHF
TATICO
SECUNDARIO
HF
PARA RELATORIOS
UHF-VHF
APARELHO DE COMBATE
VHF
PARA RELATORIOS
COODENACAO
F 3E
F 3E
J 2B
J 2B
J 2B
J 2B
A 3E
A 3E
A 3E
J 3E
J 3E
A 3E
A 3E
J 3E
F 3E
F 3E
A 3E
A 3E
Canal 10/17
Canal 16
328.0 MHZ
282.4 MHZ
2610.0 KHZ
8344.0 KHZ
281.2 MHZ
273.5 MHZ
357.8 MHZ
4141.0 KHZ
1180.0 KHZ
336.9 MHZ
352.9 MHZ
2464.0 MHZ
43.150 MHZ
43.800 MHZ
270.2 MHZ
278.95 MHZ
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OBSERVACOES
J2B/170/1/75
J2B/170/1/75
J2B/170/1/75
J2B/170/1/75
USB
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SECTION 5 - HYDROGRAPHY CO-OPERATION PLAN
Reference A: Summary of the state of Hydrography in SADC coastal states.
4501 Situation
1. The SADC Member States depend almost exclusively on the sea for trade. The growth of trade
is the key to rebuilding economies and because the terminals of almost all imports and exports
are ports, it is evident that provision of safe and efficient ports is a logical first step. Stronger
economies are axiomatic to the generation of peace and security in our region. The aim of
regional Hydrography must be to improve navigational safety for local and international shipping
thereby attracting modern cost-effective vessels that will land goods cheaper.
2. Commercial Hydrography in the region encompasses the following aspects of navigational
safety:
a. Accurate port and approach surveys.
b. Well-maintained charts and nautical publications.
c. Provision and maintenance of aids to navigation.
d. Provision of safety information transmitted by radio and satellite.
e. Accurate tidal predictions ensuring safe under-keel clearances.
f. Provision of environmental data.
3. Naval Hydrography involves improving the knowledge of the maritime battlefield in order to
obtain an advantage over the enemy. This encompasses the following:
a. Oceanographic information,
b. Meteorological information,
c. Bathymetric information.
4. The situation regarding Hydrography in the SADC region varies from satisfactory to poor and
any means to improve the situation in an efficient manner needs to be explored.
4502
Aim
To improve Hydrography in the SADC region in a co-ordinated manner.
4503 Factors
1. Differing Government Departments in Charge of Hydrography. In South Africa and Tanzania
Hydrography resort under the Department of Defence. In all other Member States Hydrography
falls under various other departments or authorities if at all. See Reference A.
a. Effect. No direct links between Hydrographic authorities in the region are found amongst
the members of the Standing Maritime Committee of the ISDSC. This is not the case in the
other SADC body charged with Hydrography, the sub-sectoral committee on Maritime and
Inland Waterways.
2. Lack of Hydrographic Institutions. Some Member States have no official Hydrographic office
which is mandated to carry out Hydrography for that state.
a. Effect. Evidently, if no institution is mandated to conduct Hydrography then there will be
no improvement in the situation in that country. This may be used to advantage in that the
military could fill the vacuum and provide the initial impetus for development.
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3. Lack of Hydrographic Capability in some Member States. Some Member States suffer from a
severe shortage of Hydrographic capability both in terms of equipment and trained personnel. In
others, like South Africa, the capability is decreasing with personnel shortage and ageing
equipment.
a. Effect. Reduced output of surveys and other services which effect the safety of life at sea.
4. Mobile Survey Unit. The SADC protocol is to be amended to include the establishment of a
regional mobile survey unit which will be based centrally and carry out port and approach
surveys in the region, including the inland waterways, as well as training and institution building.
This initiative is being pursued by the SATCC and will be funded by Norway.
a. Effect. The initial steps to autonomous Hydrography will be established in a structured, port
by port manner, resulting in port surveys and trained personnel to maintain those surveys
accurately.
5. Non membership of international bodies concerned with Hydrography and aids to navigation.
See Reference A.
a. Effect. Exclusion from the world effort in the various initiatives in respect of improvement
of safety of life at sea and the employment of varying standards, formats and methods which
automatically prevent the introduction of a homogeneous regional system.
6. Lack of belief in the value of Hydrography by major SADC decision-makers.
a. Effect. In the pecking order of fund allocation, Hydrography does not enjoy any real
priority.
4504 Courses of Action
1. Course 1. Assist with the establishment of the Mobile Survey Unit by SADC for regional
employment in port and approach surveys and inland waterway surveys.
2. Course 2. Where a vacuum exists in that no institution have been established with Hydrography
as a responsibility the military should establish such an office and accept the responsibility.
3. Course 3. When the Mobile Survey Unit commences surveys in the region the military is ideally
equipped to provide transport, physical security and entrée to suitable government departments to
facilitate its operation in their ports.
4. Course 4. Surveys to be conducted in a standardised manner agreed to in the region which
comply with international norms and which will be acceptable to a regional data base eg the RSA
Hydrographic Office data base from which homogeneous charting for the region can be derived.
5. Course 5. The adoption of course 4 will facilitate the compilation and printing of charts in a
centralised centre, such as the RSA Hydrographic Office and the RSA Naval Printing Press.
6. Course 6. The encouragement of respective national authorities to become members of
international bodies such as the International Hydrographic Organisation, the International
Association of Lighthouse Authorities, the International Maritime Organisation and others.
7. Course 7. To broadcast radio navigation warnings on Navtex, radio and satellite in accordance
with the IMO Navarea scheme.
8. Course 8. To actively influence decision makers to prioritise Hydrography as the starting point of
port development.
9. Course 9. To pool environmental data in a single data base to allow advantageous use of
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warships in times of emergency.
4505 Plan
1. The Departments of Defence to establish a Hydrographic office in Tanzania, Angola and possibly
Namibia.
2. The Standing Maritime Committee of the ISDSC should give written support to the concept of
the Mobile Survey Unit to the SADC Ministers.
3. Employ a uniform regional exchange standard for Hydrographic data which is also
internationally recognised. The IHO S-57 format is the preferred one.
4. Assist the relevant government departments charged with aids to navigation with the placing and
preservation of these aids.
5. Supply the RSA Hydrographic Office with all available oceanographic and meteorological data
for insertion into the regional Ocean Information System which it maintains and from where it
will be available to Member States.
6. The SA Navy Printing Press will supply digital copies of fair charts of ports and approaches to
the RSA Hydrographic Office chart database for chart compilation and later printing.
7. Assist the relevant government department charged with the broadcast of radio navigation
warnings using military facilities if only those are available.
8. Make recommendations to relevant Ministers for individual states to become members of the
relevant international maritime organisations.
4506 Conclusion
1. Security in the region is dependent on social well being which can only be improved by
revitalising the economies of the Member States. Port development is a pre-requisite to efficient
sea borne trade and Hydrography is axiomatic to port development.
2. A co-operative effort directed to Hydrography, concentrating on port and approach surveys,
training and aids to navigation should be initiated. The establishment of the regional mobile
survey unit has been agreed by various other maritime bodies to be the most effective means to
kick-start Hydrography in our region.
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CHAPTER 5
MARITIME SEARCH AND RESCUE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE
FOR MUTUAL ASSISTANCE BETWEEN SADC MEMBER STATES
INDEX
Paragraph
Title
Page
5001
5002
5003
5004
5005
5006
5007
5008
5009
5010
5011
5012
Introduction
The Mission
Scope of the Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)
Request Procedures
Member States' Responsibility
Responsibility of Countries Initiating Requests for Assistance
Possible Missions for Military Forces
Command and Control
Administration and Logistics
Communications
Withdrawal
Typical National Organisation for Search and Rescue
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CHAPTER 5
MARITIME SEARCH AND RESCUE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE
FOR MUTUAL ASSISTANCE BETWEEN SADC MEMBER STATES
5001 Introduction
1. In Search and Rescue (SAR) operations, time is the key factor in all preparations and actions to
ensure quick reaction to an incident. This draft plan proposes Standard Operating Procedures
(SOPs) for requesting and providing assistance for SAR operations. The SOPs establish the rules
and norms that the SADC countries will follow for co-operation during SAR operations.
2. Search and Rescue must be considered as an important part of all operations. Planning of
procedures must consider the safety capabilities and must fully use the capabilities of the various
services that can help in the rescue operation.
3. The training of the crews in SAR procedures is all-important. All crew members must know the
procedures required for personal safety and also know and have practical experience in operating
rescue equipment
4. In Angola a project is underway to devise a National plan for SAR. At the moment such a plan
does not exist. The only system used is the "INTERSAT" which is co-ordinated by our national
civil aviation authority. Angola, DR Congo, Namibia, Botswana, RSA and Brazil co-operate
within this system for maritime and air distress.
5. The Angolan National SAR Commission still needs to be established. It is planned to include the
Defence, Home Affairs, Fisheries and Environment Transport and Finance and Agriculture
Ministries. The Ministry of Transport and Telecommunications, the primary department for
SAR, has a co-ordination centre that also supports the Angolan Navy.
5002
The Mission
The principal mission of SAR is to reach the incident quickly and to rescue survivors using all
available resources.
5003 Scope of the Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)
1. These SOPs will cover the following:
a. Request procedures.
b. Responsibility of Member States.
c. Responsibility of Initiating States.
d. Possible missions for military forces in SAR operations.
e. Command and Control.
f. Communications.
g. Logistics and Administration.
h. Withdrawal.
5004 Request Procedures
1. General. Speed of action is essential, therefore any bureaucracy must be eliminated and the
fastest means of communications used. Communications must be in clear language, because
there is no time for deciphering messages. Communications discipline, however, remains
indispensable.
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2. Alert Message. The signal will be sent to all Member States from the Initiating Country. The
message will provide the following data:
a. Kind of incident or distress.
b. Date, time and place of incident.
c. Magnitude of the incident.
d. Estimated scope of assistance and any specialised equipment required.
e. Initial assistance required.
f. Suggested routes to place of incident by air, sea or land.
g. Any other relevant information.
3. Request for Assistance. The same format and detail as in paragraph 2 above, will be used to
make an official request for assistance.
4. Confirmation of Available Means. All Member States must confirm what assistance they can
provide and the time within which the assistance can be available at the scene of operations.
5005 Member States' Responsibility
1. SADC Member States will have the following responsibilities:
a. To support the initiating country with material and technical means.
b. To provide communication support.
c. To provide human resource support.
d. To provide medical support and other facilities.
5006 Responsibility of Countries Initiating Requests for Assistance
1. The country initiating the request for assistance ("Initiating State") must do everything possible,
within its capabilities, to execute the search and rescue.
2. It must provide current information about the SAR area and compile a record of all material and
equipment available to carry out the necessary operations.
3. It must co-ordinate and control the communication means employed during operations and
arrange translators if necessary.
5007 Possible Missions for Military Forces
1. The following possible missions may be required from military forces:
a. Provide communications between participating units.
b. Provide situation reports (SITREPs) to the controlling agency.
c. Provide forces for search, rescue and transport operations.
d. Keeping Law and Order at the scene of action.
e. Fire fighting, removing obstacles and protecting life and property.
5008 Command and Control
1. The Initiating State will appoint a "Chief Executor". He will be responsible for co-ordinating all
operations.
2. The Chief Executor must be in the operational area and keep the SAR Control Centre informed of
the progress of the operation.
3. A single overall co-ordinator (Chief Executor) is essential. Even if many nations, organisations,
departments or services are involved there must be only one co-ordinating authority. All
information must be directed to this authority who will be the decision-maker. The best way to
co-ordinate the efficient application of the forces and other resources available for the search and
rescue effort is by a single co-ordination authority.
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4. In the operational theatre ("Scene of Operations") all units engaged in SAR operations, whether
aircraft or ships, must similarly be under operational control of a single, appointed, commander.
5009 Administration and Logistics
1. Each Member State involved is responsible for paying the costs of its forces and should be selfsufficient for a minimum of 15 days.
2. Military personnel of participating states will wear their national uniforms. Transport and other
relevant support will be under control of the Chief Executor.
5010
Communications
Assisting states in SAR operations must supply their personnel with the necessary means for
internal communication.
Alternative means must be used to ensure uninterrupted
communication. The Initiating State must provide communication between assisting teams and
the control centre.
5011 Withdrawal
1. The control centre will advise the commander of operations how and when to withdraw. Each
participating state must ensure a quick and smooth withdrawal.
2. On completion of operations, each participating state must distribute a report of the lessons
learned to all Member States.
5012
Typical National Organisation for Search and Rescue
A typical national organisation for Search and Rescue is given in Figure 5-1. Whilst the
organisations may differ in individual countries, the principal elements will be similar.
GOVERNMENT
STRATEGIC
LEVEL
NATIONAL
DEPARTMENTAL
AUTHORITY
OPERATIONAL
LEVEL
NATIONAL SAR
REPORTING
CENTRE
NATIONAL SAR
CO-ORDINATING
CENTRE
LAND
SUB-CENTRE
MARITIME
SUB-CENTRE
SAR UNITS
SAR UNITS
AIR SUBCENTRE
SAR UNITS
POLICE
INTERNATIONAL
POINTS OF
CONTACT
EXECUTIVE
LEVEL
National Organisation for Search and Rescue
Figure 5-1
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CHAPTER 6
DOCUMENT CONFIGURATION CONTROL
INDEX
Paragraph
Title
Page
6001
6002
Introduction
Publication Configuration Procedure
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Appendix A
Appendix B
Appendix C
Publication Configuration Procedure: Functions of Responsible Authorities
Receipt Form
Certificate of Insertion
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CHAPTER 6
DOCUMENT CONFIGURATION CONTROL
6001 Introduction
1. The Standing Maritime Committee (SMC) has produced a number of documents during its
existence over the last six years. Most of these documents need to be referred to regularly and to
be amended from time to time, that is, they are of a permanent nature. These documents,
however, mostly form part of the minutes of previous SMC meetings and are thus difficult to
handle as independent documents. Therefore, a need exists, to extract these documents into
publications that are freely available to Member States.
2. The publication configuration procedure set out below has as its purposes the extraction of such
documents as independent publications and the control of all future publications produced by the
SMC.
3. It is important that other forums of the ISDSC, with which the SMC has business, are aware of
this control procedure.
6002 Publication Configuration Procedure
1. Introduction
a. Definition. Publication control refers to the measures taken at various levels to record the
access, distribution, movement, storage and withdrawal of publications that have been
produced. This also outlines the various authorities required to originate or amend any
publication.
b.
Purpose. The purpose of these control measures is to ensure that the introduction,
publication and withdrawal of any publication are done in an orderly fashion. This is to say
it is done in a manner that does not conflict with any multilateral protocols that have been
signed within the SADC.
2. Production and Distribution of Publications
a. Appointment of Responsible Authorities. The SMC will appoint an Editor for each
publication (see Appendix A). The South African Naval Publications Unit (SANPU) will be
the Publishing Agency for SMC publications.
b.
Distribution. The SANPU will distribute one copy only of each publication to each Member
State, via the SA Navy Foreign Relations Section. Member States must make sufficient
copies to satisfy their internal requirements.
3. Formatting
a. Layout. Every publication shall be required to conform to a standard layout and format as
determined by the SANPU. It is incumbent on the editor of each publication to ensure that
the publication is compliant to these standards.
b.
Drafts. All draft publications shall be marked "draft" on the cover page to prevent any
possibility of mistaking them for approved publications.
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c.
SADC SMC 1
Title and Numbering of Publications. Publications shall carry the prefix "SADC" (Southern
African Development Community) in their full title for identification, for example "SADC
Maritime Search and Rescue Standing Operation Procedures". Each publication shall also
have a short title, in this case, for example "SADC MARSARSOP".
4. Approval of Publications
a. Approval Procedure. All draft publications must be submitted to the SMC for approval
before they can be finally produced and distributed.
b.
Approval Authority. The SMC Chair or a higher Interstate Defence and Security Committee
(ISDSC) authority, as decided within the ISDSC, will approve SMC publications.
5. Control
a. Nodal Points. Each country will establish a nodal point where all publications will be
directed. See detailed role and functions of Nodal Point Officer attached as Appendix A.
b.
Publications Register
i.
The SMC Secretary will maintain a register of the publications that are in existence.
Each SMC publication must contain a list of other SMC publications in force.
ii.
c.
At National level, the nodal point officer shall be responsible for all publications that
have been distributed to the Member States. It would be expected that the national
nodal point would maintain a register of all such publications.
Acknowledgement of Receipt. A Receipt Form (Appendix B) must be appended to all
distributed publications. The form must be completed by the recipient and returned to the
SANPU (SADC Member State distribution) or the Nodal Point (internal national
distribution).
6. Amendments and Changes
a. Initiation. Editors must submit proposed amendments or changes to the SMC Secretariat for
distribution to Member States at least three months before the next SMC meeting. This will
allow for Member States' input before the meeting.
b.
Approval. The approval procedure for amendments will be the same as for the approval of
publications (see par 4.a. above).
c.
Insertion. Editors of SADC publications must submit approved changes/amendments to the
SANPU, for insertion by all SADC countries holding the publication. It will then be the
responsibility of the SANPU to distribute the amendments. An insertion certificate will
accompany the changes (Appendix C). This certificate must be signed and returned to the
SANPU and Nodal Points.
d.
Identification. A vertical line on the right hand side of the page must indicate amendments to
original text. Changes must show the change number on affected pages. A List of Effective
Pages (LEP) must be used to control each publication and updated each time pages are
replaced.
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SADC SMC 1
APPENDIX A
PUBLICATION CONFIGURATION PROCEDURE: FUNCTIONS OF RESPONSIBLE
AUTHORITIES
1. Editor. The Editor of a publication will be a Member State that has been allocated the
responsibility by the SMC to compile the particular publication. This will entail co-ordinating the
input of other Member States and consolidating a draft of the publication for discussion and
consolidation by the SMC Work Group. The Editor will then submit the draft publication for
approval to the SMC.
2. Publishing Agency. Approved publications are forwarded to the Publishing Agency, which has
the following functions:
a. Configuration.
b. Reproduction.
c. Distribution.
d. Record Distribution.
3. Nodal Point Officer. The Naval Co-ordinating Work Group (of the SMC) representative of each
Member State is the nodal point officer for all SMC Work Group related communication between
Member States. He is responsible for the following publication configuration actions:
a. Acknowledge receipt of publication to the Publishing Agency.
b.
Carry out a page by page muster and record the action in the change page table and
controlled book register.
c.
Inform principal of the receipt of the publication and arrange copies for national distribution
of the publication as instructed, informing the Publishing Agency of such copies.
d.
In the event of subsequent changes or amendments, carry out such changes and indicate to
Principal and Publishing Agency. A record of the change is to be entered into the change
page of the appropriate publication.
d.
Carry out annual muster of all publications, which is to include a page by page muster and
confirm result to the Publishing Agency.
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APPENDIX B
Receipt No .............................................................
RECEIPT FORM
From: ...............................................................................................................................................................
To: ...................................................................................................................................................................
_____________________________________________________________________________________
1.
Receipt for SMC Publication: ..............................................................................................................
2.
This receipt should be returned as soon as the items are put on the register.
3.
Receipt is acknowledged of:
..........................................................................................................................................................................
..........................................................................................................................................................................
..........................................................................................................................................................................
..........................................................................................................................................................................
..........................................................................................................................................................................
..........................................................................................................................................................................
Signature of the Certifying Officer
Signature of Witnessing Officer
Print Name: ......................................................
Print Name: ...............................................................
Rank: ...............................................................
Rank: .........................................................................
Date: ...............................................................
Date: ..........................................................................
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APPENDIX C
Receipt No ................................................
CERTIFICATE OF INSERTION
____________________________________________________________________________________
From: .............................................................................................................................................................
To: .................................................................................................................................................................
We the undersigned certify that we have received the following amendment/s
........................................................................................................................................................................
.........................................................................................................................................................................
.........................................................................................................................................................................
..........................................................................................................................................................................
the following publication/s
..........................................................................................................................................................................
..........................................................................................................................................................................
..........................................................................................................................................................................
Signature of the Certifying Officer
Signature of Witnessing Officer
Print Name: .................................................
Print Name: ...............................................................
Rank: ...........................................................
Rank: .........................................................................
Date: ............................................................
Date: ..........................................................................
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SADC SMC 1
CHAPTER 7
STANDING OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR THE MOVEMENT OF A
COMBINED SOUTHERN AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY (SADC)
MILITARY TASK FORCE FROM HOME BASES TO AN AREA OF
DEPLOYMENT
INDEX
Paragraph
Title
Page
7001
7002
7003
7004
7005
7006
7007
7008
7009
7010
7011
7012
7013
7014
7015
7016
Introduction
Aim
Scope
Definitions
Concept of Movement of the Combined Task Force
Functions of the CMCC
Strategic Movement Control
Strategic Movement
Theatre Movement
Port Movement Centre
Deployment Phases
Cargo Considerations
Responsibilities of the Officer Commanding a Water Terminal
Tasks of a Port Movement Centre in SPOE
Tasks of a Port Movement Centre in SPOD
Discharge Operations
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7-7
7-7
7-7
7-8
7-9
7-9
7-10
7-12
7-14
Appendix A
Appendix B
Appendix C
Movement Control Concept
Combined Movement Control Centre
Port Movement Centre
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SADC SMC 1
CHAPTER 7
STANDING OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR THE MOVEMENT OF A
COMBINED SOUTHERN AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY (SADC)
MILITARY TASK FORCE FROM HOME BASES TO AN AREA OF
DEPLOYMENT
7001 Introduction
1. Employment of military forces and combat power decides the outcome of campaigns and
operations. The success of these forces is largely dependent on a sound, timely deployment and
support. A well-defined integrated transportation system is a critical part of this support.
Inadequate control of logistic movement results in waste, reduced efficiency and loss of potential
combat power.
2. Elements of a transportation system are mode operations (surface, water, air), terminal operations
and movement control. Movement control is the most critical component of an integrated
transportation system and must co-ordinate the transportation assets of modes, terminals, services,
commands and host nations during deployment, sustainment and redeployment.
3. The transportation system should also provide transportation of patients, enemy POW's, noncombatant evacuation operations (NEO) and force redeployment. The latter should be addressed
at an early stage as it may take twice as long as deployment. All this is normally done over long
distances and is subjected to the timetable of the Commander Combined Task Force.
7002
Aim
To establish a Standing Operating Procedure (SOP) for the sealift of a combined SADC Military
Task Force from an identified Seaport of Embarkation (SPOE) to the area of deployment.
7003
Scope
This SOP will address the actions to be taken prior to the arrival of the force in the SPOE and the
responsibilities of the Port Movement Centre.
7004 Definitions
1. Combined Movement Control Centre (CMCC). Staff Officers at the SADC Military Headquarters
(SADCMHQ)/Combined Operations Board (COB) forms this centre on an ad hoc base. The
CMCC is responsible for the planning, routing, determining of priorities, obtaining of additional
assets, scheduling and controlling of strategic assets and maintaining of in-transit visibility to
assist commanders and operations staffs in force tracking. This applies to all forces from home
bases to assembly areas, SPOE/APOE, rail, road and from SPOD/APOD to a forward assembly
area.
2. Strategic Assets. Are those organic assets that are utilised for the movement of personnel and/or
equipment in bulk over long distances. These assets normally operate from safe airport/harbour to
safe airport/harbour. These assets remain under operational command of SADCMHQ/COB and
are seldom, if ever, allocated to the operational level commander.
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SADC SMC 1
3. Port Movement Centre. This organisation operates in the Seaport of Embarkation and
Disembarkation. It is responsible for the receiving of equipment and/or personnel from home
bases and/or assembly areas, accommodating of personnel, warehousing of equipment, preparing
of equipment, arranging stevedoring, marshal equipment, prepare all relevant documentation,
prepare schedules/cargo manifests, liaise with local authorities wrt amenities, provide facilities,
berthing of ships at piers and quays, loading and discharging of cargo, inspection and clearance of
cargo and courier service.
4. Airport Movement Centre. This organisation operates in the Airport of Embarkation and
Disembarkation. It is responsible for the receiving of equipment and/or personnel from home
bases and/or assembly areas, warehousing of equipment and accommodation of personnel, the
preparing of equipment, prepare all relevant documentation, prepare schedules/cargo manifests,
liaise with local authorities wrt amenities, provide facility for the landing of aircraft, loading and
discharge of cargo, inspection and clearance of cargo and courier service. Details to be included
at a later stage.
5. Surface Movement Centre. To be included at a later stage.
6. Strategic Airlift. The pre-positioning and air movement of military material in support of SADC
and/or allied forces. It includes organic and commercial acquired aircraft and services, including
the charter of foreign aircraft.
7. Strategic Sealift. The afloat pre-positioning and ocean movement of military material in support
of SADC and/or allied forces. It includes organic and commercial acquired shipping, ships taken
up from trade (STUFT) and shipping services, including the charter of foreign flag vessels.
8. Lead Nation. Is the nation appointed by SADC to take the lead in any military operation.
9. Combined Operations Board (COB). Is a board established by SADC to oversee any combined
SADC military operation.
10. Troop Contributing Country (TCC).
Combined Task Force.
Refers to all the countries contributing forces to the
11. Commander Combined Task Force (CCTF). Is the appointed commander of the Combined
SADC Military Force.
7005 Concept of Movement of the Combined Task Force
1. It is envisaged that all participating forces will mobilise within their own country. This movement
will be the responsibility of the various TCCs. See Appendix A.
2. A Combined Movement Control Centre, that will be established, will co-ordinate all strategic
movement from the respective TCCs to the area of deployment. This task may be delegated to a
lead nation. In the event of the latter the CMCC will be supplemented with liaison officers of the
various TCC's. See Appendix B.
3. SADCMHQ/COB is responsible for the effective management of available strategic resource,
including chartered assets, to ensure an uninterrupted flow of supplies. It must however be
flexible enough to change with mission modifications.
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SADC SMC 1
4. All strategic assets deployed during strategic movement remains under the operational command
of the SADCMHQ/COB or under the command of the country appointed to operate the CMCC.
7006 Functions of the CMCC
1. Planning. Movement of personnel and/or equipment should be done during the combined
planning process. Appendix B reflects a typical composition of a CMCC. The planning should
cover the following:
a. Initial or Surge Stage
i.
Re-Deployment. During this phase units will be moved from their respective home
bases to a mobilisation centre or an assembly area where mission ready training will
take place. The various countries are responsible for the movement of forces from
home base to either the mobilisation centre or the assembly area. CMCC is responsible
for the movement of forces from the mobilisation centre to the assembly area.
ii.
Movement to the SPOE. The movement of the Task Force from a mobilisation or
assembly area to the POE is the responsibility of the CMCC. This movement may be
executed by rail and/or road. It is envisaged that only a small number of personnel,
those that will ultimately accompany the ship(s), will be moved to the SPOE. If the
rest of the Task Force is destined to be airlifted from the APOE closest to the SPOE
then the entire CTF will be moved to a facility close to the SPOE and APOE. If the
CTF is airlifted from an APOE close to the assembly or mobilisation area, the
personnel will be moved to the APOE.
iii.
Strategic Sealift. This entails the movement of the equipment and personnel into the
SPOE, the loading of the ship(s) and the movement of the ship(s) to the SPOD. The
Port Movement Centre is responsible for all the activities in the SPOE and may be
involved in the activities within the SPOD.
iv.
In-theatre Reception at the SPOD. Depending on the auspices under which the
operation and/or deployment is carried out, the reception in the SPOD will be done by
the United Nations Logistics Company. A SADC contingent element may be part of
the reception organisation. If the SADC is responsible for the deployment, an element
of the PMC will be airlifted and deployed in the SPOD prior to the arrival of the
ship(s). The equipment will be moved to an assembly area in or close to the SPOD for
formalities.
v.
In-theatre movement. This is the responsibility of the CTF and entails the movement
from the assembly area in the SPOD to the area of deployment. This may be done by
rail and/or road. The Host Nation (HN) may render assistance. The latter may have to
be co-ordinated by the PMC or SADC contingent element in the SPOD.
b.
Tactical Re-supply. This entails the initial re-supply of the CTF and will be co-ordinated by
the CMCC.
c.
Sustained Re-supply. This entails the sustained re-supply of the CTF and will be coordinated by the CMCC.
d.
Redeployment. This entails the redeployment of the forces to another area of operation or
back to their respective home bases and is often neglected. Planning for it should commence
at an early stage to alleviate the burden on the strategic assets. This will be co-ordinated by
the CMCC.
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SADC SMC 1
2. De-conflicting Priorities. The number of conflicting priorities in a transportation system depends
on the demands placed on the system. Conflicts should be resolved at the lowest level and only if
it cannot be done should the CTF (Log) determine the priorities. Only if this is not possible will
the CMCC be required to determine the priorities. The PMC is to be informed accordingly.
3. Validation. Authorities within the requesting unit's chain of command and the CTF (Log) must
validate shipments presented to the CMCC for movement. This confirms the need for the
movement, shipment configuration, dimensions and routing. The CTF (Log) is to submit all
requests for support to SADCMHQ/COB who will advise the PMC of cargo that are presented for
movement.
4. Co-ordination. Comprises the following:
a. Special Moves. Involves the movement of special weapons or large formations and are often
politically sensitive and can adversely impact on other operations.
b.
Multinational Operation Moves. Will require integration with the movement organisations
and capabilities of other nations. Within SADC the various TCC movement organisations
will be involved during the pre-deployment and specific consideration should be given to the
following :
i.
Inland Surface Lines of Communication. Use are to be made of available highways,
railroads and (where applicable) canals to move units and supplies. Cognisance should
be taken of the local government and civilian requirements. This is applicable to both
the SPOE and the SPOD.
ii.
Host Nation Support. This is very important and may comprise both the host nations at
the SPOE and the SPOD. The PMC commander will be responsible to co-ordinate all
host nation support (HNS) at the SPOE. If a PMC is not deployed in the SPOD, the
CCTF will be responsible to co-ordinate and arrange all host nation support. The latter
may be delegated to the CTF logistic officer.
iii.
Support from Other Nations. If the SADC is part of a multi-nation force and
depending on the size and composition of the force, strategic sea- and airlift assets
could be provided by another nation or by commercial enterprise. The United Nations
may arrange the latter.
iv.
Support to Other Nations. Assistance to other governments providing humanitarian aid
may have to be provided utilising own strategic sea- and airlift assets. This will be coordinated by the CMCC.
v.
Multinational Operations. In the event of SADC being part of a multinational
operation, strategic movement could be provided by another nation. This will be coordinated by the CMCC.
5. Planning and Selection of SPOE and SPOD. The CMCC, in co-operation with the CCTF, will
determine the SPOE and the SPOD. The SPOD may be identified by another organisation, ie the
UN or the OAU. The following factors will influence the selection of the ports:
a. Type of Cargo. Cargo can be handled in the following categories at the water terminals and
can be loaded or discharged by utilising cranes and/or MHE (forklifts):
i.
Containerisation. Goods transported in containers that meet the international
standards.
ii.
Breakbulk/crater/palletisation.
iii. Original Configuration. Such as rolling stock.
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b.
SADC SMC 1
Category of Ports. These can be categorised based on following three main characteristics :
i.
Physical Facility.
(1) Fixed Water Terminals. Deep-draft vessels come alongside for berthing and
discharge cargo directly onto the wharf, pier or quay. These are equipped with
sophisticated handling equipment that is capable of handling large volumes.
Cargo is generally discharged directly onto surface transport or into a terminal.
This is the ideal terminal.
(2)
Unimproved Facilities. Is a site that is not specifically designed for cargo
discharge as it lacks facilities, equipment and/or infrastructure of a fixed water
terminal. Shortcomings may include sufficient depth to accommodate strategic
sealift ships, MHE and berthing space.
(3)
Bare Beach. Lighterage is utilised to off load ships at anchor and cargo is moved
over the beach or shore.
c.
Commodities Handled. The type of cargo that is handled at that specific terminal categorises
water terminals. The special requirements for the handling of ammunition, explosives, bulk
fuel and other hazardous cargo must be carefully planned. Classified cargo must receive
special attention and personnel must be cleared to handle such cargo.
d.
Methods of Cargo Handling. Within the Water Terminal cargo is handled in the following
ways :
i.
Containers. Significant infrastructure, cranes, specialised MHE and secure open
storage, is usually required to handle containers. Cognisance should be taken of the
facilities available in the SPOD in handling and conveying containers placed on the
quay by the ships crane. It is however the preferred way of handling cargo through a
Water Terminal.
e.
ii.
Roll-On/Roll-Off (RO-RO). This is the preferred way of transporting all vehicles and
wheeled equipment. It, however, requires assembly area close to the seaports and
marshalling areas within the seaports, preferable on the quay next to the ship(s). The
influence of the weather on these areas is to be appreciated and it is recommended that
the marshalling area be a hard surface. Loading of the ship(s) may take longer than the
discharge. Specialised RO-RO ships require specialised berths while others are able to
operate from a normal quay. The influence of the tide on the latter should be
appreciated.
iii.
General Cargo. This is a time consuming, MHE dependent and manpower-intensive
method of handling cargo. The cargo should at least be palletised for ease of handling.
The berth should have an apron for the full length of the ship(s), be able to
accommodate all MHE operations and provide covered warehousing for the cargo until
it is loaded and/or off loaded.
iv.
Lighterage. This is hazardous, complex, time consuming and manpower intensive and
may involve cargo in containers, RO-RO or breakbulk. This method should only be
used if no other method is available.
Workload Required to Support the Deployment. This is expressed in cargo tons, cubic
metres or pieces per day. This is what is actually required to be sea lifted.
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SADC SMC 1
f.
Terminal Throughput Capacity. This represents the tonnage, cubic metres and pieces that
the terminals are capable of handling and clear per day and is very important for both the
terminal in the SPOD and SPOE.
g.
Construction and/or Repair Requirements. Are any construction and/or repairs required to
the terminals to handle and/or increase the handling capability of the said terminal? This is
usually time consuming and resource-intensive.
h.
Equipment Requirements. What equipment, including MHE, is required in the terminal to
process the required workload, or is additional equipment required? If the latter, what is the
impact on time and the proposed schedule of the CTF? This should be carefully appreciated.
i.
Personnel Requirements. What is required in the seaports for administration and operations?
How are these to be conveyed and how will their own administration requirements be
satisfied?
6. Establishing PMCs. Once the magnitude of the force to be moved is confirmed and the ports are
identified, the CMCC will deploy a PMC. The composition of this may vary depending on the
nature of the operation and the phase of deployment. The PMC will be under command of the
CMCC.
7007 Strategic Movement Control
1. The Strategic Movement Control process covers the movements planned during the deliberate and
the crisis action planning process.
a. Deliberate Planning Process. This process deals with the time phasing of movements and
the assigning of transportation resources to support initial deployments for a set period,
normally approximately 90 days after the deployment commences. It entails the following
actions:
i.
Identifying the total movement requirements. This includes personnel, vehicles,
equipment and supplies. The dimensions of all major equipment, ie ICV, should be
established.
ii.
Describe the total movement requirements in Logistic terms, ie litres, tons, square
metres, cubic metres and number of personnel. It is important to determine the
following wrt the cargo that are to be sea lifted:
(1) What must be embarked between decks?
(2) What can be stowed on the upper decks? Must it be covered or not?
(3) What may be stacked and how high?
(4) Types of ammunition and explosives to be transported.
(5) SPOE/SPOD.
iii.
Determine the Strategic Deployment method.
(1) If the deployment is under the auspices of the United Nations (UN), the SADC
may offer its own Strategic resources to the UN for the transport of the force. If
this is not done, or not accepted by the UN, the UN will provide Strategic
resources. The information of paragraph 0707.1.a.ii. above is of paramount
importance and should be forwarded to the SADCMHQ/COB and the UN six
weeks prior to the departure of the force.
(2) If the deployment is not under the auspices of the UN, own Strategic resources
are to be utilised.
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SADC SMC 1
iv
The movement of the force from the forward assembly area to the SPOE could form
part of this function. Organic convoys are an important mode of transport. CMCC will
be responsible for the co-ordination of the convoys to coincide with the proposed
Transportation Operations Plan.
v.
Produce a Transportation Feasible Operations Plan.
b.
Crisis Action Strategic Movement Control. This follows the same process as the Deliberate
Planning Process with the main difference being the time available to reach allocation,
scheduling, identification of threats to transportation assets en route to the SPOD. Early
identification of the force and its movement requirements is of vital importance. Once again
the information required in paragraph 0707.1.a.ii. is vital.
7008 Strategic Movement
1. Strategic movement assets will be in high demand during the deployment and withdrawal phases
of an operation and will decrease as the deployed force is sustained by HNS. During this phase,
depending on the nature of the operation, strategic assets may be provided by another country,
local ships taken up from trade (STUFTs) or foreign STUFTs provided for by an organisation like
the UN or OAU. During the sustainment phase regular movement of both or either sea and air
strategic assets will occur.
2. Own strategic movement assets will be limited and will in all probability be limited to a small
number of ships and aircraft. The utilisation of these assets, if available, will be the responsibility
of the CMCC. These may be utilised during the initial deployment and withdrawal phases as part
of the strategic lift and thereafter some may be utilised during the sustainment phase.
3. The utilisation of STUFTs and routine commercial flights and ships during the sustainment phase
should not be ignored as these assets could be less expensive than military assets.
4. Movement by road and rail should never be underestimated. This includes the movement during
any of the phases and could be done by utilising existing infrastructure and facilities. This mode
of transport should always be considered in the country of deployment as part of HNS between
the SPOD and the forward logistics base, if it is not established within the SPOD.
7009
Theatre Movement
The terminal operating organisation in the SPOD should co-ordinate the employment of all means
of theatre transportation, including that provided by the HN, to support the concept of operations.
If a terminal operating organisation is not established in the SPOD the CTF logistics organisation
will be responsible for the employment of all theatre transportation.
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SADC SMC 1
7010 Port Movement Centre
1. Overview. Water terminals are key nodes in the total distribution system that must be established
to ensure the success of military operations. Historically, approximately 85 to 95% of a force's
equipment and sustainment cargo is moved into a theatre utilising sealift and is off loaded through
existing seaports or water terminals.
2. A Port Dossier should be maintained of all SADC harbours. Port dossiers should contain the
following information and should be updated annually :
a. Availability of Harbour. Operating hours of the harbour. This should include the
availability of tugs and berthing parties.
b.
Wharfage. Number of wharves available including quay number, length, depth at CD (m)
and quay above CD (m). Indicate services that are available at each quay, ie fuel, water,
electricity (indicate type and voltage etc), telephone, electric cranes, fire fighting, removing
of refuse, black and brown water. Indicate the hose size, max reach, flanges and delivery
speed.
c.
Slip and Drydock Facilities. Indicate if these are available indicating dimensions, services
available, MHE available, electricity and welding points.
d.
MHE. This should include all MHE other than the electric cranes indicated under
paragraph 2.b. above. Type of cartage available and access to national road and rail network
should be indicated.
e.
Diving Services. Who operates the service and contact details.
f.
Work Boats. Number and type of tugs available. Other work boats available.
g.
Fenders. Type and availability.
h.
Storage Sheds. Availability and ownership.
i.
Open Storage. Availability and ownership.
j.
Types of cargo. Indicate the types of cargo that can be handled by the various quays, ie
break-bulk or containers etc and the MHE available to handle the types of cargo.
k.
Industrial Infrastructure. Indicate the various types of industries available in and around the
harbour that could assist in the event of repairs being required. The capability of each
industry should be included.
l.
Geophysical Characteristics of the Theatre.
port(s).
Layout and physical characteristics of the
m. Steps in Water Terminal Planning. Assess the following :
7011 Deployment Phases
1. The type and volume of cargo handled will change during the various deployment stages and
adequate planning will ensure effective and efficient handling during the stage. The following is
an indication of changes per stage :
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a.
Initial or Surge Stage. During this stage units deploy with their equipment, vehicles and
supplies and should predominantly be RO-RO or breakbulk. Personnel should be airlifted
and only essential personnel should be accommodated on board the ship(s) for the sealift.
The early deployment of elements of the PMC is of paramount importance to ensure that the
PMC is in place to receive the deployed Task Force both in the SPOE and SPOD. HNS in
the SPOD is of utmost importance.
b.
Tactical Resupply Stage. During the initial or surge stage, the CTF will only be taking
sufficient supplies for a number of days, as the CTF organisation will not be in a position to
handle or support large volumes of cargo. Once the CTF organisation is in place, the CTF
are to be supplied with the CTF determining priorities. To avoid bottlenecks, the movement
should be planned taking into account the capability and infrastructure available to the PMC
and CTF in the SPOD.
c.
Sustained Resupply Stage. During this stage the CTF is sustained and the volume of cargo
will decrease which means that the size of the PMC could be adjusted accordingly.
d.
Redeployment Stage. During this stage, the CTF is re-deployed to another theatre or to their
original SPOE. This should be planned at an early stage and excess equipment and supplies
should be returned during the sustainment re-supply stage, to alleviate the pressure during
this stage.
7012 Cargo Considerations
1. The transportation plan is influenced by the amount of containerised, breakbulk and vehicle cargo.
Internationally it is accepted that the ration of containerised versus non-containerised cargo is 4 to
1 during peacetime. However, this ratio will change drastically during wartime.
2. Consideration should be given to the following:
a. Packaging may dictate the need for specialised equipment and trained personnel.
Cognisance should be taken of the variety of vehicles that could be deployed as part of a
SADC TF and need to be loaded utilising the ship's inherent cranes.
b.
Cargo that may require covered storage or warehousing.
c.
Dangerous or hazardous cargo (ammunition) requires careful handling, warehousing,
segregation or possible separate or isolated terminals. The planner should evaluate the
terminal capacity with emphasis being on the handling of items like ammunition by MHE.
7013 Responsibilities of the Officer Commanding a Water Terminal
1. The officer commanding a Port Movement Centre is responsible for the overall operation of the
terminal and include the following (see Appendix C for a typical layout of a PMC):
a. Port Movement Centre Planning and Operations.
i.
Notification of consignees.
ii.
Port clearance.
iii. Vessel scheduling.
iv. Availability of local pilots.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Statutory and regulatory constraints.
Military construction.
Environmental and natural resource preservation.
Energy conservation.
Terminal readiness.
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g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.
m.
n.
o.
p.
q.
r.
s.
t.
u.
SADC SMC 1
Terminal performance measurement and reporting.
Safety management.
Terminal security.
Terminal and warehouse operations.
Rail and road truck unloading and loading operations.
Container handling operations.
Quay operations.
Cargo movement control documentation.
Contract management.
Stevedores and related services (this includes the outsourcing of the service to commercial
enterprise).
Ship stowing.
Ship scheduling.
Proper handling of hazardous cargo.
Attendance of the ship arrivals/departures/movement meetings in the harbour.
Liaison with the relevant authorities wrt possible spills of hazardous materials and render
assistance.
7014 Tasks of a Port Movement Centre in SPOE
1. It is envisaged that the PMC who should be established within the SADC port is responsible for a
variety of tasks which includes the following:
a. Attendance of the weekly shipping conference within the specific harbour.
b.
Establish relations with the local railway representative to ensure that loading and off loading
of trains carrying military equipment due to be loaded, receives required priority.
c.
Provide accommodation and messing facilities to the personnel due to be sea lifted or
arrange to have it provided by another service.
d.
Loading of the ship(s) including the following:
i.
Establish the loading order of the vehicles with the ship(s).
ii.
Providing a secure assembly area where all vehicles are assembled. This need not be
within the harbour area.
iii. Arrange the vehicles into groups and marking as per the Bill of Lading.
iv. Provide a secure marshalling area within the harbour, close to the quay where the
ship(s) are to be loaded.
v.
Movement of the vehicles in groups from the assembly area to the marshalling area.
e.
Terminal Throughput Capacity. If the following is not readily available, it is to be
determined :
i.
Reception Capacity. Is based on the number of ships that can be berthed or anchored
in a harbour, by type.
ii.
Terminal Discharge Capacity. Is the amount of cargo that can be discharged from
each of the berths. This is given in number of 6/12-metre containers, tons, square
metres and in number of personnel for passengers. Cognisance should be taken of
MHE and quay infrastructure.
iii.
Terminal Transfer Capacity. Is the total capability to transfer cargo from storage to
ship-side. The type and quantity of cargo, distance and the MHE will influence this.
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SADC SMC 1
iv.
Terminal Storage Capability. This is the amount of cargo that can be stored at the
water terminal at any given time. This should be broken down into number of
containers, litres of fuel, tonnage of breakbulk and amount of ammunition that can be
stored in a warehouse or in the open. The packing and stacking modes will influence
this.
v.
Terminal Acceptance Capacity. The amount of cargo that the terminal can receive per
18 hour day. This should be expressed in tons, containers or pieces of equipment.
This will be influenced by the position and accessibility of the nearest railhead, off
loading capacity at the railhead, road infrastructure, quay space and off loading
capacity for road trucks.
vi.
Other Factors. Any other factor that may have an influence on the throughput capacity
of the terminal is to be evaluated. Factors like the influence of the weather and
availability and condition of manual labour.
f.
Ship Arrival and Destination Meetings. If ships are to transit hostile environment it could be
done utilising Naval Control Shipping convoys, escorted or unescorted. This may result in
congestion at the terminal as ships could arrive in groups rather than individually. Advance
planning is of paramount importance.
i.
Ship Destination Meetings. CMCC will advise the PMC of pending arrivals of ships to
be loaded, destination and the cargo intended for the specific ship(s). The PMC are to
ensure that the required cargo is prepared and all MHE and operators are in place to
handle said cargo.
ii.
Ship Arrival Meeting and Boarding Party. This should be planned and all persons
involved should be informed.
iii.
Ship Berthing Assignments. The PMC are responsible for the following :
(1) PMC is to liaise with the local port authorities to ensure that the required berth(s)
are available for the arriving ship(s). If only a limited number of berths are
available, a sequence of berthing is to be determined and the ships advised.
(2)
The PMC ensure that the requirements of the ship(s) LOGREQ are satisfied upon
arrival. This includes Tugs, berthing parties, victuals and transport.
(3) If personnel are to embark on board the ship(s) the PMC co-ordinates the
joining.
(4)
g.
Liaison with the local Military Base wrt assistance in accommodation and
transport.
Personnel and Equipment Requirements. Where the Bill of Lading is known, determining
personnel and equipment requirement would be easy. If this is not known, it must be
determined as soon as possible after docking of the ship. The following should be addressed:
i.
Cargo Handled by Hand. If breakbulk cargo is to be handled by hand, sufficient
workers and checkers are to be available to execute the loading of the ship(s).
ii.
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Material Handling Equipment.
Sufficient and suitable MHE, operators and
supervisors should be available. Contracting of local commercial operators should be
considered, if the need arises.
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h.
SADC SMC 1
Other Documentation. Cognisance should be taken of the following:
i.
Passenger Manifest. CMCC will advise the number of passengers to embark per ship
and the destination. PMC to ensure that the necessary passenger manifests are handed
to the ships. CMCC are to be informed of any changes.
ii.
Cargo Reports. PMC are to confirm cargo loaded and advise any changes and the
reason(s) for these changes. See Appendix C for details that should be reported.
7015 Tasks of a Port Movement Centre in SPOD
1. It is envisaged that a section of the PMC could be deployed to the SPOD. Responsibility and
tasks includes the following:
a. Attendance of the weekly shipping conference within the specific harbour.
b.
Establish relations with the local Railway representative to ensure that loading and off
loading of trains carrying military equipment due to be loaded receives required priority.
c.
Provide messing facilities to the personnel due to be sea lifted or arrange to have it provided
by another service.
d.
Loading of the ship(s) including the following:
i.
Establish the loading order of the vehicles with the ship(s).
e.
ii.
Providing a secure assembly area where all vehicles are assembled. This need not be
within the harbour area.
iii.
Provide a secure marshalling area within the harbour close to the quay where the
ship(s) are to be loaded.
iv.
Arrange the vehicles into groups and marking as per the Bill of Lading.
v.
Movement of the vehicles in groups from the assembly area to the marshalling area.
Determine the following wrt the specific harbour if not known:
i.
Availability of Harbour. Operating hours of the harbour. This should include the
availability of tugs and berthing parties.
ii.
Wharfage. Number of wharves available including quay number, length, depth at CD
(m) and quay above CD (m). Indicate services that are available at each quay, ie fuel,
water, electricity (indicate type and voltage etc), telephone, electric cranes, fire
fighting, removing of refuse, black and brown water. Indicate the hose size, max reach,
flanges and delivery speed.
iii.
Slip and Dry-dock Facilities. Indicate if these are available indicating dimensions,
services available, MHE available, electricity and welding points.
iv.
MHE. This should include all MHE other than the electric cranes indicated under par
7015.1.e.ii. above. Type of cartage available and access to national road and rail
network should be indicated.
v.
Diving Services. Who operates the service and contact details.
vi.
Work Boats. Number and type of tugs available. Other work boats available.
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vii.
SADC SMC 1
Fenders. Type and availability.
viii. Storage Sheds. Availability and ownership.
ix. Open Storage. Availability and ownership.
x.
Types of cargo. Indicate the types of cargo that can be handled by the various quays, ie
breakbulk or containers etc and the MHE available to handle the types of cargo.
xi.
Industrial Infrastructure. Indicate the various types of industries available in and
around the harbour that could assist in the event of repairs being required. The
capability of each industry should be included.
xii.
Reception Capacity. Is based on the number of ships that can be berthed or anchored
in a harbour, by type.
xiii. Terminal Discharge Capacity. Is the amount of cargo that can be discharged from
each of the berths. This is given in number of 6/12-metre containers, tons, square
metres and in number of personnel for passengers. Cognisance should be taken of
MHE and quay infrastructure.
xiv. Terminal Transfer Capacity. Is the total capability to transfer cargo from storage to
ship-side. The type and quantity of cargo, distance and the MHE will influence this.
xv.
Terminal Storage Capability. This is the amount of cargo that can be stored at the
water terminal at any given time. This should be broken down into number of
containers, litres of fuel, tonnage of breakbulk and amount of ammunition that can be
stored in a warehouse or in the open. The packing and stacking modes will influence
this.
xvi. Terminal Acceptance Capacity. The amount of cargo that the terminal can receive per
18 hour day. This should be expressed in tons, containers or pieces of equipment.
This will be influenced by the position and accessibility of the nearest railhead, off
loading capacity at the railhead, road infrastructure, quay space and off loading
capacity for road trucks.
xvii. Other Factors. Any other factor that may have an influence on the throughput capacity
of the terminal is to be evaluated. Factors like the influence of the weather and
availability and condition of manual labour.
f.
Ship Arrival and Destination Meetings. If ships are to transit hostile environment it could be
done utilising Naval Control Shipping convoys, escorted or unescorted. This may result in
congestion at the terminal as ships could arrive in groups rather than individually. Advance
planning is of paramount importance.
g.
Ship Destination Meetings. CMCC will advise the PMC of pending arrivals of ships to be
loaded, destination and the cargo intended for the specific ship(s). The PMC are to ensure
that the required cargo is prepared and all MHE and operators are in place to handle said
cargo.
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h.
i.
Ship Berthing Assignments. PMC is to liaise with the local port authorities to ensure that the
required berth(s) are available for the arriving ships. The following factors will dictate
where a ship is berthed at this specific terminal:
i.
Oceanographic Conditions. Harbour channel depth and width, currents, tidal
fluctuations, prevailing winds, sea states and seasonal storms.
ii.
Cargo Types. Type or category of cargo, ie container, RO-RO, breakbulk, special
commodities, ammunition or bulk fuel.
iii.
Routing Scheme. The order in which the ships will be scheduled through the terminal
will be determined by the availability of wharves and cargo types.
iv.
Logistic Support. The PMC ensure that the requirements of the ship(s) LOGREQ are
satisfied upon arrival. This includes Tugs, berthing parties, victuals and transport.
Certain STUFTs may use appointed agents to provide certain services. The CMCC
will advise the PMC of such arrangements.
Personnel and Equipment Requirements. The following needs to be addressed during
planning. Where the Bill of Lading is known determining the requirement would be easy. If
this is not known, it must be determined as soon as possible after docking of the ship.
i.
Cargo Handled by Hand. If breakbulk cargo is to be handled by hand, sufficient
workers and checkers are to be available to execute the loading of the ship(s).
ii.
j.
SADC SMC 1
Material Handling Equipment.
Sufficient and suitable MHE, operators and
supervisors should be available. Contracting of local commercial operators should be
considered, if the need arises.
Other Documentation. Cognisance should be taken of the following:
i.
Passenger Manifest. CMCC will advise the number of passengers to embark per ship
and the destination. PMC to ensure that the necessary passenger manifests are handed
to the ships. CMCC are to be informed of any changes.
ii.
Cargo Reports. PMC are to confirm cargo loaded and advise any changes and the
reason(s) for these changes. See Appendix C for details of what should be reported.
2. Area Defence Threats. Water terminals are not always located within Naval or Military facilities
and as such Water terminals in SPOD could in particular be susceptible to threats and are to
expect and prepare for sabotage, terrorism, mining and espionage.
7016 Discharge Operations
1. The off-loading of ships will be conducted by the members of the CTF that accompanied the
ship(s) and the ship’s company and may be augmented by the rest of the CTF and/or HNS. In
certain scenarios stevedores could further support the off-loading. To ensure that the schedules of
the CCTF are met, planning is very important and the following should be addressed:
a. Advance Planning. Based on the manifest and cargo being carried by the ship(s) along with
the instructions received from CMCC, the discharge is planned by the PMC. Planning
includes the following:
i.
Berthing. Identify the specific location within the terminal and confirm the
availability.
ii.
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Discharge Method. Method of discharge, floating or shore side cranes, sequence of
hatches and the cargo within each hatch.
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SADC SMC 1
iii.
Assignment of Assistance. Is additional assistance required? If yes, these are assigned
to the various ships by the PMC
b.
c.
Co-ordination. The PMC works closely with the host nation and the operators of the local
infrastructure to ensure that discharged cargo is moved and cleared to coincide with the CTF
schedule. The following should be addressed:
i.
Unit Assignments. Assigning of units within the PMC to unloading specific ships.
ii.
Documentation. Ensure that all documentation, manifests, stowage plans, hatch lists
and cargo instructions are in order.
iii.
Cargo Handling Equipment. All required MHE are available and fully manned.
Boarding Party. Prior to the discharge of a ship a boarding party should go onboard to coordinate the discharge with the master/captain of the ship. The following should be part of
the boarding party:
i.
Terminal Operations Officer. The following functions are conducted by the Terminal
Operations Officer:
(1) Briefs the master/captain of the ship(s) and the OC of troops on terminal
regulations.
(2) Obtains copies of documentation not received.
(3) Determines damage to or pilferage of cargo by inspecting the various holds.
(4) Identify unload problems that might be caused by cargo that was not secured
properly. This is very important if the ship is a STUFT.
(5) Obtain information on the unloading of the ship.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
Customs Personnel. Carry out functions as prescribed.
Medical Personnel. Carry out checks on diseases and sanitary conditions of troop
facilities and inspects conditions of perishable cargo.
Harbour Master. Co-ordinates usage of all harbour craft under his control.
Embarkation Officer. Co-ordinates the detail planning of the unloading of the ship and
the movement of troop units through the terminal.
Military Police. Provide support as required.
Signal Officer. Co-ordinates all communication during the discharge of the ship.
d.
Vessel Policy. This is to be determined during the boarding party meeting and includes who
will be responsible for what during the discharge. Typically this includes that only the ship’s
company may open and close hatches, operate ships cranes and rigging of lift gear.
e.
Special Conditions. Packaging may require special MHE and special cargo handling slings
that may have to be constructed.
f.
Cargo Clearance. The use of marshalling yards will assist in the clearing of water terminals.
It will clear the quay and will increase the turn around time of ships. It is however dependant
on the availability of MHE, vehicles and infrastructure within the harbour, ie if cargo can be
loaded directly onto a train.
g.
Cargo Marshalling Yard. Provides temporary in transit storage of cargo and should be
situated close to the harbour and should preferably be linked to the rail and road
infrastructure. It can be utilised for the clearing of cargo and the In and Out Survey (required
by the UN) can be conducted within the cargo marshalling yard.
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h.
SADC SMC 1
Security. This remains the single biggest headache for the operating of water terminals and
is to receive high priority during the planning phase of the water terminal.
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SADC SMC 1
APPENDIX A
MOVEMENT CONTROL CONCEPT
UNIT A
UNIT A
UNIT A
UNIT A
AA
TCC 2
AA
TCC 1
SADC MOB AREA
UNIT A
T
C
C
C
M
C
C
SPOE - PMC
SADC MOB AREA
C
M
C
C
/
P
M
C
SADC MOB AREA
SADC MOB AREA
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7A-1
C
T
F
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SADC SMC 1
APPENDIX B
COMBINED MOVEMENT CONTROL CENTRE
SADC
SADCMHQ/
CPB
ADMIN
PLANNING
OPERATIONS
AIR OPS
LAND OPS
AMC
HOST NATION
TCC
SEA OPS
PMC
7B-1
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SADC SMC 1
APPENDIX C
PORT MOVEMENT CENTRE
OC PMC
TCC REPS
ADMIN AND LOG
WAREHOUSE
ACCOM
Receive Store
Preserve Issue
Logreq Eng Supp
Accommodation
Messing
Transport
Gen Comm
OPERATIONS
SUP SUPP
Shore Teams
Medical
Procurement
Mark of Eqpt
PRPEP
Assay Area
Ship
Marshall Area
LOAD
Stevedores
Railway Quay
Bill of Lading
Movement
HOST NATION
LIAISON
SECURITY
Harbour auth
MHE
Ship
Boarding Party
7C-1
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SADC SMC 1
LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES
Subject
Page Numbers
Title Page
Letter of Promulgation
Record of Changes
Contents
i (RB)
iii (RB)
v, vi
vii(RB)
Original
Original
Original
Original
Chapter 1
1-i (RB)
1-1, 1-2
Original
Original
Chapter 2
2-i (RB)
2-1, 2-2
2-3 (RB)
Original
Original
Original
Chapter 3
3-i (RB)
3-1, 3-2
3-3 (RB)
Original
Original
Original
Chapter 4
4-i (RB)
4-1 to 4-4
4-5 (RB)
4-7 (RB)
4-9, 4-10
4-11 (RB)
Original
Original
Original
Original
Original
Original
Chapter 5
5-i (RB)
5-1, 5-2
5-3 (RB)
Original
Original
Original
Chapter 6
6-i (RB)
6-1, 6-2
6-A-1 (RB)
6-B-1 (RB)
6-C-1 (RB)
Original
Original
Original
Original
Original
Chapter 7
7-i (RB)
7-1 to 7-16
7-A-1 (RB)
7-B-1 (RB)
7-C-1 (RB)
Original
Original
Original
Original
Original
List of Effective Pages
LEP-1 (RB)
Original
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LEP-1
Effective Change
ORIGINAL

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