D. Angelica Santos. (C.japonica), Jacintho de Mattos, 1900

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D. Angelica Santos. (C.japonica), Jacintho de Mattos, 1900
D.
D. Angelica Santos. (C.japonica), Jacintho de Mattos, 1900, Catalogue No.14, p.64; Abbreviation
for Dona Angelica Santos.
D.C. Strother.
Magnolia Gardens and Nursery Catalogue, 1944-1945. Synonym for Evening Star.
D. Calif. Red. Vanderbilt, 1942, Camellia Digest, 1(1). Abbreviation for ‘Donckelarii California
Red’, synonym for ‘Monjusu-aka’ (Shusugasane).
D. Californica. Vanderbilt, 1942, Camellia Digest, 1(1). Abbreviation for ‘Donckelarii California’,
synonym for Monjusu.
D. Camilla de Faria. Joaquim Moreira da Silva 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation for Dona
Camilla de Faria.
D. Camello Borghese. van Houtte Catalogue, 1864-1865, 104:80. Abbreviation for Don Camillo
Borghese.
D. Carlos Fernando.
Oliveira Catalogue, 1873. Abbreviation for Dom Carlos Fernando.
D. Carlota de Barros Van Zeller. Joaquim Moreira da Silva 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation
for Dona Carlota de Barros van-Zeller.
D. Casimira Chaves. Joaquim Mooreira da Silva 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation for Dona
Casimira Chaves.
D. Catharina d’Athaide. Joaquim Moreira da Silva 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation for Dona
Catharina d’Athaide.
D. Constana de Portugal. Joaquim Moreira da Silva 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation for Dona
Constança de Portugal.
D. Dinis. Samartin, M.C & A.P, La Camelia, Un regalo oriental para accidente, 1988, p.156;
Orthographic error and abbreviation for Dom Diniz.
D. Diniz.(C.japonica), Alfredo Moreira da Silva, 1966-67, Catalogue No.101, p.27; Abbreviation
for Dom Diniz.
D.E. Huger. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1950, The Camellia, Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.28: Red. Large,
semi-double. Medium growth. Mid-season flowering. Originated in Middleton Gardens,
Charleston, South Carolina, USA.
D. Fernando.
Alfredo Moreira da Silva Catalogue, 1964-1965, p.26. Abbreviation for Dom
Fernando II de Portugal.
D. Fernando II de Portugal. Escuela de Agricultura de Potevedra, 1882, Catalogue, p.29. da Silva
& Filhos Catalogue, 1955, p.76. Abbreviation for Dom Fernando II de Portugal.
D. Fernando II (Rei de Portugal).
Fernando II de Portugal.
Jornal de Horticultura Pratica, 1874. Synonym for Dom
D. Fr. Caetano Brandão. Joaquim Moreira da Silva, 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation for Dom
Frei Caetano Brandão.
D. Fuas Roupinho.
Roupinho.
Joaquim Moreira da Silva, 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation for Dom Fuas
D. Giovani Battiste Borghese. van Houtte Catalogue, 1864-1865, 104:80. Abbreviation for Don
Giovanni Battiste Borghese.
D. Helena de Sousa Holstein. Joaquim Moreira da Silva, 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation and
orthographic variant for Dona Helena de Souza Holstein.
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D. Hertilia de Freitas. Gardening with Camellias and Azaleas, (p.80), ND. Orthographic error for
Dona Herzilia de Freitas Magalhaes.
D. Hertzilia de Freitas Magalhaes. Camellia Lodge Nursery Catalogue, 1981. Abbreviation and
error for Dona Herzilia de Freitas Magalhaes.
D. Herzilia F. Magalhaes. Haskin’s Nursery Main Catalogue, 1962, p.3. Abbreviation for Dona
Herzilia de Freitas Magalhaes.
D. Herzilia de Freitas Magalhaes.
Alfredo Moreira da Silva, Catalogue, No.18, 1947, p.18.
Abbreviaton for Dona Herzilia de Freitas Magalhaes.
D. Herzilia de Freitas Magalhaes Vgtd.
Cowell’s Camellia Nursery Catalogue, 1997, p.2:
Abbreviation for ‘Dona Herzilia de Freitas Magalhaes Variegated’. Synonym for Magalhaes
Variegated, (ICS Register p.1149).
D. Herzilla de Freitas Magalhaes. SCCS., 1958, Camellia Nomenclature, p.28. Abbreviation and
error for Dona Herzilia de Freitas Magalhaes.
D. Herzina de Freitas M. Fairlight Camellia Nursery Catalogue, 1986, p.6. Abbreviation and error
for Dona Herzilia Freitas Magalhaes.
D. Ignez de Castro.
Joaquim Moreira da Silva, 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation for Dona
Ignez de Castro.
D. Inês. (C.japonica), Alfredo Moreira da Silva Catalogue No.99, 1964-65, p.27, ref 106.
Abbreviation for Dona Inês.
D.J. Andreson.
Andresen.
D. Jane Andresen.
Andresen.
Hewton Nurseries Catalogue, 1973-1974, p.3. Abreviation for Dona Jane
Alfredo Moreira da Silva Catalogue, 1920. Abbreviation for Dona Jane
D. Jane Andreson. Jacintho de Mattos Catalogue No.20, Catalogue, 1904. Abbreviation and error
for Dona Jane Andresen.
D. Jane Andressen. Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1963-1964, p.4. Abbreviation & error for
Dona Jane Andresen.
D. Joana Andresen. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue, 1959. Abbreviation
& error for Dona Jane Andresen.
D. Joanna Andresen. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue, 1914. Abbreviation and error for Dona Jane Andresen.
D. João de Castro.
de Castro.
Joaquim Moreira da Silva, 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation for Dom João
D. João IV. Joaquim Moreira da Silva, 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation for Dom João IV.
D. Joaquim de Mello e Faro. Joaquim Moreira da Silva, 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation for
Dom Joaquim de Mello e Faro.
D. Juan IV. Escuela di Agricultura Catalogue, 1882. Orthographic variant for Dom João IV.
D. Leonor d’Arrochela. Joaquim Moreira da Silva, 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation for Dona
Leonor d’Arrochella.
D. Lily Ponds. Mount Congreve Wholesale Nursery , 1990/1991, Price List. Orthographic error
for Lily Pons.
D. Luiz, Rei de Portugal. Joaquim Moreira da Silva, 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation for Dom
Luiz I, Rei de Portugal.
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D. Magalhaes. Belle Fontaine Nursery Catalogue, 1962, p.1. Abbreviation for Dona Herzilia de
Freitas Magalhaes.
D. Maria Luiza. Joaquim Moreira da Silva, 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation for ‘Dona Maria
Luiza’, synonym for Maria Luigia.
D. Maria Pia, Rainha de Portugal. Joaquim Moreira da Silva, 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation
for Dona Maria Pia, Rainha de Portugal.
D. Maria II, Rainha de Portugal. Joaquim Moreira da Silva, 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation
for Dona Maria II, Rainha de Portugal.
D. Nuno Alvarez Pereira. Joaquim Moreira da Silva, 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation and error
for Dom Nuno Alvares Pereira.
D. Paola Borghese.
Borghese.
D. Pedro V.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1864-1865, 104:80. Abbreviation for Don Paola
Linden Catalogue, 1874. Abbreviation for Dom Pedro V, Rei de Portugal.
D. Pedo V, Rei de Portugal. Joaquim Moreira da Silva, 1955, ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation for
Dom Pedro V, Rei de Portugal.
D. Pedro V. Rey de Portugal.
Escuela de Agricultura de Pontevedra , 1882, Catalogue, p.29.
Orthographic variant for Dom Pedro V, Rei de Portugal.
D. Red. Vanderbilt, 1942, Camellia Digest, 1(1). Abbreviation for ‘California Donckelarii Red’,
synonym for ‘Monjusu-aka’.
D. Rita de Cassia. Oliveira, Jr.1871, Jornal Horticultura Pratica. Abbreviation for Dona Rita de
Cassia.
D. Stephania, Rainha de Portugal. Joaquim Moreira da Silva, 1955 ACS Yearbook. Abbreviation
for Dona Stephania, Rainha de Portugal.
D & D #325.
D.W. Davis.
Davis.
Wilmot, 1946, American Camellia Yearbook, p.28. Synonym for Mrs Lurman.
Stewart’s Florists and Nursery Catalogue, 1964, p.1. Abbreviation for Mrs D.W.
D’Iberville. (C.japonica), McIlhenny Catalogue, 1948-1949, p.4: A small blossom measuring 7.5 cm
across, full double with upstanding petals and a rosebud centre, white ground suffused with
thulite pink, each petal having a line of thulite pink from its base to its tip. Originated in USA.
d’Iride.
Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.26. Synonym for Dride.
d’Oiseau. von Biedenfeld, 1856, Practische Grundlehren der Cultur von Camellien, p.21 as
Florida or ‘Nid d’Oiseau’. Synonym for Florida.
d’Orleans.
von Biedenfeld, 1856, Practische Grundlehren de Cultur von Camellien, p.38.
Abbreviation for Duchesse d’Orleans.
Da Feilisi. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.406; Chinese synonym
for the USA C.japonica Francis Eugene Phillips.
Da Qio. (Da Qio Lady) ((C.hybrid), ACS, Yearbook 2012, p.57 with colour photo; Large to very large
size, Wang “WW#1” x Kona; Photo shows a pink, rose form to formal double flower with
upstanding, separated, and mainly fluted petals. Originated by John Wang, Orinda, Calif.,
USA.
Da Novaro.
Auguste van Geert , 1861, Catalogue, No.50, p.33. Orthographic error for Danovaro.
Da Novarro.
van Houtte Catalogue,1858, 72:10. Orthographic error for Danovaro.
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Da Niuxi’ao.
Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.405; Chinese
synonym for the USA C.japonica Guilio Nuccio.
Daadaofu.
Shao, Taichong, 1992, The Observations from the Camellia World, No.175, p.66.
Chinese synonym for French C.japonica Adolphe Audusson.
Daaotuo.
Gao, Jiyin, Ltr 22nd August, 1994. Chinese synonym for the USA C.reticulata hybrid
Otto Hopfer.
Dabai. Liu, 1959, Chung Kuo Chu Ming Ti Chi Chung Hua Hui. Different reading: ‘Ta Pei’.
Translation: ‘Large White’. Synonym for Alba Plena.
Dabaihe. (Large White Lotus), (C.japonica), Liu, 1959, Chung Kuo Chu Ming Ti Chi Chung Hua Hui:
Petals white and curled with central stamens, Belongs to the peony type. Different reading:
‘Ta Pei Ho’. Japanese reading: ‘Daihakuren’. Originated in China.
Dabai Hehua.
(Large white lotus flower), Shao Yun, 1987, Camellias from Zhejiang, p.98.
Synonym for Yumeiren.
Dabai Linjiao. (Large White Hexagular), (C.japonica), Shanghai Botanic Gardens List, 1985: Large,
formal double white with a star shaped or tiered petal formation. Originated in China.
Dabier. Gao, Jiyin, 1998, The World's Best Camellia Cultivars, p.101. Chinese synonym for Bill
Johnston.
Dacaiyun. (Large Rosy Clouds).
Shao, Taichong, 1992, The Observations from the Camellia
World, No.154, p.64. Chinese synonym for the UK C.japonica Gigantea.
Dachengguan.
Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.406. Chinese
synonym for the Japan C.japonica Daijôkan.
Dachusha. (Large Vermilion). American Camellia Yearbook, 1990, p.191. Chinese synonym for
the USA reticulata hybrid Howard Asper.
Daclerii. Anonymous, 1841, Gardeners’ Chronicle, 314:278. Orthographic error for ‘Dahlenii’,
synonym for Rathmoreana.
Daddy Mac. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Mar. 2009, p.29, Regn No. 2753. Originated by
John M. Davy, Milton, Fla, USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 2008, p.108 with colour
photo; The 30 year old seedling first bloomed in 1979. Propagated by Panhandle Select,
LLC, Milton, Fla. Open, spreading, slow growth. Leaves 11.5 cm x 5 cm. The 11.5 cm
diameter, anemone to peony blooms are white heavily flecked and streaked with dark red,
deep coral pink, and light red to medium pink in an irregular pattern. Light yellow anthers and
yellow filaments.
Dadiechi.
Feng et al., 1981, Yunnan Shanchahua, p.99. Synonym for Houye Diechi.
Dadongfang.
Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.405. Chinese
synonym for the Australia C.japonica Great Eastern.
Dadong Fangliang. (Great Eastern Light). (C.japonica), Wang & Yu, 1989, Camellia, No.85, p.43,
Colour photo [p.142]: Large white to cream centred formal double. Petals channelled,
slightly emarginate, 70-80, obovate, slightly retuse, imbricated, up to 15 rows, white tinted
blush. Originated in China. Very similar to Dongfangliang.
Dadong Fanliang. (Great Eastern Light), (C.japonica), Wang & Yü,1981, Shancha Hua: Formal double,
red. Different reading ‘Ta-hung Fang-liang’. Originated in China.
Dad’s Pink. (C.japonica) SCCS, Supplementary List 2011, Candy-striped, half pink or solid pink. A
colour sport of Romany. Originated by Ray Watson, Sanford, N.C., USA.
Daelenii. Jacob Makoy et Cie Catalogue, 1838. Orthographic error for ‘Dahlenii’, synonym for
Rathmoreana.
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Daelerii. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery Catalogues,
p.52. Orthographic error for ‘Dahlenii’, synonym for Rathmoreana.
Dafugui. (Great Wealth & Rank), (C.japonica), Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia in China, p.49,
No.299: Large size, 9-11 cm across, red, semi-double with 9-11 petals. Blooms mid-season.
Originated in China.
Dagmar Berghoff. (C.hybrid). International Camellia Journal 2005, p.129 with colour photo; Reg. No.
56. An open pollinated seedling of C.pitardii var. yunnanica. Originated by Peter Fischer,
Wingst, Germany. First flowered 1985. A dense upright shrub of medium growth rate. Highly
floriferous, early to late season. Pink flowers in variable shades (RHS.CC. 55C-D), single to
semi-double, 7.5 cm diameter x 3.5 cm deep. Considered to be a cold hardy plant in
Germany. Parent sourced from 1200 metres.
Dagongdeng. Chinese Camellia Culture, 2003, p.251 with colour photo; A C.hybrid developed by Mr
Huang Delin, Shanghai, China. First flowered 1991. Large, pure pink semi-double with 4-5
layers of petals. Diameter 10-11 cm. Late flowering.
Daguiye. (Large Osmanthus Leaf), (C.reticulata), Yü, 1950, RHS., “Camellia Reticulata and its Garden
Varieties”. Camellias and Magnolias Conference Report, pp.13-25 as ‘Takeiyeh’: A medium
large flower, 9-11 cm across, petals about 20 in 4-5 whorls, elliptic-obovate, notched at the
apex, semi-double to peony form with some petaloids; central petals, wavy and erect; stamens
few, divided into 3-4 fascicles, connate with inner petals. mid-season flowering. Leaves
obovatelanceolate, margins revolute, apices acute and recurved, bases cuneate, 6-9 cm long
by 2.6-3.5 cm wide. Leaves similar to those of the Osmanthus fragrans. They are also similar
to Liuye Yinhong except that the apex is broader and more curved. The cultivar originated in
Dali, Kunming, China. Western synonym: ‘Large Osmanthus Leaf’. Different readings:
‘Ta-kuei-yeh’, ‘Takueiyeh’. For colour plates see p.66 Feng et al., 1981, Yunnan Shanchahua
or p.50, 1986, Yunnan Camellias of China; also Macoboy, 1981. The Colour Dictionary of
Camellias. Corruptions of the name: ‘Takeyeh’, ‘Takeiyeh’, ‘Takeyeh’, ‘Takieyeh’.
Daguetti Odorata.
Dahailun.
Verschaffelt Catalogue, !850, p.46. Orthographic error for Duguetti Odorata.
Gao, Jiyin, Ltr 30 July 1990. Chinese synonym for Helen Bower.
Dahejin.
(Dahe Brocade). Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia in China, p.34, No.341, colour
photo, No.199. Synonym for the Japanese cultivar, Yamato-nishiki. Chinese names of sports:
‘Baidahejin’ & ‘Fendahejin’. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias,
p.418. Chinese synonym ‘Feihou Ribenjin’.
Dahelenii. Cachet Catalogue, 1845-1846, p.2. Orthographic error for ‘Dahlenii’, synonym for
Rathmoreana.
Dahelina. Prince & Co. Catalogue, 1844, p.104. Orthographic error for ‘Dahlenii’, synonym for
Rathmoreana.
Dahlaeflora.
Harrison ed., 1835, Floricultural Cabinet, p.186. Orthographic error for Dahliiflora.
Dahlaeiflora Rosea.
Charles van Geert, 1848 Catalogue No.105, p.108. Orthographic error for
Dahliiflora Rosea.
Dahleaeflora.
Berlèse, 1841, Iconographie, pl.26. Orthographic error for Dahliiflora.
Dahlenii. Raised by Jean Van Hal, Antwerp, Belgium, in 1836 and commercialised following his
death. van Houtte Catalogue,1839, 1:7 as ‘Dahleni’. Mertens & Fontaine, Collection de cent
espèces.....camellia, 1845, pl. 31. Synonym for Rathmoreana.
Dahliaeflora. Redouté et al., 1828, Annales Société Horticulture de Paris. Orthographic error for
Dahliiflora.
5
Dahliaeflora Alba. Shneiderff, ed., 1841, Catalogo delle piante che si Trovano nel Giardino, p.8.
Orthographic error for Dahliiflora Alba.
Dahliaeflora Coccinea. Baumann, Mulhouse Nursery Catalogue, 1841-1842, Orthographic error for
Dahliiflora Coccinea.
Dahliaeflora (Casoretti).
Paillet, 1844 In Lemaire. Des Genres Camellias, Rhododendrum,
Azalea.... p.150 as ‘Dahliaeflora’ ou ‘Ignescens’. Synonym for Ignescens.
Dahliaeflora Heterophylla.
Trillon, 1845, Catalogue, p.4. Synonym for Dahliiflora.
Dahliaeflora Igna.
The Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, No.12, Mar 24, 1856,
p.280. Orthographic error for ‘Dahliaeflora Ignescens’, synonym for Ignescens.
Dahliaeflora Ignea. Burdin Maggiore & Co. Catalogue, 1835. Synonym for Ignescens.
Dahliaeflora Ignel. Ellis, 1953, Old Camellia Varieties, p.101. Orthographic error for ‘Dahliaeflora
Ignea’, synonym for Ignescens.
Dahliaeflora Ignescens.
Naudin, Apr. 1 852, Revue Horticole, P. 153. Synonym for Ignescens.
Dahliaeflora Nivea. Jacob Makoy et Cie Nursery Catalogue, 1842, p.9. Orthographic error for
Dahliiflora Nivea.
Dahliaeflora Rosea. Anonymous, June 1839, Revue Horticole, p.205. Orthographic error for
Dahliiflora Rosea.
Dahliaeflora Superba.
‘Ardens’.
Trillon, Le Mans Nursery Catalogue, 1843-1844, p.4. Synonym for
Dahliaeflora Ygnea. Rousseau, Angers Nursery Catalogue, 1842-1843, p.1. Orthographic error for
‘Dahliiflora Ignea’, synonym for Ignescens.
Dahliaflora. Buist, 1854, American Gardeners’ Dictionary, ed.6, p.212. Orthographic error for
Dahliiflora.
Dahliaflora Ignea.
Auguste van Geert, 1848, Catalogue, p.16. Synonym for Ignescens.
Dahliaflora Ignes. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.52. Orthographic error for ‘Dahliiflora Ignescens’, synonym for Ignescens.
Dahlieflora Ignea.
Dahlieflora Rosea.
Rosea.
Trillon, Le Mans Nursery Catalogue, 1843, p.4. Synonym for Ignescens.
Trillon, Le Mans Nursery Catalogue, 1843, p.4. Synonym for Dahliiflora
Dahliiflora. (C.japonica), Redouté et al.,1828, Annales Société Horticulture de Paris, 2:281-287 erroneously as ‘Dahliaeflora’. It was also listed in the Floricultural Cabinet, vol.III, 1835, p.186
as a “British hybrid with pale or light red flowers.” Berlèse in the three editions of his
Monographie, 1837, 1840 and 1845, had the cultivar as being originated in England by
Knight and described it as: Leaves deformed, some elliptical, a little obtuse, others lanceolate,
acute, narrow, undulate, wrinkled, irregular, sabre or scythe form, of a greyish green; buds,
pointed, scales green; flower semi-double, depressed, 6.8 cm across, rose-pink. The variation
in its foliage gave it the synonym ‘Heterophylla’ or ‘various leaved’. The name ‘Dahliaeflora’
has been invalidly applied to two other cultivars; an Italian one originated by Casoretti, which
is properly known as Ignescens and an American one raised by Seavey in California.
Synonym: ‘Dahlaeiflora Heterophylla’. Orthographic errors: ‘Dahliaeflora’, ‘Dahlieflora’,
‘Dahlaeflora’, ‘Dahleaeflora’.
Dahliiflora Alba. (C.japonica), Shneiderff, ed., 1841, Catalogo delle piante che si Trovano nel Giardino,
p.8, erroneously as ‘Dahliaeflora Alba’, No description. Originated in Italy. (Believed
extinct.)
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Dahliiflora Coccinea. (C.japonica), Baumann, Mulhouse Nursery Catalogue, 1841-1842, p.13 erroneously as ‘Dahliaeflora Coccinea’. No description. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Dahliiflora Nivea. (C.japonica), Jacob Makoy et Cie Catalogue, 1842, p.9, erroneously as ‘Dahliaeflora
Nivea’. No description. Geldorf, Const., 1844, Catalogue of Plants and Price List, p.5, as
‘Dahliaeflora Nivea’: Very double, white with revolute petals. Originated in Italy.
Dahliiflora Rosea. (C.japonica), Anonymous, Jun.1839, Revue Horticole, p.205-207 as ‘Dahliaeflora
Rosea’. No description. Charles van Geert , 1846, Catalogue Général, p.65: Beautiful
imbricated, dark pink. First class. Orthographic errors; ‘Dahliaeflora Rosea’, ‘Dahlaeiflora
Rosea’. Originated in Italy.
Dahliiflora (Seavey). (C.japonica), SCCS., 1954, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.38
invalidly and erroneously as ‘Dahliaeflora’: Raspberry red with darker veining. Medium
semidouble, peony to anemone forms with centre petals, pointed and swirled as in a dahlia.
Vigorous, compact growth. Mid-season blooming. Originated by T.H. Seavey, Alhambra,
California, USA.
Dahlohnega. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1986, p.189, Reg. No.1995: A small to
medium size, Canary yellow formal double C.japonica, (Witman’s Yellow x [seedling x
(Elizabeth Boardman x Colonial Dame)]), mid-season blooming; originated by W.F.
Homeyer Jr., Macon, Georgia, USA. The 11 year old seedling first bloomed 1983. Average
flower size 7.5 cm across x 1.6 cm deep with 85 petals and 21 smaller central petals. Plant
growth is upright, average, open and slow with dark green leaves, 10.5 cm long x 5.5 cm
wide. Synonym: ‘Nuccio’s Golden Anniversary’. Chinese synonym: ‘Huangda’. See colour
photos: Rear cover, ACS., Feb.1987, The Camellia Journal, vol.42, No.1, and front cover,
SCCS., 1989, The Camellia Review, vol.50, No.4.
Dahong. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.406; Chinese synonym
for the Japan C.japonica Ô-niji.
Dahong Baocha. (Crimson Precious Pearl), (C.japonica), Chang Shao Yun, 1987, Camellias from Zhejiang, p.70, 72: An excellent cultivar like Huabaozhu but a scarlet anemone form with less
petaloids, smoother on the petal margins. Leaves darker, thinner and shorter than
Huabaozhu. Note: This cultivar is different to Wuhe Pengqui whose synonym, ‘Dahong
Baozhu’, is only a local name in Shaoxin. To avoid confusion, Chang, in her book, used the
Hangzhou name instead. See colour photo, Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia in China,
No.117. Synonyms: Jinpan Lizhi’, ‘Wuhe Pengqiu’ and ‘Hongbaozhu’. Originated in China.
Dahong Bao Ta. (C.japonica), Collected Papers, ICS Congress, Falmouth, 2008, Genetic Analysis on
20 Camellia Varieties by ISSR Markers, Sui Ni and Jiyuan Li; Bright red. Semi-double form.
From Wenzhou and Hongzhou.
Dahong Cha. (Crimson Camellia), (C.reticulata), Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia in China, p.61,
No.412, colour photo No.269: Large size, 12-16 cm across, crimson, semi-double with 25-30
large, rounded, incurved petals and a small, central stamen cluster. Blooms mid-season.
Leaves large, elliptic, channelled, serrulate, deep green. Similar to Shizitou except that the
flowers are a little smaller and a deeper red. Originated in Tengchong County, Yunnan,
China.
Dahong Chuanmudan.
(C.japonica), Chinese Camellia Culture, 2003, Appendix, p.569 as
‘Dahongchuanmudan’. Fast growing shrub. Leaf elliptic, 7-7.5 cm x 3-3.5 cm, middle vein
asymetrical. Flower semi-double to peony, deep red, 8-10 cm diameter. Petals 2-3 rows,
stamen petaloids in centre, irregular arrangement. Flowers mid-season. From Sichuan
Province, China.
Dahong Furong. (Crimson Hibiscus), (C.japonica), Shanghai Botanic Gardens List, 1985. No description. Savige, 1986, International Camellia Journal, No.18, p.107, 108: Light red, irregular,
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peony form, some deeper veining. Centre mass of petaloids with small, twisted petals and
stamens intermixed. Outer petals large, variable and twisted. Originated in China.
Dahong Guiye. (Red Osmanthus Leaf), (C.reticulata),, Tsui Wah Garden, 1974, Chungkuo Shangtung
Moutan, Yunnan Chahua Chanlan. No description. Different readings: ‘Tahungkueiyeh’, ‘Tahung Kuei-yeh’. Originated in China.
Dahong Jinxin. Gao, Jiyin, Ltr January 31st, 1993. Orthographic variation for ‘Jinxin Dahong’.
Synonym for Biejia Cha in the Sichuan Province.
Dahong Juban. (Red Chrysanthemum Petal), (C.reticulata), Chuang, Mao-Chang, 1959, Yunnan Shanchahua. No description. Different readings: ‘Tahungtsueban’, ‘Ta-hung Chû-pan’. Originated
in China.
Dahonglian. (Scarlet Lotus), (C.japonica), Wang & Yü, 1981, Shancha Hua: A medium sized, scarlet
anemone double with 2-3 rows of large, outer, lobed petals and a small, compact centre of
petaloids. Synonyms: ‘Zhongban Baozhu’, ‘Saiyanghong’, ‘Haiyunxia’. See colour pl. Chang
Shao Yun, 1987, Camellias from Zhejiang, p.61 as ‘Haiyunxia’. Originated in China.
Dahong Mudan. (Scarlet Peony), (C.japonica), Wang & Yü, 1981, Shancha Hua: Rose form double to
peony form, medium size crimson. Used as a synonym for Qixinhong. Originated in China.
Dahong Mudan. China Flowers & Horticulture, Jan 2006, No.2, p.49; Chinese synonym for the
C.hiemalis Shishigashira.
Dahongpao. (Bright Red Gown), (C.reticulata), Yü and Bartholomew, 1980, American Camellia
Yearbook, p.13, 24: Different reading: ‘Ta-hung-p’ao’. Western synonym: ‘Bright Red
Gown’; invalidly ‘Crimson Robe’. Feng et al, 1981, Yunnan Shancha Hua:: p.71, colour
photo: Flower deep pink (RHS.CC, 58B), 12-14 cm across with 24-27 petals in 5-6 rows with
a stamen centre, mostly petaloid. Leaves, mid-green, keeled, broad-ovate to sub-orbicular,
apices acuminate, bases bluntly rounded, finely and sharply serrate, 7-11 cm long x 4-7 cm
wide. Flowers midseason. Originated in China at the Kunming Botanic Gardens, Yunnan as a
new cultivar selected from open pollenated seedlings.
Dahongqiu. (Scarlet Ball), (C.japonica), Wang and Yü, 1981, Shancha Hua: A scarlet, full peony of
many small, twisted petals forming a ball shape. Colour photos [p.141], Chang, Shao Yun,
1987, Camellias from Zhejiang, and Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia in China, No.126.
Synonyms: ‘Dahong Shiziqiu’, ‘Zaochun Dahongqiu’. Originated in China.
Dahong Shiziqiu. (Crimson Lion’s Ball), Chang, Shao Yun, 1987, Camellias from Zhejiang, p.31.
Synonym for Dahongqiu.
Dahong Songzike. Chuang, 1958, Yunnan Shanchahua. Different readings: ‘Tahungsungtzeke’,
‘Ta-hung Sung-tzu-k’o’. Synonym: ‘Red Pine Cone Shell’. Synonym for Songzike.
Dahong Wubao. (Crimson Jewel), (C.japonica), Liu, 1959, Chung Kuochu Ming Tichi Chung Hua Hui
as the crimson form of Wubao. Different reading: ‘Ta-hung Wu-p’ao’. Originated in China.
Dahong Xiuqiu. (Scarlet Embroidered Ball), (C.japonica), Shanghai Botanic Gardens List, 1985, No
description. Savige, 1986, International Camellia Journal, No.18, p.108: A red coloured,
complete informal double, spherical, like Debutante in form. See Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The
Camellia in China, p.43, No.234 and colour photo No.127. Originated in China.
Dahua Jinxin. (Large Flower Gold Heart), (C.japonica), Wang & Yü, 1981, Shan Chahua: Light red,
single, with large stamen cluster, medium size, 7-8 cm across, 2 rows 6 petals. See Chang,
Shao Yun, 1987, Camellias from Zhejiang, p.45, colour photo [p.119]. Originated in China.
Dai Kagura. SCCS., 1942, Classification of Camellias, p.3. Different reading for Daikagura, however, in this case used erroneously for Benidaikagura.
Dai Kagura Variegated.
SCCS., 1942, Classification of Camellias, p.3. Synonym for Daikagura.
8
Daianna Wanghou. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.431; Chinese
synonym for the New Zealand C.japonica Queen Diana.
Daiao Meigui.
Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.431; Chinese
synonym for the Australia C.japonica Dionisia Poniatowski Rosea.
Dai-aso.
Different reading for Ô-aso.
Daibai. (Large White), (C.sasanqua), Yang, 1965, Camellia Varieties of Taiwan as ‘Tai Pai’: A large
white, semi-double. Originated in Taiwan.
Daibi.
Daidi.
Chinese synonym for N.Z. C x williamsii Debbie.
Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.431; Chinese synonym for
the USA C.japonica Diddy Mealing.
Daibutsu-sakiwake. (Diversified Flowers of Great Buddha), (C.japonica), Chinka Zufu, (before 1700),
Watanabe, 1968, pl.554: Medium size semi-double to double, white with streaks and dashes
of rose-pink and scarlet, with soft pink at the base of the petals. Centre petals becoming erect.
Originated in Japan. (Believed extinct.)
Daibutsu-sakiwake. (Diversified Flowers of Great Buddha), (C.japonica), Chinka Zufu, (before 1700),
Watanabe, 1969, pl.569: Medium size white, rose form double with yellow cast at the base of
the petals with dispersed stamens. Originated in Japan. (Believed extinct.)
Daibutsu-usuiro. Synonym for Daibutsu-usuiro-sazanka.
Daibutsu-usuiro-sazanka. (Pale Coloured Great Buddha Sasanqua), (C.sasanqua), Chinka Zufu, (before
1700), Watanabe, 1969, pl.506: Large white washed heliotrope pink on petal margins, 5
petals, short stamen cluster, brown anthers. Synonym: ‘Daibutsu-usuiro’. Originated in Japan.
(Believed extinct.)
Daibyakuren.
Different reading for Ô-shirahasu.
Daichirimen. Different reading for ‘Ohchirimen’, (Ô-chirimen).
Daidôzan. (Mount Daidô), (C.sasanqua), Satomi, 1958, Nomenclature List of Sasanqua of Japan, p.8 as
‘Daido-zan’: Pure pink. Large single with round petals. Originated in Japan.
Daifu Boshi. Gao, Jiyin, 1998, The World's Best Camellia Cultivars, p.107. Chinese synonym for
Doctor Dave, as ‘Dr Dave’.
Daifukkô. Sebundô Shinkôsha, 1979, Senchinshû, p.206. Different reading for ‘Daifuku-beni; synonym for Kakuju. This is a local name in Toyama Prefecture.
Daifuku-beni.
Synonym for Kakuju.
Daifukurin. (Large White Border), (C.japonica), Kasuya Kamegorô, 1859, Tsubaki Irohanayose Irotsuki
in the section on variegated leaves. Itô, Ko’emon, 1879, Chinka Shu: A variegated leaf
Camellia. Flowers are small rose red singles. Originated in Japan. Different readings:
‘Ohfukurin’, ‘Daihukurin’. See JCS., 1969, Tsubaki, No,7, p.37.
Daigo. (Deep Taste). (C.japonica), Nippon Tsubaki - Sasanqua Meikan, 1998, p.152 with colour photo;
English translation p.104. Medium size, vermilion, bowl-shaped single, round and thick
petals, circular stamens. Flowers mid-season to late. Leaves elliptic, medium size, somewhat
waved. Spreading, vigorous growth. A chance seedling, originated and released by Fumio
Naitô in 1973. From Hyogô Prefecture.
Daigokuden. (Main Imperial Palace Building), (C.japonica), Satô, 1975. Chûbu no Tsubaki, p.74, colour
photo: Medium size, campanulate, deep crimson single, 6-7 large outer petals, compact
cylinder of stamens, golden anthers, very pale cream filaments. Leaves, dark green, elliptical
with blunt acute apex, serrate margins. Blooms late season. Originated in the Chûbu area,
9
Japan. A chance seedling, originated and released by Fumio Naitô in 1973. See also colour
photo, Sebundô Shinkôsha, 1979, Senchinshû, p.93.
Daihaku. (Large White), (C.japonica), Mizuno, Motokatsu, 1681, Kadan Kômoku: Large, white semidouble. See JCS., 1965, Tsubaki, No.5, p.29. Shirai, 1926, Scientific Japan. Past and Present,
p.213-227. Different reading: ‘Ôhaku’. Originated in Japan. (Believed extinct.)
Daihakkan.
Sebundô Shinkôsha, 1979, Senchinshû, p.93. Different reading for Daihakukan.
Daihakukan. (Large White Diadem), (C.japonica), Satô, 1975, Chûbu no Tsubaki, p.70: Medium size,
cup shaped, pale flesh coloured to white single with a Higo-like stamen cluster, pale yellow
anthers and white filaments. Leaves, wide-ovate, dark, dull green, shallow serrations, sharp
apex. Originated in Inazawa City, Aichi Prefecture,, Japan. See p.93 & 229, Sebundô
Shinkôsha, 1979, Senchinshû as ‘Daihakkan’. Named by Toshiaki Kosaki in 1963, released
by Yoshiaki Itô.
Daihakuren.
Itô, Ihei, 1695, Kadan Chikinshô. Different reading for Ô-shirahasu.
Daihakuren. (Great White Lotus), (C.japonica), Tuyama, 1966, Camellia Cultivars of Japan, p.96, and
1968, Camellias of Japan, pl.21, p.11 as ‘Dai-haku-ren’, p.91 description: Leaves, broadly
oblong or oblong-elliptic, shortly acuminate, with glabrous petioles. Flowers single, pure
white; petals roundish, crimped at margin. Stamens cylindrical, pale yellow anthers, white
filaments. The Kadan Chikinshô variety is read as ‘Ôshirahasu’ and is obsolete; Tuyama’s
Camellia is a modern one, originated in Sofue-chô, Nakajima-gun, Aichi Prefecture, Japan in
1933. The Chinese reading is ‘Daibaihe’.
Daihannya. (Great Wisdom Personified), (C.japonica), Chinka Zufu, (before 1700), Watanabe, 1969,
pl.213, 559: Large white single with creped, irregular margins and Higo-like stamens. Originated in Japan. Different reading: ‘Ohannya’. Resembles Yukimiguruma. (Believed extinct.)
Daihassaku. (Great Hassaku). (C.japonica), Nippon Tsubaki - Sasanqua Meikan, 1998, p.154 with colour
photo; English translation p.106. Medium size, red vertical stripes on pink ground, trumpet
shaped single, cylindrical stamen column. Flowers mid-season to late. Leaves elliptic,
medium size, waved. Upright growth. A chance seedling of Hassaku-shibori. Originated and
named by Katsuomi Inoue, released by the Kagawa Branch of the JCS in 1997. From Kagawa
Prefecture.
Daihassu.
Chugai Catalogue, 1939-1940. Synonym for Dewatairin.
Daihiryû. (Great Scarlet Dragon), (C.sasanqua), Yôshun-en Engei Hôchi, 1954, No.586, p.26: Scarlet,
large. Winter blooming. Originated in Japan.
Daihiryû-nishiki. (Great Scarlet Dragon Brocade), (C.sasanqua), Yôshun-en Engei Hôchi, 1955,
No.589, p.19: Large red with white spots. Winter blooming. Originated in Japan.
Daihôkan. (Great Treasure Diadem), (C.japonica), Yokoyama & Kirino, 1989, Nihon no Chinka, p.252,
description, p.253, colour photo: Medium size, blush pink ground, finely peppered with red,
wide campanulate single, with 5 broad, rounded, overlapping, crinkled and reflexed petals,
and a broad central stamen cylinder with creamy filaments, joined for the lower third, and
dark yellow anthers. Blooms very early to mid-season. Leaves dark green, broad ovate, apices
abruptly blunt-acute, margins serrate. Originated in the Gifu Prefecture, Japan. Believed to be
a seedling of Kamo-honnami. Nippon Tsubaki - Sasanqua Meikan, 1998, p.154 with colour
photo; English translation p.105. History obscure, a tree surviving with a private family in
Gifu City. Named by Nagaharu Niwa in 1984, released by Gifu Camellia Club.
Daihô-wabishin. (Great Treasure - Degenerated stamens), (Wabisuke), JCS., 1988, Japan Camellia,
No.28, p.13, colour photo: Small size, rose-pink, campanulate single of 6 petals; 3 outer,
smaller and 3 inner, larger, channelled, somewhat reflexed. Stamen cluster smallish, compact,
white, infertile. Leaves long-elliptic, dark green. Selected from wild camellias on Gotô Island,
10
Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. Discovered by Shigeru Terawaki in 1983, named and released by
Yûichi Fujita.
Daihukurin. Watanabe, 1970, Kyôto Engei Kurabu, Tsubaki, Tokushû, No.10, p.117. Different
reading for ‘Daifukurin’.
Daii.
Different reading for Ô-i.
Daijohkan.
SCCS., 1978, Camellia Nomenclature, p.43. Different reading for Daijôkan.
Daijôkan. (Large Castle Crown), (C.japonica), Chûbu Tsubaki Kyôkai, 1964, Tsubaki Meikan; Tuyama,
1966, Camellia Cultivars of Japan, No.74, p.128; Tuyama, 1968, Camellias of Japan, pl.45,
p.98: Upright with lax branches. Leaves narrowly elliptic, pale green, thin texture, veins
impressed; petioles glabrous. Flowers, pure white, petals narrow, 20 or more, a little plicated
along the middle and arcuated outward from the middle, having the nature of a Magnolia
flowering variety. Petals tend to fall as flower ages. Filaments cylindrical, white. Late
flowering. Originated in the Castle of Nagoya, Japan and first released in 1964. Different
readings: ‘Daijohkan’, ‘Daijyôkan’. Chinese synonym: ‘Dajiaokan’. See p.112, pl.234 &
p.325, 1972, Encyclopedia of Camellias in Colour; p.107, Satô, 1975, Chûbu no Tsubaki and
p.94 & 229, Sebundô Shinkôsha, 1979, Senchinshû, also p.296, Yokoyama & Kirino, 1989,
Nihon no Chinka. Synonym: ‘Goten-tsubaki’ which was the local name in Nagoya, meaning
palace camellia, and which was prohibited from being taken outside the castle. Gao, Jiyin,
2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.406; Chinese synonym ‘Dachengguan’.
Daijyôkan.
Satô, 1975, Chûbu no Tsubaki, p.107. Different reading for Daijôkan.
Daikagura. (Great Sacred Dance), (C.japonica), Kasuya, Kamegorô, 1859, Tsubaki Irohanayose
Irotsuki: Red, semi-double in 2-3 rows, very large, stamens spread in a ring form; early
blooming. Originated in Japan. (Believed extinct.) See JCS., 1969, Tsubaki, No.7, p.26.
Daikagura. (Great Sacred Dance), (C.japonica), Itô, Tokuemon, 1788, Tsubaki Hanagata Tsuki
Obo’echô; Shirai-Bunko, 1789, Shoshiki Hanagatachô: Red, peony form, large size, double.
Blooms early. Kasuya, Kamegorô, 1859, Tsubaki Irohanayose Irotsuki, list two different
cultivars of this name. One is that above, the other is described as a new cultivar. See JCS.,
1969, Tsubaki, No.7, p.35. Uesa, 1844, Sômoku Benran; Itô, Ko’emon, 1879, Chinka Shû:
Cardinal red mottled white, medium size, peony form, 9-11 cm across. Very early to
mid-season flowering. Large, dull green foliage, slow tall growth. Hertrich, 1954, Camellias
in the Huntington Gardens, vol.I, p.94: This cultivar is extremely variable as to colour and
form. Normally it is deep pink to carmine rose, blotched white, about 11 cm in diameter x 5.5
cm deep. In some strains it is more nearly white moired pink. The flower is a peony form,
incomplete double with notched, wavy and recurved petals. The centre of the bloom is an
irregular mass of various sized petaloids, mixed with and joined to, 4 or 5 groups of stamens.
It has typical elliptic to wide-elliptic, coarsely serrated and definitely veined, thick leaves with
an abrupt acuminate apex. Leaves sometimes show yellow variegation. Originated in Kantô
area, Japan. See colour plates: American Camellia Yearbook, 1949, facing p.51; Camellias by
G.G. Gerbing, 1945, p.51 as ‘Daikagura Variegated’; Hume, 1946, Camellias in America,
p.258. Tuyama, 1966, Camellia Cultivars of Japan, p.62, pl.31; JCS., ed. 1972, Encyclopedia
of Camellias in Colour, p.134, pl.266 & p.335; Sebundô Shinkôsha, 1979, Senchinshû, p.92 &
229. Yokohama & Kirino, 1989, Nihon no Chinka, p.370. Synonyms: ‘Shôjitsu’, ‘Kiyosu’,
‘Daikagura Variegated’, ‘Daikagura Variegata’, ‘Daikagura’(Ward), ‘Seihi’, ‘Lion’s Dance’,
‘Shônichi’, ‘Shôhi”, ‘Shibori-daikagura’, ‘Teruhi’, ‘Ward’s ‘Daikagura Marbled’, Daikagura’,
‘Daikagura Variant’, ‘Daikagure Supreme’, ‘Daikagure’(Ward’s Light), ‘Daikagura Ward’s
Variegated’, ‘Daikagura Special’, ‘Tôbusa’, and erroneously ‘Idaten-shibori’. Different
readings: ‘Dai Kagura’, ‘Taikagura’, ‘Daikakura’. Western corruptions of the Japanese name:
‘Dyka-gura’, ‘Daikgura’, ‘Daikiagura’, ‘Daikaguri’. Sports: Benidaikagura, Benten-kagura,
‘Conrad Hilton’, High Hat. Seedlings: Margaret Hearn, Mrs Josephine M. Hearn, Pink
11
Dawn, Mrs Marie Keating, Indian Summer. Most early American listings of Daikagura
were actually of Benidaikagura, the self red form. Chinese synonyms: ‘Baiban Daikagula’,
‘Taishenle’, and ‘Huamudan’.
Daikagura-Beni.
Benidaikagura.
Daikagura-Kansai.
Killiow Gardens Catalogue, 1985-1986. Orthographic variant for
Tuyama, 1966, Camellia Cultivars of Japan. Synonym for Benidaikagura.
Daikagura Marbled. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.52. Synonym for Daikagura.
Daikagura Pink.
Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2. Synonym for Benidaikagura.
Daikagura Red.
Doty & Doerner, 1954, Catalogue, p.23. Synonym for Benidaikagura.
Daikagura Rose. Griffiths & Strother, 1954, ACS., Nomenclatural Crossreference List. Synonym
for Benidaikagura .
Daikagura Rosea.
Hazlewood Nursey Catalogue, 1949, p.6. synonym for Benidaikagura.
Daikagura Shell Pink. Butterfield, 1952, Camellia Culture for the Home Gardener Manual, 5:19.
Synonym for High Hat.
Daikagura Special. Hertrich, 1954, Camellias in the Huntington Gardens, vol.I, p.97. Synonym for
Daikagura.
Daikagura Supreme.
Daikagura Variant.
Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1963-1964, p.4. Synonym for Daikagura.
Overlook Nursery Catalogue, 1948-1949, p.25. Synonym for Daikagura.
Daikagura Variegata.
Overlook Nursery Catalogue, 1942-1943, p.29. Synonym for Daikagura.
Daikagura Variegated.
Daikagura.
Daikagura (Ward).
McIlhenny, 1937, 600 Varieties of Camellias, p.2. Synonym for
SCCS., 1960, Camellia Nomenclature, p.43. Synonym for Daikagura.
Daikagura (Ward’s Light). Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1964-1965, p.4. Synonym for Daikagura.
Daikagura Ward’s White. Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1962, p.3. Synonym for Shiro-daikagura.
Daikagura Ward’s Variegated.
Thomasville Nurseries Catalogue, 1961. Synonym for Daikagura.
Daikagura White.
McIlhenny, 1941, 700 Varieties of Camellias, p.4. Synonym for
Shiro-daikagura.
Daikagurakyso.
agura.
River View Nursery Catalogue, 1958. Corruption of the Japanese name Daik-
Daikakura.
Yokohama Nursery Catalogue, 1899. Different reading for Daikagura.
Daikanpô.
Different reading for Daikanhô.
Daikanhô. (Appearance of Large Summit), (Higo), ICS., 1990, Japanese Camellia Cultivar List, p.5.
Higo Rokka, [ca.1989], p.32: Large size, 13-15 cm across with 6 petals, white ground with red
variegation. Originated in the Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan. There is confusion between
Taikanhô and Daikanhô. They can both be read as ‘Taikanpô’ or ‘Daikanpô’. Taikanhô is
first listed in Higo Tsubaki Meikan, 1961 by Yoshimura. Another alternative reading
‘Daikanbô’.
Daikarako.
A.J. Mackie Nursery Catalogue, 1963, p.18. Different reading for Ô-karako.
12
Daikichi. (Great Auspice), (C.japonica), Yokoyama & Kirino, 1989, Nihon no Chinka, p.212 colour
photo, p.213, description: Medium size, vivid crimson, wide campanulate single with 7 wide,
crinkled, reflexed petals, and a central stamen column, pinched in at top, pale yellow to
pinkish filaments, joined for the lower half, and yellow anthers. Blooms early to mid-season.
Leaves bright green, broad elliptic, margins obscurely serrate. The original tree is growing in
Kagamihara City, Gifu Prefecture, history obscure. Named by Nagaharu Niwa in 1987,
released by Gifu Camellia Club.
Daikokten. Watanabe, 1970, Kyôto Engei Kurabu, Tsubaki, Tokushû, No.10, p.117. Orthographic
error for Daikokuten.
Daikokuten. (God of Wealth), (C.japonica), Tuyama, 1966, Camellia Cultivars of Japan, p.192, pl.113:
Dark red semi-double, having deeper veining and 4-5 rows of petals and, in the centre, an
irregular group of poor stamens. Orthographic error: ‘Daikokten’. Originated in
Takarazuki-shi, Hyôgo Prefecture, Japan.
Daikokuji. (Daikoku Temple), (C.japonica), Hamamatsu, Utakuni, 1825, Setsuyô Kikan, vol.23. No
description. Originated in Japan. (Believed extinct.)
Dai-mokkô.
Tomita et al., Heibonsha, 1980, Tsubaki, p.137. Different reading for Ô-mokkô.
Daimonji. (Mountain name in Kyôto), (C.japonica), Chinka Zufu, (before 1700), Watanabe, 1969, pl.84
& 441: Small, irregular, five petalled single; soft pink, red splashed. (Believed extinct),
Originated in Japan. On 16 August, a huge firelit character for “dai-great” is a spectacular
sight on the slope of Mt. Nyoigatake near Kyôto. This event is called “Daimonji” for short.
Daimonji. (Mountain name in Kyôto), (C.sasanqua), Fuji-en Nursery Catalogue, 1955: Pink. Large,
blooms very early. Originated in Japan.
Daimio.
Hanger, 1956, Wisley Camellia List. Synonym for Daimyô-nishiki.
Daimyô-nishiki. (Brocade of Feudal Lord), (C.sasanqua), Wada, 1941, Garden Treasures of Japan;
Satomi, 1958, Nomenclature List of Sasanqua of Japan, p.8: Semi-double, autumn flowering.
A red, striped white, medium size. Originated in Japan. Orthographic error: ‘Diamyo-nishiki’.
Dainagon. (Second Rank Court Official), (C.japonica), Mainichi Shinbun, 1971, JCS., ed. Tsubaki;
Yokoyama et al. 1975, Gendai Tsubaki Meikan, p.154, our photo; Seibundô Shinkôsha, 1979,
Senchinshû, p.94, Colour photo, p.229, description: A soft pink semi-double, 9-10 cm across,
4 rows of 20 guard petals, transparent and with creped margins; a small column of light
yellow stamens. Leaves, thick, lanceolate-elliptic with long acuminated apex and shallow
serrations. Originated in Japan. Its old name was ‘Chûbu-hanafûki’. Originated and named by
Minoru Satô in 1970.
Dainichi-no-akebono. (Dawn on Mt. Dainichi-dake), (C.japonica). The name refers to the “Dainichi
Buddha” “Mahârairocanasatathâga”: Kamo Zenji. 1967, Kyôto Engei Kurabu, Tsubaki,
Tokushû, No.8; Encyclopedia of Camellias in Colour, vol.1, 1972, pl.45, p.53; Seibundô
Shinkôsha, 1979, Senchinshû, p.94, colour photo: Spherical formed single pink, very small
flower, 3-4 cm in diameter, mid-yellow stamen cluster, with white filaments. Blooms early to
mid-season. Leaves, broad-oval, blunt, recurved apex, coarse, shallow serrations, gently
wavy. See p.72, Yokoyama & Kirino, 1989, Nihon no Chinka. Originated in Takaoka-shi’,
Toyama Prefecture, Japan. Originated by Zenji Kamo, named by Sukekurô Satô in 1962.
Dainiji. Katayama Catalogue, 1960; Encyclopedia of Camellias in Colour, vol. l, 1972, pl.136,
p.81 ; Sebundô Shinkôsha, 1979, Senchinshû, p.205. Synonym for Oridono-nishiki.
Dainikakehashi. (Second Suspension Bridge), (Higo), Tamura, Teruo, 1956, Higotsubaki Shinkaki, (9)
:33-34: Red spots on white background. Large size. Originated in Japan.
Daintiness. (C.x williamsii), Camellia Lodge, 1971, Nursery Catalogue. Trehane Nursery Catalogue,
1972-1973; New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1975, vol.lX, No.1, P.28, Reg. No.96:
13
C.saluenensis x C.japonica ‘Magnoliiflora’. (Hagoromo) Salmon pink, large semi-double of
12 petals, 12 cm across. Yellow anthers, white filaments. Medium, open growth. Flowers
mid-season. Colour is in the Red-Purple Group, 62C veined 62A-B. Originated by L.E. Jury,
New Zealand. Received RHS., “Award of Merit”, 1986, Rhododendrons with Magnolias and
Camellias, p.87. Colour photo, Front cover, New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, vol.X, No.2,
1977.
Daintree Seivers.
SCCS., 1962, Camellia Nomenclature. Orthographic error for Daintrie Sievers.
Daintri Sievers.
Sievers.
Trehane Camellia Nursery Catalogue, 1972. Orthographic error for Daintrie
Daintrie Sievers. (C.japonica), Outteridge, 1962, 1000 Named Camellias in Australia erroneously as
‘Daintree Seivers’: Pink. Double centre or waratah form. Large. Late flowering. Originated by
Keith Brushfield, Kewita, Gosford, N.S.W., Australia. Orthographic errors: ‘Daintri Sievers’,
‘Daintree Seivers’, ‘Daintree Sievers’.
Dainty. (C.japonica), Overlook Nursery Catalogue, 1939-1940, p.19: “This is the first year we have put
this variety on the market. The single flower, 7.5-8.5 cm across is bell-shaped. It has 5 petals
of soft pink and numerous, yellow stamens.” Originated by Pfingstl, USA. See photo p.164,
Sharp’s Camellias Illustrated, 1957. Synonym: ‘Dainty’(South). Two other Camellias have
invalidly been named ‘Dainty’. See ‘Dainty’(California) and ‘Dainty’ (Oregon).
Dainty Bess. (C.sasanqua), Fruitland Nursery Catalogue, 1948-1949, p.32: A salmon pink, medium size,
single sasanqua originated by T. Kiyono, USA.
Dainty Bess Rose. (C.sasanqua), Fruitland Nursery Catalogue, 1951-1952, p.29. No description. Originated in USA.
Dainty (California). (C.japonica), The Pacific Camellia Society, 1945, Camellia Nomenclature, p.10
invalidly as ‘Dainty’; SCCS., 1947, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature: Sport of
Tricolor, (‘Ezo-nishiki’) blush white striped red with fringed and ruffled petals. Vigorous,
upright growth. Mid-season blooming. Originated by E.H. Carter, Monterey Park, California,
USA. See black and white photo, Hertrich, 1959, Camellias in the Huntington Garden,
vol.III, p.59. Chinese synonym: ‘Xiuli’.
Dainty Dale. (C.hybrid), American Camellia Yearbook, 1962-1963, p.216, Reg. No.652: 7 year old
hybrid seedling of Robbie x Dr Tinsley that first bloomed 1957; originated by V.R. James,
Aptos, California, USA. Plant growth is upright, dense and rapid with dark green leaves, 9 cm
long by 4 cm wide. The loose, peony form to semi-double flower, 11 cm across by 7 cm deep,
is shaded orchid pink with yellow anthers and filaments. Blooms have 35 petals and are
shaded to a deeped coloured petallage. Flowers mid-season to late.
Dainty Maid. Platt, 1970, RHS., The Rhododendron and Camellia Yearbook, p.160. Orthographic
error for Dainty Maiden.
Dainty Maiden. (C.japonica), Waterhouse, 1952, Camellia Trail, p.30: Medium size, semi-double to
informal double of Rhodamine Pink. (RHS.CC.,527/3). A seedling of Suibijin, originated by
E.G. Waterhouse, Gordon, NSW, Australia. Received an RHS. “Preliminary Commendation”
in 1967. Orthographic error: ‘Dainty Maid’.
Dainty Miss. (C.japonica), McCaskill Gardens Catalogue, 1948: Soft pink at the base of the petals
merging into darker pink at the margins, due to deep pink veining. A medium sized, rose form
double with loose, heart shaped petals. Vigorous, spreading growth. Leaves mid-green, elliptic, acuminate, slightly serrate, 8 cm long by 3.6 cm wide. Mid-season flowering. A seedling
of Akebono originated by V. McCaskill, California, USA. See black and white photo,
Hertich, 1959, Camellias in the Huntington Gardens, vol.III, p.60. Sport: Dainty Miss
Variegated.
14
Dainty Miss Variegated. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1960, Camellia Nomeclature, p.43 as ‘Dainty Miss Var.’:
A virus variegated form of Dainty Miss - Soft pink and white. Originated at McCaskill
Gardens, Pasadena, California.
Dainty (Oregon). (C.japonica), Portland Camellia Nursery Catalogue, 1948-1949 invalidly as ‘Dainty’;
SCCS., 1950, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.31: White. Medium size, formal
double. Late blooming. Originated in Oregon, USA.
Dainty Pink. (C.japonica), Blackwell Nursery Inc. Catalogue, 1957. No description. Originated in USA.
Dainty Red. Domoto Nursery Catalogue, 1956. A sport of Dainty (California). Probably synonymous with Fred Sander.
Dainty Rosea.
Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.52. A sport of Dainty (California). Synonym for Fred Sander.
Dainty (South).
SCCS, 1947, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature as ‘Dainty’(So),
changed to ‘Dainty’(South) in later editions. Synonym for Dainty.
Dairan. Watanabe, 1960, Kyôto Engei Kurabu, Tsubaki Tokushû, No.1, p.52. Different reading for
‘Ohmidare’.
Dairenge.
Different reading for Ôrenge.
Daisen. (Great Wizard), (C.rusticana), Yokoyama, 1975, Gendai Tsubaki Meikan, p.154, black and white
photo; Seibundô Shinkôsha, 1979, Senchinshû, p.93, colour photo, p.229, description: Dark
red. Medium size single, 8 petals, spreading stamen cluster with golden anthers. Blooms early
to late. Leaves, large, ovate to elliptic, abruptly acuminate, sharply serrate. Petioles
tomentose. Tree vigorous lateral growth. Originated in Mitsuke City, Niigata Prefecture,
Japan. Named and released by Yaichi Kawamura in 1966.
Daisen-akadera. (Daisen Red Temple), (C.japonica), ICS., 1990, Japanese Camellia Cultivar List, p.5:
Medium to large size, deep red, tubular single. Blooms mid-season. Originated in the Tottori
Prefecture, Japan. Nippon Tsubaki - Sasanqua Meikan, 1998, p.153 with colour photo;
English translation p.105. Small, deep red, tubular to cup-shaped single, slender petals
cylindrical stamen cluster. Flowers mid-season to late. Leaves elliptic, medium size. Upright,
vigorous growth. Named and released by Nobuo Sasai in 1982.
Daisenbeni. (Red Camellia from Daisen), (C.japonica), Encyclopedia of Camellias in Colour, Vol.II
,1978, p.116, pl.262: Small trumpet shaped, red single of 6-7 petals and compact stamen
cylindrical cluster, yellow anthers. Blooms early to mid-season. Leaves, long-elliptic, caudate,
shallowly serrate, mid-green, raised venation. Selected from wild japonicas growing in the
San-in District, Japan and named by Hisatoshi, Nagami. See: p.93 & 229, Seibundô
Shinkôsha, 1979, Senchinshû and p.194, Yokoyama & Kirino, 1989, Nihon no Chinka.
Different reading: ‘Daisenkô’.
Daisen-fuji-tsukasa-nigô. (Daisen Fujitsukasa No.2), (C.japonica), Yokoyama & Kirino, 1989, Nihon no
Chinka, p.164, colour photo and description: Medium size, light red, with a purplish tinge and
deep red veins. campanulate single with 5 wide, overlapping, emarginate, reflexed petals, a
litle crinkled on the margins, and a slender stamen column with white filaments, joined for the
lower third, and yellow anthers. Blooms mid-season. Leaves, bright, strong green, elliptic,
apices acuminate, margins serrulate. Originated in the Tottori Prefecture, Japan.
Daisenhaku. (White Camellia from Daisen), (C.japonica), Encyclopedia of Camellias in Colour, vol.II,
1978, p.139, pl.335: Small, long, slender, campanulate white single of 6-7 petals and compact
stamen cluster, pinched in at top, pale yellow anthers. Blooms mid to late season. Leaves,
elliptic, apex acuminate, base wedge shaped, mid-green, serrations obscure. See: pp.93, 229,
Seibundô Shinkôsha, 1979, Senchinshû and p.23, Yokoyama & Kirino, 1989, Nihon no
15
Chinka. Originated in Tottori Prefecture, Japan, from an old tree in the Yamakage district.
Named by Nagami, Hisatoshi, Sakaiminato. Different readings: ‘Ôyamajiro’, ‘Ôyamashiro’.
Daisenkô.
Different reading for Daisenbeni.
Daisen-seikô. (Pure Light on Mt. Daisen). (C.japonica), Seibu Maizuru Institute of Botany, 1987-1988,
Seibu no Tsubaki, No.319: Trumpet shaped, dark red single with cylindrical stamens. Small to
medium size. Originated in San’in District, Japan.
Daisen-wabisuke. (Daisen Wabisuke), (C.japonica), Yokoyama & Kirino, 1989, Nihon no Chinka,
p.174, colour photo and description: Very small size, deep red, slender tubular single of 5
petals and small, irregular stamen cluster with some yellow anthers. Blooms mid-season.
Leaves deep green, narrow-elliptic to obolanceolate, apices long acuminate, margins
shallowly or obscurely serrate. Originated in the Tottori Prefecture, Japan. Note: This cultivar
is a C.japonica in spite of its name.
Daisetsuzan. (Great Snowy Mountain), (Higo), Jihe’i, Yoshimura’s Higo Tsubaki Meikan, No.9, 1964;
Encyclopedia of Camellias in Colour, vol.I, 1972, p.65, pl.88; Seibundô Shinkôsha, 1979,
Senchinshû, p.93, colour photo, p.229, description: Large, white Higo camellia; 5-7 large
outer petals, broad, waved. Large, central burst of stamens, golden anthers, pale yellow
filaments. Leaves, dark glossy green, broad-elliptic, finely and sharply serrate, occasionally
with yellow variegation. Originated in Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan.
Daishi-no-chôshi. (Fourth tone), (C.japonica), Sakuden, 1630, Hyakuchinshû. Fourth tone alludes to the
yellow colour tone. This remarkable, ancient cultivar was described as a yellow camellia with
colour like dead leaves. Large size, single with emarginate petals. See Kyôto Engei Kurabu,
1961, Tsubaki Tokushû, No.2, p.114. Different reading: ‘Daiyon-no-chôshi’. (Believed
extinct.) Originated in Japan.
Daishirotama. A.J. Mackie Nursery Catalogue, 1963, p.18 as ‘Dai-Shirotama’. Different reading for
Ô-Shiratama.
Daishizhige.
Shao, Taichong, 1992 The Observations from the Camellia World, p.74, No.265.
Chinese synonym for the USA C.japonica Mrs D.W.Davis Descanso.
Daishôhai. (Large Red Cup), (C.japonica), Kamo Zenji, 1968, Kyôto Engei Kurabu, Tsubaki Tokushû,
No.8, p.32: Dark red. Large single with higo-like spreading stamen cluster. Originated in
Japan by Kamo Zenji. Different reading: ‘Ôshôhai’.
Daishuhai. (Large Sake Cup), (C.japonica), Watanabe, 1960, Kyôto Engei Kurabu, Tsubaki Tokushû,
No.1, p.52 as ‘Dai-syu-hai’. No description. Originated by Kamo, Zenji in Japan. Believed to
be a different cultivar from Ôsakazuki.
Daishuhai. (Large Vermilion Cup), (C.sasanqua), Hakoda, 1974, Nôkôdai Nojôhô, No.6, p.39: Red with
a white base, large, single. Blooms early to mid-season. Originated in Fukuoka Prefecture,
Japan. Different readings: ‘Taishuhai’, ‘Dai-syuhai’. Chinese synonym: ‘Dazhubei’.
Daisy Banks. (C.japonica), Gerbing’s Azalea Gardens Catalogue, 1943-1944 Supplement: Seedling
No.200, named in honor of Mrs J. Banks of Opelika, Alabama. The large, pure white,
tissue-like textured flowers, vary in form from loosely peony semi-double to single, with
stamens intermingled or prominent. Flowers mid-season to late. Foliage, dull green; growth
vigorous and spreading. A white seedling of ‘Alba Superba’ originated by G.G. Gerbing,
Fernandina, Florida, USA, in Camellias, 1945: This new white camellia produced flowers of
variable formation, 11-12.5 cm across. The petals are waved and very thin, almost
transparent. Blooms early. Growth is vigorous, compact and upright. Foliage dull green,
deeply serrate.
Daisy Eagleson. (C.japonica x C.sasanqua), American Camellia Yearbook, 1961, p.220, Reg. No.546:
Camellia japonica x Camellia sasanqua Daisy Eagleson, a graft chimera sport originated by
16
Tom Eagleson, Port Arthur, Texas, USA. A japonica seedling scion grafted onto a Maiden’s
Blush, sasanqua understock. Plant growth is rapid, upright and dense with dark green leaves,
7.5 cm long by 6 cm wide. The rose form double flowers. 6 cm across, are light pink and
white and have 50 petals. Blooms early to mid-season. See Stewart et al., 1972, ‘Camellia
‘Daisy Eagleson’, a graft chimera’, American Journal of Botany, vol.59, No.5, pp.515-524.
Dai-syuhai. Watanabe, 1970, Kyôto Engei Kurabu, Tsubaki Tokushû, No.10, p.117. Different reading for Daishuhai.
Daitairin.
Wada, 1941, Hakoneya Nursery Catalogue. Synonym for Dewatairin.
Daitarin. Portland Camellia Nursery Catalogue, 1945-1946. Corruption of Japanese name
‘Daitairin’, synonym for Dewatairin.
Daitarin Variegated. Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1962-1963, p.3,, as ‘Daitarin Var.’. Orthographic error for ‘Daitairin Variegated’; synonym for Manzairaku.
Daitarine. Portland Camellia Nursery Catalogue, 1946-1947. Corruption of Japanese name
‘Daitairin’, synonym for Dewatairin.
Daiterin.
SCCS Bulletin Vol.11, No.2, p.17, Dec. 1949. Fendig, 1950, American Camellia
Catalogue. Corruption of Japanese name ‘Daitairin’, synonym for Dewatairin.
Daitô. (Large Peach), (C.japonica), Okumura, Shigetarô, ca.1810, Chinka Hin’i. No description. Originated in Japan. (Believed extinct.)
Daitô-shidare. (Large Weeping Peach), (C.rusticana), Seibundô, Shinkôsha, 1979, Senchinshû, p.229:
Peach red, double peony form blossom, large, with divide stamen cluster; mid-season flowering. Leaves, rather large, ovate, serrate, mid-green, petioles hirsute. Plant habit upright and
vigorous but having weak branches so that the heavy flowers hang down. Originated in Mure
Town, Kagawa Prefecture, Japan. Named and released by Saneichi Oyama in 1979.
Daitokuji-shiratama. (‘Shiratama from the Daitokuji Temple). (C.japonica), Yasumori Kanda, 1997,
Interntet site www.fujitsu.co.jp/people/kanda: Medium size, single white of 7 rounded petals
and central brush of anthers. Plant in Jindai Botanical Park, Japan. Nippon Tsubaki Sasanqua Meikan, 1998, p.153 with colour photo; English translation p.105. Small. Flowers
early to mid-season. Collected by Tôjirô Seto in Tokyo, said that the original tree is growing
in Kyoto. Named and released by Shûji Noguchi in 1970. From Kyoto to Tokyo.
Daitokuji-wabisuke. Setoguchi, Hiroshi, 1962. JCS., Tsubaki, No.2, p.5. Synonym for Kochôwabisuke, ‘Hon-wabisuke’as ‘Wabisuke’.
Daiturin.
George Jackman & Son Nursery, 1954-1955, Planter’s Handbook, No.16, p.18.
Corruption of Japanese name ‘Daitairin’, synonmy for Dewatairin.
Daiunji-aka. (Daiun Temple Red), (C.japonica), Usami, Naohachi, (ca.1910), Nagoya Chinzu’e; see
Asai, Keitarô, 1966, Kyôto Engei Kurabu, Tsubaki Tokushû, No.6, p.125. No description.
Originated in the Daiunji Temple, Kyôto, Japan. (Believed extinct.)
Daiunji-shiro. (Daiun Temple White), (C.japonica), Usami, Naohachi, (ca.1910), Nagoya Chinzu’e; see
Asai, Keitarô, 1966, Kyôto Engei Kurabu, Tsubaki Tokushû, No.6, p.125. No description.
Originated in the Daiunji Temple, Kyôto, Japan. (Believed extinct.)
Daiwei Zhi Xing. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.430; Chinese
synonym for the Australian C.japonica Star of David.
Daiweisi Furen.
Gao, Jiyin, Ltr 30 July, 1990. Chinese synonym for Mrs D.W. Davis.
Daixing Shiba Xueshi. (Large Type Eighteen Scholars), (C.japonica), Yang, 1965, Camellia Varieties of
Taiwan as ‘Tad Hsing Shih-pa-hsueh Shih’: Pink, rose form double. Originated in China.
Daiyon-no-chôshi.
Different reading for Daishi-no-chôshi.
17
Dajiangshang.
Gao, Jiyin, Ltr 30 July 1990. Chinese synonym for Grand Prix.
Dajiao Cangyin. (Charming, Great Concealed Silver), (C.japonica), Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia
in China, p.50, No.308, colour photo, No.178: Large size, 8-10 cm across, rose form double,
white with pink patches, 3-4 rows of somewhat irregular emarginate petals, with a centre of
small, erect petals, petaloids and golden stamens. Blooms mid-season to late. Leaves deep
green, elliptic.
Dajiaokan.
Dajin.
Gao, Jiyin, Ltr.30 July, 1990. Chinese synonym for the Japanese Daijôkan
(Large Brocade), Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia in China. p.76, No.563. Chinese
synonym for the Japanese Ô-nishiki.
Dajinsui. (Large Golden Tassel), (C.reticulata), Yü and Bartholomew, 1980, American Camellia
Yearbook, p.10; Feng et al., 1981, Yunnan Shancha Hua, p.36-37, colour plate; Feng et al,
1986, Yunnan Camellias of China, p.36. colour photo and description: Leaves elliptic to
broad-elliptic, 6-8 cm long, 3-4.5 cm wide, apices acuminate, bases cuneate, margins sparsely
and shallowly serrate, reclinate in a V shape, margins of bases undulate. Flowers deep red
(RHS.CC.53C), diameter 10-11 cm. Petals 7-13, slightly reclinate. Stamens numerous, placed
around pistil to form a ring and occupying one third of the flower which gives the appearance
of ears of wheat in the centre of the flower. It flowers in mid-season and was selected from an
open pollinated plant of C.reticulata f. simplex in Tengchong, Yunnan, China. Synonyms:
‘Early Sunshine’, ‘Large Golden Tassel’. Different reading: ‘Ta-chin-sui’.
Dajixiang. (Good Luck). (C.japonica), The World’s Best Camellia Cultivars, 1998, p.37 with colour
photo; , Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.37 with colour photo;
An old cultivar originating in Eastern China. Flowers light red with a few white spots.
Anemone to peony form, medium size, 11-16 large petals, broad-round, wrinkled and waved
at the edges. Small petals and stamens mixed in the centre. Flowers larger than Huafoding,
and have less white spots. Leaves mid-green, elliptic. Spreading plant with average growth.
Flowers mid-season.
Dajixiang. (Good Luck). Chang, Shao Yun, 1987, Camellias of Zhejiang, p.52. Synonym for
Sailuoyang.
Dakate.
Gao, Jiyin, Ltr 25 May 1990. Chinese synonym for Carter’s Sunburst.
Dakota. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, June 2004, p.28, Reg. No.2622. An 8-10 year old
chance seedling originated by Dr Howard Smith, Gainesville, Fla., USA. Flower is 7.5 cm
across, variegated red and white, peony to anemone form with 7 petals and 119 petaloids.
Flowers mid-season to late. American Camellia Yearbook, 2004, p.91. Plant is upright and
open, with average growth rate. Leaves are 9 cm long x 5.7 cm wide.
Dakota Variegated.
Dakota.
Camellia Nomenclature 2006, p.33. Variation of published and valid name
Dale Fitzgerald. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Mar. 2008, p.C11 with colour photo, Regn
No. 2710. A seedling of Moonlight Bay, first flowered 2000. Originated and propagated by
Jerry Conrad, Erinon Nurseries, Plymouth, Fla., USA. A 12.7 cm diameter, rose pink, peony
form flower with central yellow anthers on cream filaments. Heavy petal texture, and flowers
early to mid-season. Plant is upright, dense and vigorous. American Camellia Yearbook,
2008, p.109 with colour photo; Dark green leaves 10 cm x 5 cm.
Daleni.
Longone Catalogue, 1846. Orthographic error for ‘Dahlenii’.
Dali. (Big Oriole). (C.tunghinensis). Collected Papers, International Convention on C.chrysantha; “A
sum-up Report” by Cheng, Jinshu et al. A special clone of C.tunghinensis selected in the wild
for breeding purposes.
Dali Baozhu.
Fang, 1930, Tiannan Chahua Xiaozhi. Synonym for Dali Cha.
18
Dali Butterfly Wings. Bao, 1980, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.35, No.2, p.18. Western
synonym for Dali Diechi.
Dali Camellia.
Feng et al., 1981, Yunnan Shancha Hua, p.143. Synonym for Dali Cha.
Dali Cha. (Dali Camellia), (C.reticulata), Yü, 1950, RHS., Camellias and Magnolias Conference Report,
pp.13-25 as ‘Talicha’ or ‘Queen of Tali’. Feng et al., 1986, Yunnan Camellias of China, p.98,
colour plate and description: Leaves large, thick, broad-ovate to elliptic-ovate, apices acute or
acuminate, bases rounded or broad-cuneate, flat or slightly raised, margins undulate, 7.6-10
cm long, 5-6 cm wide. Flowers bright red, becoming lighter after opening (RHS.CC.53D)
diameter 12-22 cm, forming a spherical corolla. Petals about 30 in 4-5 whorls, outer petals
flat, inner whorls folded, rolled and erect, forming a globular flower. Stamens numerous,
united to form a tube or divided into several groups by rolled petals. Pistils mostly well
developed, a few rudimetary, fertile. The flowers af this cultivar are large and gorgeous and
are the largest amongst the Yunnan reticulatas with a diameter up to 22 cm. It has large, thick
leaves, strong axillary bud growth and a loose branching pattern. It flowers early to
mid-season. There is a large, old tree of this cultivar in Dapingdi, Guangtong, Yunnan,
estimated to be several hundred years old. Western synonym: ‘Tali Queen’. Other synonyms:
‘Tali Camellia’, ‘Queen of Tali’, ‘Dali Camellia’, ‘Dali Baozhu’. Different readings: ‘Ta-li
Ch’a’, ‘Dalicha’.
Dali Diechi. (Dali Butterfly Wings), (C.reticulata), Yü & Bartholomew, 1980, ACS., The Camellia
Journal, vol.35, No.2, p.20; Feng et al., 1986, Yunnan Camellias of China, p.64 colour plate
and description: Leaves ovate to broad-ovate, flat or slightly reclinate, apices short pointed or
acute, bases obtusely rounded or broad-cuneate, 6-7.7 cm long, 4.5-5.8 cm wide. Flowers
deep pink (RHS.CC.53C-D), diameter 10-13 cm. Petals about 16 in 3-4 whorls, outer whorls
large, slightly curved, inner whorls smaller, curved. Stamens numerous, inconspicuously
divided into several groups placed amongst curved petals. Pistils well developed, fertile. This
is a new cultivar selected from seedlings of Dali Cha by researchers of the Kunming Botanic
Gardens. Flowers early to mid-season. Synonyms: ‘Dali Butterfly Wings’, ‘Tali Butterfly
Wings’, ‘Hudiecha’. Different reading: ‘Ta-li Tieh-ch’ih’.
Dali Mudan. (Dali Peony), (C.reticulata), Fang, 1930, Tainnan Chahua Xiaozhi: Similar to Mudan Cha
but the petals are simpler. Originated in Yunnan, China.
Dali Peony.
Bartholomew, 1982, American Camellia Yearbook, p.150. Synonym for Dali Mudan.
Dali Precious Pearl. Bartholomew, 1982, American Camellia Yearbook, p.150. Synonym for ‘Dali
Baozhu’.
Dalicha.
Feng et al., 1981, Yunnan Shancha Hua. Different reading from Dali Cha.
Dalia Flora (OJgnen). Sacco, 1832-1834, according to Schiavone, 1981, Il Giardino nel Camelie,
pl.12. Orthographic error for ‘Dahliaeflora Ignea’, synonym for Ignescens.
Daliaeflora Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.10. Orthographic error
for ‘Dahliiflora’, synonym for Ignescens.
Dalhiaeflora Nova. Franco Agostini, 1844, Catalogo Plantarum... Orthographic error for ‘Dahliiflora’, synonym for Ignescens.
Dalhiaflora.
Dartington Hall Garden Catalogue, 1966, p.2. Orthographic error for Dahliiflora.
Dalieflora.
Isola Madre Catalogue, 1845. Orthographic error for ‘Dahliiflora’, synonym for
Ignescens.
Dalieflora Rosea.
Isola Madre Catalogue, 1845. Orthographic error for Dahliiflora Rosea.
19
Dallas. (C.reticulata), Kramer Bros. Nursery Catalogue, 1977: Orchid pink. Large semi-double to loose
peony form. Open growth. Flowers mid-season to late. A chance reticulata seedling originated
by Kramer Bros, Upland, California, USA.
Dallas Pratt. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1974, vol.II, p.231, Reg. No.1311: A 9 year
old chance seedling that first bloomed 1966; originated by Mrs W.K. Laughlin, Aiken, South
Carolina, USA. Plant growth, upright, medium in rate with dark green leaves, 10 cm x 5 cm.
The anemone form, Elegans type bloom is medium pink. Average size, 11 cm across by 6 cm
deep with 12 petaloids, yellow anthers and white filaments. White splashed petaloids. Blooms
early to mid-season.
Dallas Price. (C.reticulata), American Camellia Yearbook, 1984, p.176, Reg. No.1937: A large, dark red,
rose form double to semi-double C.reticulata (‘Crimson Robe’ (Dataohong) x Arch of Triumph), mid-season to late flowering. Originated by Frank Pursel, Oakland, California, USA.
The 6 year old seedling first bloomed 1978. Average flower size 12.5 cm wide by 4 cm deep.
Plant growth is upright and rapid in rate with dark green leaves, 11 cm x 6 cm.
Dalleni. Baumann, Mulhouse Catalogue, 1841-1842, p.13. Orthographic error for Dahlenii’, synonym for Rathmoreana.
Dallenii. Robert Tyas, 1843, Popular Flowers, p.85. Orthographic error for ‘Dahlenii’, synonym
for Rathmoreana.
Dallich. (C.japonica), Seidel, 1846, Pflanzen Catalog , p.6. Originated in Germany. No description .
(Believed extinct ).
Dalu Jiuqu. (Nine Bends in Mainland), (C.edithae hybrid). Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification
....Outstanding Camellias, p.306 with colour photo; Originated in Fujian Province, China.
Previously known as ‘Jiuqu’, and renamed by Professor Gao to distinguish it from another
‘Jiuqu’, belonging to Taiwan, now named Taiwan Jiuqu. Flowers deep pink, formal double,
small to medium size, petals obcordate, regularly arranged, tips pointed, sparse flowering.
Leaves dark green, cardioid at the base, sunken veins, long pubescence on back surfaces.
Spreading plant, tender shoots with long and dense pubescences. Vigorous growth. Late
flowering.
Dama de Pao. Ingram, 1951,-American Camellia Yearbook-, p.97. Orthographic error for Dama
do Paço.
Dama de Tollo. (C.japonica) Camelia, Soc. Española de la Camelia, Dec. 2011, p.41 with colour photo;
A medium size, rose form double, 7.5-9.5 cm diameter x 4 cm deep with 40-55 petals and 1-7
central petaloids. 0-11 stamens with cream filaments and yellow anthers. Flower colour red
(RHSCC 054A). Leaf dark green (RHSCC 147A), 8 cm x 4.5 cm, elliptic, margins serrated,
apices pointed. Late flowering. A seedling of Katie, first flowered 2005. Originated by
Leonor Magariños, Viveros Rio Tollo, Spain.
Dama del Pazo. (C.japonica), Escuela de Agricultura de Pontevedra , 1882, Catalogue: Formal
double. Delicate pink with paler centre. Originated in Portugal. Spanish translation of Dama
do Paço. (Before Nomenclature Rules would have made illegal).
Dama do Paço. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.30, & No.9,
1872-1873,p.42: Formal double. Delicate pink with paler centre, striped with white.
Originated in Portugal. Spanish translation; ‘Dama del Pazo’. Orthographic errors: ‘Dama de
Pao’, ‘Dama do Passo’.
Damana Novella. Waterhouse, 1952, American Camellia Yearbook, p.31. Orthographic error for
Damiana Novella.
Damanao. (Large Cornelian), (C.reticulata), Pa Chung Hua P’u, 1621; Fang, 1930, Tiannan Chahua
Xiaozhu as ‘Hongbai Manao Shizitou’, (White-red Cornelian Lion-head). The shape is like
20
‘Jiuxin Shipaban’. When red predominates it is called ‘Hongmanao’, (Red Cornelian) or
‘Xueshi’, when white predominated it is called ‘Baimanao’, (White Cornelian). This camellia
is a virus variegated form of Shizitou, (‘Lion Head’). As the white variegation is not stable,
names for selected clones cannot be acepted as valid and can only be regarded as synonyms.
Yü in the RHS. Rhododendron and Camellia Conference Report, 1950 gave the names
‘Tarmarnao’ or ‘Large Cornelian’. It was originally released in the USA, erroneously as
‘Lion’s Head’. See colour plate facing p.7, 1950 American Camellia Yearbook and p.153,
Macoboy, 1981, The Colour Dictionary of Camellias. The most complete description and
illustration is given in Feng et al., 1986, Yunnan Camellias of China, p.96: Leaves
oblong-ovate to oblong-obovate, apices acuminate, bases cuneate, slightly reclinate, 6-9 cm
long, 3.3-5 cm wide. Flowers bright red with white, diameter 12-13 cm. Petals about 30 in 4-5
whorls, outer whorls flat, inner whorls folded, curved, erect, forming a spherical flower
centre. Stamens numerous, divided into several groups by folded petals. Pistils often
rudimentary. Fertile. The branches and leaves are very similar to those of Shizitou. The only
difference is that the flower colour of Damanao is red with white. Flowers mid-season.
Synonyms: ‘Hongbai Manao Shizitou’, ‘Xueshi’, ‘Baimanao’, ‘Hongmanao’, ‘Manao’,
‘Large Cornelian’, ‘Cornelian’. Different readings: ‘Ta-ma-nao’, ‘Tarmarnao’, ‘Pai-ma-nao’,
‘Hung-ma-nao’. Originated in Yunnan, China.
Damanguan.
Gao, Jiyin, Ltr 25 May, 1990. Chinese synonym for Grand Slam.
Damanguan Xinzhong.
gated.
Gao, Jiyin Ltr 25 May 1990. Chinese synonym for Grand Slam Varie-
Dame Silvia. (C.japonica hybrid). New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, March 2002, Issue No.141, vol.XXII,
No.5, P.13, Reg. No.442. Registered by J.R. Finlay, Whangarei, New Zealand. A cross
between C.hybrid Fragrant One x C.japonica Scentasia which first flowered in 1999. The
flower, 10 cm diameter x 5 cm deep, may be variable in form, the registration offered
describing it as semi-double, whereas the samples and photos provided best fitted anemone
form. On the samples supplied, there were about 12 petals and 25 petaloids mixed with
partly-visible stamens, and a clear separation between the petal ring and the stamen/petaloid
mass. Colour is an unusual bright scarlet pink, most closely matched to RHS.CC.52A, and the
petals have a distinctive heavy texture. There is a moderate, floral, rose-like scent. The plant
is upright, and of average density and growth rate with dark green leaves 9 cm long x 5 cm
wide. Flowers mid-season to late.
Dameiren. American Camellia Yearbook, 1993, p.37. Chinese synonym for the USA C.japonica
Big Beauty.
Damiana. (C.japonica), Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.10. No description.
Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Damiana Novella. (C.japonica), de Jonghe, 1851, Traité de la Culture du Camellia, p.103 as
‘Damiananovella’: Formal double, imbricated. A beautiful purplish red, with a bright centre.
Said to have been originated by Frére Danien V. Corsi, Italy. Luzzatti, 1851, Collezione di
Camelie, p.31: Circumference, bright rose pink, the petals in the middle, bright, central deep
coloured with a line of white; perfectly imbricated, often in a spiral form. It often has flowers
that are all striped with white. Orthographic errors: ‘Daminia Novella’, ‘Comiana Novella’,
‘Bamiano Novella’, ‘Damana Novella’, ‘Damiana Novello’. Originated in Italy according to
Verschaffelt, 1854, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book X, pl.I as ‘Damina Novella’, where it is
described as: Medium sized, imbricated, outer petals ample, rounded, recurved, a deep cherry
red with a few delicate white stripes; intermediate petals, smaller, oblong, bilobate, their red
colour intersected at the centre by a white streak; those central, smaller, lanceolate, full and of
the same colour as the exterior ones.
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Damiana Novello.
Novella.
Burdin Maggiore & Co. Catalogue, 1862. Orthographic error for Damiana
Damina Novella. Verschaffelt, 1854, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book X, pl.I. Orthographic error for
Damiana Novella.
Damingxing.. Gao, Jiyin, 1998, The World's Best Camellia Cultivars, p.129. Chinese synonym for
Star is Born.
Damio.
Waterer Nursery Catalogue, 1954-1955. Orthographic error for ‘Daimyô’.
Damon Runyon.
Damosel.
Fendig, 1952, American Camellia Catalogue. Synonym for Undaunted.
Hume, 1946, Camellias in America, p.329. Orthographic variant for Damozel.
Damozel. (C.japonica), Magnolia Gardens and Nursery Catalogue, 1942-1943: Light pink. Medium
sized, semi-double with irregular petals. Upright growth. Late blooming. Originated at Magnolia Gardens, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. Orthographic variant: ‘Damosel’.
Dan el Webster.
Guichard Nursery Catalogue, 1910. Orthographic error for Daniel Webster.
Dan Grant. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1966, p.86, Reg. No.858: A 9 years old chance
seedling, that first bloomed 1961; originated by Dr T.A. Grant, Savannah, Georgia, USA.
Plant habit is dense, spreading and rapid in rate with dark green leaves, 9.5 cm long x 5 cm
wide. The light pink flower is semi-double, similar to ‘Herme’ (Hikarugenji) with rabbit
ears. Anthers, yellow and filaments white. Size, 11-12 cm across and 6 cm deep with 26
petals including 8-10 rabbit ears mixed with stamens. Flowers are pale pink with darker
venation and white spots and streaks. Flowers early to late.
Dan Graves. (C.japonica), Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1963-1964, p.4. No description. American
Camellia Yearbook, 1965, p.230, Reg. No. 749: A 5 year old chance seedling, first bloomed
1959; originated by Mrs D. Graves, Bogalusa, Louisiana, USA. Leaves heavily veined,
serrated, dark green, 10 cm x 5 cm. The flower, 11-12.5 cm across and 6 cm deep, is Orient
red (819 Verbena chamaedrifolia - Horticultural Color Chart vol.I). Large, thick petals, heavy
yellow pollen. Blooms midseason. There is a variegated form, Dan Graves Variegated.
Dan Graves Variegated. (C.japonica), Tammia Nursery Catalogue, 1964-1965 as ‘Dan Graves Var.’: A
virus variegated form of Dan Graves - Orient red and white. Originated in USA at the
Tammia Nursery, Slidell, Louisiana.
Dan McCarthy.
SCCS., 1958, Camellia Nomenclature, p.28. Synonym for ‘Horkan’, itself a
synonym for Pompone.
Dan Stewart. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1969, p.159, Reg. No.1037: A 5 year old
chance seedling that first flowered 1962; originated by D.W. Stewart, Jr., Minden, Louisiana,
USA. Plant growth upright, dense and medium in rate with 12.5 cm x 2.5 cm dark green
leaves. The peony form flower, similar to Debutante, is 12.5 cm across and 7 cm deep, rose
pink. Blooms mid-season.
Dana Homeyer. (C.reticulata hybrid), SCCS., 1990, Camellia Nomenclature, p.120: Deep, ruby red,
large size, semi-double to peony form. Vigorous, upright growth. Blooms early to
mid-season. (C.reticulata x C.japonica) x Mouchang. Originated by Dr Homeyer, Macon,
Georgia, USA. ACS., Nov.1989, The Camellia Journal. vol.44, No.4, p.17, Reg. No.2173.
American Camellia Yearbook, 1989, p.120: 10 year old seedling that first bloomed 1986. Size
15 cm across x 7.5 cm deep. Plant growth is upright, average in rate and open, with dark
green leaves, 12.5 cm x 7.5 cm. wide.
Dana Homeyer Variegated. (C.reticulata hybrid) ACS 1992, The Camellia Journal, vol.47, No.4, p.13.
Advert. for Valdosta Camellia scions. A white blotched, virus variegated form of Dana
Homeyer. Originated in USA.
22
Danae. (C.japonica), Halewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.52: Bright crimson. Originated in Australia.
Danbang Yanghong. (Single Pink), (C.japonica), Chang, Shao Yun, 1987, Camellias from Zhejiang,
p.48: Medium size, pink, single. Branches and foliage dense. Leaves dark green, elliptic,
upper surface uneven, lateral veins not prominent. Flowers pink, about 7 cm across. Petals 7
in two rows, unsymetrical, rounded, notched at the apex. Stamens normal, about 100, joined
basally in a cylinder. Pistil normal. Buds long-elliptic, green. Native to Wenzhou, and
introduced to Hangzhou in 1965. Originated in China.
Dance of Heavenly Dragon.
Tenryû-no-mai.
Dance of the Goddess of Luck.
Benten-kagura
Camellias, Y.C. Shen, 2009, p.330 with colour photo; Synonym for
Camellias, Y.C. Shen, 2009, p.56 with colour photo; Synonym for
Danci. de Jonghe, 1851, Traité de la culture du Camellia, p.103. Orthographic error for ‘Dansi’,
synonym for Dryade.
Dancing Blaze. (C.hybrid) ACS, The Camellia Journal, Dec. 2010, p.29 with colour photo; Regn
No.2798. Originated by Neville Haydon, Papakura, New Zealand, registered by E. Hulyn
Smith, Valdosta, Ga., USA. ACS, Yearbook 2010, p.75 with colour photo. A 12 year old
cross of Peggy Burton x Black Magic, which first flowered 2004. Propagated by Mark
Crawford, Valdosta. Spreading habit with slow growth rate. Mid-green leaves are 9 cm x 5
cm. Medium size flower is a dark red semi-double, 8.2 cm diameter x 6.2 cm height, with
yellow anthers and red filaments. Flowers have a heavy, waxy, glowing texture.
Dancing Flame. (C.hybrid). New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, July 2010, p.10; Regn No.486; A cross of
Peggy Burton x Black Magic, made in 1999 and first flowered 2002. Plant is upright, open
foliage when young, and of medium growth rate. Mid-green leaves are 8 cm x 4 cm, with
crinkled and serrated margins like Black Magic. Flower is semi-double, 9 cm x 5 cm, with
16-18 petals and occasionally a few petaloids. Colour is a rich, deep scarlet (RHS.CC. 46B)
and the upstanding petals are fluted and frilled at the edges. Stamens are interspersed with the
petals and have cream filaments and gold anthers. Originated by Neville Haydon, Takanini,
New Zealand.
Dancing Girl. (C.japonica), Hillcrest Nursery Catalogue, 1958. No description. Originated in USA.
Dancing Jishi.
Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.52. Synonym for Arajishi.
Dancing Lady. (C.japonica), Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.52. No description. Originated in USA. (Believed extinct.)
Dancing Sleeve.
Mai-no-sode.
Yashiroda, 1950, American Camellia Yearbook, p.23. Synonym for
Dandahong. (Pale Bright Red), (C.reticulata), Yü & Bartholomew, 1980, ACS., The Camellia Journal,
vol.35, No.2, p.20; Feng et al., 1986, Yunnan Camellias of China, p.70 with colour
illustration: Leaves oblong, thin, flat, apices long-acuminate, bases cuneate to broad-cuneate,
7-10 cm long, 2.7-4.7 cm wide. Flowers light pink (RHS.CC.53D-55A), the flower colour
becoming gradually paler after opening, sometimes with white spots, diameter, 12-13 cm.
Petals about 27 in 4-5 whorls, outer whorls flat and slightly declinate, inner whorls folded and
erect. Stamens numerous, divided into 5-7 groups by curved petals. Pistils well developed or
partly rudimentary, fertile. This is a thin leafed, loosely branched cultivar with open, pliable
branches that are nodding when in bloom. It originated in Xiaguan, Dali, Yunnan, China.
Flowers mid-season. Western Synonym: ‘Pale Bright Red’. Other synonym: ‘Pale Spinel
Pink’. Different reading: ‘Tan-ta-hung’.
23
Danding. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.408; Chinese synonym
for the Japan C.japonica Tanchô.
Dandinghe. (C.reticulata) Fine Camellia Garden, Chuxiong, 2012, p.19 with colour photo. No details.
Photo shows a red, semi-double to rose form double, with a small group of weak central
stamens.
Danel Webster.
McIlhenny, 1935, Catalogue. Orthographic error for Daniel Webster.
Danfen Beidi. (Light Pink Betty).
Gao, Jiyin, 1991, The Observations from the Camellia World,
p.9. Chinese synonym for the USA C.japonica Betty Sheffield Dream.
Danfen Wude.
Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.426; Chinese
synonym for the USA C.japonica Woodville Red Blush.
Danfenbian Mingtian. Shao, Taichong, 1992, The Observations from the Camellia World, p.14.
Chinese synonym for the USA C.japonica Tomorrow Marbury’s Light Pink.
Danfenhong Beidi. (Pink Betty). Gao, Jiyin, 1991, The Observations from the Camellia World, p.9.
Chinese synonym for the USA C.japonica Betty Sheffield Pink.
Danhon.
Waterhouse, 1965, International Camellia Journal, p.26. Taiwanese for Danhong.
Danhong. (Light red), (C.sasanqua), Yang. 1965, Camellia Varieties of Taiwan as ‘Tan-hung’: Pale red
single. Medium size. Originated in Taiwan.
Daniel Fluffy.
Fluffy.
Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1962, p.3.Orthographic error for Daniel’s
Daniel Websler. Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.10. Orthographic
error for Daniel Webster.
Daniel Webster. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1848, 33:14: No description. Catalogue 18481849, 35:36: Carmine with fine lines of white, some petals completely white, others with
broad stripes, perfectly imbricated. Petals well rounded. Berlèse, 1849, Annales de la Société
Central d’Horticulture de Paris, vol.40, p.231: Cherry red carmine, delicately streaked with
white, petals rounded, almost round, broad, indented, some entirely white, others steaked or
blotched with deep or light red. A perfect formal double, 10-11 cm across. Described and
illustrated in Verschaffelt,1855, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book X, pl.1: The blossoms, of
medium size, are full bodied, pink liberally striped with white. They are intermediate between
formal and peony, the first rows regularly imbricated, while in the centre the petals are erect,
close and form a prominent heart. It was received from Mr Boll of Philadelphia, USA who
obtained it from seed. Orthographic errors: ‘Dan el Webster’, ‘Danel Webster’, ‘Daniel
Websler’, ‘Daniel Webstget’.
Daniel’s Fluffy. (C.japonica), Portland Camellia Nursery Catalogue, 1947-1948: Pink striped red.
Medium size, loose rose form double to formal double. Mid-season blooming. Orthographic
error: ‘Daniel Fluffy’. Originated in USA.
Daniel Webstget.
Notizziario della Società Italiana della Camellia, Dec.1989, No.4, p.4.
Orthographic error for Daniel Webster.
Danjing. (C.reticulata) Fine Camellia Garden, Chuxiong, 2012, p.21 with colour photo. No details.
Photo shows a dark pink semi-double to rose form. Some petals rounded at the tips, some an
unusual triangular shape
Dannier. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.408; Chinese synonym
for the USA C.japonica Ellen Daniel.
Danovara. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery Catalogues,
p.53. Orthographic error for Danovaro.
24
Danovaro. (C.japonica), Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.24: Colour and form of Incarnata.
Petals streaked with carmine. Imbricated, large. Illustrated and described in Verschaffelt,
1858, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book II, pl.III: The blossoms, larger than average, are
composed of many small, rounded petals, regularly imbricated, pure white with a few delicate
pink stripes. Foliage small. Originated by Danovaro, Genoa, Italy. Orthographic errors: ‘De
Novaro’, ‘De Novara’, ‘Da Novarro’, ‘Denavaro’, ‘Danovara’, ‘Da Novaro’.
DAN’s Alice. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.9 with colour photo; Regn
No.627; A chance seedling with medium, upright, bushy growth. Elliptic leaves. New growth
bronze, turning dark green, almost black, finally maturing to very dark green. Flowers early to
late sasanqua season. Perfumed, small, single, magenta blooms have a spreading ring of
cream stamens. Broad petals are also crinkled and notched. Originated by Kurt Boesen,
Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Amanda. (C.sasanqua) C. Aust., Camellia News, No.184, Spring 2010, p.26 with colour photo;
Regn No.650-N. Chance seedling, first flowered 1991. Fragrant, medium size flowers, white
with pink edge, single to semi-double. Spreading cluster of cream filaments with yellow
anthers. Flowers early to very late sasanqua season. Irregular, fluted and wavy petals are also
ruffled, crinkled and notched. Bush is dense, upright and fast growing, with small, oblong
leaves. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Anneka. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.9 with colour photo;
Regn No.632N. A chance seedling, first flowered 1987. Slow, upright, dense and bushy
growth. Dark green elliptic leaves. Flowers mid to late sasanqua season. Fragrant, medium
size, white blooms with pale lavender edges and lavender reverse begin as pink buds. Flowers
open as formal double, maturing to informal double or semi-double form. Petals broad,
smooth and notched. Stamens in a flared column with some petaloids. Originated by Kurt
Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Annelise. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.10, colour photo p.9;
Regn No.634N; A chance seedling, first flowered 1990. Fast, upright, spreading growth,
oblong leaves. Fragrant, medium size flowers are pale pink. Flowers mid to very late sasanqua
season. Broad petals are notched and slightly crinkled. Flared, creamy white filaments and
yellow anthers. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Audrey. (C.sasanqua) C. Aust., Camellia News, No.184 Spring 2010, p.26 with colour photo;
Regn No 651-N. Seedling of Dan’s Sally, male parent unknown, first flowered 1995.
Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust. Medium size,
fragrant, semidouble flowers produced early to late sasanqua season.Medium growth on a
spreading, vase shaped plant, with glossy, leathery, obovate shaped leaves in average density.
Pink petals are twisted and notched, and RHSCC 65A at the centre, shading to 65D at the
edges. Spreading ring of yellow filaments and stamens may have occasional petaloids.
DAN’s Barbara. (C.sasanqua), C. Aust. Camellia News, No.191, Autumn 2013, p.28 with colour photo.
Regn No.668-N. Chance seedling of Plantation Pink. Slightly fragrant, single, small to
medium size. White blooms have broad, crinkled incurved petals, with occasional lavender
tips, and a central flare of pale yellow stamens. Fast growing, spreading plant, elliptic shaped
leaves with acute tip. Originator Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, NSW., Aust.
DAN’s Birgitte. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.9 with colour photo;
Regn No. 626N; A tall, weeping plant, with upright bushy growth at medium rate. Elliptic
leaves. Blooms early to late sasanqua season. Fragrant, small, informal double flowers are
silvery pink and have very few stamens. Petals are irregular, slightly notched, and may be
wavy, fluted, twisted. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW,
Aust.
25
DAN’s Carolyn. (C.sasanqua), C. Aust. Camellia News, No.191, Autumn 2013, p.28 with colour photo;
Regn No.669-N. A chance seedling, released in 2009. Small, fragrant semidouble, with
irregular broad, crinkled and notched petals, dark pink (RHSCC 72C), with purple edges
(RHSCC 70B). Flared centre of yellow filaments and golden anthers occasionally has a few
mingled petaloids. Plant is fast growing, very dense, upright and bushy. Leaves are leathery,
matt, elliptic, apex acuminate. Early flowering. Originator Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries,
NSW., Aust.
DAN’s Cassandra. (C.sasanqua), C. Aust. Camellia News, No.191, Autumn 2013, p.29 with colour
photo, Regn No.670-N. A chance seedling of Plantation Pink, released 2009. Small, lollypop
pink single, 5-6 petals. RHSCC 62B at centre and 62A at edges. Petals crinkled and deeply
notched. Flared stamens with white filaments and golden anthers. Plant is upright and fast
growing. Leaves are obovate with an acuminate apex. Long flowering season from autumn.
Originator Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, NSW., Aust.
DAN’s Chloe. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.10, colour photo p.9;
Regn No.635N; A chance seedling of Plantation Pink, first flowered 1991. Fast, upright,
dense, bushy growth, elliptic leaves. Fragrant, medium size, single blooms are white, with
occasional pink edges. Petals are broad, reflexed, notched, with crinkled edges. Stamens are
cream in a flared column. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW,
Aust.
DAN’s Connie. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.10 with colour photo;
Regn No.642N; A chance seedling of C.sasanqua Setsugekka, first flowered 1992. Strong,
fast, upright, dense, bushy growth, with curled, leathery, obovate leaves. Strongly scented,
medium size, semi-double flowers are white, outer petals having a dark cerise edge, inner
petals a lighter edge. Petals are ruffled, and may also be fluted or wavy, giving height to the
flowers.. Solid cluster of filaments are cream, with gold anthers, and is slightly spread, with
an occasional petaloid. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW,
Aust.
DAN’s Corinne. (C.sasanqua), C. Aust. Camellia News, No.191, Autumn 2013, p.29 with colour photo;
Regn. No.671-N. A chance seedling of DAN’s Hanne, released 2009. Slightly fragrant, large
single blooms. Unusual vivid dark crimson colour (RHSCC 61A). 6 Broad petals are deeply
notched. Flared ring of pale yellow stamens with split pistil. Plant is upright and fast growing,
with dark green, elliptic leaves, acuminate apex. Originator Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries,
NSW., Aust.
DAN’s Elsa. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.9 with colour photo; Regn
No.629N; A chance seedling, parentage unknown, first flowered 1985. Medium, upright and
spreading, bushy growth. Leaves elliptic. Flowers mid to late sasanqua season on arching
branches. Fragrant, medium size semi-double blooms are pale pink with a silvery sheen and a
spreading ring of yellow stamens. Petals are narrow, crinkled, creped, notched, and are
translucent at the outer edges. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce,
NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Elvi. (C.sasanqua), C. Aust. Camellia News, No.191, Autumn 2013, p.29 with colour photo;
Regn No.672-N; A chance seedling of DAN’s Alice, released 2009. Fragrant, small to
medium size blooms, single, with a silvery white centre and dark pink to cerise edges. The 5
broad petals are crinkled and notched. Flared column of pale yellow stamens. Slow, upright,
compact growth. Leathery, elliptic leaves, acuminate tips. Originator Kurt Boesen, Dancraft
Nurseries, NSW., Aust.
DAN’s Emily. (C.hiemalis). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.9 with colour photo; Regn
No.628N. A chance seedling of Rose Ann (Matthews), first flowered 1983. Fast, upright,
dense, bushy growth. Large, obovate leaves, flowers mid to late sasanqua season. Fragrant,
26
medium size, single, rose pink (RHS.CC.66C) blooms with large, rounded, creped and
crinkled petals, slightly paler at the centre. Occasional petaloid, and flared column of pale
yellow stamens. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Emma. (C.sasanqua), C. Aust. Camellia News, No.191, Autumn 2013, p.29 with colour photo;
Regn No.673-N; A chance seedling of DAN’s Hanne. Small to medium size, fragrant, single
with 5 to 6 broad petals, which are creped, slightly notched, solid mid-pink. Central flare of
pale yellow filaments and yellow anthers. Fast, spreading, dense and pendulous growth.
Leathery, elliptic leaves with acuminate tips. Early flowering. Originator Kurt Boesen,
Dancraft Nurseries, NSW., Aust.
DAN’s Hanne. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.10, colour photo p.9;
Regn No.633N; A seedling of unknown C.sasanqua ‘Hogoku Ruby’ purchased around 1975
in Melbourne. Strong, fast growing, bushy, upright plant with elliptic leaves. Flowers mid to
very late sasanqua season. Single to semi-double, red blooms with broad, crinkled and
notched petals, moired with a lighter centre. Spreading ring of yellow stamens. Originated by
Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Helena. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.11, colour photo p.10;
Regn No.645N; A chance seedling of Dan’s Hanne, first flowered 1995. Slow, dense, bushy
growth of upright-vase form, with elliptic leaves. Flowers mid to late sasanqua flowering
season. Highly perfumed, medium size, single blooms have long narrow, notched, petals,
pink (RHS.CC.68B), and have a somewhat sparse, spreading ring of cream filaments with
yellow anthers. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Janice. (C.sasanqua). Dancraft Nurseries Catalogue, Wilberforce, NSW, Australia, 1997, p.1:
White with pale cerise margins, medium size single. Fragrant. Slow to medium, dense
growth. C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183 Winter 2010, p.9 with colour photo; Regn
No.630N; Slender growth with arching branches. Early to very late sasanqua season. Petals
crinkled and twisted. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW,
Aust.
DAN’s Jessica. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.11, colour photo p.10;
Regn No.644N; A chance seedling of Jennifer Susan, first flowered 1993. Fast, upright,
dense, bushy growth, with shiny, dark green leaves. Flowers mid to late sasanqua season.
Strongly fragrant, medium size, anemone to informal double flowers are white with the
occasional pink edge. Petals are irregular and notched. Cream filaments with yellow anthers
dispersed among the central petaloids. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries,
Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Joan. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.10, colour photo p.9; Regn
No.636N; Upright, dense, bushy growth at medium rate. Ovate leaves. Flowers mid to late
sasanqua season. Large, fragrant, semi-double blooms are lavender pink, with irregular,
ruffled and crinkled petals. Spreading ring of yellow stamens. Originated by Kurt Boesen,
Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Johanna. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.11, colour photo p.10;
Regn No.647N; A chance seedling of Dan’s Hanne, first flowered 1997. Fast, upright, dense,
bushy growth, with elliptic and distinctly textured leaves. Blooms mid to late sasanqua
flowering season. Strongly perfumed, small, single to semi-double flowers have cream
centred petals shading to cerise (RHS.CC.74D) at the edges, with a flared column of yellow
stamens. Petals are broad, flat, crinkled and notched. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft
Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Kate. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.10 with colour photo;
Regn No.637N; A chance seedling, first flowered 1991. Very slow, compact, bushy growth.
Oblong leaves. Flowers early to very late sasanqua season. Pink buds open into highly
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perfumed, small, cupped, single blooms, which are white flushed pink, with a cerise edge.
Spreading ring of yellow stamens. Petals broad, cupped and notched Originated by Kurt
Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Lauren. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.10 with colour photo;
Regn No.638N; A chance seedling of Plantation Pink, first flowered 1991. Fast, upright,
dense, bushy growth with elliptic leaves. Blooms mid to late sasanqua season. Fragrant,
small, single to semi-double flowers are white, with dark pink to lavender edges. Petals are
irregular, notched, ruffled and creped. Cream filaments with yellow anthers in a flared
column. Occasional petaloids. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce,
NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Mary. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.11, colour photo p.10;
Regn No.643N; A chance seedling of C.sasanqua Setsugekka, first flowered 1992. Dense,
slow growth, producing a short, stocky plant, with matt, elliptic leaves. Flowers mid to late
sasanqua season. Slightly frgrant, miniature, single to semi-double blooms have white to pale
pink centres, with petals edged completely around with purplish pink (RHS.CC.66C). Flared
column of yellow filaments and gold anthers. Broad, flat and creped petals. Originated by
Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Melanie. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.10 with colour photo;
Regn No.639N; A chance seedling of Dan’s Alice, first flowered 1991. Fast, upright, bushy
growth, with elliptic leaves. New growth has a weeping tendency. Blooms mid to late
sasanqua season. Highly perfumed, medium size, single blooms are white to very pale pink at
the centre, shading to dark pink or cerise at the edges. Petals are broad, rounded, slightly
incurved and creped at the edges. Flared column of cream stamens with a split pistil.
Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Meredith. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust., Camellia News, No.192, Winter 2013, p.28 with colour photo;
Regn No. 677N; A chance seedling. Medium to large, semidouble, fragrant, pure white
blooms have notched, crinkled, elongated petals, which may have reflexed edges. Spreading
ring of pale yellow filaments with golden anthers. Plant is spreading, semi-prostrate, and has
an average growth rate. Very dense foliage with small elliptic leaves. Early flowering.Flower
similar to Setsugekka, but a clearer white. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries,
Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Meta. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.9 with colour photo; Regn
No. 625N; A chance seedling, 1981, from Setsuggekka. Medium, upright, dense, bushy
growth. Leaves shiny, dark green, elliptic. Perfumed, white, medium size, cup-shaped semidouble blooms have a flared column of yellow stamens with golden anthers Occasionally
some pink on the reverse of petals. Broad petals are also incurved, creped and notched.
Flowers early to late sasanqua season Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries,
Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Mona. (C.sasanqua), C. Aust. Camellia News, No.191, Autumn 2013, p.29 with colour photo;
Regn No.674-N; A chance seedling of DAN’s Alice, released 2009. Very fragrant, small to
medium size blooms, single, light red. Centre of spreading yellow stamens. Broad crinkled
petals. Bushy spreading plant, average growth rate. Leaves obovate with acuminate tips.
Originator Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, NSW., Aust.
DAN’s Natalie. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.11, colour photo p.10;
Regn No.646N; A chance seedling of Dan’s Hanne, first flowered 1996. Medium, upright
growth, with elliptic leaves. Blooms early to late sasanqua flowering season. Highly
perfumed, small, informal double flowers. Petals are broad, irregular, notched, and pink
fading to silvery pink at the centres. Stamens are multi-clustered and dispersed among the
petaloids. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
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DAN’s Nicoline. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust., Camellia News, No.192, Winter 2013, p.28 with colour photo;
Regn No. 678N. Chance seedling of DAN’s Hanne, released in 1989.Fast-growing, upright,
bushy plant with dense foliage. Leaves ovate with acute tip. Slightly fragrant, small to
medium size, semidouble blooms. Long flowering season. Petals are crimson (RHSCC 67C)
with dark crimson (67A) edges, wavy, ruffled, slightly notched, with crimped and slightly
incurved edges. Spreading ring of bright yellow anthers. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft
Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Nina. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.9 with colour photo; Regn
No.631N; A chance seedling first flowered 1986. Dense, spreading growth at medium rate.
Small elliptic leaves with inconspicuous veining. Blooms mid to late sasanqua season.
Fragrant, miniature cup shaped single blooms are porcelain pink with a fine paler pink to
white edge. Petals are incurved and notched. Spreading ring of yellow filaments with golden
anthers. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Rebecca. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.11, colour photo p.10;
Regn No. 648N; A chance seedling of Dan’s Hanne, first flowered 1998. Vigorous, upright,
dense, bushy growth, with large elliptic leaves. Flowers mid to late sasanqua flowering
season. Fragrant, medium size, informal double blooms are shell pink (RHS.CC.66D) with a
darker cerise centre (RHS.CC.66B). Petals are irregular, broad and notched. Stamens are
multi-clustered and dispersed. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce,
NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Sally. (C.sasanqua) C. Aust., Camellia News, No.184, Spring 2010, p.26 with colour photo; Regn
No.649-N. Chance seedling, first flowered 1988. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft
Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust. Medium, spreading, dense growth, leaves elliptic.
Fragrant, medium size, single flowers, slightly cupped, pastel pink (RHSCC 62B). Flared
column of creamy yellow filaments with gold stamens. Flowers early to late sasanqua season.
Petals are broad, rounded, crinkled and also incurved and notched.
DAN’s Simone. C. Aust. Camellia News, No.191, Autumn 2013, p.29 with colour photo; Regn No. 675N; A chance seedling of Jennifer Susan, released 2009. Small to medium size single,
fragrant, crimson red. Spreading orange/yellow stamens. The 6 broad petals are smooth and
notched. Fast growing, upright plant. Large, glossy, dark green elliptic leaves with acuminate
tips. Originator Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, NSW., Aust.
DAN’s Sonya. (C.hiemalis). C. Aust, Camellia News, No.183 Winter 2010, p.10 with colour photo; Regn
No.640N; A chance seedling of C.hiemalis Shishigashira, first flowered 1991. Upright,
compact, slow growing plant with masses of small to medium size, semi-double to informal
double blooms. Pink buds open to a white flower with a strong, sweet fragrance. Irregular,
broad petals are waved, and may also be fluted or twisted. Filaments are cream in a flared
column, with an occasional petaloid. Glossy, dark green, elliptic leaves. Early and extended
sasanqua flowering season. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce,
NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Stephanie. (C.sasanqua), C. Aust., Camellia News, No.192, Winter 2013, p.28 with colour
photo; Regn No. 679N; Chance seedling of Plantation Pink. Upright bushy plant with
average growth rate. Elliptic leaves with acute tip. Small to medium size, single, very
fragrant. White blooms shade to a crimped cerise edge, long flowering season. Rounded
petals are notched. Spreading ring of pale yellow stamens. Originator Kurt Boesen, Dancraft
Nurseries, NSW., Aust.
DAN’s Susanne. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust., Camellia News, No. 184, Spring 2010, p.26 with colour photo;
Regn No.652-N. Seedling of Dan’s Joan, male parent unknown, first flowered 2000.
Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust. Medium size,
fragrant, very dark silvery pink (RHSCC 66B) single blooms. Broad, creped, reflexed and
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notched petals, and a cluster of large spreading stamens with white filaments and golden
anthers. Fast, upright, bushy growth, with leathery, elliptic leaves. Flowers early to late
sasanqua season.
DAN’s Susie. C. Aust. Camellia News, No.191, Autumn 2013, p.29 with colour photo; Regn No.676-N;
Chance seedling, parentage unknown, Fragrant, small to medium size blooms. Long
flowering period. Pink buds open to white blooms with irregular petals, occasional pink edge.
Semidouble to irregular semidouble. Dispersed petaloids may breach the flared group of
cream to pale yellow stamens. Slow growing, spreading plant. Elliptic leaves with acuminate
tips.
DAN’s Tommelise. (C.sasanqua) C. Aust, Camellia News, No.184, Spring 2010, p.26 with color photo;
Regn No.653-N. Chance seedling, first flowered 2001. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft
Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust. Very dark pink to red, miniature, fragrant, elegans
(anemone) form blooms, sometimes with a splash of white. Flowers early to late sasanqua
season. Petals are broad, notched, and creped towards the outer edges. Very few stamens.
Very slow, spreading and weeping growth, with very small elliptic leaves. Ideal as a low
hedge.
DAN’s Valerie. (C.sasanqua), C. Aust., Camellia News, No.192, Winter 2013, p.28 with colour photo
p.28; Regn No. 680N. Chance seedling of DAN’s Hanne. Small to medium size, irregular
semidouble with petaloids, lovely fragrance. Petals are marbled pink/lavender, crinkled and
notched, the top layer often twisted. Pale yellow stamens are dispersed and multi-fascicle.
Plant is fast growing, upright and bushy. New foliage very dark green, almost black. Leaves
elliptic with acute tip. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW,
Aust.
DAN’s Virginia. (C.sasanqua), C. Aust., Camellia News, No.192, Winter 2013, p.29 with colour photo;
Chance seedling of DAN’s Hanne. Fragrant miniature blooms, less than 6.5cm diameter.
Irregular semidouble through to elegans form. White, with dark pink tipped or edged petals.
Petals irregular, generally broad, wavy and incurved. Pale yellow filaments and bright yellow
anthers with petaloids interspersed. Late flowering. Dense, stocky plant with slow growth
rate. Leaves small, elliptic with acuminate tip. Originated by Kurt Boesen, Dancraft
Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
DAN’s Zoe. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No. 183, Winter 2010, p.10 with colour photo; Regn
No.641N; A chance seedling of Jennifer Susan, first flowered 1991. Fast, spreading, bushy
growth, with shiny, leathery, elliptic leaves. Fragrant, small, lavender pink, semi-double
blooms are produced mid to late sasanqua flowering season. Petals are wavy and slightly
notched. Cream filaments in a flared column with an occasional petaloid. Originated by Kurt
Boesen, Dancraft Nurseries, Wilberforce, NSW, Aust.
Danse Jiuxin. (Light Coloured Nine Hearts), (C.reticulata), Chuang, 1959, Yunnan Shanchahua. Listed
by Ikeda, 1976, American Camellia Yearbook, p.144 as ‘Tansechiuhsin’. Different reading:
‘Tan-se Chiu-hsin’. No description. Originated in China.
Dansi.
Luzzatti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.13. Synonym for Dryade.
Dante. (C.japonica), Luzzatti Catalogue, 1853. No description. Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie,
p.24: Ivory white, with vivid carmine stripes and spots. Well imbricated. Verschaffelt, 1857,
Nouvelle Iconographie, Book IX, pl.III: Its blooms are of the largest size, convex, pure white,
with a few small, delicate pink stains and stripes. Its petals are rounded, full and apiculate; at
the centre they form a compact rosette. Received a medal in 1857 when exhibited at Brussels.
Synonym: ‘Le Dante’. Not to be confused with the Japanese cultivar Kagiri, invalidly known
as ‘Dante’ in the USA. Originated by Negri, Milan, Italy.
Dante.
Gerbing’s Azalea Gardens Catalogue, 1940-1941. An invalid synonym for Kagiri in USA.
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Dante’s Inferno. (C.japonica), Stowe, 1951, American Camellia Yearbook, p.283: An incomplete
double, 10 cm across x 6 cm deep. The colour is scarlet. It has bright yellow stamens
intermixed with petals in the centre of the flower. The plant is a medium to slow, compact
grower. Registered in American Camellia Yearbook, 1956, Reg. No.275. Originated by A.M.
Stowe, Pensacola, Florida, USA.
Dantiflora. (C.japonica), Del Lungo & Girardi, 1928, Le Camelie, p.159: Bicoloured Camellia. Flowers
with red ground, variegated or striped with white. Single. Originated in Italy.
Danuo. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.411; Chinese synonym
for the Italy C.japonica Danovaro.
Danyu. (Red Jade). (C.sasanqua). The World’s Best Camellia Cultivars, 1998, p.164 with colour photo;
and Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.338 with colour photo;
Originated in the areas of Jinhua and Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China. Flower red blotched white,
slightly fragrant, semi-double, medium size with 25-30 petals, nearly rounded, slightly waved
at edges. Some short yellow stamens in the centre. Leaves dark green, small elliptic, shiny.
Plant compact with vigorous growth. Flowers early to mid-season.
Danzador. (C.japonica), Wylam, 1957, American Camellia Yearbook, p.25, A striking, bold pattern of
bright dots and dashes against a blush background. The large, somewhat flat, flower has a
graceful flare to the petals. It is an 1947 seedling of unknown parentage. The plant has a slow,
compact habit; branches slightly pendulous. Its medium sized foliage is dark green. Flowers
mid-season to late. Originated by Mrs S.M. Miller, El Cajon, California, USA.
Danzhi. (Red Iris), (C.japonica) Wang & Yu, 1981, Shancha Hua: Medium sized, semi-double, white
with pink stripes to self pink, 3-4 rows of rounded, emarginated petals with an irregular
stamen centre. Chang, Shao Yun, 1987, Camellias from Zhejiang, p.143: Young twigs
purplish red; leaves glossy, deep green, long-elliptic, 5.9-6.8 cm long x 4 cm wide, slightly
oblique, convex at apex, broad cuneate at base, sharp, uniform serrations, veins depressed but
distinct. Flowers semi-double, lotus type, variegated, base colour light pink to white, white
lineate on light pink, pink lineate on white, 8.5-9 cm across with 22-24 petals in 3-4 rows,
slightly incurved at first, recurved later, slightly convex at apex. Stamens about 50 in 4 or 5
fascicles, joined as short cylinders, clustered at the centre. Pistils rarely fertile. Buds peachshaped, green. Blooms mid-season to late. A sport of Baisan Xueshi. Originated in China.
Danzhuang Xizi. (Pale faced Western Child), (C.japonica), Wang & Yu, 1989, Camellia, No.72, p.39:
Flowers, glossy, pale pink with 12-15 petals in 3-4 rows with a central group of stamens.
Originated in the Fujian Province, China. Blooms mid-season.
Danzi. (Pale Purple), (C.sasanqua), Yang, 1965, Camellia Varieties of Taiwan, p.5 as ‘Tan Tsu’: A pale
mauve, single sasanqua of 8 petals, 8.5 cm across. Originated in Taiwan.
Danzi Beidi. (Betty’s Orchid). Shao, Taichong, 1992, The Observations from the Camellia World,
p.10. Chinese synonym for the USA C.japonica Betty Sheffield Pink Chiffon.
Daohong Wubao. (Peach Red Five Jewels), (C.japonica), Liu, 1959, Chung Kuo Chu Ming Ti Chi
Chung Hua Hui. No description but given as a crimson form of Wubao. Different reading:
‘Tao-hung Wu-pao’. Originated in China.
Daoliu. (Peach Willow), (C.japonica), Liu, 1959, Chung Kuo Chu Ming Ti Chi Chung Hua Hui: The
leaves resemble a peach tree’s; flowers peach red. Originated in China. Different reading:
‘Tao Liu’.
Daoqianniao. Gao, Jiyin, 1998, The World's Best Camellia Cultivars, p.168. Chinese synonym for
Shimachidori.
Daowende Shuguang.
Light.
Gao, Jiyin, Ltr., 25th May 1990. Chinese synonym for Dawn’s Early
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Daphné. J & F Thoby, Gaujacq, France, Catalogue, 2009, p.2; Pink, single.
Daphne du Maurier. (C.japonica), Tregrehan Camellia Nursery Catalogue, 1973: A metalic red.
Medium sized semi-double to anemone form with open, upright growth. A seedling of
Aaron’s Ruby, originated by Gillian Carlyon, Cornwall, England.
Daphne T. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Aug. 1997, p.15, Reg. No.2415. A medium size,
white, semi-double chance seedling, which flowers mid-season. Originated by Charles T.
Elliott Sr, Swainsboro, Ga., USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 1997, p.2, colour photo
before p.1. The 15 year old seedling first flowered in 1992. Average flower size is 9 cm
across x 4.5 cm deep, with 36 petals, yellow anthers and cream filaments. Plant growth is
spreading, open and average, with dark green leaves 7.5 cm long x 3.8 cm wide.
Dapingguo. (Big Apple).
American Camellia Yearbook, 1993, p.37. Chinese synonym for the
USA C.reticulata hybrid Big Apple.
Daqiao. Chinese Camellia Culture, 2003, p.234. Synonym for Huayilanjiao.
Darbyana.
Killiow Nursery Catalogue,1981. Orthographic error for Derbyana.
Darc Imbricata. Rousseau, Angers Nursery Catalogue, 1842-1843, p.2. Orthographic error for
‘Dark Imbricata’, synonym for Concinna.
Darck.
Berlèse, 1840, Monographie, ed.2, p.155. Orthographic error for Dark.
Darck Fulgens. Cachet Catalogue, 1840-1841, p.2. Orthographic error for ‘Dark Fulgens’, synonym for Francofurtensis.
Darck Imbricata.
Trillon, Le Manns Nursery Catalogue, 1845, p.4. Synonym for Imbricata.
Darck Perfection. Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardina a Villa Quiete, p.10. Synonym for
Concinna.
Darcy. (C.hybrid). C. Aust, Camellia News, No.182, Autumn 2010, p.9 with colour photo; Regn No.624N.; Medium size, light pink edged white, anemone form flowers.
Daria. (C.japonica), Cattolica, G., Le mie Camelie, My Camellias, 2005, p.78 with colour photo;
Medium size, anemone form, white. Some stamens interspersed with petaloids, and some
petaloids may assume a yellow tinge. A seedling of Alba Simplex x Pomponia Alba, first
flowered 2003. Originated by Dott. Guido Cattolica, Livorno, Italy.
Dariesii.
Mariotti, Nervi Nursery Catalogue, 1924, p.15. Orthographic error for Daviesii.
Dario. Verschaffelt, 1844, Catalogue No.50, p.19. Geldorf, Const., 1844, Catalogue of Plants and
Price List , p.5. Fratelli Rovelli Nursery Catalogue, 1852, p.15. Orthographic error for
Darius.
Darius. (C.japonica), Berlèse, 1840, Monographie, ed.2, p.116, 228: Leaves rounded, very large, apex
acute, recurved, prominent venation, deeply serrate; bud very large, obtuse, scales greenish.
Flower about 10 cm across, exterior petals over 2.7 cm, not numerous, deeply notched, largely
imbricated like a dahlia without regularity; those of the interior unequal, deformed, poorly
disposed and forming an irregular centre. Fratelli Rovelli Catalogue, 1852, p.15, as ‘Dario’:
Milano. Peony form. Milk white. Originated in Italy by Mariani. Orthographic errors: ‘Dario’,
‘Davio’, ‘Davio d’Italie’.
Dark. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1839, 1:3. No description. Berlèse, 1845, Monographie, ed.3
as ‘Darck’. (Believed extinct.)
Dark Cheerful. (C.japonica), Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. No description. Originated
in USA. (Believed extinct.)
Dark Coccinea.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1839, 1:3. Synonym for Gilesii.
32
Dark Coloured. Baumann, Mulhouse Nursery Catalogue, 1841-1842, p.13. Synonym for
Francofurtensis.
Dark Crimson.
Jacob Makoy et Cie Nursery Catalogue, 1839, p.16. Synonym for Gilesii.
Dark Fulgens. van Houtte Catalogue, 1839, 1:3. Orthographic error: ‘Darck Fulgens’. Synonym for
Francofurtensis.
Dark Gem. (C.japonica), Collected Papers, ICS Congress, Jinhua 2003, Naming new Cultivars of
"Naidong" Camellias..., Chen Junzhi and Chen Jinshui, p.47; Red gem pendent group. Deep
red flower, cupped corolla.
Dark Imbricata.
van Houtte Catalogue,1842, 9:51. Synonym for Concinna.
Dark Imbricata of Gilesi.
Charles Vuylsteke, 1875-1876, Price List, p.14. Synonym for Gilesii.
Dark Jewel. (C.reticulata), ACRS., 1985, Camellia News, No.95, p.20, Reg. No.335 with colour plate on
back cover: Originated by Edgar Sebire, Wandin North, Victoria, Australia. A seedling of
Damanao as ‘Cornelian’ that first flowered 1980. The very dark red, large, peony flowers
bloom mid-season on an open, upright plant with 9 cm x 5 cm leaves, lanceolate, long acuminate, finely serrate.
Dark Jewel Variegated. (C.reticulata). ACS 1992, The Camellia Journal, vol.47, No.4, p.13. Valdosta
Camellia Scions as ‘Dark Jewel V.’: A white blotched, virus variegated form of Dark Jewel.
Originated in the USA.
Dark Marguerite.
New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, vol.XIII, No.4, p.9. Synonym for Pilida.
Dark Nite. (C.x williamsii), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, vol.XII, No.2, P.7, Reg. No.167: A seedling
raised by L.E. Jury, New Plymouth, New Zealand from a cross, C.hybrid Joyful Bells x
C.japonica Australis that first flowered 1971. Growth rate is medium to form an upright plant
of open density. The light green leaves average 7 cm x 4 cm. Colour is crimson with yellow
anthers and pink filaments. The 14 outer petals surround a dense centre burst of petaloids.
Flowers midseason to late.
Dark of Night. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Dec. 2009, p.29, Regn No. 2772; Originated
by Jim Moon, Portland, Ore., USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 2009, p.110 with colour
photo; A cross of ‘Tinsie’ (Bokuhan) x ‘Fuyajo’ (Kon-wabisuke), first flowered in 2003.
Medium size, 8.2 cm diameter x 3.2 cm deep, dark red semi-double. Yellow anthers and pink
filaments in a central column with an occasional mixed petaloid. 15 petals. Filaments and
petals are conjoined and fall in one piece.Upright, average growth. Dark green leaves average
9 cm x 4.5 cm. Flowers mid-season to late.
Dark of the Moon. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1956, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.37:
Maroon. Large, full peony form. Vigorous, upright growth. Flowers mid-season. Originated
by Harvey Short, Ramona, California, USA.
Dark of the Moon Variegated. (C.japonica), Don Ellison, 1997, "Camellias - A Photo Dictionary", p.31
with colour illustration: Peony form, large size, mid-season blooming. Medium, bushy and
upright growth. A virus-variegated, red blotched white form of Dark of the Moon.
Originated in USA.
Dark Pink Clouds. Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Orthographic variant for Deep
Pink Clouds.
Dark Purple. (C.japonica), Collected Papers, ICS Congress, Jinhua 2003, Naming new Cultivars of
"Naidong" Camellias..., Chen Junzhi and Chen Jinshui, p.47; Dark purple pendent group;
Dark purple flower, crisped or slitting petals, macro-flora, mid-folia, ovate and broad elliptic
leaves.
33
Dark Red Camellia.
Atrorubens.
Curtis, Saml., 1820, Monograph on the Genus Camellia, p.2. Synonym for
Dark Secret. (C.japonica), Thompson, 1953, American Camellia Yearbook, p.79: (Seedling of Rainy
Sun) The male parent is probably Kuro-tsubaki as its foliage is similar and new leaves are a
mahogany colour. The flower is a 10 cm semi-double of dark red, almost maroon. The petals
are fringed and the stamens golden. Vigorous, compact growth. Originated by Harvey Short,
Ramona, California, USA.
Darkie.
New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, vol XIV, No.1, 1981, p.25, Reg. No.225: Name
withdrawn due to its racial connotation.
Darleen Grace. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Dec. 2013, p.29 with colour photo; Regn No.
2899; Originated and registered by C.M. & Lillian Gordy, Ocala, Fla., USA. ACS, Yearbook,
2013, p.111 with colour photo; Propagated by Loch Laurel Nursery, Valdosta, Ga. The
medium size, 8.2cm diameter x 3.8cm deep flower is semi-double to loose peony, cream
white with a touch of pink on the outer edges of the petals. Gold anthers and cream filaments
mixed with the central petals. Late flowers are sometimes blush pink with darker pink petal
edges. Plant is upright with average growth rate. Dark green leaves average 9cm x 4.5cm with
medium serration. Flowers mid-season to late.
Darleen Stoner. (C.hybrid). SCCS, The Camellia Review, Jan-Mar 2010, p.1, colour photo front cover;
Bright cranberry-coral with splash of white on centremost petals, semi-double to loose
informal double. Crinkled petal edges. Vigorous upright growth, moderately sun tolerant. A
seedling of Coral Delight x Kramer’s Supreme. Originated by Martin F. Stoner, Pomona,
Calif., USA.
Darling. (C.reticulata hybrid). Japanese postcard with colour photo, 1995. Large, bright red semi-double
of 17 petals. Outer are large, rounded, waved, inner are smaller, tending to be erect. Central
column of stamens with golden anthers. Originated by David L. Feathers, Lafayette,
California, USA from a seedling of (C.reticulata Buddha x C.fraterna) x C.hybrid Salab.
Darling Pink. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1964, Camellia Nomenclature, p.38, Rose pink with frosty white
centre. Large formal double. Mid-season flowering. Originated in USA by Malbis.
Darlington Mathotiana. Levi, 1958, American Camellia Yearbook, p.242, 246, 251. Synonym for
Julia Drayton.
Darsi. (C.japonica), Cachet Catalogue, 1840-1841, p.2. No description. van Houtte Catalogue, 18441845, 18:10: Violet red, widely stained, with large splashes of white. Very brilliant red of the
flowers of the Grenadine, petals firm, round, well displayed with a central tuft. Berlèse, 1843,
Iconographie, ed.3, pl.278: The flower, about 9 cm across, sometimes 10 cm, is full, irregular,
peonyform; animated, pure, vivid carmine red with large splashes of white on the exterior
petals; of many rows, well displayed, loosely imbricated. The heart is composed of a great
number of unequal petals of different sizes, alternatively white and red. Orthographic errors:
‘Darsil’, ‘Darsii’. Synonym: ‘Darsi Vera’, ‘Darsii Fulgens’.
Darsi Vera.
Darsii.
Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1849-1850, p.45 as ‘Darsii Vera’. Synonym for Darsi.
Rousseau, Angers Nursery Catalogue, 1842-1843, p.2. Orthographic error for Darsi.
Darsii Fulgens.
Darsil.
Catalogus Plantarum, Petrograd, 1860. Synonym for Darsi.
McIlhenny Catalogue, 1935, p.4. Orthographic error for Darsi.
Dartington Pink. (C.japonica), Treseder Nurseries Special Camellia List, 1964-1965: Medium sized
pink single of 6-8 petals. Originated in England.
Dartington Red. (C.japonica), Treseder Nurseries Special Camellia List, 196~1965: Medium sized red
single of 5-7 petals. Originated in England.
34
Daruma. (The founder of Zen Buddhism), (C.japonica), Chinka Zufu, (before 1700), Watanabe, 1969,
pl.381: Soft pink. Peony to semi-double camellia with white, laciniated petal margins. Originated in Japan. (Believed extinct). Different reading: ‘Taruma’.
Daruma. (The founder of Zen Buddhism), (C.japonica), Mizuno, Motokatsu, 1681, Kadan Kômoku:
Red, double, large. Originated in Japan. (Believed extinct.)
Dashi. (Pageant Carriage for Festival), (C.japonica), Sakata, Shubyô Co, 1938, Engei Tsûshin: Peony
flowered variety. White with red veins. Large. Originated in Japan.
Dashi-karako. (Pageant Festival Carriage Anemone), (C.japonica), Himuro, 1982, Murasuzume: Large,
rose pink single with anemone centre. Originated in Japan.
Dasongzi. (Big Pine Cone), (C.japonica), Chang, Shao, Yun, 1987, Camellias from Zhejiang, p.57,
colour photo [p.141]: Medium size, rose form double, red. with 5-6 rows of imbricated petals,
standing apart, rounded, emarginate; opening to show small, confused, stamen centre. Leaves
green, wide-elliptic, apices acute, margins serrate, Synonym: ‘Wusonghua’. Originated in
China. See colour photo No.95, Gao & Zhuang, 1987, The Camellia in China.
Datangmi. Gao, Jiyin, 1998, The World's Best Camellia Cultivars, p.p.130. Chinese synonym for
Tommy Land.
Dataohong. (Large Peach Red), (C. reticulata), Fang, 1930, Tiannan Chahua Xiaozhi as ‘Daye Taohong’
. Yü in the RHS, Rhododendron and Camellia Report, 1950, called it ‘Tataohung’ or ‘Large
Crimson’. Lammerts in p.42 of the 1952, American Camellia Yearbook gave it the presently
used Western synonym of ‘Crimson Robe’. The best illustration and description is in Feng et
al., 1986, Yunnan Camellias of China, p.72: Leaves broad-ovate, apices acute and recurved,
bases cuneate or broadcuneate, deeply serrate, 9-10 cm long, 4.5-5.8 cm wide. Flowers
carmine red (RHS.CC.53B-C), 12-16 cm diameter. Petals waved and crinkled, 21 in about 4-5
whorls; outer whorls more or less flat, inner undulate, sometimes 2-3 petals conate at the base.
Stamens numerous, 3-6 fascicles or united to form a tube. Fertile. Flowers early to
mid-season. Originated in Yunnan, China. Different Reading: ‘Tataohung’, ‘Ta Tao Hung’,
‘Ta-t’ao-hung’. Synonyms: ‘Daye Taohong’, ‘Large Crimson’, ‘Great Peach Bloom’.
Corruption of Chinese name ‘Tataochung’. Received the RHS “Preliminary Commendation”
in 1967 as ‘Tataohung’. See colour plates Macoboy, 1981, The Colour Dictionary of
Camellias and front cover, New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, vol.IV, No.1, 1964.
Date. (Showy), (C.japonica), Watanabe, 1960, Kyôto Engei Kurabu, Tsubaki Tokushû, No. l, p.52. No
description. Originated in Japan.
Datebeni.
Different reading for Datekurenai.
Datekarako. (Showy Anemone), (C.japonica), Himuro, 1982, Murasuzume: White streaked red and
pink. Anemone form. Originated in Japan as a seedling of Kyôkarako.
Datekurenai. (Showy Red), (C.sasanqua), Shunkô-en Catalogue, 1958; Nagao Sôsei-en Catalogue,
1962: Shining red. Double. Originated in Japan. Different reading: ‘Datebeni’.
Date-nishiki. (Showy Brocade), (C.x vernalis), Minagawa, Iza’emon, 1885, Nisshôen Chabaifu: Red
stripes on white ground, medium size, single. Wada, 1941, Garden Treasures of Japan, p.32:
Light pink striped deeped pink. Medium sized single. Originated in Japan by Minagawa.
Date-nishiki. (Showy Brocade), (C.x vernalis), Kirino, Kyôto Engei Kurabu, 1970, Tsubaki Tokushû,
No.10, p.39; Hakoda, 1987, JCS., Tsubaki, No.26, p.50; A triploid cultivar. ICS., 1990,
Japanese Camellia Cultivar List, p.40: Small size, crimson with white patches, double form.
Blooms early to mid-season. Originated in Kawaguchi-shi, Saitama Prefecture, Japan.
Date-nishiki. (Showy Brocade), (C.japonica), Shirai-Bunko, 1789, Shoshiki Hanagatachô: Early flowering. Originated in Japan. (Believed extinct),. See Kyôto Engei Kurabu, 1964, Tsubaki
Tokushû, No.5, p.80.
35
Date-nishiki-beni. (Showy Red Brocade), (C.x vernalis), Minagawa, Iza’emon, 1885, Nisshôen
Chabaifu: Self red sport of Date-nishiki above, (ibid). Originated in Japan by Minagawa.
Date-nishiki-sazanka. (Showy Brocade Sasanqua), (C.sasanqua), Hantei, Kinta, 1827, Sômoku Kihin
Kagami: Variegated flower and leaves. Originated in Japan. (Believed extinct.) See Kyôto
Engei Kurabu, 1966, Tsubaki Tokushû, No.5, p.161.
Date-shibori-wabisuke. (Showy Dappled Wabisuke), (Wabisuke), Uekiya, Seijirô, 1874, Tsubaki
Hyakuro no Zu, vol.2, No.15: White, rose form double showing a small centre stamen cluster
when fully open. Originated in Japan. (Believed extinct.)
Dating. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.411; Chinese synonym
for the USA C.japonica Mary Agnes Patin, changed from ‘Mali Xiaojie’.
Dattan. (Ancient Japanese name for Tartars), (C.japonica), Yashiro, 1841, Kokon Yôrankô, vol.310:
Anemone form with outer petals white and centre petals red. Originated in Japan. Different
reading: ‘Tattan’. (Believed extinct.)
Dattan. (Ancient Japanese name for Tartars), (C.japonica), Chinka Zufu, (before 1700), Watanabe, 1968,
pl.640: A large, single pink with white petal margins and large, central stamen column. Originated in Japan. (Believed extinct.) Different reading ‘Tattan’.
Daunoy Variegata. (C.japonica), Wilmot, Camellia Variety Classification Report, 1945, p.7. No
description. Originated in USA. (Believed extinct.)
Dauphin. (C.sasanqua), Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. No description. Originated in
USA. Orthographic variant ‘Dauphine’.
Dauphine.
Fruitland Nursery Catalogue, 1954-1955, p.31. Orthographic variant for Dauphin.
Dautel’s Supreme. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1962, Camellia Nomenclature, p.32: Sport of Julia Drayton.
(Invalidly as ‘Mathotiana’). Reported in three forms; a darker and heavier Mathotiana
Supreme; a pom pom centre of petaloids; two rows of large petals with a large cluster of
bright yellow stamens. Large. Originated at Dautel’s Nursery, Lake Charles, Louisiana, USA.
Dauveriana. (C.japonica), Jardin la Société Royale de Belgique Catalogue, 1843. No description.
Charles van Geert, 1846, Catalogue Général, p.66: Very large, imbricated flower. Free
flowering and very pretty. Ibid: 1848, Catalogue No.105, p.109: Peony form, orange red, first
class. Orthographic error: ‘Doveriana’.
Dave Bull. (C.japonica), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1993, Issue No.114, vol.XVIII, No.1, p.32,
Reg. No.324: Originated by Dave Bull, Auckland, New Zealand. First bloomed 1985 on a
plant of dense upright habit with medium growth rate. Lea 8 cm long x 4 cm wide. Flower is
anemone form, 6.5 cm across x 3 cm deep, soft pink (RHS.CC.58C-D) with some streaks of
deeper pink, about 12 petals and 137 petaloids. A few yellow anthers on creamy filaments
amongst the petaloids. Blooms last well. Flowers mid-season to late.
Dave Strother.
Star.
Magnolia Gardens and Nursery Catalogue, 1942-1943. Synonym for Evening
Davesii. Gelding, Catalogue of Garden & Farm Seeds, Plants etc., 1887-1888, p.53. Orthographic
error for Daviesii.
Dave C. Strother. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1950, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.31: Blush
peach pink. Large semi-double to anemone form. Vigorous, upright growth. Blooms mid-season to late. Originated by S.J. Katz, Covington, Louisiana, USA. Orthographic variants:
‘Dave Strother’, ‘D.C. Strother’. An early blooming, light pink, single camellia had been
given this name by Magnolia Gardens about 1942 without Mr Strother’s permission. On his
objection it was renamed Evening Star and Mr Strother’s name transferred to the camellia
originated by Mr. Katz.
36
Dave’s Weeper. (C.fraterna x C.japonica), Smart, 1977, RHS, Rhododendrons with Magnolias and
Camellias, p.77: Mr Dave Feathers ...also had a weeping plant with small pink flowers
registered as Dave’s Weeper; this is C.fraterna x C.japonica. Actually this cultivar had never
been registered and Dr Smart’s reference constitutes its first valid listing.
David Alam. George Jackman & Son, 1954-1955, Planter’s Handbook, No.16, p.18. Orthographic
error for David Allan.
David Allam.
Hanger, 1956, Wisley Garden List. Orthographic error for David Allan.
David Allan. (C.japonica), George Jackman & Son, 1952-1952, Planter’s Handbook, No.14, p.19. erroneously as ‘David Allom’: Small and dainty, funnel-shaped semi-double. Clear pink flowers.
Originated in USA. Orthographic errors: ‘David Allom’, ‘David Alan’, ‘David Allam’,
‘David Alam’.
David Allom. Jackman & Son, 1952-1953, The Planter’s Handbook, No.14. Orthographic error
for David Allan.
David Boschi. (C.japonica), Ambroise Verschaffelt, 1854, Catalogue, p.18. No description. Franchetti,
1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.24: Completely imbricated, admirable form, beautiful clear
rose pink, paler at the centre, and with the first rows of petals streaked with white.
Verschaffelt, 1960, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book XIII, pl.I: Blossoms of the largest size (at
least 11 cm in diameter), of a vivid pink colour with a few dainty white stripes, very
numerous petals, the exterior ones quite large, orbicular, emarginate, closely imbricated with
perfect regularity. Originated in Italy by Boschi, Florence. Orthographic errors: ‘David
Boschy’, ‘David Bosschi’, ‘David Boschii’, ‘Davide Boschi’, ‘Davide Boschi’.
David Boschii.
Taylor & Sangster Nursery Catalogue, 1887. Orthographic error for David Boschi.
David Boschy. da Silva, 1880, Forcing Varieties of Camellias in Oporto, p.7. Orthographic error
for David Boschi.
David Bosschi.
Auguste van Geert, 1863-1864, Catalogue, No.54, p.36. Schneider, Sept.1894,
Revue Horticole, p.432. Orthographic error for David Boschi.
David Cook. (C.japonica), Valley Garden Supply Co. Catalogue, 1948: Rose red. Medium sized, formal
double. Flowers mid-season. Originated by Arnesen, California, USA.
David Feathers. (C.reticulata). ACS, The Camellia Journal, Sept. 2003, p.13 with colour photo, Reg.
No.2600. A chance seedling which first bloomed in 1994 with pink semi-double blooms.
Originated by David. L. Feathers, Lafayette, Calif., USA. American Camellia Yearbook,
2003, p.61, colour photo p.c2. The flower has 23 petals and measures 12.7 cm across x 7.5
cm deep. Plant is upright and average and blooms early to mid-season. The light green leaves
measure 10 cm long x 5 cm wide.
David Gerbing. (C.japonica), Gerbing’s Azalea Gardens Catalogue, 1941-1942: “(Our Seedling), New
pink, double rosebud form with 8-10 cm blooms. (See front cover) The opening colour and
form resembles that of a ‘Pink Radiance’ rose. When fully open some show short stamens.
Flowers mid-season to late. Foliage is long, medium green. Vigorous, bushy, tall growth, free
flowering.” See colour plate p.53, Camellias by G.G. Gerbing. Originated by G.G. Gerbing,
Fernandina, Florida, USA from seed of Reverend John G. Drayton. Pseudonym: ‘Cup of
Beauty’(JG).
David Honour Nelson. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1970, p.162, Reg. No.1109: A 13
year old chance seedling that first bloomed 1966; originated by George A. Nelson, Florence,
South Georgia, USA. Plant growth is spreading, average, open and medium in rate with dark
green leavers, 11 cm x 6 cm. The semi-double ‘Herme’ (Hikarugenji) type bloom is 10.5 cm
across and 4 cm deep with 13 petals and 3 or more petaloids. Colour is predominantly white
37
with a few rose red markings or stripes and deep yellow to orange anthers and white to cream
filaments.
David Ratcliff. (C.japonica), ACS 1994, The Camellia Journal, vol.49, No.4, inside back cover,
Valdosta Camellia Scions. No. description. SCCS 1996, Camellia Nomenclature, p.32: Bright
red, large, loose peony form. Blooms early to mid-season. Average, upright growth.
Originated in USA by J.Ratcliff, Tifton, Georgia.
David Ratcliff Variegated. (C.japonica), ACS, Aug. 1995, The Camellia Journal, vol.50, No.3, p.36,
Reg. No.2327 as ‘David Ratcliff Var’: Large size, bright red with white markings, loose
peony form, chance seedling. Blooms early to mid-season. Originated in USA by Jack
Ratcliff, Tifton, Georgia. ACS 1995, American Camellia Yearbook, p.4 with colour photo: the
15 year old seedling first bloomed 1982. Average flower size is 11.5 cm across x 7 cm deep,
with yellow anthers and creamy yellow filaments. Plant growth is upright and average in rate
with dark green leaves 7.5 cm long x 2.5 cm wide.
David Ribeiro da Silva. (C.japonica) List of Portuguese Camellias 2010, Guedes & Oliveira, pp.16 &
57; Originated about 1950 by David Ribeiro da Silva. Single. Seven pinkish white petals with
a carmine pink blotch on each petal, and wide darker veins and spots. Diameter 7-7.5 cm.
David Stuart. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1956, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.37: White.
Large, semi-double of flat form. Vigorous, upright growth. Mid-season to late blooming.
Originated by David Feathers, Lafayette, California, USA.
David Surina. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1968, p.129, Reg. No.1005: A 12 year old
chance seedling, first bloomed 1957; originated by Surina’s Camellia Nursery, Sepulveda,
California, USA. Plant growth is upright, dense and medium in rate with light green leaves,
8.5 cm x 5 cm. The formal double flower is 10 cm in diameter. Light red and blooms
mid-season to late, Never shows stamens.
David Wilson. (C.japonica), ACS., 1990. The Camellia Journal, vol.45, No.1, p.12: Large size, white,
peony form, C.japonica chance seedling. Blooms mid-season to late. Originated by Walter A.
Wilson, Augusta, Georgia, USA. ACS., Nov.1990 The Camellia Journal, vol.46, No.4, p.18,
Reg. No.2185. American Camellia Yearbook, 1990, p.88, with colour photo between p.90-91:
Average flower size, 11 cm across x 7.8 cm deep, with 36 petals. Cold hardy. Plant growth
upright and medium in rate with leaves 10 cm long x 3.8 cm wide.
David Wirth. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1956, p.60, Reg. No.255: A 6 year old chance
seedling originated by Ernest A. Judice, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. First flowered 1955.
Plant growth upright, slow and compact with large, dark green leaves. Flowers, rich wine red
colour, 11-12 cm across with 21 petals, 7 petaloids and 5 groups (97) of stamens. The petals
are thick and heavy and stand erect like rabbit ears. Anthers brown. Flowers early. Sport:
David Wirth Variegated.
David Wirth Variegated. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1960, Camellia Nomenclature as ‘David Wirth Var.’: A
virus variegated form of David Wirth - Wine red blotched white. Originated in USA.
Davide Boschi. Catalogo della Stablimento Agrario-Botanico di Castagnola e Casabono, 18671868. Orthographic error for David Boschi.
Davidea. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1841, 7:6. No description.1842, 9:9: Peony form. Large
flower, red speckled. Originated in Belgium. Orthographic errors: ‘Davideo’, ‘Davidio’.
Davideo.
Charles Van Geert Nursery Catalogue, 1845, p.5.Orthographic error for Davidea.
Davidio.
Verschaffelt, 1844, Catalogue No.50, p.19. Orthographic error for Davidea.
Davie Fifield. (C.japonica), Gerbing Camellia Nursery, 1969, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.24,
No.3, inside front cover. No description. Originated in USA. No valid listing located.
38
Daviesh.
Downing Nursery Catalogue, (before 1858). Orthographic error for Daviesii.
Daviesii. (C.japonica), The Gardeners Chronicle, No.12, March 25th, 1843, p.190. No description.
Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1847-1848, p.56. No description. van Houtte Catalogue, 1847-1848,
31:28: Red flower of Pomegranate, very bright; petals firm, well rounded, well displayed,
central tuft, well packed. Verschaffelt, 1849, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book VI, pl.II: Its
blossoms, 11 cm diameter, are a bright cherry-red. The numerous petals are large, rounded,
emarginate and regularly imbricated, but this regularity is broken here and there by several
clusters of very small, serried and wrinkled petals, producing an odd effect. Originated by
Davies, Liverpool, England. Orthographic errors: ‘Davesii’, ‘Daveisi’, ‘Dawiesii’, ‘Davisii’,
‘Daviesii’(Davis), ‘Dariesii’, ‘Daviezi’, ‘Daviosi’, ‘Daviesti’, ‘Daviesh’, ‘Daviezii’. See
colour plate No.18, Claude Thoby Catalogue, 1971.
Daviesii (Davis).
Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1847-1848, p.56. Synonym for Daviesii.
Daviesti.
Le Texier, 1911, Catalogue, pile. Orthographic error for Daviesii.
Daviezi.
Bahuaud-Litou Nursery Catalogue, 1914. Orthographic error for Daviesii.
Daviezii.
Louis Leroy, 1868, Catalogue, p.123. Orthographic error for Daviesii.
Davio.
Jacob Makoy et Cie Catalogue, 1838, p.16. Orthographic error for Darius.
Davio d’Italie.
Daviosi.
Davis.
van Houtte, Catalogue, 1843-1844, 12:vv. Synonym for Darius.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1872-1873. Orthographic error for Daviesii.
Sharp, 1957, Camellia Illustrated, p.151. Synonym for Rose Dawn.
Davis Dark Red.
Davis Pink.
Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Synonym for Lady Vansittart.
SCCS, 1951, Camellia Review, vol.12, No.6, p.10. Synonym for Miya.
Davis Rose Dawn. (C.japonica), Dodd Nursery Catalogue, 1946-1947, p.4: Large full double, imbricated, rose pink. Vigorous grower with slender branches. Originated in USA by Davis.
Davis Variegated. (C.japonica), Rubel, Winter Hardy Camellias Price List, No.77, 1939, p.21: No
description. Previously sold as “Lot 23” which is described as “this variegated, rose-pink and
white camellia. The precise arrangement of the petals will appeal to flower lovers who admire
formality with colour variation. Occasionally solid rose-pink flowers are produced.” This
cultivar was confused with Elisabeth and Teutonia in USA. Synonym: ‘Kennedy’s
Variegated’.
Davisii.
Clibrans Altrincham Catalogue, 1966, p.3. Orthographic error for Daviesii.
Davonaro.
Burdin Maggiore & Co. Catalogue, 1862. Orthographic error for Danovaro.
Davy Crochett.
Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.3. Orthographic error for Davy Crockett.
Davy Crockett. (C.japonica), Buist, 1852, The American Flower Garden Dictionary, 5th ed., p.211:
Rosy crimson, exceedingly large, 12.5 cm across, round petals, very double and showy.
Originated in USA. Orthographic error: ‘Davy Crochett’.
Dawiesii.
Catalogus Plantarum Petrograd, 1887. Orthographic error for Daviesii.
Dawn.
Sawada, Overlook Nursery Catalogue, 1933 as a sasanqua. This cultivar originated in
Japan about 1896 under the name Ginryû and is a C.x vernalis and was imported into
America in 1906 by the Alvin Nursery Co., Alvin, Texas under the name ‘Akebono’ from
where it was acquired by Sawada who gave it the translated name ‘Dawn’. It is not to be
confused with the C.japonica Akebono. Synonym for Ginryû. Orthographic error: ‘Dawon’.
Dawn.
The Pacific Camellia Society, 1946, Camellia Nomenclature, p.10. Synonym for the
C.japonica Akebono Pink.
39
Dawn. SCCS, 1942, Classification of Camellias, p.6. Renamed Hearn’s Dawn due to confusion
with existing cultivars.
Dawn-Chiffon.
Rhodellia Nursery Catalogue, 1944. Synonym for Akebono Pink.
Dawn Delight. (C.japonica), Pyron, 1971, American Camellia Yearbook, p.42: An early blooming light
pink sport of Tomorrow’s Dawn. Originated by Jeff Fuller, Montgomery, Alabama, USA.
Dawn Diversiflora Plena. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues. p.53. Synonym for Akebono-shibori as ‘Akebono Variegated’.
Dawn Fragrance. Macoboy, 1981, The Colour Dictionary of Camellias, p.136, 194. Synonym for
Akatsuki-no-kaori.
Dawn (Hearn).
Dawn.
Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Orthographic variant for Hearn’s
Dawn Lynn. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Dec. 2008, p.34 with colour photo, Regn. No.
2730; A chance seedling that first flowered in 1994. Originated by Clarence and Lillian
Gordy, Ocala, Fla., USA, and propagated by Erinon Nursery, Plymouth, Fla., and Loch Laurel
Nursery, Valdosta, Ga. A 10 cm deep pink anemone form flower with largely hidden gold
anthers and yellow filaments. Flowers mid-season to late. American Camellia Yearbook,
2008, p.109 with colour photo; Dark green leaves 9 cm x 3.8 cm.
Dawn of Creation. (C.hybrid) SCCS, Supplementary List 2011. Bright rose colour, large semi-double.
Rounded, well branched growth. Flowers early to midseason. [(C.pitardii var yunnanica x
C.yunnanensis) x Scentsation]. Originated in 2011 by Daniel Charvet, Fort Bragg, Calif.,
USA.
Dawn Song. (C.x vernalis), American Camellia Yearbook, 1973, p.189, Reg. No.1233: A 17 year old
chance C.x vernalis seedling, first bloomed 1960; originated by Camellia Grove Nursery, St
Ives, N.S.W., Australia and propagated by L.G. MacDowell, Lakeland, Florida, USA. Plant
growth is upright, dense and medium in rate with heavy textured, dark green leaves, 7 cm
long x 3.5 cm wide. The semi-double, Frizzle White type, bloom is white edged pink. Anthers
are yellow and filaments golden with 21-27 petals. It is 6.5 cm in diamenter and 4 cm deep.
The bloom has a faint scent. Blooms early to mid-season.
Dawn Striped.
Yashiroda, 1950, American Camellia Yearbook. Synonym for Akebono-shibori.
Dawn Variegated. Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2, as ‘Dawn Varie.’. Synonym for
Akebono-shibori as ‘Akebono Variegated’.
Dawn’s Early Light. (C.japonica), Nuccio’s Nurseries Catalogue, 1985-1986, #8016; American
Camellia Yearbook, 1986, p.89, Reg. No.2023: Medium to large peony, occasionally rose
form double. Light orchid pink with deeper pink intermixed, especially on edges. Flower size
10.5 cm across. Flowers early to late. Plant growth is erect, dense and rapid in rate. The 6 year
old, chance C.japonica seedling first flowered 1980. Originated by Nuccio’s Nurseries,
Altadena, California, USA. Chinese synonym: ‘Daowen De Shuguang’.
Dawn’s Own. (C.japonica), ACRS, Camellia News, 1995, No.135, p.11, colour pl. p.2, Reg. No.445:
Originated by Kenneth Brown, Mitcham, Victoria, Australia. A chance seedling of C.japonica
Rosemary Elsom. First flowered 1989. A pink (RHS.CC.62B) flower of anemone form with
10 petals and numerous petaloids, 8 cm across x 5 cm deep. Plant growth is average and
bushy. Leaves olive-green, glossy, ovate, flat with serrate margins and acuminate apices, 10
cm long x 5 cm wide. Petals open flat. Filaments and petaloids mixed. Flowers shed whole.
Free flowering, mid-season to late.
Dawon. Jean Lebihan, 1971, Pas de Jardin sans Camellia, 2nd. ed. p.57. Orthographic error for
‘Dawn’, synonym for Ginryû.
40
Dawsiana Nouvello. (C.japonica), Hovey & Co. Nursery Catalogue, 1857, p.9. No description. Originated in USA. (Believed extinct.)
Dawson Curley Leaf. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1969, p.100: One of the oddities
noted is Dawson Curley Leaf, a C.japonica, the leaves of which are deeply serrated and
twisted or curled. This unusual variety is from Hugh Shackelford, Albany, Georgia, USA.
Dawson Pink. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1956, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.38 as
‘Dawson’s Pink’ but listed as Dawson Pink in all subsequent editions: Dark pink. Medium
semi-double of tiered form. Medium, pendulous growth. Mid-season blooming. Originated in
USA by Bowman.
Dawubao.
(Five Large Treasures). Chang Shao Yun, 1987, Camellias from Zhejiang, p.93.
Synonym for Hongchang’e Cai.
Daxianniang. (Great Goddess), (C.reticulata), Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia in China, p.60,
No.402, colour photo No.259: Large size, 10-13 cm across, crimson. Open peony form with 3
rows of 26-30 large, rounded, emarginate petals and a centre of a few small petals and rare
stamens. Blooms early to mid-season. Originated in Tengchong, Yunnan, China.
Day Dream. Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1964-1965, p.4. Orthographic variant for Daydream.
Daybreak. (C.japonica), Gerbing’s Azalea Garden Catalogue, 1941-1942: (No.7) A fluffy peony type
flower of medium size and soft pink colouring. Dull green foliage, bushy growth, late flowering. Originated at Magnolia Gardens, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. This camellia is very
similar to Debutante except that it is late flowering. See colour pl. p.55, Gerbing, 1945,
Camellias.
Daydawn Belle. (C.sasanqua). ACRS, Camellia News, 1992, No.123, p.4, Reg. No.408: Originated by
Keith Abbott, Rossmoyne, Western Australia. A chance seedling that first flowered 1988. The
semi-double to rose form double flower is pink (RHS.CC.68D) of 18 petals; 5 cm across x 2
cm deep and blooms early to mid-season on a dense, upright, rapid growing, free flowering
plant. Leaves matt green, oval, curved, rare serrations, apices acute, 3.5 cm long x 2 cm wide.
Small, rose form flower. Sun hardy.
Daydream. (C.sasanqua), McIlhenny Catalogue, 1948-1949, p.14: A large single blossom, each petal
deeply V’ed and heavily crinkled; white delicately edged with deep rose-pink, some petals
tinted below with rose-pink; stamens light buff tipped yellow ochre. Originated by Mobile
Ornamental Nursery, Alabama, USA. See p.87, Hertrich, 1955, Camellias in the Huntington
Gardens, vol.II, for black and white illustration.
Daydream Believer. (C.sasanqua) SCCS, Supplementary List, 2014. Originated by Bobby Green, Green
Nurseries, Fairhope, Ala., USA. Pure white, medium size single. Flowers early.Fast upright
growth.
Daydreams. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1948, p.168: “McCaskill Garden’s - Seedling
No.165”. This flower is a semidouble white with fine pink or rose pencilled lines running the
length of each petal. The petals are of different lengths and each has three dainty scallops.
Stamens and petaloids form the centre. The flower is large, 10-11.5 cm aaoss and blooms
early to late. First flowered 1944. The growth is loose, upright and vigorous with bright green
leaves, 6.5 cm long x 3.8 cm wide. Parentage unknown. Not to be confused with the
C.sasanqua Daydream. Originated by McCaskill Gardens, Pasadena, California, USA.
Orthographic variant: ‘Day Dream’. Sport: Daydreams Pink.
Daydreams Pink. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1960, Camellia Nomenclature, p.32: Rose pink sport of Daydreams. Originated by McCaskill Gardens, Pasadena, California, USA.
41
Daye Baishitou. (Large Foliage White Lion Head), (C.japonica), Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The
Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.136 with colour photo; Originated in the Chengdu –
Dujiangyan areas, Sichuan, China. Flowers white, anemone to peony form, medium to large.
Outside petals broad-round and flat. Small inner petals tightly clustered. Occasionally some
larger petals occur in the centre (the lion’s mane of the name). Leaves light green, ovate to
elliptic, large and shiny. Compact, vigorous plant. Flowers mid-season.
Daye Diechi.
Ikeda, 1976, American Camellia Yearbook, p.139 as ‘Tayehtiechih’. Different
reading: ‘Ta-eh Tieh-ch’ih’. Synonym: ‘Large Leaf Butterfly Wings’. Synonym for ‘Houye
Diechi’.
Daye Hudie. (Big Leaf Butterfly) (C.japonica), Chinese Camellia Culture, 2003, Appendix, p.565;
Small tree, erect. Juvenile leaves and buds purple, mature leaves dark green, lustrous, elliptic,
7-8 cm x 3-4 cm, veins obscure, margins sharply serrate. Flower semi-double, hibiscus form,
opening pale purple, deep red when fully open, 8-9 cm diameter, outer petals 10-20,
somewhat incurved in 2-3 rows, inner petals short and narrow, twisted, erect. Stamens
numerous, divided into several bundles. From Zheijiang Province, China.
Daye Taohong. Fang, 1930, Diannan Chahua Xiaozhi. Different reading: ‘Ta-ye T’ao-hung’. Synonym: ‘Large Leaf Crimson’. Synonym for Dataohong.
Daye Yinhong. Waterhouse, 1970, ACRS., Camellia News, No.40, p.8, as ‘Ta Yeh Yin Hung’,
synonym for Dayinhong.
Dayin. (Large Brocade), (C.sasanqua), Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia in China, p.76, No.563:
Large size, 10-14 cm across, white with red margins and reverse, single with 7-9 petals. Early
blooming. Originated in China.
Dayinhong. (C.reticulata), Fang, 1930, Dainnan Chahua Ziaozhi, as silver red in colour with large flowers. Yü, 1950, RHS., Rhododendron and Camellia Conference Report as ‘Tayinhung’ or
‘Large Pink’. Colour plate and description Feng et al., 1986, Yunnan Camellias of China,
p.56: Leaves ovate to elliptic-ovate, apices acuminate, bases obtusely rounded, slightly
reclinate, margins revolute, veins conspicuous, short hairs beneath, 6-8 cm long, 3-4.8 cm
wide. Flowers spinel pink (RHS.CC.66C), diameter 10-13 cm. Petals about 28 in 3-4 whorls,
outer whorls flat, regularly arranged, inner whorls curved, erect, sometimes two petals
connate at the base. Stamens numerous, divided into 5-7 groups, connate at base. Pistils
mostly rudimentary. The leaves of this cultivar are similar to Liuye Yinhong but broader, the
flowers are smaller than those of Liuye Yinhong and a deeper colour. This cultivar has
abundant axillary flower buds, sometimes 4-5 flower buds per axil. It originated in Kunming,
Yunnan, China, about 70 years ago and is said to be a seedling of the cultivar Liuye Yinhong
growing at the Black Dragon Pool Park. The original tree of Dayinhong is on the hillside
behind the Golden Temple, Kunming. Synonyms: ‘Large Silver Red’, ‘Large Spinel Pink’,
‘Great Shot Silk’, ‘Large Pink’, ‘Daye Yinhong’, ‘Large Leaf Spinel Pink’. The accepted
Western synonym is ‘Shot Silk’ .Different readings: ‘Ta-yin-hung’, ‘Tayinhung’. See also
colour photo, p.155, Macoboy, 1981, The Colour Dictionary of Camellias. Received the
RHC, “First Class Certificate” in 1967 as ‘Tayinhung’ syn. ‘Shot Silk’.
Dayouli. Gao & Zhuang, 1988, The Camellia in China, p.72, No.522. Chinese synonym for Grand
Jury. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.405; changed to
‘Dazhurui’.
Daymon Runyon.
Fendig, 1952, American Camellia Catalogue. Synonym for Undaunted.
Dayuanshuai. Gao, Jiyin, 1998, The World's Best Camellia Cultivars, p.39. Chinese synonym for
Grand Marshal.
Dayunpian. (Large Cloudy Petal), (C.reticulata), Savige, 1980, International Camellia Journal, No.12,
p.71: A semi-double lotus form. Feng et al., 1986, Yunnan Camellias of China, p.41: Leaves
broad elliptic, apices acuminate and recurved, bases rounded, margins revolute, rugose,
42
7.5-8.2 cm long, 4.4-4.5 cm wide. Flowers pink (RHS.CC.55B), diameter 13 cm. Petals
13-15, slightly corrugate. Stamens numerous, around pistil. Fertile. Flowers early to
mid-season. The cultivar was selected from an open pollinated plant of ‘Wild Form’
reticulata. Synonyms: ‘Large Cloud Petal’, ‘Large Cloudy Petal’. Different reading:
‘Ta-yün-p’ien’.
Dazaifu. (Ancient Government Office in Kyushu). (C.japonica), Nippon Tsubaki - Sasanqua Meikan,
1998, p.157 with colour photo; English translation p.108. Large and small red stripes,
sometimes with wide white border, on pale pink ground. Semi-double to peony form,
cylindrical to split stamens. Flowers mid-season to late. Leaves elliptic, medium size.
Upright, vigorous, growing in a cone. An old variety, origin details obscure. From Aichi
Prefecture.
Dazaifu-no-tsubaki. (Camellia of Dazaifu), (C.japonica), Andoh, 1971, Tsubaki, Meika no Shôkai to
Saibai, pl.197 as ‘Camellia of Dazaifu’ and p.216, description as ‘Dazaifunotsubaki’: A
medium to large size semi-double of hose-in-hose form, white with soft pink flush at the base
of the petals, developing into veining and some wide, vivid carmine marking. A central
cylinder of stamens with golden anthers and light cream filaments. Originated in Japan.
Dazaifu-shibori. (Dazai District Dapple), (C.japonica), Seibundô Shinkôsha, 1979, Senchinshû, p.229,
description: Red lines on a white ground, also with small spots, single. Cylindrical stamen
cluster, petals thick, flower large. Mid-season blooming. Often produces self red flowers.
Leaves medium sized, wide oval, gently undulate, sharply serrate. Plant habit upright,
vigorous. Originated in Kurume, Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan.
Dazhengjin. (Dazheng Brocade). Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia in China, p.74, No.537.
Chinese synonym for the Japanese sasanqua Taishô-nishiki.
Dazhuang Bier. (Dazhuang’s Bill Goertz). (C.japonica), Gao, Jiyin, Lte 22nd August, 1994. A name
given in China for John Wang’s seedling No.2, California, USA. No description.
Dazhuang Xiangyuan. (Dazhuang’s Fragrant Garden). Gao, Jiyin, Ltr 22nd August 1994. A name given
in China for John Wang’s seedling No.1, California, USA. No description.
Dazhubei. (Large Crimson Cup), Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia in China, p.74, No.538.
Chinese synonym for the Japanese sasanqua Daishuhai.
Dazhurui. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.405. Chinese synonym
for the New Zealand C.reticulata hybrid Grand Jury. Former synonym ‘Dayouli’.
Dazhusha. (Large Cinnabar Red), (C.japonica), Wang & Yü, 1981, Shanchahua. Large vermilion,
formal double, 10-11 cm across, with 6-7 irregularly imbricated rows of petals totalling 60-70
in number; the centre often consisting of a mass of small, erect petals. Leaves elliptic, 7-10
cm long x 3.5-6 cm wide. See colour photo [p.129], Chang Shao Yun, 1987, Camellias from
Zhejiang, and Gao & Zhuang, 1988, The Camellia in China, p.45, No.256, colour photo
No.143,A,B. Originated in the Sichuan Province, China about 1940.
Dazhusha. (Large Vermilion). American Camellia Yearbook, 1990, p.191. Chinese synonym for the
USA C.reticulata hybrid Howard Asper.
Dazidie.
Chang, Shao Yun, 1987, Camellias from Zhejiang, p.69. (Large Purple Butterfly).
Synonym for Zihudie.
Dazipao. Fang, 1930, Diannan Chahua Xinozhi. Translation is ‘Large Purple Gown’. This cultivar
has been renamed in Kunming as Zhusha Zipao (Cinnabar Purple Gown) as published by
Feng & Shi, 1966, Zhiwu Yinhong Xunhua Jikan, 2:105, 113, and ‘Dazipao’ is regarded as a
synonym, although not strictly in accordance with the “Horticultural Code”. Different
reading: ‘Ta-tsu-pao’.
43
Dazzle. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1965, p.231, Reg. No.780, black and white photo,
p.63: A 12 year old chance seedling that first bloomed 1960; originated by G.C. Clark Jr.,
Savannah, Georgia, USA. Plant growth is upright and open and medium in rate with
mid-green leaves 10 cm long x 5 cm wide. The semi-double bloom, similar to ‘Herme’
(Hikarugenji), measures 15 cm across and 7.5 cm deep with 30 petals. Colour is rose-pink
with bright yellow stamens which are interspersed, standing in 5 groups of 20 each with rabbit
ears around the centre. Blooms mid-season to late.
Dazzler. (C.hiemalis), Nuccio’s Nurseries Catalogue, 1960: Rose-red. Semi-double, 8 cm in diameter.
Flowers early. Originated by Nuccio’s Nurseries, Altadena, California, USA. See colour
photo, front cover, SCCS, 1961, The Camellia Review, vol.23, No.1. Orthographic error:
‘Dazzun’.
Dazzun.
Nantes, 1982, Services des Espaces -Collections. Orthographic error for Dazzler.
De Bugny. (C.japonica), Vallon, Apr.1858, Revue Horticole, p.188: Red, peony form. Originated in
France. Orthographic error: ‘Di Brugni’.
De Candoleii.
Charles van Geert , 1846, Catalogue Général, p.66. Orthographic error for
Candolleana.
De Candolle.
Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.24. Orthographic error for Candolleana.
De Candolleana.
Candolleana.
Berlèse, 1843, Iconographie, vol.2, pl.192. Orthographic variant for
De Candolli.
Burdin Maggiore & Co. Catalogue, 1845, p.41. Ambroise Verschaffelt, 1854,
Catalogue, p.21. Orthographic error for Candolleana.
De Candollii.
Seidel, 1846, Pflanzen Catalog, p.6. Orthographic error for Candolleana.
De L’Ile. (C.japonica), McIlhenny, 1937, 600 Varieties of Camellias, p.4: Large, peonyform. Rose-red
mottled white. Orthographic errors: ‘De L’Ille’, ‘De L’Isle’. Originated in USA.
De L’Ille.
Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Orthographic error for De L’Ile.
De L’Isle.
Wilmot, Camellia Variety Classification Report, 1943. Orthographic error for De L’Ile.
De la Chine.
André Leroy Catalogue, 1823, p.10. Synonym for Rawesiana.
De la Force. (C.japonica), The Garden, 1889. No description. Synonym: ‘Camellia de la Force’.
(Believed extinct.)
De Lancey. (C.reticulata), ACRS., 1979, Camellia News, No.72, p.26, Reg. No.217: Originated by E.R.
Sebire, Wandin North, Victoria, Australia. A chance seedling of William Hertrich that first
bloomed 1970. The plant is upright with mid-green, 12 cm x 5 cm, lanceolate leaves. The 15
cm, dark red, semi-double flowers, bloom mid-season. Orthographic error: ‘Delancey’.
De la Reina.
Fratelli Rovelli Catalogue, 1852, p.16. Orthographic error for De la Reine.
De La Reine. (C,japonica), van Houtte, Flores des Serres...vol.2, 1846, p.205, pl.5: Raised by M.
Varenbergh of Belgium and named in honour of the Queen of that country. It forms a shrub,
very tall, vigorous, of a good shape, ample foliage and is covered with large, strong buds,
which, in spite of their numerous petals, open easily. The petals are very large, rounded,
shallowly notched, very regularly imbricated, sometimes tiered, all of them pure white with
very rare spots or stripes, definitely marked, of pink. It was figured and described in
Verschaffelt, 1854, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book I, pl.III; Sports: Bicolore de la Reine, De la
Reine Rosea, De la Reine Alba. Synonyms: ‘Reginae’, ‘Camellia de la Reine’,
‘Dell’Regina’, ‘Madame Cavallo’, ‘De la Reine’(Varenbergh), ‘Reine (de la)’. Orthographic
errors: ‘Della Regina’, ‘Reine’, ‘De la Reina’. Originated by C.J. Varenburgh, Sleydinge, near
Ghent, Belgium.
44
De la Reine à Fleurs Rosea. Jean Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1867-1868, p.39. Orthographic variant
for De la Reine Rosea.
De la Reine Alba. (C.japonica), Koch.1862, Belgique Horticole, p.119, 120: A pure white form of De la
Reine that originated in Belgium.
De la Reine Rose. André Leroy ses Enfants, 1889, Catalogue Général, p.34. Vanderbilt, 1940,
Camellia Research, p.4. Orthographic error for De la Reine Rosea.
De la Reine var. Rosea.
Verschaffelt, 1856, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book I, pl.II. Invalid
orthographic variant for De la Reine Rosea.
De la Reine Rosea. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt, 1856, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book I, pl.II, as ‘De la
Reine var. Rosea’: Extremely large, rounded petals, full or sub-emarginate, imbricated,
outspread, serried and hooded at the heart, all a delicate pink. A sport of De la Reine
originated by de Coster, Melle, Belgium. Orthographic errors: ‘De la Reine Rose’, ‘De la
Reine à Fleurs Roses’, ‘De la Reine var. Rosea’. Synonyms: ‘Madame Cavallo (Pink Form)’,
‘De la Reine à Fleurs Rosea’, ‘Camellia du Roi’, ‘Camellia de la Reine Rosea’.
De Marii. (C.japonica), Oudin Catalogue of Conservatory Plants, 1845, p.3. No decription. Originated in
France. (Believed extinct.)
De Medici. (C.japonica), Ambroise Verschaffelt, 1850, Catalogue Général, p.46. No description. de
Jonghe, 1851, Traité de la Culture du Camellia, p.103. No description. Figured and described
in Verschaffelt, 1853, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book IV, pl.III: Five or six years ago we
received this variety from M. Mariani, Milan, Italy. The rather large blossoms are a full
peony. The petals of the first two or three rows are ample, outspread, full or bilobate, while all
the others are small, serried, ruffled and upright, forming a compact whole. The roseate white
colouring is fasciated and stippled with crimson. Orthographic errors: ‘De Medicis’,
‘Demedici’, ‘Demidei’, ‘Demideici’.
De Medicis. da Silva, 1880, Forcing Varieties of Camellias in Oporto, p.7. Orthographic variant
for De Medici.
De Medicis (Casoretti).
De Milan.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1857, 67:43. Synonym for Mazzucchelli.
de Jonghe,1851, Traité de la Culture du Camellia. Synonym for Pie IX.
De Negro Nuova.
Mercatelli Catalogue, 1909-1910. Orthographic variant for Di Negro Nova.
De Nigro Nova.
Auguste van Geert, 1857, Catalogue, No.43, p.34. Orthographic error for Di
Negro Nova.
De Notaris. (C.japonica), Oudin, Lisieux Nursery Catalogue, 1844, p.10: Perfect form. Cinnabar red
fading to violet crimson. Anonymous, Apr,1845, Revue Horticole, p.57, 58. No description.
Journal d’Horticulture Pratique, 1845-1846, vol.3, No.2, p.31. No description. Charles van
Geert Catalogue, 1846, p.66: Regular form, fully shaded grey red at the centre. de Jonghe,
1851, Traité de la Culture du Camellia, p.103: Medium size, formal double, cinnabar red
base, tinted purple or violet. Verschaffelt, 1856, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book X, pl.IV:
Medium sized formal double to rose form. Carmine pink becoming vivid blood red at the
centre with large white spots. Orthographic errors: ‘De Notoris’, ‘Denotaris’, ‘De Notre’,
‘Denotavis’. Stated by Verschaffelt to be of Italian origin.
De Notoris. SCCS., 1951, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature. Orthographic error for ‘De
Notaris’.
De Notre.
Le Poidevin Nursery Catalogue, 1981. Orthographic error for ‘De Notaris’.
DeNovara. George Carter’s Nursery Catalogue, SA., 1962-1963, p.110. Orthographic error for
Danovaro.
De Novaro.
Luzzatti Catalogue, 1853. Orthographic error for Danovaro.
45
De Soto. (C.japonica), McIlhenny Catalogue, 1845-1946, p.13: Medium sized, amaranth pink; Many
petaloids blotched white, peony type; petals numerous and deeply cut; large pompom completely fills centre. Originated at Jungle Gardens, Avery Island, Louisiana, USA.
De van Cassel de Gand. (C.japonica), Berlèse, 1841, Iconographie, pl.24, Index. No description. Originated in Belgium. (Believed extinct.) Probably a synonym for Casselii.
Dea di Flora. de Jonghe, 1851, Traité de la Culture du Camellia, p.103. Orthographic error for La
Dea Flora.
Dea Flora. Luzzatti, 1851, Collezione di Camelie, p.14. Orthographic error for La Dea Flora.
Grammatically incorrect, a goddess, being a minor deity, when spoken of should be “The
Goddess Flora”.
Deacon Dodd. Dodd Nursery Catalogue, 1943-1944. Synonym for Hanatachibana as ‘Kumasaka
Variegated’.
Dean Day Smith.
Smith.
SCCS., 1990, Camellia Nomenclature, p.30: Orthographic error for Deen Day
Deane’s Darling. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 2003, p.61, colour photo p.c2, Reg.
No.2606. A 12 year old chance seedling which first flowered in 1993. Originated by Hal and
Deane Burch, Citrus Heights, Calif., USA. The anemone form flower has 20-25 garnet red,
imbricated, incurved, outside petals, with a smallish centre of red petaloids. Plant is upright,
dense, slow growing and flowers mid-season to late. The dark green leaves are 7 cm long x
3.8 cm wide. ACS, The Camellia Journal, Mar. 2004, p.24 with colour photo. Flowers
measure 7.5 cm across.
Deanna J. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Aug. 1997, p.15, Reg. No.2406. A large, rose
blush, peony to rose form double chance seedling. Flowers early to late. Originated by O.L.
Jacobson, Jacksonville Beach, Fla., USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 1997, p.2, colour
photo before p.1. The 14 year old seedling first flowered in 1992. Average flower size is 11.5
cm across x 10 cm deep, with 30-40 petals, gold anthers and white filaments. Colour is stated
to be unique – a faint rose glow from deep centre, receding to blush in outer edges. Plant
growth is spreading and average with light green leaves 9 cm long x 4.5 cm wide.
Dear Jenny. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1957, p.299, Reg. No.303: A 12 year old
chance seedling originated by C.W. Hand, Pelham, Georgia, USA, that first bloomed 1951.
Plant growth is dense and rapid with leaves averaging 7 cm x 4 cm. The white flowers are
semi-double,11-12.5 cm across with 15 petals and 15 or more petaloids. Flowers early to late.
Chinese synonym ‘Aizhanni’.
Dearest.
Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.3. Synonym for Finlandia.
Dearie Mealing. (C.japonica), Magnolia Gardens and Nursery Catalogue, 1942-1943: White marbled
pink. Large flat semi-double of slow growth. Blooms mid-season. For black and white photo
see p.99, Hertrich, 1954, Camellias in the Huntington Gardens, vol.I.
Debbi.
Champernowne Spring Sale Catalogue, 1980. Abbreviation for Debbie.
Debbie. (C.x williamsii), R.E. Harrison & Co. Ltd Nursery Catalogue, 1966, p.28: C.saluenensis x Debutante. An attractive, deep rosy pink, full anemone form to an occasional formal double,
medium size. Free flowering. Upright growth. SCCS., 1968, Camellia Nomenclature, p.159:
Clear spinel pink. Large semi-double to open peony form. Raised in New Zealand by L.E.
Jury. Received an “Award of Merit” from the RHS in 1971. Synonym: ‘New Zealand
Champ’. Colour photos p.183, Macoboy, 1981, The Colour Dictionary of Camellias; p.49
Camellias - A Wisley Handbook, 1985 and on the front cover, New Zealand Camellia
Bulletin, 1966, vol.V, No.1. Abbreviation: ‘Debbi’. Orthographic error ‘Delbie’. Sport:
Debbie Variegated. Chinese synonym: ‘Daibi’.
46
Debbie Anderton. (C.reticulata), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, vol. XIII, No.6, 1984, p.23, Reg.
No.204: A chance seedling of C.reticulata William Hertrich, originated by T. Lennard, Te
Puke, New Zealand, and first flowered 1979. Plant growth is average, upright and dense with
dark green leaves measuring 8 cm x 4.5 cm. The peony form blooms are 11 cm across by 5.5
cm deep with 22 petals and pink filaments and anthers. Early flowering with a full, loose
peony form, ruffled petals and glowing carmine red colour. (RHS.CC.53C).
Debbie Carnation.
Carnation.
Coghurst Nursery, 1994, Camellias, p.5. Orthographic variant for Debbie’s
Debbie Odom. (C.reticulata hybrid). SCCS Camellia Nomenclature 2009, p.139; Large semi-double,
pink with fluorescent sheen. Vigorous, open, upright growth. Flowers mid-season to late.
(Trewithen Pink x ‘Tali Queen’ {Dali Cha}) x Lilette Witman. Originted in 2008 by M.
Jernigan, USA.
Debbie Stutts.(C.japonica), SCCS., 1960, Camellia Nomenclature, p.44: Deep salmon rose-pink. Large,
semi-double with white petaloids. Originated by L.W. Ruffin, Ellisville, Mississippi, USA.
Debbie Variegated. (C.x williamsii), Cannon, 1969, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.24, No.1, as
‘Debbie Var.’: A virus variegated form of Debbie - Spinel pink, blotched white. Originated
in USA.
Debbie’s Carnation. (C.x williamsii), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1984, vol.XIII, No.6, P.22, Reg.
No.201: C.saluenensis x C.japonica Debutante, raised by Felix Jury, Tikorangi, Taranaki,
New Zealand and first flowered 1971. The plant is dense, upright and spreading with dark
green leaves, 8 cm x 3.5 cm. The peony form flower measures up to 10 cm across and 7 cm
deep, featuring a complete rosette of petaloids. The colour is bright, cerise pink. Blooms early
to midseason.
Debenette Pink. (C.japonica), Lindo Nurseries Price List, 1947-1948, p.4. No description. Originated in
USA. (Believed extinct.)
Debo. (C.hybrid). ACS, The Camellia Journal, Aug. 1998, p.23, Reg. No.2463. A medium size, bright
red, single C.hybrid (C.japonica seedling x C.vernalis seedling). Flowers early to mid-season.
Originated by Ray Bond, Bond Nursery Corp, Dallas, Tex., USA. American Camellia
Yearbook, 1998, p.1, colour photo before p.1. The 10 year old seedling first flowered in 1987.
Average flower size is 8.2 cm across x 2.5 cm deep, with 6 petals, yellow anthers and yellow
filaments. Blooms fall in one piece and are fragrant. Plant growth is spreading, dense and
vigorous, with light green leaves 7.5 cm long x 3.8 cm wide.
Debonaire. (C.japonica), Magnolia Gardens and Nursery Catalogue, 1942-1943: Coloured pink and
white to solid pink. Small semi-double. Low, spreading growth. Flowers early. Originated by
Magnolia Gardens, Charleston, South Carolina, USA.
Deborah Ann. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1957, p.60, Reg. No.269: A 6 year old
chance seedling originated by Mrs Frank H. Hamel, Yazoo City, Mississippi, USA. First
flowered 1955. Leaves 7.5-8 cm long by 5.5 cm wide. Flowers, delicate rose-pink, striped
deep rose-pink, similar to ‘Herme’, (Hikarugenji) in form. Average size 12 cm across and
8.5 cm deep. Blooms midseason. Orthographic error: ‘Deborrah Ann’.
Deborrah Ann.
Tammia Nursery Catalogue, 1960, p.3. Orthographic error for Deborah Ann.
Debret. (C.japonica x C.reticulata), American Camellia Yearbook, 1983, p.157, Reg. No.1915: A large,
salmon pink, peony form C.hybrid ([C.japonica Debutante x C.japonica ‘Waterloo’
(Etherington White)] x C.reticulata ‘Crimson Robe’) (Dataohong), very late flowering;
originated by D. Feathers, Lafayette, California, USA. The 18 year old seedling first bloomed
1968. Average flower size is 10 cm wide by 7.5 cm deep with 43 petals and 5 petaloids,
47
yellow anthers and pink filaments. The flower is heavy and dense, many petals are double or
treble. Leaves are medium green, 8.5 cm long by 5 cm wide.
Debret S.
Levi, 1967, American Camellia Yearbook, p.40. Name later registered as Debret as
above.
Debut. (C.reticulata x C.japonica), Nuccio’s Nurseries Catalogue, 1977. #7303. American Camellia
Yearbook, 1979, p.104, Reg. No.1518: A very large, china rose (rich rose red), wavy petalled,
loose, peony form hybrid (C.reticulata x C.japonica) seedling that blooms mid-season,
originated by Nuccio’s Nurseries, Altadena, California, USA. The 5 year old seedling first
bloomed 1973. Average flower size is 13 cm wide. Plant growth is upright, dense and rapid in
rate with dark green leaves, 10 cm x 5 cm. Colour plate front cover, SCCS., The Camellia
Review, 1977, vol.39, No.2. Sport: Debut Variegated. Chinese synonym: ‘Shouyan’.
Debut Variegated. (C.reticulata x C.japonica), Cannon, 1980, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.35, No.4
as ‘Debut Var.’: A virus variegated form of Debut - China rose blotched with white.
Originated in USA.
Debutanta.
F. le Poidevin & Son Nursery Catalogue, 1980. Orthographic error for Debutante.
Debutante. (C.japonica). Originally listed as ‘Sara C. Hastie’ by Wilson, 1930, House & Garden,
57(3):158, then as ‘Sara C. Hastie’ (Debutante) by Fruitland Nursery Catalogue, 1836-1937
and finally as Debutante, Gerbings Azalea Nurseries, 1938-1939. It is now so widely known
as Debutante and, because of the number of seedlings and sports that have been derived from
it under the name Debutante, that it is considered Article 31 of Nomenclature Code should be
invoked, and Debutante established as its valid name and ‘Sarah C. Hastie’ relegated to synonymity. A beautiful light pink, spherical peony form flower, 8-10 cm in diameter, early
flowering. Slow growth with light green foliage. Sports: Gladys Marie, Debutante Blush,
Vernice Anne. Orthographic error: ‘Debutanta’. For colour illustrations see p.57, Gerbings,
G.G., 1945, Camellias and in the American Camellia Yearbook, 1947 facing p.46. Also pl.37,
p.32, Encyclopedia of Camellias in Colour, vol.II, 1978. Chinese synonym: ‘Wutai Xinxiu’.
Debutante Benten. (C.japonica) Nuccio's Nurseries Catalogue, 2002-3. A variegated leaf sport of
Debutante. Nuccio's Nurseries Catalogue, 2007, p.33. Originated by Shirley Real, USA.
Light yellow-green edge to leaves, darker green centre, irregular shape. Flowers slightly
smaller than parent, not profuse.
Debutante Blush. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1974, Camellia Nomenclature, p.45: A blush pink sport of
Debutante. Originated by Dr R.K. Womack, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA.
Decandollei.
Decandolli.
Charles van Geert Nursery Catalogue, 1845, p.6. Synonym for Candolleana.
Cels, Paris Nursery Catalogue, 1836-1837, p.9. Synonym for Candolleana.
Decandollii Nova. Costa, 1846, Catalogue de la collection de Camellies présentée à sa majesté
L’lmperatrice de toutes les Russies et Reine de Pologne, p.9. Synonym for Candolleana.
Decaze. (C.japonica), Camellias, Y.C. Shen, 2009, p.109 with colour photo; Dark rose red with wide,
cupped petals, sometimes with light red stripes and a few white blotches, rose form double, 10
cm diameter. Leaves elliptic, matt.
December Rose. (C.x vernalis). ACS, The Camellia Journal, Dec. 2002, p.20, Reg. No.2580. A rose
pink, semi-double seedling of Egao. Originated by Nuccio's Nurseries, Altadena, Calif.,
USA, and introduced in their 2001 catalogue. American Camellia Yearbook, 2002, p.127. The
9 year old seedling first flowered in 1989. Flowers measure 11.5 cm across x 5 cm deep, with
9-12 petals. Plant is upright, with vigorous, spreading growth, and flowers early to late. The
dark green leaves are 7 cm long x 3.8 cm wide.
Deceus Italicus.
Hovey & Co. Catalogue, 1846, p.6. Orthographic error for Decus Italicum.
48
Decipiens.
Jacob Makoy et Cie Catalogue, 1838. No description. Courtois, 1833, Magazin
d’Horticulture, 1[pt.D]:315: “Deceptive”. Berlèse, 1843, Iconographie, facing pl.205.
Received from Japan at the same time as Ochroleuca and ‘Donckelaeri’ (Masayoshi).
Synonym: ‘Decipiens Flore Plena’. Originated in Japan. Synonym for Lady de Saumarez.
Decipiens Flore Plena.
Ridolfi, 1843, Catalogue of Camellias Cultivated at Bibbiani, as
‘Decipiens Fl. Pl.’. Synonym for ‘Decipiens’.
Decisa. (C.japonica), Jardin la Société Royale de Belgique Catalogue, 1842, p.21. No description.
Berlèse, 1845, Monographie, ed.3, p.210: Shrub most vigorous, of a beautiful shape and well
branched. Leaves 8 cm long by 5 cm wide, long-oval, of a glossy deep green; buds long,
solid, scales yellowish; Flower, anemone form, deep red, of average size, composed of an
exterior row of large petals, rounded and notched, with a centre of short petaloids, splashed
with red and pink.
Decliatissima.
The Gardener and Practical Florist, vol.2, 1843. Orthographic error for
Delicatissima.
Decolorans. (C.japonica), L.L. Liebig, 1839 Verzeichnis von Warmen und Kalten Hauspflanzen…, p.4.
Baumann, Mulhouse Nursery Catalogue, 1841-1842, p.13. No description. (Believed extinct.)
Decora. (C.japonica), Jacob Makoy et Cie Nursery Catalogue, 1833. No description. Courtois, 1833,
Magazin d’Horticulture, 1 [pt.D]:315: “Beau”; Berlèse, 1837, Monographie, ed.1, p.71, 127:
Leaves, 9 cm x 6 cm, obtuse-oval, almost round, serrate, a little veined, of a glossy green;
buds large, scales whitish at summit and dark yellow at base of calyx; flower, 11 cm in
diameter, double, cherry-red, petals of first three rows almost 5 cm across, reflexed,
festooned, deeply crenate; those of the interior, small, rumpled,, short, forming a large centre
with some concealed stamens. Originated in England. Orthographic error: ‘Decorosa’.
Decora Vera. (C.japonica), Fra. Tagliabue, 1840, Nomenclatore Camelliae. No description. Berlèse,
1840, Monographie, ed.2, p.116, 117, 228: Large double flower, cherry red, fringed petals,
regularly imbricated, varied forms; those of the centre twisted. Originated in Italy.
Decorosa.
Giacomelli, 184, La Catalogue della Camelie. Orthographic error for Decora.
Decumbens. Kitamura, 1950. See Camellia japonica var. decumbens Sugimoto, 1936, Key to the
Trees and Shrubs of Japan.
Decurrens. (C.japonica), Grilli, 1843-1844, Catalogo Generale. Costa, 1846, Catalogue de la collection
de Camellias présentée à sa majesté L’lmperatrice de toutes les Russies et Reine de Pologne,
p.7. No description. (Believed extinct.)
Decurrens Oblonga. (C.japonica), Burnier & Grilli Catalogue, 1846-1847: The form of Alba Plena,
imbrication admirable, vivid red with the last rows of petals towards the centre flesh pink with
a few lines of white. Original commercial release by Burnier & Grilli, Florence, Italy.
Decurrens Rosea. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt, 1844, Catalogue No.50, p.19. Isola Madre Catalogue,
1845. No description. Burnier & Grilli Catalogue,1846-1847: Imbricated. Bright red. Original
commercial release by Burnier & Grilli, Italy.
Decus.
Anonymous, 1846, Gardeners’ Chronicle (13):206. Abbreviation for Decus Italicum.
Decus Italiae. Berlèse, 1843, Iconographie, Index with reference to pl.288. Orthographic error for
Decus Italicum.
Decus Italicum. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1841, 7:6. No description. 1842, 9:9: Imbricated
form. Flower white. Most beautiful. Del Lungo e Girardi, 1928, Le Camelie, p.90: Full white
flowers, first row of outer petals rounded, others elongated but symmetrically arranged.
Synonyms: ‘Gloire d’Italie’, ‘Gloria Italica’, ‘Gloria d’Italia’. Orthographic variant: ‘Decus
49
Italicus’. Orthographic errors: ‘Deceus Italicus’, ‘Decusitalicum’, ‘Decus
Abbreviation: ‘Decus’. Originated in Italy by Mariani.
Italiae’.
Decus Italicus. Trillon, 1843, Catalogue, p.4. Orthographic variant for Decus Italicum.
Decus Lombardiae. (C.japonica), Ambroise Verschaffelt, 1853-1854, Catalogue, p.14. No description.
Verschaffelt, 1854, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book III, pl.III: It is a real perfection by reason of
the regular imbrication of its petals, the general colouring of uniform, carmine cherry-red.
They are outspread, rounded, faintly emarginate and becoming lanceolate towards the centre.
Originated in Lombardy, Italy.
Decusitalicum.
Leroy, Louis, 1893, Catalogue, p.100. Orthographic variant for Decus Italicum.
Dee Davis. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1976, p.160, Reg. No.1392: A 10 year old
chance seedling that first bloomed 1970; originated by Dr Jack Davis, Tuscaloosa, Alabama,
USA. Plant growth is upright, open and rapid in rate, with dark green leaves, averaging 12.5
cm long by 5.5 cm wide. The rose form double, ‘Mathotiana’, (Julia Drayton) type, bloom,
is rose-pink, 68 petals, 3-4 petaloids, yellow anthers and pink filaments; 8.5 cm across by 5
cm deep. Blooms mid-season. Colour plate, back cover, ACS., 1982, The Camellia Journal,
vol.37, No.2. Sport: Dee Davis Variegated. Chinese synonym ‘Didaiwei’.
Dee Davis Variegated. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1978, Camellia Nomenclature, p.46 as ‘Dee Davis Var.’:
Virus variegated form of Dee Davis - Rose-pink marbled white. Originated in USA by Dr
Jack Davis, Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
Dee Dot. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1981, p.96, Reg. No.1724: A medium to large, pale
pink to deeper on edge, occasionally red striped, formal double C.japonica (Dr Tinsley x
Tomorrow). Mid-season to late flowering. Originated by E.P. Akin, Shreveport, Louisiana,
USA. The 10 year old seedling first bloomed 1976. Average flower size is 10 cm across by
3.2 cm deep with 95 petals. Plant growth is upright and medium in rate with dark green
leaves, 8.5 cm x 4cm.
Deedy. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1966, p.86, Reg. No.894: A light, rose-pink
semi-double chance seedling that first bloomed 1964; originated by Gary Chitty Le Croy,
Moncks Corner, South Carolina, USA. Plant growth is upright, open and rapid in rate with
dark green leaves, 8.5 cm long x 2 cm wide. Blooms are 12.5 cm across by 7.5 cm deep with
185 stamens, 37 petals and 4 petaloids. Although blooms are substantially semi-double, they
vary to peony form with petals and petaloids intermixed. Blooms mid-season to late. There
are some stripes on centre petals. Anthers are yellow and filaments white.
Deen Day Smith. (C.japonica), ACS., 1989, The Camellia Journal, vol.44, No.4, p.17, Reg. No.2174:
Very large size, white, rose form double, (Witman’s Yellow x Charlie Bettes). Originated by
Dr Walter F. Homeyer, Macon Georgia, USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 1989, p.120,
colour photo [p.132]: The 11 year old seedling first bloomed 1985. Average flower size, 14
cm across x 8 cm deep with 48 petals, 5-8 small, rabbit eared petaloids, white anthers and
filaments. Plant growth is upright, spreading and average in rate, with dark green leaves, 10
cm long x 5.5 cm wide. Chinese synonym ‘Dengde’.
Deep Drift. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1956, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.38: White. Large
semi-double. Vigorous, upright growth. Blooms mid-season to late. Originated by Harvey
Short, Ramona, California, USA.
Deep Pink.
Hume, 1946, Camellias in America, p.330. Abbreviation for Deep Pink Napa.
Deep Pink. (C.sasanqua), Hazlewood, 1955, ACRS, Camellia Annual, No.2, p.10: Deep pink, single
sasanqua. Originated in Australia.
Deep Pink. (C.japonica), Avenue Nursery Catalogue, 1958, p.19: A hardy old fashioned type. Origin
unknown.
50
Deep Pink and White Variegated. (C.sasanqua), Kiyono Nursery Catalogue, 1940-1941, p.26: Large,
single, pink and white sasanqua. Originated in the USA.
Deep Pink Clouds. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1958, Camellia Nomenclature, p.29: Silver pink sport of ‘Pink
Clouds’. Originated by Fisher, USA.
Deep Pink Napa. (C.japonica), Lindo Nursery Price List, 1940-1941. Full double, deep pink, medium
large size. Originated in USA. Abbreviation: ‘Deep Pink’.
Deep Purple Dream. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, March 2009, p.29, Regn No.2736.
Originated by John L. Spencer, Lakeland, Fla, USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 2008,
p.110 with colour photo; A 13 year old seedling of Edna Campbell, first bloomed in 2003.
Flowers are semi-double, 9.5 cm diameter x 5.7 cm deep. Colour deep purple red, with yellow
filaments and anthers. Dark green leaves 11.5 cm x 5 cm. Plant is upright, dense and
vigorous.
Deep Rose Pink.
McIlhenny Catalogue, 1945-1946, p.6. Synonym for Rubra Virginalis.
Deep Rose Pink. (C.sasanqua), Camellia Grove Nursery Catalogue, 1945, p.10: Large single of deep
rose red. Originated in Australia.
Deep Secret. (C.japonica), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, March 1992, Issue No.111, vol.XVIII, No.4,
p.7, Reg. No.294: Originated by Les Jury, New Plymouth, New Zealand. First bloomed 1987
at 12 years old, a seedling of Scarlet Buoy x Bob Hope. The growth habit is upright and of
medium density and rapidity,, the dark green leaves being 9 cm long x 4.5 cm wide. The
flower is semi-double, cardinal red (RHS.CC.53B with veining 53A) veined darker, and the
anthers are lemon yellow on yellow filaments. Blooms mid-season and flowers medium to
large.
Deep South. (C.japonica), SCCS Bulletin Vol.11, No.6, p.4, June 1950. SCCS., 1951, The Camellia. Its
Culture and Nomenclature: Dark rose-red. Medium to large semi-double to loose peony form.
Medium, compact, upright growth. Midseason blooming. Originated by Harvey Short,
Ramona, California, USA.
Deep Velvet Red. (C.japonica), McIlhenny Catalogue, 1945-1946, p.3: Small carmine with occasionally
a white streak down the centre of its petals, full double, outer petals imbricated, inner loosely
arranged. Late blooming. Originated at Jungle Gardens, Avery Island, Louisiana, USA.
Deeten. (C.japonica), Outteridge, 1962, 1000 Named Camellias in Australia, p.7: Semi-double, red
striped white, large. Flowers mid-season. Named by E.G. Waterhouse from a plant from the
Taylor & Sangster Nursery known as ‘D.10’. Orthographic errors: ‘Detenne’, ‘Deetenne’.
Deetenne. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery Catalogues,
p.55. Orthographic error for Deeten.
Defender. (C.japonica), Giles & Son Nursery Catalogue, 1881, p.91. No description. Originated in Australia. (Believed extinct.)
Defiance. (C.japonica), Royal Nursery Catalogue, 1902, p.59, 60. Formal double. Red with radial bars of
white. (Believed extinct.) Originated in Australia.
Deffie Stutts. (C.japonica), Cannon, 1962, ACS., The Camellia Journal, Vol.17, No.1, back cover.
No description. Originated in USA. No valid listing located.
Deharai-fuiri. (Spotted variety of Deharai), (C.japonica), Izu-Ohshima Hawaii Botanic Gardens
Catalogue,1980 as ‘Deharaifuiri’. No description. Selected from the wild camellias in Izu
Ohshima, Tokyo, Japan.
Deharai-nioi. (Fragrance of Deharai), (C.japonica), Izu-Oshima Hawaii Botanic Gardens Catalogue,
1980 as ‘Deharainioi’. No description. Selected from the wild camellias in Izu Ohshima,
Tokyo, Japan.
51
Deirdre. (C.japonica), Dodd, 1968, An Adventure in Camellia Seedlings, p.8, colour photo: An open,
informal peony type of deep pink, centre consisting of fascicles of stamens intermingled with
small erect, fluted petals. A seedling of Tricolor White originated by Richard Dodd,
Marshallville, Georgia, USA.
D’Elbée. J & F Thoby, Gaujacq, France, Catalogue, 2009, p.2; Red, single.
Dejaniera. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1846, p.52. No description. (Believed extinct.)
Dekiyama. (Mount Deki), (C.japonica), Shirai-Bunko, 1789, Shoshiki Hanagatachô: Formal double, red
with large white spots. Very large. (Believed extinct.) See: Kyôto Engei Kuraku, 1964,
Tokushû, No.5, p.79. Originated in Japan.
Delancey. Gentry, 1984, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.39, No.4, p.17. Orthographic error for
De Lancey.
Del Mar.
SCCS., 1942, Classification of Camellias, p.4. Originated in USA. Synonym for
Eureka Variegated.
Del Rio. (C.japonica), ACRS., 1959, Camellia Annual, No.6, p.21, Reg. No.41: Originated by G.
Hooper, Bexley North, N.S.W., Australia. Parentage unknown. Informal double, confused
centre. Colour light rose and crimson. Candy stripes with large petaloids and a slight perfume.
Upright and vigorous.
Delbeiana.
Delbie.
Ridolfi, 1848, Catalogo delle Camelie, p.7. Orthographic error for Derbyana.
Reginald Kaye Nursery Catalogue, 1982. Orthographic error for Debbie.
Delciatissima.
Tourres, Macheteau Nursery Catalogue, 1839, p.21. Orthographic error for
Delicatissima.
Delecta. (C.japonica), Jacob Makoy et Cie Nursery Catalogue, 1833. No description . Courtois, 1833,
Magazin d’Horticulture, 1[pt.D.]:315: “Select”. Harrison, ed. 1838, Floricultural Cabinet,
vol.6, p.11: Double. Blood red. Originated in England.
Delecta Striata.
Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.35. Orthographic error for Delicata Striata.
Delectabilis. Makoy Nursery Catalogue, 1838. Synonym for Nivea, according to van Houtte,
1844-1845, Catalogue, 18:10.
Delectabilis Rosea. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.35. Synonym for Delectissima Rosea.
Delectata. (C.japonica), Charles van Geert Nursery Catalogue, 1845, p.5. No description. Ibid, No.105,
1848, p.109: Rose form double, yellowish white in the centre. Originated in England.
Delectissima. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1839, 1:3: White, peony form, flecked lightly with
carmine. Originated in England.
Delectissima (MG). (C.japonica), Magnolia Gardens and Nursery Catalogue, 1942-1953, invalidly as
‘Delectissima’: Large single. White with wide pink stripes. Vigorous, spreading growth. Early
to mid-season blooming. Originated in the Magnolia Gardens, Charleston, South Carolina,
USA. See p.101, Hertrich, 1954, Camellias in the Huntington Gardens, vol.I, for black and
white photo.
Delelii.
Verschaffelt Catalogue, No.50, 1844, p.19. Orthographic error for Delesii.
Delesii (C.japonica), Harrison, ed. 1839, Floricultural Cabinet, vol.7, p.56: Double, dark rose. Berlèse,
1843, Iconographie, pl.207: A flower, 9-10 cm in diameter, very full, red richly marked with
touches more or less delicate. The corolla is irregular, of a globular form, composed of
numerous petals, not disposed in rows as usual, but inserted pell-mell; some are broad and
round, others long and erect, many are short, close-set, more or less confused. Those of the
52
centre are unequal like the first, but united in distinct fascicles, making the corolla sphrerical.
Originated in England. Orthographic errors: ‘Delsii’, ‘Delzii’, ‘Delelii’.
Delfosse.
Lenten, 1963, Gardeners’ Chronicle & Gardening Illust., p.411. Abbreviation for
Auguste Delfosse.
Delgrande.
Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Synonym for Ninfa Egeria.
Delia. (C.japonica), Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.10. No description.
Originated in Italy by Tagliabue. (Believed extinct.)
Delia Williams. RHS, 1965, The Rhododendron and Camellia Yearbook, No.19, p.165 and pl.3:
RHS., “Award of Merit”, April, 21, 1964. Typical of the grex as a whole, this cultivar has
narrow leaves attenuated at the tip and some 10 cm long and 3.8 cm wide. The flowers are 10
cm across, contain 8-10 petals and are coloured rose-pink (HCC.427/2) with some darker
staining on the outer petals. In the centre is a cluster of stamens, a few of which are petaloid.
See coloured illustration pl.3 facing p.56. Exhibited by Mrs Alison Johnstone, Trewithen.
Cornwall, England. The priority name for this cultivar is Citation.
Delicacy. (C.japonica), Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery Catalogues, p.55. No description. Originated in USA. (Believed extinct.)
Delicata Amoena. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt, 1859, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book X, pl.III: The
blossoms, larger than average, are formed of large, ovate petals, emarginate, outspread,
regularly imbricated, a delicate rosy white, banded and stippled a vivid pink. Originated in
Belgium by Verschaffelt..
Delicata Striata. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt, 1851, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book I, pl.III: The blossom,
of medium size, belongs to the class of perfections by the perfect imbrication of its petals.
These are large, rounded-oval, slightly sinuate, emarginated, of a vivid pink, veined a deeper
shade and streaked longitudinally by more or less distinct white lines. Originated in Italy.
Orthographic variant: ‘Delecta Striata’.
Delicate Pink. (C.japonica), Hume, 1946, Camellias in America, p.330. No description. Originated in the
Lindo Nursery, Alabama. USA. (Believed extinct.)
Delicate Pink Imbricated. (C.japonica), Hume, 1946, Camellias in America, p.330. No description.
Originated in the Lindo Nursery, Alabama, USA. (Believed extinct.)
Delicatescent. (C.hybrid). New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1993, Issue No.115, vol.XVIII, No.2, p.47,
colour photo p.48: A seedling of Dream Baby x C.lutchuensis raised by John Lesnie,
Manukau City, New Zealand. Very pale pink to white, small single form.
Delicatissima. (C.japonica), Morren, 1834, L’Illustration Horticole, vol.2, p.93. No description.
Anonymous,1834, Revue Horticole. Berlèse, 1837, Monographie, ed.1, p.112, 131: Leaves
8.5 cm long by 5 cm wide, ovate-oblong. Flowers, 8.5 cm in diameter, double rose form, heart
large, 5.5 cm diameter, petals curled, sinuous, irregular. Those at the periphery larger, being
2.5 cm or more broad, entire, all white striped with rose, stripes both large, small and
numerous. Originated in Japan and imported by von Siebold according to Berlèse. See pl.63,
Berlèse, 1841, Iconographie, vol.1. Orthographic errors: ‘Decliatissima’, ‘Deliciatissima’.
Sports: Delicatissima Rubra, Delicatissima Rosea. Synonym: ‘Delicatissima Nova’. See
also Mertens & Fontaine, Collection de cent espèces.....camellia, 1845, pl. 23. Mertens says
the plant was obtained by British nurserymen in 1831.
Delicatissima Nova. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.55. Synonym for Delicatissima.
Delicatissima Rosea. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt Catalogue, No.50, 1844, p.19. A rose-pink sport of
Delicatissima. Originated in Italy.
53
Delicatissima Rubra. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1843-1844, 12: vv: Salmon red with dawn
reflections, covered with spots of white. A sport of Delicatissima. Originated in England.
Delight.
SCCS Bulletin Vol.11, No.2, Dec 1949. SCCS., 1950, The Camellia. Its Culture and
Nomenclature: Synonym for Mrs Josephine M. Hearn.
Delightful. (C.japonica), ACRS., 1988, Camellia News, No.107, p.10, Reg. No.350: Originated by Craig
Carroll, West Pymble, NSW., Australia. Seed parent C.japonica, White Tulip, pollen parent
unknown. First flowered 1981. A single white, 6 petalled plant, 10 cm across x 6 cm deep.
Flowers freely on a upright, rapid-growing plant. Fluted petals with stamens in a column.
Flowers fall complete. Leaves ovate, flat, margins serrate, apices acuminate, glossy green, 10
cm long x 5.5 cm wide.
Delimoniana. (C.japonica), William Bull Catalogue, 1869, p.79. No description. Originated in England.
(Believed extinct.)
Delizia. (C.japonica), Medici Spada, 1858, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete: Small flower, formal
double, petals pale pink with close carmine stripes, very similar to the rose ‘Oeillet Parfait’.
Originated in Italy by Delgrande, Rome.
Della Regina.
Roda Nursery Catalogue, 1885. Orthographic error for De la Reine.
Dell’Universita. (C.japonica), Linden Catalogue, 1875. No description. Orthographic error ‘Delle
Universata’. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Della Lamberti.
de Bisschop Nursery Catalogue, 1937, p.10. Synonym for Lambertii.
Della Regina.
Roda Catalogue, 1885, p.42. Orthographic variant for De la Reine.
Della Robbia.
Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.4. Synonym for Meredith Lake.
Della Robia.
SCCS., 1942, Classification of Camellias, p.1. Orthographic error for ‘Della
Robbia’, synonym for Meredith Lake.
Della Peschiera. van Houtte Catalogue, 1858, 72:10. Orthographic error for ‘Delle Peschiere’, synonym for Contessa Belgioioso.
Delle d’Ardiglioni.
d’Ardiglione.
da Silva & Filhos Catalogue, 1987-1988. Orthographic error for Bella
Delle Peschiere. Luzzatti 1851, Collezione di Camelie. p.14. Orthographic errors: ‘Bella Peschiera’,
‘Bella da Peschiera’, ‘Bella Della Peschiera’, ‘Della Peschiera’, ‘Delle Peschiere’. Synonym
for Contessa Belgioioso.
Delle Universata.
Real Comphania Horticolo-Agricola Portuense, Catalogue, No.29, 1985-1986,
p.57. Orthographic error for Dell’ Universita.
Dellie McCaw. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1975, p.236, Reg. No.1368: A 5 year old
chance C.japonica seedling that first flowered, 1974; originated by Joseph M. Almand,
Warner Robbins, Georgia, USA. Plant growth is upright, dense and medium in rate, with dark
green leaves, 10 cm long by 5.5 cm wide. The formal double, Alba Plena type, bloom is pink
with 85 petals. Average size, 8 cm across by 5 cm deep. Falls complete. Blooms early to late.
Deloraine. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery Catalogues.
p.56. Orthographic error for De la Reine.
Deloraine. (C.hybrid), Duchy of Cornwall Catalogue, 2014. A chance seedling of C.saluensis, which it
resembles. Small light pink single, late flowering. Originated by Moira Reid, Moyclare
Nursery, Cornwall, UK.
Delores Edwards. (C.x williamsii), ACS., Aug.1989, The Camellia Journal, vol.44, No.3, p.9, Reg.
No.2161: Large size, light, orchid pink, semi-double to anemone form to peony form, chance
seedling of a C.saluenensis x C.japonica hybrid. Blooms mid-season to late. Originated by
54
Hulyn Smith, Valdosta, Georgia, USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 1989, p.120: The 9
year old seedling first bloomed 1985. Average size bloom, 12 cm across x 3.8 cm deep with
20 petals, 8 petaloids, bright yellow anthers and white filaments. Plant growth is upright and
medium with dark green leaves, 11cm long x 3.8 cm wide.
Delores Taylor.
Taylor.
Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Orthographic error for Dolores
Delores Thompson. (C.japonica), ACS., Feb.1989, The Camellia Journal, vol.44, No.1, p.12, Reg.
No.2116: Small size, light pink - almost white, roseform double, C.japonica chance seedling.
Originated by Johnny Aldrich, Brooklet, Georgia, USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 1989,
p.120, colour photo, 3p.1324: The 15 year old seedling first bloomed 1977. Average flower
size, 7.5 cm across x 3.8 cm deep with 59 petals. Plant growth is spreading and medium with
dark green leaves, 9.5 cm x 7 cm.
Delorme. (C.japonica), McIlhenny, 1937, 600 Varieties of Camellias, p.5: Rose madder, blotched white.
Medium sized semi-double. Originated by Jungle Gardens, Avery Island, Louisiana, USA.
Delphina. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt Catalogue, No.50, 1844-1845, p.24. No description. Originated in
Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Delphine. (C.japonica), Magnolia Gardens and Nursery Catalogue, 1944-1945: Large single, salmon
pink. Mid-season blooming. Originated at Magnolia Gardens, Charleston, South Carolina,
USA.
Delphine Johnson. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Aug. 1999, p.14, Reg. No.2499. A formal
double chance seedling, pale pink with many different sized maroon stripes. Star shaped
petals surround the centre of the flower. Originated by Elizabeth R. Scott, Aiken, S.C., USA.
American Camellia Yearbook, 1999, p.3, colour photo before p.1. The 19 year old seedling
first flowered 1986. Average flower size is 9 cm across x 3.8 cm deep, with 55 petals and a
bud centre. Flowers have heavy texture and sheen. Plant is upright and dense, and of average
growth rate. Flowers profusely, and has dark green leaves 11.5 cm long x 5 cm wide.
Delsii.
Cachet Catalogue, 1840-1841, p.2. Orthographic error for Delesii.
Delta Dawn. (C.reticulata.x C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1980, p.162, Reg. No.1672: A
very large, rose-pink semi-double, C.reticulata hybrid ([‘Cornelian’ (Damanao) x Mrs D.W.
Davis] x ‘Cornelian’). Mid-season to late flowering; originated by Frank Pursel, Oakland,
California, USA. Average flower size, 15 cm wide x 11 cm deep. Plant growth upright,
spreading and medium in rate with dark green leaves, 15 cm long x 7.5 cm wide.
Delta King. (C.japonica), Camellian Nursery Catalogue, 1961-1962, inside front cover: Bright red,
irregular semi-double with folded frilly petals, and a heavy centre of intense yellow stamens
in clusters, intermixed with petaloids. Originated by Camelliana Nursery, California, USA.
Delta Queen. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1970, p.162, Reg. No.1081: A 13 year old
chance seedling that first bloomed 1958; originated by Dr John D. Lawson, Antioch,
California, USA. Plant growth is upright, average in density and slow in rate, with medium
sized, dark green leaves. The formal double bloom is blush with an occasional pink streak, no
anthers. It measures 11 cm across and 3.5 cm deep with 60-65 petals. Late flowering.
Delvecchio. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1860-1861, 83:44. No description. van Houtte Catalogue, 1864-1865, 104:80: Well imbricated, petals serrated; the central and outer petals a very
deep rose-pink, the intermediate petals a pale pink. From Danovaro. Mariotti Catalogue,
1924: Vivid cherry red, centre lighter. Originated in Italy.
Delzii.
Charles van Geert Catalogue, No.105, 1848, p.109. Orthographic error for Delesii.
Demari. (C.japonica), Fratelli Rovelli, Catalogue, 1852, p.16: No description. Synonyms: ‘Demari della
Scogi’, ‘Demari della Scoglietto’. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
55
Demari della Scogi.
Burdin Maggiore & Co. Catalogue, 1856-1857. Synonym for Demari.
Demari Della Scoglietto.
Demari.
Burdin Maggiore & Co. Catalogue, 1870-1871, p.73. Synonym for
Demedici. Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Orthographic error for ‘De Medici’; synonym for Mazzuchelli.
Demetria Boutourlin.
Jose Maria Serra, Establecimiento de Horticultura, 1855 Catalogo, p.10.
Orthographic error for Demetrio Bouturlin.
Demetria Bouturlin.
Bouturlin.
Joseph Baumann, 1856, Prix Courant, p.3. Orthographic error for Demetrio
Demetrio Boutourlin. von Biedenfeld, 1856, Practische Grundlehren Cultur von Camellien, p.38.
Orthographic variant for Demetrio Bouturlin.
Demetrio Bouturlin. (C.japonica), Luzzatti Catalogue, 1853. No description. Franchetti, 1855,
Collezione di Camelie, p.25: Crimson petals striped white, often two stripes on many petals,
sometimes dark at the circumference and whitish in the centre. Imbricated. Verschaffelt,
1857, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book VIII, pl.IV, as ‘Demetrio Boutourlin’ in text and
‘Demetrio Bouturlin’ on plate: Blossoms of the largest size, of a vivid pink with broad white
stains and bands, numerous and ample petals, the exterior, imbricated and rounded, the
following, oval or oblong in a somewhat irregular cluster. We received this in 1852 from Mr
Luzzatti, Florence, Italy, where it was obtained from seed. Orthographic errors: ‘Demetria
Boutourlin’, ‘Demetria Bouturlin’ ‘Demetrio Bouturline’, ‘Demetrio Buturlin’. Orthographic
variant: ‘Demetrio Boutourlin’.
Demetrio Bouturline.
Mercatelli Catalogue, 1894. Orthographic error for Demetrio Bouturlin.
Demetrio Buturlin. Verschaffelt, 1857, Iconographie in footnote. Orthographic variant for
Demetrio Bouturlin.
Demidei. van Houtte Catalogue, 1858, 72:10. Orthographic error for ‘De Medici’; synonym for
Mazzuchelli.
Demideici.
Downing Catalogue, ca.1858. Orthographic error for ‘De Medici’; synonym for
Mazzuchelli.
Demidiei. van Houtte Catalogue, 1851, 44:8. Orthographic error for ‘De Medici’; synonym for
Mazzuchelli.
Demi-Tasse. (C.japonica), McCaskill Gardens Catalogue, 1962: Pink, semi-double. Small. American
Camellia Yearbook, 1965, p.230, Reg. No.738: [SCCS.No.62-27] McCaskill Gardens,
Pasadena, California, USA. A seedling, female parent My Darling, pollen parent unknown.
Colour warm peach blossom pink with yellow stamens. Semi-double with a diameter of 5-6
cm, 4 cm deep. Form is hose-in-hose or cup-in-saucer with a row of petaloids between the cup
and the saucer. Plant is upright, compact and vigorous. Orthographic variant: ‘Demitasse’.
Recipient of the William E. Wylam “Miniature Award”, 1971. For colour photo see p.79, 80,
Macoboy, 1981, The Colour Dictionary of Camellias and pl.38, p.33, Encyclopedia of
Camellias in Colour, vol.II, 1978. Also back cover of The Camellia Journal, Aug.1990,
vol.46, No.3 as ‘Demitasse’.
Demitasse. ACS, Aug.1990, The Camellia Journal, vol.46, No.3, back cover caption. Orthographic
variant for Demi-Tasse.
Demur.
ACS, The Camellia Journal, Jun 2011, p.17. Orthographic error for Demure.
Demure. (C.x williamsii), SCCS., 1960, Camellia Nomenclature, p.120: Pale pink with deeper edges.
Small single. Medium, spreading growth. Blooms early to mid-season. Originated by David
Feathers, Lafayette, California, USA.
56
Den Burton. (C.reticulata hybrid). New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, March 1999, Issue No.132, vol.XXI,
No.1, p.15, Reg. No.402. Registered by N. Haydon, Takanini, New Zealand. A chance
seedling with characteristics typical of C.reticulata x C.japonica. Flowers are very large
peony form, 13 cm diameter x 8 cm deep,with some intermingled stamens, and the colour is
bright scarlet red (RHS.CC. 52A). Plant is upright and of medium density and growth rate for
its type. Dark green leaves are 12 cm long x 5 cm wide.
Denovaro. Stefano Pagliai Catalogue, 1867, p.66. Orthographic error for Danovaro.
Denbudor. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1951, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature: Red to red and
white. Small formal double. Upright, compact growth. Mid-season blooming. Originated by
H. Davis, El Monte, California, USA.
Deneb. (C.japonica), Cattolica, G., Le mie Camelie, My Camellias, 2005, p.79 with colour photo;
Medium size, semi-double with upright central petals, white with red streaks and blotches
(RHS.CC.53C). A seedling of Moshio x Alba Simplex, first flowered 1986. Originated by
Dott. Guido Cattolica, Livorno, Italy.
Deneen Fendig. (C.japonica), Fendig, 1956, American Camellia Yearbook, p.33: White variegated
seedlings. Deneen Fendig - a mutant of Gladys Fendig, discovered and fixed by grafting by
the author. This variety was named for our small daughter, Deneen. The medium to large,
white, variegated semidouble flower with unusual pink markings is about 10 cm in diameter.
The base colour is white suffused with irregular markings of light pink, but with a white margin around the petal tips. The bloom is flat and has a faint fragrance. Early blooming. Originated by Albert Fendig, Georgia, USA.
Dengde. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.428; Chinese synonym
for the USA C.japonica Deen Day Smith.
Dengnisi. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.428; Chinese synonym
the USA C.japonica Dennis Vaughan
Dengshi Shancha.
Chinese name for the species C.tenii. Different reading ‘Teng Shih Shan Ch’a’.
Denise Bauvin. Pépinières Thoby, Carquefou, France, Plant List, 2003, p.16; No details.
Denisiana. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1842, 9:9 & 1844-1845, 18:10: Very large flower, deep
carmine, exceptionally variegated. Trillon, Le Mans Nursery Catalogue, 1843, p.4: Large red
flower with large white blotches. Lungo & Girardi, 1928, Le Camelie, p.128: Dark red.
Double flower, rose form with external petals, few in number, imbricated, but separated, those
internal, few, small and disposed irregularly. Originated in Italy by Cock. Orthographic
variant: ‘Denysiana’. Orthographic error: ‘Dennisii’.
Denkôji-chiri-tsubaki.
(Denkô Temple Scattering Camellia), (C.japonica), Encyclopedia of
Camellias in Colour, vol.I, 1972, pl.426, p.177 & 355: Vivid pink formal double of large size,
9 cm across with about 50 rounded petals. Leaves, large, wide-elliptic, dark green,
blunt-acuminate, defined venation, small, shallow serrations. Originated in Nara Prefecture,
Japan. The original old tree at the Denkô Temple in Nara-shi has died recently. A synonym
for Mononofu-tsubaki Denkôji. Different reading: ‘Bushitsubaki’.
Dennis Higgins.
gins.
SCCS., 1984, Camellia Nomenclature, p.115. Orthographic error for Dorrie Hig-
Dennis Vaughn. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1983, p.157, Reg. No.1864: A large, deep
velvet red, formal double C.japonica, early to mid-season flowering; originated by Mary
McLeod, Monticello, Florida, USA. The 15 year old seedling first bloomed 1972. Average
flower size, 10.5 cm wide x 2.5 cm deep with 115 petals. The three outer rows of petals lie
flat or convex; the other rows curl in at outer edge and are purple to black. Plant growth is
57
spreading, dense and medium in rate with dark green leaves, 9 cm long x 5 cm wide. Sport:
Dennis Vaughn Variegated. Chinese synonym ‘Dengnisi’.
Dennis Vaughn Variegated. (C.japonica), Valdosta Camellias, Nov.1990, ACS., The Camellia Journal,
vol.46, No.4, p.22 as ‘Dennis Vaughn V.’: A virus variegated form of Dennis Vaughn - Deep
velvet red blotched white. Originated in USA.
Dennisii.
Cachet Catalogue, 1845-1846, p.6. Orthographic error for Denisiana.
Denny D. SCCS Bulletin Vol 11, No.2, p.7, Dec. 1949. SCCS., 1950, The Camellia. Its Culture
and Nomenclature, p.32 as ‘Dennyd’. Synonym for Iwane-shibori.
Denotaris.
Trillon, Le Mans Nursery Catalogue, 1843, p.4. Orthographic variant for De Notaris.
Denotavis.
Auguste van Geert Nursery Catalogue, 1848, p.16. Orthographic error for De Notaris.
Denotre.
Russell Nursery Catalogue, 1955-1956. Synonym for De Notaris.
Dense Hailstones. Macoboy, 1981, The Colour Dictionary of Camellias, p.179. Synonym for Yaearare.
Dentellata Floreatina. (C.japonica), Costa, 1846, Catalogue de la collection de Camellias présentée à sa
majesté L’Imperatrice de toutes les Russies et Reine de Pologne, p.9. No description.
Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Denysiana.
Alexis Dalliere, 1852, Price List, p.15. Orthographic variant for Denisiana.
Depressa. (C.japonica), Jacob Makoy et Cie Catalogue, 1839, p.11. No description. Jardin la Société
Royale de Belgique Catalogue.1842, p.21. No description. Van Houtte Catalogue, 1843-1844:
Large flower of the type of ‘Conspicua’ of Loddiges. Ridolfi Catalogue, 1848: Deep rose with
few petals, variegated at the centre. Synonyms: ‘Depressa d’Italie’, ‘Depressa Flore Rubro’.
Originated in Italy.
Depressa d’Italie.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1843-1844, 12:w. Large flower of the type of
‘Conspicua’ of Loddiges’. Synonym for Depressa.
Depressa Flore Rubro. Ridolfi, 1843, Catalogue of Camellias Cultivated at Bibbiani, as ‘Depressa
Fl. Rubro’. Synonym for Depressa.
Dera May. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1960, Camellia Nomenclature, p.44: White with a blotch of red on one
or two petals. Medium semi-double to peony form with loose petals. Vigorous, bushy growth.
Flowers mid-season. Originated in USA.
Derbejana.
Rovelli Catalogue, 1852, p.16. Orthographic error for Derbyana.
Derbeyana. Jacob Makoy et Cie Catalogue, 1833; Courtois, 1833, Magazin d’Horticulture, 1
[pt.D]:315. Orthographic error for Derbyana.
Derbiana. J.E. von Reider, 1834, Die Beschreibung und Kultur der Azaleen, Camelien.., p.218. No
description. Berlèse, 1837, Monographie, ed.1. Orthographic variant for Derbyana.
Derbiana. The Pacific Camellia Society, 1946, Camellia Nomenclature, p.11. Synonym for Cup of
Beauty (United States).
Derbiana Red.
Barrios’ Nursery Catalogue, 1954-1955. Synonym for Derbyana.
Derbiana Vera. Berlèse, 1837, Monographie, ed.1, p.108, 130. Orthographic variant for ‘Derbyana
Vera’, synonym for Derbyana.
Derbriana.
Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Orthographic error for Derbyana.
Derbriana Vera. Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue Orthographic error for ‘Derbyana
Vera’, synonym for Derbyana.
Derby Red.
Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2. Synonym for Derbyana.
58
Derbyana. (C.japonica), Loddiges Catalogue, 1830, p.21. No description. Harrison, 1835, Floricultural
Cabinet, vol.III, p.186 as a “British hybrid having dark red flowers”. Berlèse, 1837 and 1840,
Monographie, describe a camellia he called ‘Derbiana Vera’. In his 1841 and 1843
Iconographie he figures and describes ‘Derbiana’. It is believed they are synonymous with
Derbyana. His description as follows, matches his colour plates: Flowers 10 cm in diameter
and often more, double, deep orange-red of a brightness difficult to designate; the exterior
petals arranged in several rows, broad, a little spoon shaped, crenate at the apex; those of the
interior, narrow, rumpled, of a rose tint with a few sterile stamens in the centre. van Houtte
Catalogue, 1841, 7:6 gives as synonyms: ‘Ammanta’, ‘Angresiae’, and ‘Coloured’. The
Floricultural Cabinet, 1838, gives ‘Amanda’ as a synonym and Loddiges Catalogue, 1848
gives ‘Angrezia’, while Charles van Geert, 1845 gives ‘Clartoni’, ‘Clertonii’, ‘Clertonia’,
‘Amanda’ and ‘Derejana’. See also Mertens & Fontaine, Collection de cent
espèces.....camellia, 1845, pl. 56. There are also a number of orthographically erroneous
names such as ‘Derbiana’, ‘Derbeyana’, ‘Derbyanna’, ‘Debriana’, ‘Delbeiana’ as well as the
synonyms ‘Derbiana Vera’, ‘Debriana Vera’, ‘Derby Red’ and ‘Derbiana Red’. The situation
in America is that the synonyms ‘Lady Derby’s’ and ‘Zachary Taylor’ were used, but also
two other invalid names in ‘Cup of Beauty’ and ‘Tasse de Beauté’ both of which validly
belong to an old Chinese variety which Fortune imported to England in 1857. According to
Fendig, 1950, American Camellia Catalogue other synonyms that have been attached to
Derbyana in America are ‘Florapena’, ‘Peonyflora’, ‘New Orlean’s Red’, ‘Tassa de Beau’,
‘J.G. Peonyflora’ and ‘Derbeyiana’.
Derbyana Vera. Berlèse, 1837, Monographie, ed.1, p.108, 170 as ‘Derbiana Vera’ and changed to
‘Derbyana Vera’ in his 1840 Monographie, ed.2, p.185, 186. Synonym for Derbyana.
Dernii. Baumann & Baumann, 1835 Collection de Camellias é1evés à Bollwieler, No.45 as J.W.
‘Dernii’ (Augusta). Makoy Catalogue, 1838, gives Augusta as the valid name and Berlèse,
1841, Iconographie -‘ Augusta Rubra Aurantiaca’. It is a synonym for Augusta.
Des Peintres. (C.japonica), Cachet Catalogue, 1840-1841, p.1: Pink. Jardin de Société Royale de
Belgique Catalogue, 1842, p.21; Jacob Makoy et Cie Catalogue, 1842, p.9. No description.
Charles van Geert Nursery Catalogue, 1845, p.5; Mertens & Fontaine, 1845, Collection de
cent especes ou variétés du genre Camellia, p.130: ph.,p.132. No description. Synonym:
‘Peintres’. Synonym for Pictorum Coccinea.
Descanso Blush. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1957, The Camellia Review, vol.18, No.8, p.21: White overlaid
with blush pink. Medium size, loose peony form. Compact growth. Early to mid-season
blooming. Originated at the Descanso Gardens, La Canada, California, USA.
Descanso Mist. (C.reticulata. x C.japonica), SCCS., 1972, Camellia Nomenclature, p.155: Red with
iridescent petals. Large formal double to peony form. Medium size, upright growth, Blooms
midseason. Originated by Maitland, California, USA. Sport: Descanso Mist Variegated.
Descanso Mist Variegated. (C.reticulata.x C.japonica), Gentry, 1969, ACS., The Camellia Journal,
vol.24, No.1 as ‘Descanso Mist V.’: A virus variegated form of Descanso Mist - Iridescent
red blotched white. Originated in USA.
Descanso Surprise. Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Orthographic variant for Descanso’s Surprise.
Descanso Yuletide. (C.japonica), SCCS.,1950, Camellia Nomenclature, p.44: White, irregularly striped
maroon. Very large semi-double. Medium, upright growth. Early to mid-season blooming.
Originated at Descanso Gardens, La Canada, California, USA.
Descanso’s Surprise. (C.japonica), SCCS Bulletin Vol.11, No.2, p.7, Dec. 1949. SCCS., 1950, The
Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.32: White. Medium sized anemone form. Medium,
upright growth. Originated at Descanso Gardens, La Canada, California, USA. Orthographic
59
variant: ‘Descanso Surprise’. See p.89, Hertrich, 1955, Camellias in the Huntington Cardens,
Vol.II, for black and white photo.
Descendant. (C.japonica), Middleton Gardens Catalogue, 1942: Red blotched white. Medium large
semi-double. Slow growth. Early blooming. Originated at Middleton Gardens, Charleston,
South Carolina, USA.
Desdemona. (C.japonica), Waterhouse, 1947, Camellia Quest, p.16. Camden Park Seedling 62/52, originated by Macarthur, Camden Park, N.S.W., Australia. No description. (Believed extinct.)
Desdemonais.
Verschaffelt, 1844, Catalogue No.50, p.19. Orthographic error for Desdemonia.
Desdemonia. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt Catalogue,1847-1848, p.56. No description. Orthographic error:
‘Desdemonais’. (Believed extinct.)
Desert Moon. (C.reticulata hybr.) ACS.,May 1989, The Camellia Journal, vol.44, No.2, p.9, Reg.
No.2120: Large to very large size, light pink with deep pink towards the petal edge;
semi-double, C.reticulata hybrid, seedling of ‘Lasca Beauty’. Blooms mid-season. Originated
by Langdon Nursery, Sebastapol, California, USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 1989,
p.120: The 8 year old seedling first bloomed 1987. Plant growth is upright, dense and rapid.
Desert Sunset. (C.japonica), ACS, Yearbook, 2013, p.111 with colour photo; Regn. No.2912; Originated
and registered by C.M. & Lillian Gordy, Ocala, Fla. USA,, and propagated by Loch Laurel
Nursery, Valdosta, Ga. The large, 12.7cm diameter x 5cm deep, flower is bright coral pink,
semidouble to peony form, with some petals in rabbit ear form in cooler weather. Large spray
of stamens with bright gold anthers and cream filaments mixed with the inner petals. Dense,
upright plant with vigorous growth. Dark green leaves average 12cm x 5,7cm, with medium
serration. Flowers mid-season
Desertion. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1951, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature: Pale pink. Medium
large, rose form double. Blooms mid-season to late. Originated by J. Pfingstl, California,
USA.
Desiderio. (C.japonica), van Houtte Caralogue, 1858, 72:10 as ‘Desiderio’(II): Brilliant red, petals
marked and lightly bordered white; very large, ample and perfectly imbricated. Synonym ‘Il
Desiderio’. Originated in Italy.
Desinganno.
Ambroise Verschaffelt, 1854, Catalogue, p.18. Jules Menoreau, Nantes Nursery
Catalogue, 1856, p.8. Orthographic error for Disinganno.
Desinganus.
Desir.
Auguste van Geert, 1854, Catalogue No.36, p.36. Orthographic error for Disinganno.
A. Stervinou, Catalogue 2008, p.8. French translation of Desire – not allowable under
International Commission rules.
Desire. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1977, p.209, Reg. No.1449: A medium size, pale
pink, edged a deeper pink, formal double C.japonica (Dr Tinsley x Debutante), that first
bloomed 1973. Originated by David Feathers, Lafayette, California, USA. The bloom has 60
petals and measures 10-10.5 cm across and 5 cm deep. It holds on the bush for a long time.
Plant growth is upright, dense and rapid in rate with dark green leaves, 8.5 cm long x 5 cm
wide. Colour photo, front cover, New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, vol.XII, No.3, 1981 and
ACRS., 1990, Camellia News, No.113. Chinese synonym: ‘Xiwang’, later changed to
‘Xinyuan’.
Desire Possession.
Camellias, Y.C. Shen, 2009, p.332 with colour photo; Synonym for Yuki.
Desmond Haydon. (C.williamsii). NZCS, Camellia Bulletin, No.171, March 2012, p.15 with colour
photo. Regn No.498 A seedling of Haydon’s Compact, pollen parent unknown, which first
flowered in 2004. Plant is almost globular in shape, dense, and of medium to strong growth
rate. Dark green leaves are small, 6.5 cm x 3 cm. Flower is a formal double, 8 cm diameter x
60
2.5 cm deep, with about 80 petals, usually cupped, size decreasing to tiny at flower centre. No
petaloids. Colour is light pink (RHSCC 65C, shading to 65B at petal edges and centre). Late
flowering. Originated by Neville Haydon, Papakura, NZ.
Despina. (C.japonica), Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.10. No description.
Originated in Italy by Tagliabue. (Believed extinct.)
Dessa Thompson. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1948, p.168, McCaskill Gardens seedling
No.153. A very full, complete double, irregular flower, white with a delicate creamy
suffusion, 10 cm across. Flowers early to late. Habit compact and upright with medium green
leaves, elliptic, acute and serrate, 10 cm long x 4 cm wide. First bloomed 1943. Parentage
unknown. Originated at McCaskill Gardens, Pasadena, California, USA. Registration No.43
with SCCS. See p.103, Hertrich, 1954, Camellias in the Huntington Gardens, vol.I for black
and white photo.
Destans. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt, 1844, Catalogue No.50, p.19. No description. Cachet Catalogue,
1845-1846, p.6; Burdin Maggiore & Co. Catalogue, 1845, p.41. No description. Originated in
Italy. (Believed extinct.) Orthographic errors: ‘Distans’, ‘Distons’.
Destiny. (C.japonica), Domoto Nursery Price List, 1956, p.2. No description. SCCS, 1956, The Camellia.
Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.39: A sport of ‘Lady Clare’, (Akashigata) - White streaked
deep pink. Imported to USA by Domoto in 1955. See colour plate No.39, p.33, Encyclopedia
of Camellias in Colour, vol.II, 1978. Chinese synonym ‘Disidini’.
Detenne.
SCCS., 1968, Camellia Nomenclature, p.42. Othographic error for Deeten.
Deviana.
Bull Retail List, 1872, p.498. Orthographic error for Devriana.
Devona.
Arnold-Forster, 1948, Shrubs for the Milder Counties, p.205. Orthographic error for
Devonia.
Devonensis.
W.J. Marchant’s Nursery Catalogue, 1937, p.33. Synonym for Devonia.
Devonia. (C.japonica), Anonymous, May,1900, The Gardeners’ Chronicle, ser.3, vol.27, p.302: Single
white variety that succeeds perfectly in the open in Devonshire. From Messrs R. Veitch &
Son, Exeter. Also recorded in the RHS. Journal 1900-1901, when it gained an “Award of
Merit”. A single white with 6-9 broadly ovate petals, 4-5 cm x 4 cm, apices rounded and
notched, forming a cup-shaped flower, averaging 9 cm in diameter. Stamens are in a loose,
central bunch, joined for one third of their length. Leaves glossy, dark green, broadly elliptic,
9 cm x 6 cm, acuminate and serrulate. Puddle & Hanger, 1960. RHS Yearbook No.14 p.145.
Orthographic errors include: ‘Devona’, ‘Devonensis’, ‘Deviana’. It has also invalidly been
called ‘Devoniana’ and ‘Devoniensis’, names with prior listing for other cultivars. The
synonyms: ‘Swan’, ‘Swann’ and ‘The Swan’ that have been given it should be avoided as
they have also been used as synonyms for Yobukodori. In the UK the name Devonia has also
sometimes been mistakenly used for Yukimiguruma.
Devoniana. Piantaio Comunale Romano, 1859. Orthographic error for ‘Devoniensis’, synonym for
Fordii.
Devoniana.
Hillier Nursery Catalogue, 1924-1925, p.36, Invalidly for Devonia.
Devoniana Striata. Verschaffelt Catalogue, No.50, 1844, p.19. No description. Giacomelli Catalogue,
1855. No description. Orthographic error: ‘Divoniana Striata’. (Believed extinct.)
Devoniensis. van Houtte Catalogue, 1845, 23:4 as a synonym for Fordii. Burnier & Grilli Catalogue, 1846-1847 repeats this statement. The use of this name as a synonym for Devonia by
Marchant and others is invalid.
61
Devoniensis. Slieve Donard Catalogue, 1942, p.5. Anonymous, 1943, Gardeners’ Chronicle, ser.3,
vol.CXIII, p.14. Arnold-Forster, 1948, Shrubs for Milder Counties, p.204. An invalid
synonym for Devonia.
Devriana. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1851, 44:8. No description. Verschaffelt, 1860, Nouvelle
Iconographie, Book XI, pl.IV: Pure white camellia with a few rare crimson stripes. The
blossoms, of medium size, are formed of numerous, rounded petals towards the
circumference, ovate at the centre and regularly imbricated. Originated by van Eeckhaute,
Ledeberg, Belgium.
Dew Drop.
Yashiroda, 1950, American Camellia Yearbook, p.15. Synonym for Tsuyu-no-tama.
Dewaman’e. (Camellia from Province Dewa with many rows of petals), (C.japonica), Chinka Zufu,
(before 1700), Watanabe, 1968, pl.280 as ‘Dewa-man-e’: A medium to large, loose peony
form, white with streaks of dark crimson. Originated in Japan. (Believed extinct.) “Dewa” is
the old name for the northern part of Japan, including the Aomori Prefecture.
Dewatairin. (Large flowering camellia from Dewa Province), (Higo). Itô, Ihei, 1695, Kadan Chikinshô:
Described as resembling Shikamura. Yashiro, 1841, Kokon Yôrankô, vol.306. Usamai, Naohachi, (ca.1910), Nagoya Chinzu’e where it is described as “Large, red.” It has not been confirmed that these old cultivars are the same as the modern Dewatairin. Adachi, 1960,
Camellia. Its Appreciation and Artistic Arrangement, p.71, colour pi., p.57 as ‘Taiheiraku’:
Light rose pink. Large, 13 cm across, single Higo form, often with a mass of white to pink
petaloids in the centre. Early flowering. Stamens number in excess of 100. Leaves, large,
long-ovate, thinly lustrous, recurved; sometimes yellow variegated. Synonyms: ‘Daitairin’,
‘Pink Fimbriata’, ‘Golden Temple’, ‘Bar None’, ‘Daihassu’, ‘Hatsusakura’, ‘Hatsu-zakura’,
‘Taiheiraku’. ‘Osakazuki’, ‘Taihai’ and, invalidly, ‘Hinomaru’. Originated in Sofue-chô,
Aichi Prefecture, Japan. Colour illustations have been published in: Encyclopedia of
Camellias in Colour, vol.I, 1972, pl.30, p.48; Tuyama, 1968, Camellias of Japan, pl.286,
p.144, 177 & 295. Hiratsuka, 1964, Higo Camellia as ‘Taihei-raku’; Seibundô Shinkôsha,
1979, Senchinshû, p.85 as ‘Taiheiraku’ and p.102 as ‘Dewatairin’. Macoboy, 1981, The
Colour Dictionary of Camellias, p.136. Yokoyama & Kirino, 1989, Nihon no Chinka, p.246
erroneously illustrates the variegated form as ‘Dewa-tairin’. Received the RHS. “Award of
Merit”, 1953 as ‘Hatsu-Sakura’. The white variegated form is named Manzairaku.
Dexiaojie. (Virtuous Young Woman), Gao & Zhuang, 1988, The Camellia in China, p.79, No.603.
Chinese synonym for Miss Ed.
Di Brugni.
de Bisschop Nursery Catalogue, 1935. Orthographic error for ‘De Brugny’.
Di Negro Nova. (C.japonica), Auguste van Geert, 1857, Catalogue, No.43, p.34, as ‘Di Nigro Nova’. No
description. Ibid. 1863-1864, Catalogue No.54, p.36, as ‘De Negro Nova’: Formal double
bright pink, with deeper coloured veins.van Geert Nursery Catalogue, No.75, 1869-1870,
p.51. No description. Originated in Italy. Orthographic variants: ‘De Negro Nuova’, ‘Di
Negro Nuova’, ‘Di Nigro Nova’.
Di Negro Nuova.
Mercatelli Catalogue, 1894. Orthographic variant for Di Negro Nova.
Diadem. (C.japonica), Magnolia Gardens and Nursery Catalogue, 1944-1945. White striped rose-pink.
Large semi-peony to rose form double. Originated in USA by Tea Gardens, Charleston. Synonym: ‘Tea Gardens No.383’.
Diadem.
Camellias, Y.C. Shen, 2009, p.215 with colour photo; Synonym for Ôkan.
Diadem di Flora.
Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.57. Synonym for Diadema di Flora.
Diadema. Ridolfi, Florence Catalogue, 1848, p.7: Most beautiful, very red, double, not distinct.
Synonym for Diadema di Flora.
62
Diadema di Flora. (C.japonica), Cachet Catalogue, 1840-1841, p.1 as ‘Diademaflora’: Red. van Houtte
Catalogue, 1841, 7:6. No description. Berlèse, 1845, Monographie, ed.3, p.211: Flower rose
form, double, with exterior petals in many rows, those in the centre, smaller and mixed with
stamens. Colour dark rose with white stripes. Originated in Italy. Orthographic errors:
‘Diademiflora’,
‘Diademantiflora’,
‘Diadenia
di
Flora’,
‘Diadematiflora’,
‘Diademathiflora’,’Diademadiflora’. Synonyms: ‘Diadema’, ‘Diadem Di Flora’, ‘Diadema di
Flora di Milano’.
Diadema di Flora di Milan. Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1847-1848, p.56, as ‘Diadamadiflora di
Milan’. Synonym for Diadema di Flora.
Diadema Flore Plena Rubra. (C.japonica), Ridolfi, 1843, Catalogue of Camellias Cultivated at
Bibbiani, as ‘Diadema Fl. Pl. Rubro. Red formal double flower. Originated by Ridolfi in Italy.
Diademadiflora. Jacob Makoy et Cie Catalogue, 1841, p.10. Orthographic variant for Diadema di
Flora.
Diademadiflora di Milan. Verschaffelt Catalogue, No.50, 1844, p.19. Orthographic variant for
‘Diadema di Flora di Milan’, synonym for Diadema di Flora.
Diademaflora.
Cachet Catalogue, 1840-1841, p.1. Orthographic error for Diadema di Flora.
Diademathiflora. Jardin la Société Royale de Belgique Catalogue, 1842, p.21. Orthographic error
for Diadema di Flora.
Diadematiflora.
Flora.
Verschaffelt Catalogue, No.50, 1844, p.19. Orthographic error for Diadema di
Diademantiflora.
Flora.
Burdin Maggiore & Co. Catalogue, 1862. Orthographic error for Diadema di
Diademata. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1839, 1:3. No description. Originated in Italy. (Believed
extinct.)
Diademiflora. Porcher, 1847, Revue Horticole, ser.3, vol.1, p.448. Orthographic error for Diadema
di Flora.
Diadenia di flora.
Downing Catalogue, ca.1858. Orthographic error for Diadema di Flora.
Dialbata. (C.japonica), Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.25, Peony form, deep pink petals,
edged with white. Originated in Italy.
Diamandiana.
Diamandina.
Joseph Baumann, 1849, Prix Courant, p.4. Orthographic error for Diamantina.
Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1847-1848, p.56. Orthographic error for Diamantina
Diamantina. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1841, 7:6: Delightful pink camellia. Berlèse, 1849,
Annales de la Société Central d’Horticulture de France, vol.40, p.280: Flower 10-11 cm
across, peony form, sometimes an irregular rose form, of a very bright salmon orange red,
tinted with rosepink. Exterior petals in 3-4 rows, ample, sometimes with double notches,
veins of carmine, wavy and well positioned. The centre is composed of groups of small petals
of many shapes, narrow, confused, innumerable, sometimes complete petals; others, whitish
petaloids; corolla broad, flat, compact. Originated by van Houtte, Belgium. Orthographic
errors: ‘Diamandina’, ‘Diamentina’, ‘Diamandiana’.
Diamentina.
Newman, 1849, The Florist, p.95. Orthographic error for Diamantina.
Diamond Head. (C.japonica x C.reticulata), American Camellia Yearbook, 1961, colour plate facing
p.210: Large, irridescent red semi-double with crinkled petals. Erect, open growth. A cross
from C.japonica Lady Vansittart x C.reticulata ‘Crimson Robe’ (Dataohong), raised by
David Feathers, Lafayette, California, USA. Camelliana Nursery Catalogue, 1961-1962, p.1,
with colour photo on front page of catalogue: Rich crimson colour, large, semi-double with
63
notched and crepy petals. A deep bloom with the look of an hibiscus. Blooms mid-season on a
plant with upright, compact growth. Sport: Diamond Head Variegated.
Diamond Head Variegated. (C.japonica x C.reticulata), Gentry, 1968, ACS., The Camellia Journal,
vol.23, No.1, (advert.) as ‘Diamond Head Var.’. A virus variegated form of Diamond
Head - Irridescent red blotched white. Originated in USA.
Diamyo-nishiki. SCCS., 1951, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature: Orthographic error for
Daimyô-nishiki.
Dian Fossey. (C.japonica), Cattolica, G., Le mie Camelie, My Camellias, 2005, p.80 with colour photo;
Medium size, peony form (flower shown is anemone form), pink (RHS.CC. 55A to 55B). A
selfed seedling of Moshio, first flowered 1982. Originated by Dott. Guido Cattolica, Livorno,
Italy.
Dian Hartman. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1957, p.300, Reg. No.310: A 9 year old
chance seedling originated by A.M. Hartman, San Fernando, California, USA, that first
bloomed 1952. Plant growth is upright, of medium density and average in rate with 10 cm x
5.5 cm leaves. Flowers are white with slight flecks of reddish pink and 9-10.5 cm in diameter
and 4.5 cm deep with 36 petals and 95 petaloids, resembling ‘Anemoniflora Alba’ (Australia)
in form. Late flowering. Sport: Dian’s Fancy. Illustrations: American Camellia Yearbook,
1958, facing p.242. Urquhart, 1960, The Camellia, vol,2, pl.XXXI.
Dian Moon. Cannon, 1963, ACS., The Camelia Journal, vol.18, No.5, p.28. Orthographic error for
Diana Moon.
Diana. (C.japonica), Cachet Catalogue, 1840-1841, p.2. No description. Berlèse, 1840, Monographie,
ed.2, p.117, 229: Leaves, 8 cm long x 5.4 cm wide, long-oval, acuminate, apex recurved,
horizontal, prominent venation; regular, fine serrations, of a dark green; buds large, obtuse
with blackish scales; Flower full, about 9 cm in diameter, cherry-red; exterior petals, 8-9 in
number, broad, oblong, some entire, others notched, reflexed, those following are very
numerous, forming a corolla like a bowl similar to Lefévriana’. Originated by Mariani, Milan
Italy. In America this name has been used invalidly as a synonym for Imura.
Diana. The Pacific Camellia Society, 1946, Camellia Nomenclature, p.11. Invalid synonym for
Imura.
Diana de Genova. Ludemann’s Pacific Nursery Catalogue, 1895-1896, p.4. Orthographic variant
for Diana di Genoa.
Diana di Genoa. (C.japonica), Auguste van Geert, 1853, Catalogue, No.33, p.24, as ‘Diana de Genoa’.
No description. van Geert Nursery Catalogue, No.75, 1869-1870, p.51. No description.
Ludeman’s Pacific Catalogue, 1895-1896, as ‘Diana de Genova’: Deep carmine, smetimes
spotted with white. Originated in Italy.
Diana di Nova. Auguste van Geert, 1863-1864, Catalogue, No.54, p.36. Orthographic error for
Diana Nova.
Diana d’Inghilterra. (C.japonica), Cattolica, G., Le mie Camelie, My Camellias, 2005, p.81 with colour
photo; medium size, rose form double with central petaloids closely packed. Flesh pink
(RHS.CC.73D). A seedling of ‘Rosa Simplex’ (Aitonia) x ‘Mani pulite’, first flowered in
2002. Originated by Dott. Guido Cattolica, Livorno, Italy.
Diana Lennard. (C.x williamsii), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1982, vol.XII, No.7, p.51, Reg.
No.181: A chance seedling of C.x williamsii Elegant Beauty. Originated by Trevor Lennard,
Te Puke, New Zealand. Growth habit is upright, open and of a medium rate. The light green
leaves average, 8 cm x 4 cm. The formal double flower measures 9 cm x 6.5 cm and has 62
petals. Its colour is deep pink shaded lighter. (RHS.CC.51B). Flowers mid-season to late.
64
Diana Moon. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1962, Camellia Nomenclature, p.33: Soft mauve pink splotched
white. Large semi-double with three rows of petals. Upright growth. Flowers mid-season to
late. Orthographic error: ‘Dian Moon’. Originated by Frank Griffin Sr., Columbia, South
Carolina, USA.
Diana Nova. (C.japonica), Auguste van Geert Nursery Catalogue, 1848, p.16. No description.
Lichtenthal, 1852, Manuale botanico enciclopedico popolare as “rose, full, regular”. It was
figured and described by Verschaffelt, 1855, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book 11, pl.III: Its form
is comparable to the finest tea rose, its colour, vivid cherry-red, striped with pure white. The
petals of the first rows are spread out, the others remain upright and compact. They are very
numerous and form blossoms larger that average. Originated in Italy. Orthographic variant:
‘Diana Nuova’, ‘Diana di Nova’.
Diana Nuova.
Nova.
Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.25. Orthographic variant for Diana
Diana Superba. (C.japonica), Luzzatti Catalogue, 1853. No description. Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di
Camelie, p.25: Large size, imbricated, pale pink. Originated in Italy.
Diana’s Charm. (C.japonica), Duncan & Davies (UK) Ltd, 1995, Wholesale Plant List, p.7: A
commercial synonym in the United Kingdom for the New Zealand cultivar Queen Diana, that
name being unacceptable in the UK due to Royal Protocol.
Dianchi Mingzhu. (Dianchi Lake Bright Pearl). (C.reticulata). China Regn No 22. China Flowers &
Horticulture, Feb 2008, No.4, p.47, with colour photo; An open pollinated seedling of
Zaotaohong (Early Crimson) originated by Kunming Institute of Botany, Yunnan, China, and
named by Lia Xiafang. Flowers loose peony form, pink (RHS.CC. 68B) 15-17 cm diameter.
Petals 26-28, outer flat, inner incurving. Well developed stamens distributed among the
petals. Leaves long elliptic, bases cuneate, apices long acuminate and curved downward,
10.6-14.2 cm long x 4.5-6 cm wide Flowers mid-season to late.
Diandianhua. (Tiny Spots Flower), (C.reticulata), Chuang, 1959, Yunnan Shancha Hua. No description.
Different reading: ‘Tientienhua’. Originated in Dali, China.
Diane. (C.japonica), Wilmot, Camellia Variety Classification Report, 1943, p.10. Pink formal double,
early blooming. Originated in USA.
Diane Carroll. (C.japonica), ACS., 1989, The Camellia Journal, vol.44, No.3, front cover colour photo
and inside front cover: A rose colour, medium size camellia with 70 uniform petals in 7 rows;
formal double to rose-form double bloom with abundant, long lasting flowers. Originated as a
chance seedling by Ferol and Sam Zerkowsky, Tammia Nurseries, Slidell, Louisiana, USA.
Diane Krauel. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Aug. 1997, p.15, Reg. No.2412. A medium
size, light pink centre to dark pink on edges, semi-double chance seedling. Flowers early to
mid-season. Originated by Judge R.D. Hendrick, USA, registered by Mary E. Krauel.
American Camellia Yearbook, 1997, p.2, colour photo before p.1. The 30 year old seedling
first flowered in 1971. Average flower size is 10 cm across x 6.5 cm deep, with 25 petals.
Plant growth is upright and slow, with light green leaves 8.2 cm long x 5 cm wide.
Dianhong Juban. (Spotted Red Chrysanthemum), (C.reticulata), Chuang, 1959, Yunnan Shancha Hua.
No description. Different readings: ‘Tien-hung Chû-pan’, ‘Tienhungtsueban’. Originated in
Dali, Yunnan, China.
Dianna Wuanghou. Shao, Taichong, 1992, The Observations from the Camellia World, No.327,
p.76. Chinese synoym for the NZ C.japonica Queen Diana, synonym ‘Diana’s Charm’.
Dianne Clark. (C.saluenensis x C.reticulata), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1964, vol.IV, No.1, p.11,
Reg. No.22: A hybrid seedling of C.saluenensis x C.reticulata Captain Rawes originated by
Dr Brian Doak, Papatoetoe, New Zealand. The plant is of vigorous, upright growth, has mid65
green foliage, leaves curled, margins rolled under, apices reflexed. The flowers, 12-15 cm
across, are open semi-double with 15-18 petals and varying numbers of petaloids, fascicled
stamens with golden brown anthers. Colour phlox pink. (HCC.624/1).
Dianora de Bardi. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue,1858, 72:10: Of average size, brilliant rose-pink,
veined very dark, petals ribboned regularly with white, imbricated. Originated in Italy. Orthographic error: ‘Dianova di Bardi’.
Dianova di Bardi.
Bardi.
Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1861-1862, p.22. Orthographic error for Dianora de
Dian’s Fancy. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1964, Camellia Nomenclature. p.40: Solid pink sport of Dian Hartman. Originated by A.M. Hartman, San Fernando, California, USA.
Dianshui. (Water Drops), Chang, Shao Yun, 1987, Camellias from Zhejiang, p.93. Synonym for
Dianxue.
Dianthaeflora. Ugolini, 1895, “Le Camilie, il suo passato e il suo avviniere”. R. Società Toscana
d’Orticultura, Bollettino, 20 (10 of 2nd. series):320-328. Orthographic variant for
Dianthiflora.
Dianthiflora. (C.japonica), Sweet, 1826, Hortus Britannicus, p.61. as ‘Carnation Waratah’. Baumann &
Baumann, 1829, Collection de Camellias élevés à Bollwieler, p.6, pl.5: The outer petals are
vivid red, heart-shaped, and the inner petals are smaller, imbricated and striped with white.
This variety sometimes bears single flowers (as illustrated), and sometimes double. Courtois,
1833, Magasin d’Horticulture, 1 [pt.D]:315 as ‘Knight’s Carnation Waratah’. Paxton, 1834,
Magazine of Botany, vol.1, p.38: “Red ground, striped white”. Berlèse, 1837, Monographie,
ed.1, p.72, 117, 127: Shrub very vigorous, not very graceful, expanded branches; leaves of
ordinary size, a little inclined, elongate-oval, strongly veined; bud with blackish scales,
elongate, acute; flower broad, sometimes double and often single, cherry-red; petals of the
circumference subcordiform, broad, 7 in number; those of the centre, erect, numerous, striated
with white and forming an arched centre. Late flowers are single and the centre full of
stamens. Synonyms: ‘Cariophyllaeflora’, ‘Knight’s Carnation Waratah’, ‘Carnation Waratah’,
‘Knightii’, ‘Knight’s New Carnation Waratah’, ‘Knight’s Anemomiflora’, ‘Knight’s
Waratah’, ‘Anemoniflora Knightii’, ‘Knight’s Single Scarlet Waratah’, ‘Knights’,
‘Dianthiflora Plena’, ‘Dianthiflora Waratah’, ‘Knight’s Nova’, ‘Warratah Striata’ ‘Double
Variegated Waratah de Knight’, ‘Double Variegated Warratah de la Chine’. A seedling of
Anemoniflora raised by Knight, King’s Road, Chelsea, London, England about 1822. For
illustration see Loddige’s Botanical Cabinet, 1828, vol.XV, fol.1462. Its first listing was in
Curtis’s Botanical Magazine, 1825 as ‘Knight’s New Carnation Waratah’ which is more a
description than a name.
Dianthifora Carnea. (C.japonica), Harrison ed., 1838, The Floricultural Cabinet and Florists Magazine,
vol.6, p.11: “Semi-double flesh colour”. Originated in England.
Dianthiflora Lineata. (C.japonica), Harrison ed., 1838, The Floricultural Cabinet and Florists
Magazine, vol.6, p.149: “Double white with rose-pink stripe.” Originated in England.
Dianthiflora Plena.
Dianthiflora.
Cachet Catalogue, 1840-1841, p.2 as ‘Diantiflora Plena’. Synonym for
Dianthiflora Striata. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1842, 9:9. No description. Not to be confounded with the camellia of the name Dianthiflora. However in van Houtte’s Catalogue,
1844-1845, 18:10 he gives ‘Striata’ as a synonym and then in his 1846-1847 Catalogue 27:32
he has: ‘Striata’, synonyms ‘Variegata’, ‘Dianthiflora’, ‘Dianthiflora Striata’. Dianthiflora is
rejected as a synonym as the first descriptions vary, whereas Variegata is the name of an old
Chinese cultivar.
66
Dianthiflora Striata Nova. (C.japonica), Berlèse, 1845, Monographie, ed.3, p.250:- Leaves 6-7 cm wide
x 10-11 cm long, pointed-oval, prominent venation, fine serration, deep green; bud rounded,
scales greenish; flower 9-10 cm in diameter, rose form, often whitish with bands of deep
orange-red, sometimes unicolor. Not to be confounded with the old variety Dianthiflora.
Originated in Italy.
Dianthiflora Striata Plena. (C.japonica), Berlèse, 1837, Monographie, ed.1, p.112,131: Leaves 7.8 cm x
5 cm, ovate-oblong, acuminate, horizontal, strongly serrate, very distinct venation, of a rather
deep green. Flower, large, very double, of a pretty form, resembling very much that of
camellia ‘Imperialis’. Ground white, striped or spotted with rose. Synonym: ‘Elegantissima
Striata Alba’, according to Berlèse, 1843, Iconographie, p. facing pl.184.
Dianthiflora Waratah.
Tagliabue, 1840, Nomenclatore Camelliae. Synonym for Dianthiflora.
Dianthifolia. (C.japonica), Baumann & Baumann, 1829-1835, Collection de Camellia élevés à
Bollwieler. No description. Originated in England. (Believed extinct.)
Diantiflora Plena. Cachet Catalogue, 1840-1841, p.2. Orthographic error for ‘Dainthiflora Plena’,
synonym for Dianthiflora.
Dianxi. (Happy Spots), Chang, Shao Yun, 1987, Camellias from Zhejiang, p.93. Synonym for
Dianxue.
Dianxue. (Spotted with Snow), (C.japonica), Huang Nursery Catalogue, 1949: Medium sized, 6-7 cm
across, red formal double with white spots and 60-70 petals in 5-6 rows. Chang, Shao Yun,
1987. Camellias from Zhejiang, p.93: Branches sturdy, winter leaf buds red. Leaves varied in
shape and size, oblique, obovate to lanceolate; serrations scarse and obtuse, unsymmetrically
acuminate, veins thick and prominent. Flowers red, white or pinkish maculate, petals slightly
incurved, almost round, thin, notched, roundish-obtuse with minute lobes at the apex. Buds
heart shaped or ovate, greenish-brown. Blooms early to mid-season. See Gao & Zhuang,
1988, The Camellia in China, p.46, colour photo No.149. Synonyms: ‘Dianxi’, ‘Dianshu’.
Different reading: ‘Tien-hsueh’. Originated in China.
Dianyu. (Spotted Jade). (C.japonica), Gao, Jiyin, Ltr 21st January 1993. A sport of Huamudan with
large white spots on the petals. This sport first occurred in 1988 at Qingdao City, Shandong
province, China.
Diaojinzhong. (Hanging Golden Bell), (C.japonica), Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia in China, p.33,
No.143, colour photo No.67: Medium size, light red, campanulate single, with 5-6 emarginate
petals and a central stamen cylinder with creamy filaments, joined for the lower third, and
yellow anthers. Blooms early to mid-season. Leaves dark green, broadly elliptic, apices
acuminate, margins serrate. Originated in China.
Dias Ferreira. (C.japonica), Jacintho de Mattos Nursery Catalogue No. 14, 1900, p.64: Anemone form,
bright rose-pink, veined darker, edged pure white. Originated in Portugal.
Diatarin.
Fruitland Nursery Catalogue, 1947-1948, p.30. Orthographic error for ‘Daitairin’,
synonym for Dewatairin.
Diaviesii.
Guichard Soeurs Nursery Catalogue, ca. 1928, p.12. Orthographic error for Daviesii.
Diban Zhuliya. Shao, Taichong, 1992, The Observations from the Camellia World, No.223, p.69.
Chinese synonym for the USA C.japonica Julia France.
Dichsanii.
Fratelli Rovelli Catalogue, 1852, p.16. Orthographic error for Dicksonii.
Dichsoni.
Luzzatti, 1851, Collezione di Camelie, p.14. Orthographic error for Dicksonii.
Dick Dodd. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Aug. 1998, p.23, Reg. No.2464. A large, cherry
red, rose form double chance seedling. Flowers mid-season. Originated by Richard E. Dodd,
Marshallville, Ga., USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 1998, p.1, colour photo before p.1.
67
The 14 year old seedling has flowers 11.5 cm across x 4.5 cm deep, with 37 petals, golden
anthers, and filaments shading from cream to red at the base. Plant growth is upright, dense
and average, with dark green leaves 11.5 cm long x 6.5 cm wide.
Dick Goodson. (C.reticulata.x C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1980, p.162, reg. No.1594: A
very large, dark red semi-double C.reticulata hybrid (C.reticulata ‘Cornelian’ (Damanao) x
C.japonica Mrs D.W. Davis), mid-season to late flowering; originated by Frank Pursel, Oakland, California, USA. The 5 year old seedling first bloomed 1976. Average flower size, 13.5
cm wide by 6 cm deep. Plant growth is upright, average in density and medium in rate with
dark green leaves 10 cm long x 6 cm wide. Sport: Dick Goodson Variegated.
Dick Goodson Variegated. (C.reticulata.x C.japonica.), Cannon, 1980, ACS., The Camellia Journal,
vol.35, No.4 as ‘Dick Goodson Var.’: A virus variegated form of Dick Goodson - Dark red
blotched white. Originated in USA.
Dick Hardison. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Aug. 1997, p.17, Reg. No.2437. A large, red
edged black, formal double chance seedling. Flowers early to late. Originated by Dick P.
Hardison, Tallahassee, Fla., USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 1997, p.2, colour photo
before p.1. The 8 year old seedling first flowered in 1992. Average flower size is 12.7 cm
across x 3.8 cm deep, with 75 petals. Plant growth is dense and average with dark green
leaves 6.5 cm long x 3.8 cm wide. Chinese synonym ‘Dike’.
Dick Johnson. (C.japonica), Hovey, C.M., 1844, Magazine of Horticulture, 10:83. Originated by Joshua
Pierce, USA. No description. (Believed extinct.)
Dick Parker. (C.reticulata), Kramer Bros. Nursery Catalogue, 1975: Lavender pink. Large semi-double
with vigorous, open, upright growth. Blooms mid-season to late. A reticulata seedling of
unknown parentage, originated by Kramer Bros. Nursery, Upland, California, USA.
Dick Rankin. (C.japonica), Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1962-1963, p.4. No description. SCCS,
1966, Camellia Nomenclature, p.42: Crimson shaded blue. Medium to large semi-double to
peony form with loose petals. Vigorous, upright growth. Mid-season to late flowering. Originated by Clower, Florida, USA. Chinese synonym: ‘Lanken’.
Dickie Thomas. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1958, Camellia Nomenclature, p.30: Pink striped carmine.
Medium large semi-double. Medium, open growth. Mid-season flowering. Originated by Miss
E.W. Boorman, Temple City, California, USA.
Dicksoni.
Luzzatti, 1851, Collezione di Camelie, p.14. Orthographic error for Dicksonii.
Dicksonii. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1841, 7:6 as ‘Dicksoni’. No description. Figured and
described by Berlèse, 1843, Iconographie, vol.3, pl.273 and facing p.: The flower is about 10
cm across and is full, regular and a pure milk white. The petals in 8-9 rows are concave,
rounded at the summit, entire, thin, transparent, gracefully displayed, symmetrically
imbricated. Starting from the 5th row up to the centre they are channelled. Orthographic
errors: ‘Diksoni’, ‘Dicksoni’, ‘Dichsoni’, ‘Dichsanii’.
Dictatore Garibaldi. Joseph Vervaene fils, 1875, Price List, No.1, p.6. Ed Pynart van Geert
Catalogue, 1888, p.64. Vervaene, J. Catalogue, No.11, 1888. Orthographic error for Dittatore
Garibaldi.
Didaiwei. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.417. Chinese synonym
for the USA C.japonica Dee Davis
Diddy Mealing. (C.japonica), Fendig, 1950, American Camellia Catalogue, Large, imbricated, incomplete double; creamy white with pink variegations, 11-11.5 cm in diameter. Occasionally one
petal is pink. Petals upright, guard petals rounded, inner petals pointed. Plant habit, slightly
pendulous, medium growth rate. Leaves, pale green, long acuminate. Originated by Dr and
Mrs H.G. Mealing, Augusta, Georgia, USA from seed thought to be of Duchess of
68
Sutherland. First flowered 1946. Registration No.5 with the ACS in their Newsletter,
Jan.1949, vol.4, No.1. Sports: Pink Diddy, Diddy’s Pink Organdie, Diddy Mealing Peony.
See illustrations American Camellia Yearbook, 1950, p.127. Hertrich, 1959, Camellias in the
Huntington Gardens, vol.III, p.65. Chinese synonym ‘Daidi’.
Diddy Mealing Peony. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1974, vol.II, p.231, Reg. No.1312: A
sport of Diddy Mealing first observed 1960. The peony form bloom is white with a rare pink
stripe. Average size, 10 cm across and 6 cm deep with many petals and petaloids with yellow
anthers and pink filaments. The flower is a heavy peony with many central petals. Blooms
early to late. Originated by Dr H.G. Mealing, Augusta, Georgia, USA.
Diddy Mealing Pink.
Diddy’s Pink.
Diddy.
Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Synonym for Pink Diddy.
Shackleford, 1972, ACS., The Camellia Journal. Orthographic error for Pink
Diddy’s Pink Organdie. (C.japonica), Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. A sport of Diddy
Mealing. Dawn pink at the base blending to light pink towards the petal edge and edged
white. Mid-season flowering. Originated By Dr H.G. Mealing, Augusta, Georgia, USA.
Colour illustrations: American Camellia Yearbook, 1970 facing p.116; Macoboy, 1981, The
Colour Dictionary of Camellias, p.79. Pl.40, p.33, Encyclopedia of Camellias in Colour,
vol.II, 1978. See ACS., 1989, The Camellia Journal, vol.44, No.3, p.9, Reg. No.2147.
Orthographic variant: ‘Diddy’s Pink Organdy’. Chinese synonym ‘Oujindi’.
Diddy’s Pink Organdy.
Newman’s Nursery Catalogue, 1982-1983. Orthographic variant for
Diddy’s Pink Organdie.
Dido. (C.japonica), Australian Botanical & Horticultural Society Report, 1848, A Camden Park
Seedling. Waterhouse, 1947, Camellia Quest, p.15, 17: Pure white, moderate size, petals well
shaped, not numerous, of moderate substance and well formed. Camden Park No.6/50, raised
by William Macarthur, Camden Park, N.S.W., Australia.
Didone. (C.japonica), Burdin Maggiore & Co. Catalogue, 1845. p.41. No description. Burdin Maggiore
& Co., 1849-1850, Catalogue General: Vivid rose, large, regular. Lichtenthal, 1852, Manuale
botanico enciclopedico popolare as vivid rose-pink, large, regular. Originated in Italy.
Diego Armijo. (C.hybrid), SCCS., 1990, Camellia Nomenclature, p.146: Light orchid pink, medium size,
semi-double with long, notched petals. Vigorous growth. Blooms early to late. A seedling of
Gay Time x Angel Wings, originated by Piet and Gaeta, California, USA.
Diehong Meigui. (Folded Red Rose). American Camellia Yearbook, 1992, p.42. Chinese synonym
for the USA C.japonica Red Red Rose.
Dielitz. (C.japonica), Luzzatti Catalogue, 1853. No description. Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie,
p.25: Closely imbricated, bright pink, shaded with white. Originated in Italy.
Diffusa. (C.japonica), Baumann, Mulhouse Nursery Catalogue, 1841-1842, p.13. No description. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Diguo Zhihui.
Dike
Chinese synonym for Australian C.japonica Imperial Splendor.
Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.417; Chinese synonym for
the USA C.japonica Dick Hardison.
Diksoni.
André Leroy Catalogue, 1873. Orthographic error for Dicksonii.
Dilatata. (C.japonica), Oudin, Lisieux Nursery Catalogue, 1844, p.10. No description. Originated in
France. (Believed extinct.)
Dilecta. (C.japonica), Loddige’s Catalogue, 1836, p.24. No description. Berlèse, 1837, Monographie,
ed.1, p.94, 129: Leaves small, little toothed, buds small with blackish scales; flower small, 8-9
69
cm across, semi-double of a deep cherry-red, a few petaloid stamens in the centre. See pl.73,
Berlèse, 1841, Iconographie.
Dilenii.
Costa, 1846, Catalogue de la collection de Camellias présentée à sa majesté
L’lmperatrice de Toutes les Russies et Reine de Pologne, p.10. Orthographic error for
Dillenii.
Dillenici. (C.japonica), Shneiderff, ea., 1841, Catalogo delle piante che si Trovano nel Giardino, p.8. No
description. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Dilleni.
Fratelli Rovelli, 1852, Catalogue, p.6. Orthographic variant for Dillenii.
Dillenii. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1841, 7:6. No description. Orthographic variant: ‘Dilleni’
Orthographic error: ‘Dilenii’. (believed extinct.)
Dilmanii Vera. (C.japonica), Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.10 as
‘Dilmani Vera’. No description. (Believed extinct.) Originated in Italy.
Dim Out. (C.japonica), Wilmot, 1944, Camellia Variety Classification Report, p.5. No description.
Originated in USA. (Believed extinct.)
Dimple Darling. (C.japonica), Gerbing, 1961, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.16, No.2, p.32, (advert).
10-11 cm diameter blush pink. American Camellia Yearbook, 1962-1963, p.216, Reg.
No.619: An 8 year old chance seedling that first bloomed 1956; originated by John J.
Weisner, Fernando Beach, Florida, USA. Growth habit upright, open and rapid in rate with
light green leaves, averaging p.5 cm x 4.5 cm. The semi-double. blush pink flowers, similar to
‘Herme’, (Hikarugenji), average 10.5 cm across and 5 cm deep with 9-15 petals, a varying
number of petaloids, white stamens. Mid-season flowering. Sport: Dimple Darling
Variegated.
Dimple Darling Variegated. (C.japonica), Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1963-1964, p.4 as ‘Dimple
Darling Var.’. A virus variegated form of Dimple Darling - Blush pink mottled white. Originated in USA.
Dimples. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1964, Camellia Nomenclature, p.40: Reddish pink. Miniature anemone
form. Medium, compact growth. Mid-season flowering. Originated by W. Wylam, California,
USA.
Dinard le Souvenir. (C.japonica), J & F Thoby, Gaujacq, France, Catalogue, 2005, p.41; Originated in
France. No further details.
Dinghong Jiuxin. (Top Red Lion’s Head), (C.reticulata), Chuang, 1959, Yunnan Shancha Hua. No
description. Different readings: ‘Ting-hung Chiu-hsin’, ‘Tinghungchiuhsin’. Originated in
Yunnan, China.
Dingxianghong. (Lilac Red), (C.reticulata), Yü & Bartholmew, 1980, American Camellia Yearbook, p.11
as: ‘Carmine, late. Kunming’. Feng et al., 1986, Yunnan Camellias of China, p.45 colour
illustration and description: Leaves oblong, margins slightly undulate, apices acuminate,
bases broad-cuneate or occasionally cuneate, 9-10.5 cm long, 3-4 cm wide. Flowers dark red
(RHS.CC.53C-D), diameter 12-13 cm, corolla flat. Petals 25-30 in 5-6 whorls, becoming
gradually smaller from outer to inner whorls. Stamens numerous, partly petaloid. Pistils
rudimentary. This new cultivar is selected from seedlings of open pollinated seeds at the
Kunming Botanical Garden. Flowers mid-season. Western synonym: ‘Lilac Red’. Different
reading: ‘Ting-hsiang-hung’.
Dingziche. Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia in China, p.74, No.539, Chinese synonym for the
Japanese sasanqua, Chôjiguruma.
Dinota.
Treseder’s Nursery Catalogue, 1967. Orthographic error for Dinotta (Townhill).
Dinotia.
Haskins Bros. Nursery Catalogue, 1959. Orthographic error for Dinotta (Townhill).
70
Dinotta. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt, 1852, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book XI, pl.I: Flowers of medium
size, faultless imbrication, a poppy colour. The form of its petals, rounded, apiculate,
terminating abruptly in pure white. Received from Italy 3 years ago. Orthographic errors:
‘Dinota’, ‘Dinotia’.
Dinotta (Townhill). (C.japonica), Townhill Park Nurseries Ltd Catalogue 1953-1954, p.5, invalidly as
‘Dinotta’: A variety new to our collection, a good grower of excellent habit. A well formed,
dark red. Goodwin, A.R & K.M. Nursery Catalogue, 1955 invalidly as ‘Dinotta’. Semi-double
red. Originated in UK.
Dionella.
ANZCRS, 1957, Camellia Annual, p.19. Synonym for Dionisia Poniatowski Rosea.
Dionisa Poniatowski. Wyatt Nursery Catalogue, 1886, p.36. Orthographic error for Dionisia
Poniatowski.
Dionisia.
Gelding Nursery Catalogue, 1887-1888. Abbreviation for Dionisia Poniatowski.
Dionisia Poniatocoski. C. Mariotti, Nervi Catalogue, 1924, p.15. Orthographic error for Dionisia
Poniatowski.
Dionisia Poniatowsk. Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Orthographic error for Dionisia
Poniatowski.
Dionisia Poniatowski. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1860-1861, No description. van Houtte
Catalogue, 1864-1865, 104:80: Snow white, finely imbricated in the manner of De la Reine.
One of my 12 new camellias that have been crowned with praise. From Luzzatti. Auguste van
Geert Catalogue, No.65, 1869-1870, p.51: Superb white flower with rounded petals.
Magnificent imbrication in the form of a star. Mercatelli Catalogue, 1881. p.16: Pearly white
lined with carmine, imbricated. Rollisson’s Plant Catalogue, 1877-1878: “Of snowy
whiteness with imbrication like De la Reine.” Originated by Conte Bouturlin, Florence Italy.
Sport: Dionisia Poniatowski Rosea. Abbreviation: ‘Poniatowski’. Orthographic errors:
‘Dionisa Poniatowsky’, ‘Dionysia Poniatowsky’, ‘Dionusa Poniatowski’, ‘Dionisia
Poniatocoski’, ‘Dionisia’, ‘Dionisia Poniatowsk’, ‘Diorusia Poniatowski’.
Dionisia Poniatowski Rosea. (C.japonica), Hazlewood Nursery Catalogue, 1949, p.6: A light pink sport
of Dionisia Poniatowski. Originated in Australia. Colour photo: New Zealand Camellia
Bulletin, 1974, vol.VIII, No.6, facing p.25 as ‘Dionella’. Chinese synonym ‘Daiao Meigui’.
Dionisia Poniatowsky.
Poniatowski.
Carlo Costantini Catalogue, 1886. Orthographic error for Dionisia
Dionsia. Waterhouse, 1947, Camellia Quest, p.24. Orthographic error and abbreviation for Dionisia Poniatowski.
Dionthiflora. Berlèse, 1838, Monographie, p.60. Dearborn’s edition in English. Orthographic error
for Dianthiflora.
Dionusa Poniatowski. Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.4. Orthographic error for Dionisia
Poniatowski.
Dionysia Poniatowsky. da Silva, 1880, Forcing Varieties of Camellia at Oporto, p.7. Orthographic
error for Dionisia Poniatowski.
Diorusia Poniatowski. Wilmot, 1943, Second Index to Hovey’s Magazine. Orthographic error for
Dionisia Poniatowski.
Dioscoride. (C.japonica), Claude Thoby, 1993, Camélias, pp.10, 15, 17, 25, 41 and p.18 colour photo:
Flower red peony form, sometimes with speckles of white. Flowers early to mid-season.
Originated in France.
Dipoicle. (C.japonica), Arnaud Catalogue, 1839-1840 as a new variety but no description. Originated in
Italy. (Believed extinct.)
71
Dir. Moerlands. Felix & Dykhuis Nursery Catalogue, 1965-1966, p.8. Abbreviation for Directeur
Moerlands.
Directeur Moerlands. (C.japonica), Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.4 as ‘Directeur Morelands’.
No description. However Anderson in Camellias, 1961, p.81, lists it as a late flowering, dark
red, formal double, while Felix & Dykhuis Catalogue, 1965 says “Carthamus red with yellow
stamens”. Orthographic variant: ‘Director Moerlands’. Orthographic error: ‘Directeur Morelands’. Originated in Belgium or Netherlands..
Directeur Morelands. Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.4. Orthographic error for Directeur
Moerlands.
Director Moerlands. Felix & Dykhuis Catalogue, 1966-1967, p.8. Orthographic variant for
Directeur Moerlands.
Discolor. (C.japonica), Longone Catalogue, 1873. No description. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Disenganno.
André Leroy, 1868, Catalogue. Orthographic error for Disinganno.
Disi. Shao, Taichong, 1992, The Observations from the Camellia World, No. 324, p.76. Chinese
synonym for the USA C.japonica L.T. Dees.
Disidini.
Shao, Taichong, 1992, The Observations from the Camellia World, p.62. Chinese
synonym for the USA C.japonica Destiny. Formerly misspelled as ‘Disitini’.
Disinganno. (C.japonica), Luzzatti, 1851, Collezione di Camelie, p.14: Dark carmine at the circumference, paler centre, imbricated in a spiral. For colour plate see Verschaffelt, 1855, Nouvelle
Iconographie, Book I pl.I as ‘Il Desinganno’. Orthographic errors: ‘Disenganno’, ‘Il
Desingnanno’, ‘Il Desinganno’, ‘Desinganno’, ‘Il Disinganno’, ‘S. Disinganno’,
‘Desinganus’, ‘Il Desingano’, ‘Il Disingano’, ‘St Disinganno’. Originated by Franci, Florence,
Italy.
Disinileyuan.
Chinese synonym for USA C.japonica Disneyland.
Disneyland. (C.japonica), Nuccio’s Nurseries Catalogue, 1960: A beautiful rose-pink semi-double to
anemone form with variegated petaloids makes this large camellia distinctive. Vigorous,
bushy, upright growth with medium sized foliage. American Camellia Yearbook, 1965, p.230,
Reg. No.694: (SCCS.No.62-33). This 10 year old seedling was originated by Nuccio’s
Nurseries, Altadena, California, USA and first bloomed 1957. Parentage unkown. Flower
size, 13-15 cm across. Blooms mid-season. Sport: Disneyland Variegated. Chinese
synonym: ‘Disinileyuan’.
Disneyland Variegated. (C.japonica), Cannon, 1962, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.17, No.1, back
cover as ‘Disneyland Var.’: A virus variegated form of Disneyland - Rosepink marbled
white. Originated in USA.
Distans.
Charles van Geert Nursery Catalogue, No.101, 1847, p.8. Orthographic error for
Destans.
Distinction. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt, 1860, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book V, pl.III: Secured by grafting
from a mutation on General Washington. The flowers are large and formed of petals of
unusual amplitude, rounded and lobulate, regularly imbricated, of a rosy white, deeper
coloured at the centre, mottled and streaked with crimson and with a faint yellow stripe in the
centre of each. Originated in Belgium by Verschaffelt.
Dittatore Garibaldi. (C.japonica), Stefano Pagliai Catal;ogue, 1867, p.69: Ivory white with deep pink
lines. Imbricated. Gelli & Figlio Catalogue, 1871-1872: Ivory white, lined with carmine.
Originated in Italy. Orthographic variant: ‘Dictatore Garibaldi’.
Diva. (C.japonica), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, March 1999, Issue No.132, vol.XXI, No.1, p.14,
Reg. No.398. Registered by N. Haydon, Takanini, New Zealand. A 9 year old chance seedling
72
of Bob Hope with pollen parent unknown, which first flowered in 1994.. Flowers are semidouble, rather open in form, 11 cm diameter x 5 cm deep, with 30-35 raised petals that are
slightly fluted. Colour is an unusually deep rich red (RHS.CC. 59A) with darker red veining.
Plant is dense and slow to medium growing, with dark green leaves 8 cm long x 3.5 cm wide,
and flowers mid-season to late.
Diva Maria. Trillon, Le Mans Nursery Catalogue, 1843, p.5: Large imbricated, strawberry pink. Oudin,
Lisieux Nursery Catalogue, 1844, p.10: Imbricated, soft pink. van Houtte Catalogue,
1845-1846, 23:4 es ‘Diva Marie’: Imbricated, full, rose-pink. Burdin Maggiore & Co., 18491850, Catalogue General: Splendid rose, variegated with white at the centre. Imbricated.
Orthographic variant: ‘Diva Marie’. Originated in Italy.
Diva Marie.
van Houtte Catalogue,1845-1846, 23:4. Orthographic variant for Diva Maria.
Diversaflora Plena. McIlhenny, 1937, 600 Varieties of Camellias, p.5. Orthographic variant for
Diversiflora Plena.
Diversaflora Pleno.
Pompone.
Curtis, 1820, A Monograph on the Genus Camellia. A synonym for
Diverse Variegata. (C.japonica), Attilio Tassi, 1855, I Giardini giornal orticultura. No description.
Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Diversiflora. (C.japonica), Martin Burdin Aime & Co Catalogue, 1922, p.55. No description. (Believed
extinct.)
Diversiflora Plena. (C.japonica), McIlhenny, 1937, 600 Varieties of Camellias, p.5 as ‘Diveraflora
Plena’: Imbricated. Light rose-red blotched white. In later Catalogues: Medium size white
lightly flecked rose or, solid rose-pink flecked with white, full double. Mid-season blooming.
Originated in USA. Orthographic variants: ‘Diversaflora Plena’, ‘Diversiflora Pleno’.
Diversiflora Pleno. Phelps, 1934, Garden Club of America, Bulletin, ser.5, (7-12):54. Orthographic
variation for Diversiflora Plena.
Diversifolia. Hovey, ed.1836, Magazine of Horticulture. Synonym for Pompone.
Divided Heart.
Bartholomew, 1982, American Camellia Yearbook, p.149. Synonym for Fenxin.
Divonia. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1847-1848, p.56. No description. Verschaffelt, 1851,
Nouvelle Iconographie, Book IV, pl.I: Medium sized blossoms of a delicate pink, daintily
streaked with crimson, formed of numerous, regularly imbricated, rounded-oval petals,
emarginate. Believed to be of Italian origin. Orthographic error: ‘Divonii’.
Divoniana Striata.
Auguste van Geert, 1856, Catalogue No.40, p.33. Orthographic error for
Devoniana Striata.
Divonii.
Jules Menoreau, Nantes Nursery Catalogue, 1856, p.8. Orthographic error for Divonia.
Dixie. (C.japonica), Glen St. Mary Nurseries Co. Catalogue, 1931, Azaleas and Camellias, p.5: Medium
sized flower, full double, vivid pink. Symetrical, late bloomer. Slow, upright growth. Originated in USA. Synonyms: ‘Orson’s Pride’, ‘Vivid Pink’, and, invalidly, ‘Beali Rosea’. Also
invalidly used as a synonym for ‘Otome’.
Dixie Beggs. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1992, p.92, Reg. No.2256: Originated by
W.Stout, Pensacola, Florida, USA. The 15 year old seedling first flowered 1983. Red with
some inner petals marked rose-pink, medium sized semi-double. Average flower size is 8.5
cm across x 3.5 cm deep with 25-35 petals, yellow anthers, cream filaments. Plant growth
upright, dense and average with dark green leaves 10 cm long x 4 cm wide. Colour photo
between pp.40-41.
Dixie Belle. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1980, p.162, Reg. No.1632: A large, blush pink,
anemone form C.japonica chance seedling, early to mid-season flowering; originated by Mrs
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Herman Johnson, Madison, Florida, USA. The 8 year old seedling first bloomed 1977.
Average size flower, 12.5 cm across and 5 cm deep with 20 petals, 8 petaloids and rabbit ears,
yellow anthers and yellow filaments. The flower shades from white, blush pink to deeper pink
on outside petals. Stamens not in the centre and also outside the petaloids. Plant growth is
spreading, medium in rate with dark green leaves, 9 cm long x 4 cm wide.
Dixie Darling. (C.japonica), Rogers, Belle Fontaine Nursery Catalogue, 1970. ACS., 1970, The Camellia
Journal, vol.25, No.1, p.23: Large, sweet pea, semi-double. Vigorous growth. Originated in
USA.
Dixie Knight. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1955, p.336, Reg. No.230: An 8 year old
seedling; originated by Central Georgia Nurseries, Macon, Georgia, USA. First flowered
1954. Plant growth, upright, vigorous, compact and rapid in rate with midgreen leaves, oval,
cordate, abrupt-cuspidate, serrate, 10 cm long x 5 cm wide. Flower buds are large, oval,
tapering bases and bronze green. The very dark red flowers, 10-12.5 cm across, are
semi-double, similar to Emperor of Russia. Stamens in 5 groups. Flowers mid-season to late.
See colour plate, p.66, 79, Macoboy, 1981, The Colour Dictionary of Camellias. Sports: Dixie
Knight Supreme, Dixie Knight Variegated. Chinese synonym: ‘Nantian Wushi’.
Dixie Knight Supreme. (C.japonica), SCCS. 1962, Camellia Nomenclature, p.34: Deep red, heavily
moired white. A variegated form of Dixie Knight, originated by Wheeler’s Nursery, Macon,
Georgia, USA. See colour photo facing p.22, American Camellia Yearbook, 1969 and pl.41,
p.33, Encyclopedia of Camellias in Colour, vol.II, 1978. Chinese synonym: ‘Chaoji Nantian
Wushi’.
Dixie Knight Variegated. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1962, Camellia Nomenclature, p.34 as ‘Dixie Knight
Var.’: A virus variegated form of Dixie Knight - Deep red streaked with white. Originated in
the USA.
Dixie Maid. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1981, Camellia Nomeclature, p.47: Light pink. Small formal double.
Mid-season to late flowering. Originated in USA by Haynie.
Dixie Pink. (C.japonica), Lindo Nurseries Price List, 1940-1941. No description. SCCS., 1945,
Camellias, p.15: Bright rose-pink, formal double. Mid-season flowering. SCCS, 1947, The
Camellia. Its Culture and Nomeclature: Rose pink. Medium form double. Slow, upright
growth, Late flowering. Originated in USA. For black and white photo see p.104, Hertrich,
1954, Camellias in the Huntington Gardens, vol.I.
Dixie Red. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1962, p.216, 217, Reg. No.640: A 22 year old
chance C.japonica seedling that first bloomed 1950; originated by Wheelers Nursery, Macon,
Georgia, USA. Plant growth is upright and slow with dark green leaves. The anemone form
flowers, similar to Elegans, average 10-12.5 cm across with 18 petals. Colour, wine red or
mahogany red. The flower resembles a small R.L. Wheeler with petaloids. Blooms
mid-season to late. Sport: Dixie Red Variegated.
Dixie Red Variegated. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1968, Camellia Nomenclature, as ‘Dixie Red Var.’: A virus
variegated form of Dixie Red - Wine red or mahogany red blotched white. Originated in
USA.
Dixierama. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1961, p.221, Reg. No.524: 12 year seedling of
Imura x Lady Mary Cromartie Variegated, that first bloomed 1951; originated by K.
Sawada, Overlook Nurseries Inc., Mobile, Alabama, USA. Growth is medium, dense and
rapid in rate with medium textured, serrated, acuminate leaves, 8.5 cm long x 4 cm wide. The
rose madder, loose, peony flowers average 12 cm across and 7.8 cm deep, with 40-45 petals.
Petals to the centre are crinkled or wavy. There are 100-120 yellow stamens divided into 5-6
groups, intermixed with the petals. Blooms early to mid-season. Sport: Dixierama
Variegated.
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Dixierama Variegated. (C.japonica), Tammia Nursery, 1962, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.17,
No.4, p.28 as ‘Dixierama Var.’: A virus variegated form of Dixierama - Rose madder
blotched white. Originated in USA.
Diyiliu.
American Camellia Yearbook, 1993, p.43. Chinese synonym for the Australian C.x
williamsii Tiptoe.
Do d’un Ami. von Biedenfeld, 1856, Practische Grundlehren der cultur von Camellien, p.38.
Orthographic error for Don d’un Ami.
Do Pozo. (C.japonica), La Camelia .....Diputación Provincial de Pontevedra, 2004, p.113, Register No.
117. Peony form, 8cm diameter, Rose (RHSCC 54B-55B) with darker veins (55A), petals
bordered white, and a few may have white stripes. 16-20 external petals, round or elliptic,
internal number variable, elliptic. Leaf 8-8.5 cm x 3.5-4 cm, mid-green, elliptic to lanceolate,
apex pointed. Flowers mid-season. Average, shrubby and slightly open growth. Originated by
Maciñeira Nursery, Galicia, Spain, in 1986.
Dôan. (Roadside Hermitage), (C.japonica), Chinka Zufu, (before 1700), Watanabe, 1968, pl.449: A
small, 5 petalled single with a central stamen column. Colour is white flushed with and
heavily marked crimson. Originated in Japan. (Believed extinct.) Different reading ‘Tôan’.
Dobrada. Loureiro Catalogue No.9, 1872-1873. Synonym for Reticulata Flore Pleno, ‘Robert Fortune’.
Dobreei. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1843-1844, 18:10: Brilliant poppy, best anemome form
known. Berlèse, 1849, Annales de la Société Central d’Horticulture de France, vol.40, p.313
as ‘Dobrei’: Flower, 9-10 cm across, anemone form, similar to ‘Princess Royale’ of Low; of a
poppy orange red, similar to ‘Governativa’ of Mariani. Petals in 3-4 rows, round-oval, close
set, regularly imbricated, a little lined and notched at the apex; those in the centre, are small,
innumerable, short, sometimes petaloids, and forming a broad, flat, uniform centre.
Orthographic errors: ‘Dobreyi’, ‘Dobrei’, ‘Dobreii’, ‘Dobrii’, ‘Dombreyi’, ‘Dobrey’. The
description of the modern cultivar under this name, which appears to be the same, is as
follows: Puddle and Hanger, 1961, RHS., The Rhododendron and Camellia Yearbook, No.15,
p.113: Bloom, semi-double with rotund petals, 5 cm x 4.5 cm wide rounded, 10-12 outer
petals, recurved, inner petals narrower, mixed with petaloids to form a twisted mass in the
centre of the flower. Stamens in groups of about 12, many petaloids; 9-10 cm across. Colour
carmine (HCC.21 /1). Foliage broadly-elliptic or obovate,9 cm x 4.5 cm, serrate, short
acuminate, glossy, mid-green. In commerce it has been confused with Latifolia and Emperor
of Russia, which are different cultivars and both Overlook Nursery and McIlhenny
erroneously equated it with Campbellii. It is believed to have been named for a Mr Dobree of
Guernsey, Channel Isles, who exhibited camellias about 1845.
Dobreel. McIlhenny Catalogue, 1935, p.4: Crimson blossom of medium size. Petals are round, giving a plate-like effect. Centre petals small and lighter at tips. Double variety. Orthographic
error: ‘Dobrell’. Synonym for Campbellii (Guichard).
Dobrei.
Auguste van Geert Nursery Catalogue, 1848, p.16. Orthographic error for Dobreei.
Dobrell. Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.4. Orthographic error for ‘Dobreel’, synonym for
Campbellii (Guichard).
Dobrey. Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.10. Orthographic error for
Dobreei.
Dobreyi.
Burnier & Grilli Catalogue, 1846-1847. Orthographic error for Dobreei.
Dobrielle.
Dobrii.
McIlhenny, 1937, 600 Varieties of Camellias, p.5. Orthographic error for Dorbrielle.
Bartley Nursery Catalogue, 1961, p.1: Orthographic error for Dobreei.
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Dobro. (C.reticulata hybrid) American Camellia Yearbook, 1992, pp.32-33, Reg. No.2263: Originated by
Jack L. Mandarich, California, USA. A seedling of Hulyn Smith x Harold L. Paige that first
bloomed 1985. Very large red, rose form double to formal double. Average size 13 cm across
x 6 cm deep with 38+ petals and golden anthers. Blooms early to late season. Plant growth
upright, dense and vigorous with dark green leaves 13 cm long x 6 cm wide. Colour photo
between pp.40-41.
Dockelarii. West End Nurseries Catalogue, 1985. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym
for Masayoshi.
Docklaari. Reuthe Nursery Catalogue No.16, 1911. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym
for Masayoshi.
Docteur Boiduval. Auguste van Geert Nursery Catalogue, N.65, 1869-1870, p.51. Orthographic
error for Docteur Boisduval.
Docteur Boisduval. (C.japonica), Jean Vervaene fils, 1864, Price List, No.1, p.5. No description. van
Houtte Catalogue, 1865-1866, 110:27 as ‘Dr Boisduval’: Flower generally white, except here
and there, accidently carmine. Here the perfect imbrication consists of petals of a beautiful
satin, rose-pink, enframing the major part of the flower of most delicate, whitish pink,
ornamented with ribbons of white. Stated by van Houtte to be a mutation of Madame Eliza
Centurioni. Abbreviations: ‘Dr Boisduval’, ‘Dr Duval’. Orthographic errors: ‘Dr Boisdwal’,
‘Dr. Baiduval’, ‘Dr Bois Duval’, ‘Dr Bocsduval’, ‘Docteur Boiduval’, ‘Docteur Boisduwal’.
Originated by Miellez in France.
Docteur Boisduwal.
Real Comphania Horticolo-Agricola, Portuense, Catalogue, No.29, 18951896, p.46. Orthographic error for Docteur Boisduval.
Docteur Horner. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt, 1849, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book VIII, pl.IV: This
variety was obtained from seed in Belgium a few years ago. It belongs to the class of
perfections by the extreme regularity of its imbrication, its soft pink colouring, broken by a
few scarce, white, longitudinal stripes. The flower is large, convexed and emarginate.
Abbreviation: ‘Dr. Horner’. Orthographic variants: ‘Dottore Horner’, ‘Doctor Horner’.
Docteur Louti. (C.japonica), Detriche, Charles, Angers, France, Catalogue, 1965: Red formal double.
Medium size. Mid-season blooming. Orthographic errors: ‘Dr Lauti’, ‘Dr Lautil’, ‘Dr Loutil’,
‘Docteur Loutil’.
Docteur Loutil.
Treseder’s Nursery Catalogue, 1968-1969. Orthographic error for Docteur Louti.
Docteur Tinsley.
Catalogue Descriptif des Pépinières de Kerisnel, 1995, p.29. Orthographic
variant for Dr. Tinsley.
Doctor Ames. Walter Allen Nursery Catalogue, ca.1948, according to Steffek 1949. Synonym for
Imura.
Doctor Baltazar de Melo. The Plant Finder, 1990-1991, p.88. Orthographic variant for Doutor
Balthazar de Mello.
Doctor Bill Harrison. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1961, p.221, Reg. No.530: A 12 year
old chance seedling that first bloomed 1955; originated by W.H. Harrison, Marianna, Florida,
USA. Growth is upright and rapid in rate with medium, dark green leaves, 15 cm long by 6
cm wide. The rose-pink to deep blush pink semi-double flowers are 15-17 cm in diameter and
10 cm deep with 15-18 petals, white filaments and yellow anthers. Blooms mid-season.
Abbreviation: ‘Dr Bill Harrison’.
Doctor Bliss Shafer. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1972, p.128, Reg. No.1166: A 6 year
old chance C.japonica seedling that first bloomed 1968, originated by Sadie Mancill,
Lafayette, Louisiana, USA. Plant growth is upright, medium in rate with leaves of dark green,
10 cm long x 5cm wide. The peony form bloom is pale pink with rose stripes and yellow
76
anthers and 50 filaments. It is 12.5 cm across and 7.5 cm deep with 47 petals and 12 petaloids.
It blooms mid-season and falls complete. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Bliss Shafer’.
Doctor Bob. (C.japonica), Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Red. Complete double.
Mid-season. American Camellia Yearbook, 1954, p.307, Reg. No.146: This plant, over 50
years old, owned by Dr E.J. Petitjean, Opalousa, Louisiana, USA is believed to be a seedling.
Plant growth is upright, compact and slow. Flower buds are small, round and light green until
colour shows. Flowers are formal double, similar to Alba Plena. Petals, 45-53, growing in
whorls. Colour is rose-pink. Size of flower, 6 cm across. Flowers mid-season. Originated in
USA. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Bob’.
Doctor Bob Womack. (C.hybrid), American Camellia Yearbook, 1973, p.189, Reg. No.1255: as ‘Dr Bob
Womack’: An 8 year old hybrid cross between C.japonica Letitia Schrader and Buddha,
first bloomed 1968, originated by Dr R.K. Womack, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA. Plant
growth is upright, medium in rate with light green leaves, 11 cm x 5 cm. The semi-double,
Frizzle White type, bloom is light red with 10-12 petals and yellow anthers. It measures 14
cm across and 7.5 cm deep. Flowers mid-season.
Doctor Burnside. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1962, p.217, Reg. No.658: as ‘Dr
Burnside’: An 8 year old chance seedling that first bloomed 1959, originated by Dr F.A.
Burnside Sr., Columbus, South Carolina, USA. Plant growth is upright, average in density
and medium in rate with dark green leaves, 10 cm x 7 cm. The semi-double to peony form
flowers, 16 cm across and 7.5 cm deep, are true, dark red with yellow stamens and 25-35
petals. Flowers mid-season. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Burnside’. Sport: Doctor Burnside
Variegated.
Doctor Burnsite Variegated. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1976, Camellia Nomenclature, p.49 as ‘Dr Burnside
Var.’. A virus variegated form of Doctor Burnside - Dark red marbled white. Originated in
USA. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Burnside Variegated’.
Doctor Campbell. Allan, Walter, Catalogue, ca.1949, according to Steffek, 1949, Plant Buyer’s
Guide, ed.5, p.48. Synonym for Gigantea Red as ‘Jacksonii’.
Doctor Clifford Parks.
Parks.
The Plant Finder, 1990-1991, p.80. Orthographic variant for Dr Clifford
Doctor Cy Echols. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1986, p.90, Reg. No.2002 as ‘Dr Cy
Echols’: A deep rose-pink, variegated white, semi-double, C.japonica chance seedling,
mid-season blooming; originated by Paul Gilley, Grand Ridge, Florida, USA. The 6 year old
seedling first bloomed 1983. Average flower size is 12 cm wide by 6 cm deep with 18 petals,
4 petaloids, white filaments and bright gold anthers. Plant growth is average and rapid in rate
with dark green leaves 11 cm long by 6 cm wide. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Cy Echols’.
Doctor Dan J. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1991, p.77, Reg.No.2216 as ‘Dr. Dan J’:
Originated by O.L. Jacobson, Jacksonville Beach, Florida, USA. The 9 year old seedling first
flowered 1986. Very large rose-red blending to orange red with a satin sheen; semi-double to
rose-form double chance seedling of Wonderland. Blooms early to mid-season. Average
flower size is 13-15 cm across x 7.5 cm deep chemically treated. Plant growth spreading,
medium in rate with dark green leaves 13 cm long x 5.5 cm wide. Colour photo between
pp.80-81.
Doctor Dan Nathan Supreme. (C.reticulata). American Camellia Yearbook, 1991, p.78, Reg. No.2222,
under the abbreviation ‘Dr Dan Nathan Supreme’: Originated by Marvin Jernigan, Warner
Robins, Georgia, USA. Very large pink with fluorescent sheen, semi-double C.reticulata
([Homeyer 146-Trewithen Pink x ‘Tali Queen’ (Dali Cha)] x Lilette Witman). Blooms
mid-season. The 11 year old seedling first flowered 1986. Average flower size is 17.5 cm
across x 12.5 cm deep with 21+ petals, clear red anthers and filaments. Dark green leaves 11
cm long x 6 cm wide. Colour photo between pp.80-81. ICS Journal, 1998, p.87. Don
77
Ellison, 1997, “Camellias – a Photo Dictionary”, p.92 with colour illustration. (The photo in
the Ellison book is correct, but the parentage and origin given in the ICS 1998 Journal entry
are incorrect).
Doctor Dave. (C.reticulata x C.lutchuensis). American Camellia Yearbook, 1992, p.33, Reg.No.2260
under the abbreviation ‘Dr Dave’: Originated by Frank Pursel, Oakland, California, USA:
Very large, dark red with heavy frosting, semi-double, C.reticulata ‘Crimson Robe’
(Dataohong) x (‘Crimson Robe’ x C.lutchuensis). Blooms mid-season to late. The 15 year
old seedling first flowered 1985. Average flower size is 16 cm across x 9 cm deep with 22-28
petals, red anthers and filaments. Plant growth upright and vigorous with dark green leaves 16
cm long x 7.5 cm wide. Colour photo between pp.40-41.
Doctor Donald Koonce. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1961, p.221, Reg. No.577: A 10
year old chance seedling, first bloomed 1957, originated by S.L. Marbury, Wilmington, North
Carolina, USA. Plant growth is dense, medium in rate with dark green leaves, 7.5 cm x 4 cm.
The anemone form flower, 11 cm wide by 5 cm deep, is dark red with yellow stamens and 40
petals. The stamens are interspersed with petals. Blooms mid-season. Abbreviation: ‘Dr
Donald Koonce’.
Doctor Ecorchard. (C.japonica), Claude Thoby, 1993, Camélias, pp.10, 17, as ‘Dr Ecorchard’: Vivid
red semi-double. Blooms mid-season. Originated in France.
Doctor Fay Shaw. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1969, p.159, Reg. No.1065: A 7 year old
seedling of R.L. Wheeler, that first bloomed 1965; originated by R.E. May, Gerbing’s
Camellia Nursery, Florida, USA. Plant growth is dense and rapid in rate with dark green
leaves, 8 cm x 6 cm. The semi-double flower, similar to Frizzle White, is 12.5 cm wide by
7.5 cm deep. It is deep pink with yellow anthers and white filaments. Mid-season to late
flowering. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Fay Shaw’.
Doctor Fred E. Heitman. (C.reticulata hybrid). ACS, May 1995, The Camellia Journal, vol.50, No.2,
p.15, Reg. No.2316 as ‘Dr Fred E. Heitman’: Very large, deep bright red with a fluorescent
sheen, rose form double, C.reticulata hybrid Nuccio’s Ruby x Lilette Witman. Blooms midseason. Originated by Jack L. Mandarich, Grants Pass, Oregon, USA. ACS 1995, American
Camellia Yearbook, p.4 with colour photo: the 10 year old seedling first flowered 1989.
Average flower size is 13 cm across x 6 cm deep with 20+ petals with golden anthers. Plant
growth is upright, spreading and dense with dark green leaves 10 cm long x 6 cm wide.
Doctor G.A. Bunch. Trues Camellias, 1963, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.18, No.3, p.28. This
was registered with the ACS., 1965, Reg. No.791, as ‘Dr George Bunch’. The SCCS.,
Camellia Nomenclature, 1970, p.48 lists it as a synonym for Sarah R.
Doctor Geechee. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1970, p.162, Reg. No.1071: A 15 year old
chance seedling that first flowered 1964, originated by the Robert Burgess Nursery,
Savannah, Georgia, USA. Plant growth is upright, spreading, open and rapid in rate with 14
cm x 6.5 cm leaves. The semi-double flower is 15 cm across and 6 cm deep red with yellow
anthers. Flowers mid-season. Sport: Doctor Geechee Variegated. Abbreviation: ‘Dr
Geechee’.
Doctor Geechee Variegated. (C.japonica), Gentry, 1971, ACS., The Camellia Journal,. vol.26, No.4,
p.21 as ‘Dr Geechee Var.’: A virus variegated form of Doctor Geechee - Deep red blotched
white. Originated in USA. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Geechee Variegated’.
Doctor Henry B. Harvey. (C.japonica), ACS, May 1995, The Camellia Journal, vol.50, No.2, p.16, Reg.
No.2315 as ‘Dr Henry B. Harvey’: Small, soft rose-red, formal double, High Wide’n
Handsome x Brother Rose. Blooms early to mid-season. Originated by Mrs Henry Stone,
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. ACS 1995, American Camellia Yearbook, p.4 with colour
photo: The 15 year old seedling first flowered 1986. Average flower size is 7.5 cm across x 3
78
cm deep with 84 petals. Blooms are slightly lighter where centre petals are incurved and very
pointed. Plant growth is upright, dense and vigorous with dark green leaves 10 cm long x 3
cm wide.
Doctor Horner.
Alexis Dalliere, 1852, Price List, p.15. Orthographic variant for Docteur Horner.
Doctor Howard House. (C.reticulata), American Camellia Yearbook, 1967, p.225, Reg. No.951: A 7
year old chance C.reticulata seedling of ‘Cornelian’, (Damanao) that first bloomed 1963.
Originated by Dr J.B. Tarver, San Marino, California, USA. Plant growth is upright and
spreading, open and rapid in rate with dark green, veined, leaves, 10 cm long x 6 cm wide.
The semi-double to peony form flower is 12.5 cm across and 3.5 cm deep, with 12 petals and
11 petaloids. Colour is rose-pink with golden anthers. Rabbit eared. Mid-season to late
blooming. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Howard House’. Orthographic error: ‘Dr Howard Howse’.
Doctor Jean-Paul Anthoine. (C.japonica), Claude Thoby, 1993, Camélias, pp.10, 17, 25 and colour
photo p.5, under the abbreviation ‘Dr Jean-Paul Anthoine’: Flowers single, velvety red.
Stamens with rose mauve filaments. Blooms mid-season. Leaves broad-lanceolate, apices
acuminate, margins serrate. Originated in France.
Doctor Judge. (C.japonica), ACS, May 1995, The Camellia Journal, vol.50, No.2, p.15, Reg. No.2324
as ‘Dr Judge’: Medium size, pale blush pink with darker petal edges, semi-double. C.japonica
chance seedling. Blooms mid-season to late. Originated in USA by William H. Smith,
Gainesville, Florida. ACS 1995, American Camellia Yearbook, p.4 with colour photo: The 15
year old seedling first flowered in 1989. Average flower size is 10 cm across x 6 cm deep
with 28 petals, 7 petaloids and yellow anthers. Plant growth is upright, dense, with dark green
leaves 10 cm long x 5 cm wide.
Doctor King. Neil McEacharn, 1963, Catalogue of the plants in the Gardens of Villa Taranto,
p.58. Orthographic variant for Dr King.
Doctor Lee. (C.japonica), Fruitland Nursery Catalogue, 1940-1941, p.22: Dark red, medium semi-double
of round form, 10-11 cm in diameter. Medium, spreading growth with medium to light green
leaves, broad ovate, 9.5 cm x 6 cm, short apex, raised venation, broad, shallow serrations. A
seedling of unknown parents originated by Dr W.G. Lee, Macon, Georgia, USA about 1920.
Orthographic variant: ‘Dr W.G. Lee’. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Lee’. Sport: Doctor Lee Variegated.
Doctor Lee Variegated. (C.japonica), Fruitland Nursery Catalogue, 1946-1947, p.27. A virus variegated
form of Doctor Lee - Dark red mottled white. Originated in USA. Orthographic variant: ‘Dr
W.G. Lee Variegated’. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Lee Variegated’.
Doctor Louis Pollizzi. American Camellia Yearbook, 1970, pl. facing p.52. Orthographic error for
Dr Louis Polizzi.
Doctor Max. (C.japonica), Camellia Hall Price List, 1950. No description. Fendig, 1951, American
Camellia Catalogue: Large red and white single, 12-13 cm across x 5-5.5 cm deep. The red
and white is evenly distributed. Petals, nearly round, are 6 cm x 5.5 cm. Stamens are joined at
base and attached to the petals in a solid corolla. Filaments white, anthers lemon yellow. Buds
ovoid and light green. Leaves mid-green, glossy, ovate, 8 cm x 6 cm, stiff, curled downwards,
prominent venation, apices blunt, margins shallowly serrate.. The plant is a hardy, bushy,
slow grower. This originated as a Japanese import by Camellia Hall, Sacramento, California
which first bloomed in 1940. Before 1940 this was an unnamed Japanese import at the old
Camellia City Nursery. It only carried a code number and was confused with ‘Miss
Sacramento Variegated’. Doctor Max is a large, cup-shaped single, 12.5 cm in diameter and
6 cm deep, red marbled white. It develops large seedpods and has been nicknamed the “Apple
Camellia”. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Max’.
Doctor McLean. (C.japonica), Wilmot, 1945, Camellia Variety Classification Report, p.7. No
description. SCCS., 1950, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.33 as ‘Dr McLean’:
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Rose red. Large semi-double. Vigorous, upright, compact growth. Mid-season flowering.
Originated at Huntington Gardens, San Marino, California, USA. Abbreviation: ‘Dr McLean’.
Doctor Merilatt.
rillat.
Fruitland Nursery Catalogue, 1947-1948, p.27. Orthographic variant for Dr Mer-
Doctor Olin Owen. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1991, p.78, Reg. No.2221 under the
abbreviation ‘Dr Olin Owen’: Originated by Dr. Olin W. Owen, Charlotte, N.C., USA. Large
oriental red semi-double C.japonica chance seedling. Blooms mid-season to late. The 25 year
old plant first bloomed 1974. Average flower size is 10 cm across x 5.5 cm deep with 32
petals and 6-8 petaloids and wavy upright petals and stamens mingled with petaloids. Light
green leaves 9.5 cm long x 4.5 cm wide. Colour photo between pp.80-81.
Doctor Polizzi.
Polizzi.
American Camellia Yearbook, 1970, p.108. Orthographic variant for Dr Louis
Doctor Robert Pigford. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1967, p.225, Re No.923: An 11
year old chance seedling that first bloomed 1960; originated by W.H. Powell, Garner, North
Carolina, USA. Plant growth is average and open, medium in rate with light green leaves, 10
cm x 6 cm. The flower is peony form, 12.5 cm diameter and 7.5 cm deep with 45 petals and
70 petaloids. Colour is true, rose-pink with white filaments. Petals thick. Blooms mid-season.
Abbreviation: ‘Dr Robert Pigford’.
Doctor Robert Withers. (C.reticulata hybrid). ACRS, Camellia News, 1994, Issue No.131, p.9, Bob
Withers, “A Mother Superior”: A seedling of Suzanne Withers x Arcadia. Originated by Dr.
R. Withers, Donvale, Victoria, Australia. A deep pink, almost full formal double.
Doctor Shepherd.
Walter Allan Nusrsery Catalogue, ca.1948 according Steffek, 1946, Plant
Buyer’s Guide. Synonym for Grand Sultan.
Doctor Thayer. McIlhenny Catalogue, ca.1948 according to Steffek, 1949, Plant Buyer’s Guide.
Synonym for Dr Oldwig Thayer.
Doctor Tinsley.
Tinsley.
Harn, 1953, American Camellia Yearbook, p.269. Orthographic variant for Dr
Doctor Wilds. (C.japonica), Fruitland Nursery Catalogue, 1943-1944, p.27: Medium sized white, semidouble. Blooms mid-season. Originated by the Fruitland Nursery, Augusta, Georgia, USA.
Abbreviation: ‘Dr Wilds’.
Dodici Aprile. (C.japonica), Medici Spada, 1854, Catalogue. No description. Franchetti, 1855,
Collezione di Camelie, p.25: Imbricated, pink with white blotches. Originated in Florence,
Italy.
Dody’s Delight. Camellia Nomenclature 2006, p.35. C.japonica sport of unknown parentage. Pale pink
with darker pink speckles and stripes. Very large, semi-double form. Upright, vigorous
growth. Introduced 2004 by Tom Gilfroy, LaCanada, Calif., USA.
Dogrose. (C.saluenensis), Puddle, 1955, SCCS., The Camellia Review, vol.16, No.10: Pale rose, medium
size single. Blooms mid-season to late. Originated in England by W.J. Marchant, Keeper’s
Hill Nursery, Dorset.
Dogwood. (C.japonica), Hertrich, 1955, Camellias in the Huntington Gardens, vol.II, p.88, black and
white photo, p.90: Single, self white, 10 cm wide by 4 cm deep; petals usually 6, 5.5 cm x 4
cm wide, haft abrupt, broad channelled. Stout column of stamens with white filaments, yellow
anthers. Leaves oblong-lanceolate, 8-9 cm long x 3.5-4 cm wide, very dark, glossy green,
impressed midrib, margins rolled under, thick leathery, broad, shallow, sharp serrations. Habit
upright, loosely branched. Flowers early to mid-season. Originated in USA.
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Dôji. (Boy Child), (C.japonica), Kasuya, Kamegorô, 1859, Tsubaki Irohanayose Irotsuki. See, JCS.,
1969, Tsubaki, No.7, p.24 and Yokoyama, 1982, JCS., Tsubaki, No,21, p.100: Large pale
pink, semi- double with two rows of petals. Stamens spread like a tea whisk. Originated in
Japan. (Believed extinct.) Different reading: ‘Dôshi’.
Dôkumasaka. Inazawa Nursery Catalogue, 1980-1981. Curruption of ‘Fuiri-kumasaka’ as a synonym for Hanatachibana.
Dolly. (C.japonica), ACRS., 1989, Camellia News, p.111, p.12, Reg. No.374: Originated by Keith
Abbott, Rossmoyne, West Australia. A chance seedling that first flowered 1985. Semi-double
bi-colour flower with 18 petals and a soft pink centre (RHS.SS.49D), shading to deeper pink
edging (RHS.CC.54C), 10 cm across x 5.5 cm deep. Petals semi-circular and fold down.
Stamens in a central cylinder with golden anthers. Blooms early to mid-season, on an open,
upright, medium plant. Leaves elliptic, glossy, dark green, curled, finely serrulate, apices
acuminate, 10 cm long x 5.5 cm wide.
Dolly Bowen. Griffin, ed., 1958, Camellian, vol.IX, No.1, p.5: Red, large, loose, peony form. Open
growth. Synonym for Moss Point Red, the solid red form of Moss Point Variegated.
Dolly Dyer. (C.japonica), ACRS., 1973, Camellia News, No.51, p.37, Reg. No.158: Originated by G.W.
Hooper, Camellia Vale Nursery, Bexley North, N.S.W., Australia. A chance seedling from
Bokuhan, (‘Tinsie’) seed was planted 1967 and first bloomed 1970. The scarlet, 5 cm
informal double flowers are produced early to late. The 8 cm x 3.8 cm deep green leaves have
sharply pointed apices and small blunt serrations. Growth habit is upright and vigorous.
Chinese synonym: ‘Duolidaier’.
Dolly Hussey. (C.japonica), Ginn, 1959, New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, Vol.IV, No.1, P.27: Bright
rose-pink. Medium single with 8 slightly cupped petals around a distinctive central mass of
petaloids. Originated by Mrs J. Hussey, Wanganui, New Zealand.
Dolly Madison. SCCS., 1947. The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature. Synonym for Orchid
Pink.
Dolly O’Driscoll. (C.japonica), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1982, vol.XII, No.7, p.51, Reg. No.180:
A chance seedling of C.japonica Betty Sheffield Supreme raised by T. Lennard, Te Puke,
New Zealand. The rate and habit of growth are average. The light green leaves average 9 cm x
5 cm. The formal double flowers measure 11.5 cm across x 7.5 cm deep and have 70 petals.
The colour is shell pink (RHS. Red Purple Group 62C) and white in the centre. Flowering
mid-season to late.. The flower has a rose bud centre and there is a distinct separation between
the white centre and the pink outer petals.
Dolly Parler. (C,japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1977, p.209, Reg. No.1434: A very large,
rose-pink anemone form, 12 year old chance seedling C.japonica that first flowered 1968.
Originated by A.R. Parler, Elloree, South Carolina, USA. Average size 13 cm across and 6.5
cm deep. Blooms mid-season. Plant growth, upright and medium in rate with light green
leaves, 8.5 cm long by 4 cm wide. Sport: Dolly Parler Variegated.
Dolly Parler Variegated. (C.japonica), Gentry, 1984, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.39, No.4, P.17,
(advert.) as ‘Dolly Parler Var.’. A virus variegated form of Dolly Parler - Rose-pink marbled
with white. Originated in USA.
Dolly Rice.
Wade, 1949, American Camellia Yearbook, p.194. Synonym for Mathotiana Alba.
Dolly West. (C.reticulata), ACRS., 1981, Camellia News, No.79, p.28, Reg. No.278: Originated by Terry
Pierson, Hurstville, NSW, Australia. A chance seedling of C.reticulata ‘Wild Form’. First
flowered 1979. The vigorous, upright plant has 10 cm x 7.5 cm, dark green, heavily reticulate,
oblong-elliptic leaves with short apices and fine serration. The semi-double to incomplete
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double,13.5 cm diameter by 8.5 cm deep blooms have 13 petals of salmon pink with a white
cast, a few petaloids and a large boss of stamens like a Higo. Flowers early to late.
Dolores Edwards. (C.x williamsii), SCCS., 1990, Camellia Nomenclature, p.146: Light orchid pink,
large size, semi-double. Medium, upright growth. Blooms mid-season. Originated by E.H.
Smith, Valdosta, Georgia, USA.
Dolores Hope. (C.reticulata.x C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1972, p.129, Reg. No.1204: A
7 years old hybrid seedling, (C.reticulata x C.japonica) that first bloomed 1968. Originated
by Monique J. Peer, Los Angeles, California, USA. Plant growth is upright, open and rapid in
rate with light green leaves, 10 cm x 5 cm. The semi-double, light rose-pink bloom has
irregular petals, is 13.5 cm in diameter and blooms mid-season. It is veined with orchid pink
and some centre petals are shaded white. See colour photo, front cover, SCCS., 1974, The
Camellia Review, vol.35, No.5.
Dolores Jackson. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1981, p.96, Reg. No.1739: A very large,
pure white semi-double to loose peony form C.japonica chance seedling, mid-season
blooming, originated by Ted Alfter, Bakersfield, California, USA. The 8 year old seedling
first bloomed 1979. Average flower size is 11 cm wide by 8 cm deep with 25-32 petals and a
few petaloids. Plant growth is upright, open and rapid, with dark green leaves, 11 cm x 6 cm.
Dolores Oates. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1974, vol.II, p.231, reg. No.1313: A 15 year
old chance C.japonica seedling that first bloomed 1962. (Pink Star x unknown) Originated
by J.T. Oakes, Daphne, Alabama, USA. Plant growth is medium in rate with light green
leaves, 10 cm x 5 cm. The anemone form, Elegans type bloom is ice pink to darker shading.
Average size 11 cm across and 6.5 cm deep with 22-25 petals and 15-18 petaloids,
interspersed with yellow tipped stamens having pink filaments. Blooms early to mid-season.
Dolores Taylor. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1951, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature: Soft veined
pink striped rose-pink. Medium sized semi-double. Vigorous, upright growth. Mid-season
blooming. Originated in USA by Jones.
Dolores Thompson. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1990, Camellia Nomenclature, p.32: Light pink, small size,
rose form to formal double. Blooms mid-season. Plant growth medium in rate, spreading.
Originated by J. Aldrich, Brooklet, Georgia, USA.
Dom Camille Borghese. Jules Menoreau Nursery Catalogue, 1886, p.12. Orthographic error for
Don Camillo Borghèse.
Dom Camille Borgliese. SCCS., 1951, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature. Orthographic
error for Don Camillo Borghèse.
Dom Carlos Fernando. (Principe Real) (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865,
p.36, & No.9, 1872-1873, p.42: Formal double, creamy rose-pink, paler to the centre.
Originated in Portugal. Abbreviation: ‘D. Carlos Fernando’. Orthographic variant: ‘Don
Carlos Fernando’. Orthographic errors: ‘Don Ferdinando’, ‘Don Carlos Ferdinando’.
Dom Diniz. (C.japonica), Alfredo Moreira da Silva, 1965-66, Catalogue No.100, p.27, Ref 122; Large
red semidouble. Colour photo on back cover of Catalogue No.107, 1972-73. Originated in
Portugal. Orthographic error ‘Don Dinis’. Ferreira & Celina, 2000, O Mundo da Camélia,
p.78 with colour photo; Vermillion, large semi-double, blooms mid-season..
Dom Diniz o Lavrador.. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.31 and No.9,
1872-1873, p.42. Regular rose form, colour vivid rose-pink, lighter coloured at the centre.
Orthographic variant; ‘D. Diniz, (O Lavrador)’. Orthographic error ‘Dom Dinez’. Originated
in Portugal.
Dom Fernando II. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue, No.29, 1895-1896.
Abbreviation for Dom Fernando II de Portugal.
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Dom Fernando II de Portugal. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.34, &
No.9, 1872-1873, p.42: Peony form. Pink striped and dotted with carmine. Orthographic
variants and abbreviations: ‘Dom Fernando II’, ‘Don Fernando II de Portugal’, ‘Don
Fernando II’, ‘D. Fernando II’(Rei de Portugal). Originated in Portugal.
Dom Frei Caetano Brandão. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.9, 1872-1873. Formal
double. Soft rose pink with splashes of white. Abbreviations: ‘D. Fr. Caetano Brandão’,
‘Dom. Fr. Caetano Brandão’. Orthographic error ‘Don Frey Caetano Brandão’.. Originated in
Portugal.
Dom Fuas Roupinho. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.35, & No.9,
1872-1873, p.42: Formal double. Soft rose pink with stripes of white. Abbreviation: ‘D. Fuas
Roupinho’. Originated in Portugal.
Dom João de Castro. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.36, & No.9,
1872-1873, p.42: Formal double. Vivid rose-pink with stripes of white. Abbreviations: ‘D.
João de Castro’, Originated in Portugal.
Dom João IV. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.9, 1872-1873: Form of ‘Pomponia’,
(Pompone). Soft rose spattered with white. Abbreviation: ‘D. João IV’. Originated in
Portugal. Orthographic variant: ‘Dom Juan IV’.
Dom Joaquim de Mello e Faro. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro, Catalogue No.17, 1881-82, p.70;
Loureiro Catalogue, No.19, 1883: Formal double. Bright scarlet. Abbreviation; ‘D. Joaquim
de Mello e Faro’. Originated in Portugal.
Dom Juan IV. Escuela di Agricultura Catalogue, 1882. Orthographic variant for Dom João IV.
Dom Luiz I. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue No.29, 1895-1896, p.46.
Abbreviation for Dom Luiz I, Rei de Portugal.
Dom Luiz I, Rei de Portugal. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.34, & No.9,
1872-1873, p.42: Formal double, flesh pink striped and powdered with carmine. Originated in
Portugal. Abbreviations: ‘D. Luiz I’, ‘Dom Luiz I’, ‘D. Luiz I, Rei de Portugal’.
Dom Manoel o Afortunado. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.35, & No.9,
1872-1873, p.42: Formal double, rose-pink, colour lighter in the centre, with stripes of white.
Orthographic variants; ‘Dom Manuel, o Afortunado’, ‘Dom Manoel (O Afortunado).
Abbreviation ‘D. Manuel, o Afortunado’. Originated in Portugal.
Dom Nuno Alvares Pereira. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.34, & No9,
1872-1873, p.42: Peony form. Colour violet-pink with central and other stripes of carmine.
Originated in Portugal. Abbreviation: ‘D. Nuno Alvares Pereira’. Orthographic variant: ‘Dom
Nun’Alvares Pereira’.
Dom Nun’Alvares Pereira. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue, No.29,
1895-1896, p.46. Orthographic variant for Dom Nuno Alvares Pereira.
Dom Pedro II, Imperador do Brazil. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.33,
& No.9, 1872-1873, p.42: Rose form. Colour, white, striped and speckled with carmine.
Abbreviation; ‘D. Pedro II, Imperador do Brazil’ Orthographic error ‘Emperador de Brasil’.
Originated in Portugal.
Dom Pedro V, Rei de Portugal. (C.japonica), Oliveira Junior, Jornal de Horticultura Practica, Vol. IV,
1873, Chronicle, p.160; “one of … eighteen new Camellias, portuguese…forming the
genealogical tree of the House of Bragança … (exhibited by Loureiro)…at the International
Exhibition that took place in 1865 in Palácio de Crystal’. José Marques Loureiro Catalogue,
No.9, 1872-1873: Formal double. Colour, pure white, splashed and striped with rose-pink. J.
Linden Catalogue, 1878-1879, p.4 as ‘Don Pedro V’: Flower regularly imbricated, petals
ovate, rounded, apiculate, well arranged, beautiful white, softly splashed lengthwise with
83
streaks of soft pink. Outer petals orbicular or kidney shaped, some serrated. Originated in
Portugal. Abbreviations: ‘D. Pedro V’, ‘D. Pedro V, Rei de Portugal’. Described and
illustrated in L’Illustration Horticole, vol.XXI, p.7, 8, 1874 invalidly as ‘Don Pedro’. See
pl.XII, Waterhouse, 1952, Camellia Trail as ‘Don Pedro’, and Ferreira & Celina, 2000, O
Mundo da Camélia, colour photo, p.79.. Erroneously equated with ‘Elizabeth’ in USA.
Sports: Eugènie de Massèna, Milady, Elizabeth Pink. Orthographic errors: ‘D.Pedro V, Rey
de Portugal’, ‘Don PedroV’, ‘D.Pedo V, Rei de Portugal’.
Dombreyi. RHS., 1954, The Rhododendron and Camellia Yearbook, 1955, No.9, p.10, 79, 83.
Orthographic error for Dobreei.
Domenco Casarini. (C.japonica), Mercatelli Catalogue, 1894. No description. Originated in Italy.
(Believed extinct.)
Domicilia Rosea. (C.japonica), Jean Verschaffelt, 1863-1864, Price List, p.36: White tinted with very
soft pink. Originated in Italy.
Domoto’s Baby Slam. (C.japonica), Rogers, 1974, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol. 29, No.3. No
description. Originated in USA. No valid listing located.
Domoto’s Blush Formal.
Porcelain Doll.
SCCS, 1997, The Camellia Review, vol.59, No.1, p.7. Renamed
Domoto’s Light Pink Import. (C.japonica), Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars
from Nursery Catalogues, p.58. No description. Originated in Japan. No valid listing located.
Domoto’s Petite. (C.japonica), Macoboy, 1981, The Colour Dictionary of Camellias, p.130: Produced by
California’s Domoto in the 1960’s, ‘Domoto’s Petite’ is a charming peony form miniature of
the palest mauve pink. Blooms mid-season to late. Originated by Domoto, California, USA.
ACS, Yearbook, 1998, p.2, colour photo preface, Reg. No. 2401. Miniature, anemone form.
Average flower size is 5 cm diameter x 2.5 cm deep with 6-9 petals and 60+ petaloids. Plant
growth is average with light green leaves.
Domoto’s Red Formal.
SCCS, 1997, The Camellia Review, vol.59, No.1, p.7. Renamed Hotshot.
Domoto’s Red Rose. SCCS, 1997, The Camellia Review, vol.59, No.1, p.7. Renamed Tiny Rose.
Note: The use of a plant genus name as last word in a cultivar name is illegal under the
Nomenclature Code, and this cultivar should be renamed again.
Domoto’s Snowflake.
SCCS, 1997, The Camellia Review, vol.59, No.1, p.7. Renamed Snowmist.
Don Baptiste Borghese. Osborne & Son, Fulham Nursery Catalogue, 1880, p.46. Synonym for
Don Camillo Borghese.
Don Bernado Lecchi. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.58. Orthographic error for Don Bernardo Lechi.
Don Bernardino Lechi.
Linden Catalogue, 1875. Orthographic error for Don Bernardo Lechi.
Don Bernardo Lechi. (C.japonica), Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.10 as
‘Don Bernardo Lecchi’. No description. van Houtte Catalogue, 1859, 77:55: Perfectly
imbricated flower, formal double, very vivid rose-pink, streaked white. Originated at Brescia,
Italy. Orthographic variants: ‘Don Bernardo Lecchi’, ‘Don Bernardino Lechi’. Orthographic
errors: ‘Don Bervardo Lechi’, ‘Conte Bernardini Lechi’. Synonyms: ‘Conte Bernardino
Lechi’, ‘Comte Bernardino Lechi’.
Don Bervardo Lechi. Ed. Pynaert van Geert Catalogue, 1888, p.64. Orthographic error for Don
Bernardo Lechi.
Don Camille Borghese. Guichard Soeurs Nursery Catalogue, 1928. Orthographic error for Don
Camillo Borghese.
84
Don Camillo-Baptista Borghese.
Don Camillo Borghese.
Auguste van Geert, 1861, Catalogue No.50, p.33. Synonym for
Don Camillo-Baptiste Borghese. van Geert Nursery Catalogue, No.65, 1869-1870, p.51. Synonym
for Don Camillo Borghese.
Don Camillo Borghese. (C.japonica), Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.8 as
‘Borghese, Don Camillo’: Petals star-like, neatly striped with white, straw yellow; intense
rosy carmine. Auguste van Geert, 1863-1864, Catalogue No.54, p.36: Star-like imbrication,
variegated distinctly with straw-yellow and carmine. These tints do not merge together as in
most cases but superimpose themselves distinctly as in many tulip varieties. Originated in the
Giardino Borghese, Rome, Italy. Orthographic errors and variants: ‘Don Camillo Borghesi’,
‘Don Camille Borghese’, ‘Don Cammillo Borghese’, ‘Dom Camillo Borghese’, ‘Dom
Camille Borgliese’, ‘Borghese, Don Camillo’, ‘Don Camillo Baptista Borghese’. Synonym:
‘Don Camellio-Baptiste Borghese’. Abbreviation: ‘D. Camillo Borghese’.
Don Camillo Borghesi. R. Società Toscana d’Orticultura Bullettino, 1862. Orthographic error for
Don Camillo Borghese.
Don Cammillo Borghese.
Borghese.
Mercatelli Catalogue, 1881. Orthographic error for Don Camillo
Don Carlos-Ferdinando. Linden Catalogue, 1878-1879, p.9. Orthographic variant for Don Carlos
Ferdinando.
Don Carlos Ferdinando. (C.japonica), L’Illustration Horticole, 1873, 20:26, t.119: This camellia, a
Portuguese seedling, is characterised by a very large, perfectly imbricated flower, the petals
obtuse, scarcely emarginate, arranged in radiating rows, of a bright blood red, inclined to
carmine, with spots and touches of pure white. From the different colouring to Dom Carlos
Fernando this would appear to be a sport, therefore the orthographic variant Don Carlos
Ferdinando is let stand to distinguish one from the other. Linden Catalogue, 1873.
Don Carlos Fernando. van Houtte Catalogue, 1879-1880, 184:239. Orthographic variant for Dom
Carlos Fernando.
Don Clavii. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery Catalogues,
p.58. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’. (Masayoshi).
Don Dinis. (C.japonica), Alfreo Moreira da Silva Catalogue, 1979: Large red semi-double. Early
flowering. Orthographic error for Dom Diniz.
Don d’un Ami. (C.japonica), Ambroise Verschaffelt, 1854, Catalogue p.18. No description. Franchetti,
1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.25: Regularly imbricated, pale pink, streaked with white.
Burnier Catalogue, 1855-1856: Regularly imbricated. Delicate rose pink striped with white.
Originated in Italy. Orthographic errors: ‘Do d’un Ami’, ‘Dundanamii’, ‘Dondunami’,
‘Dundunamii’.
Don Felice Borghese. (C.japonica), Burnier Catalogue, 1855-1856: Imbricated rose form. Rose-pink.
Imbricated petals at the circumference; coloured intense rose with the centre petals a paler
shade. Originated at the Giardino Borghese, Rome, Italy.
Don Ferdinando. Verschaffelt Catalogue, No.50, 1844, p.19.. Orthographic error for Dom Carlos
Fernando.
Don Fernandino II.
gal.
Linden Catalogue, 1875. Orthographic error for Dom Fernando II de Portu-
Don Ferdinando II de Portugal. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue, No.29,
1895-1896: Orthographic variant for Dom Fernando II de Portugal.
85
Don Francesco Borghese. (C.japonica), Burnier Catalogue, 1855-1856: Imbricated, Salmon pink with
the extremities of the petals almost white. Originated at the Giardino Borghese, Rome, Italy.
Orthographic variant: ‘Borghese, Don Francesco’.
Don Giobala Bapt. Borghese.
Jean Vervaene fils, 1864, Price List No.1, p.6. Orthographic error
for Don Giovanni Battista Borghese.
Don Giovan Batista Borghese. Mercatelli Catalogue, 1881. Orthographic error for: Don Giovanni
Battista Borghese.
Don Giovanni Battista Borghese. (C.japonica), Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa
Quiete, p.8 as ‘Borghese, Don Gio. Battista’: Perfectly imbricated, flesh rose-pink, with a
more vivid veining, petals lined rosy white. Originated in the Giardino Borghese, Rome, Italy.
Orthographic variants: ‘Don Giovan Batista Borghese’, ‘Don Giovanni Borghese’, ‘Borghese,
Don Giovanni Battista’. Abbreviation: ‘D. Giovanni Battista Borghese’. Orthographic error:
‘Don Giobala Bapt. Borghese’.
Don Giovanni Borghese. van Houtte Catalogue, 1859, 77:55. Abbreviation for Don Giovanni Battista Borghese.
Don Hertzilla de Freitas Magalhais. Newman’s Nursery Catalogue, 1982-1983. Orthographic error
for Dona Herzilia de Freitas Magalhaes.
Don Kasleare. American Camellia Yearbook, 1949, p.379. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’,
(Masayoshi).
Don Klari.
Berlèse, 1841, Iconographie, pl.9. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, (Masayoshi).
Doncalina. Hazlewood & Jessep,1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery Catalogues,
p.58. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, (Masayoshi).
Don-Mac. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1956, p.60, Reg.273: This 11 year old seedling
of H.A. Downing, originated by Mrs Sylvia Donahoo, Pensacola, Florida, USA, which
flowered for the first time 1951. Leaves dark green, 8.5 cm long x 4.5 cm wide. The dark red
flowers are 13.5 cm across, similar in form to Adolphe Audusson. The 21 petals are creped
and curled, anthers yellow. Flowers mid-season to late. Sports: Don-Mac Peony, Don-Mac
Variegated. See colour photo front cover SCCS., 1963, The Camellia Review, vol.24, No.5.
Orthographic error: ‘Don Mack’. Chinese synonym ‘Dongmaike’.
Don-Mac Peony. (C.japonica), Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1964-1965, p.4: A peony form type of
Don-Mac. Originated in USA.
Don-Mac Variegated. (C.japonica), Hillcrest Nursery Catalogue, 1958 as ‘Don-Mac Var.’: A variegated
form of Don-Mac - Dark red blotched white. Originated in USA. Orthographic error: ‘Don
Mack Variegated’.
Don Mack.
Feray’s Fine Flowers Catalogue, 1960. Orthographic error for Don-Mac.
Don Mack Variegated. Feray’s Fine Flowers Catalogue, 1960. Orthographic error for Don-Mac
Variegated.
Don Michel. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt Catalogue, No.50, 1844, p.19. No description. Verschaffelt,
1849, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book VI, pl.III: Received from Italy 4 or 5 years ago, a
specimen of the perfection class. The general colour of the bloom is a bright pink, deeper at
the centre; some petals are pure white, with spots and broad streaks of pink, others are pink
with white streaks and some entirely pink. Orthographic variants: ‘Don Michele’, ‘Don
Miguel’, ‘Don Miquel’. Synonym: ‘Grand-Duc Michel’. Verschaffelt, 1851, Iconographie
says it is closely related to ‘Général Zucchi’ and sometimes confused with it. van Houtte
Catalogue, 1851, 32:27 has ‘Général Zucchi’, ‘Grand-duc Michel’ and ‘Don Miquel’ all as
synonyms for Varischi. From the early descriptions they are similar but, lacking proof to the
86
contrary they are treated in the Register as different and ‘Don Michel’, synonym ‘Grand-Duc
Michel’, is listed separately to Varischi, synonym ‘Général Zucchi’.
Don Michele.
Stefano Pagliai Catalogue, 1867, p.66. Orthographic variant for Don Michel.
Don Miguel. von Biedenfeld, 1856, Practische Grundlehren der Cultur von Camellien, p.38.
Orthographic variant for Don Michel.
Don Miquel.
van Houtte Catalogue,1851, 33:27. Orthographic variant for Don Michel.
Don Paola Borghese. (C.japonica), Burnier Catalogue, 1855-1856: Imbricated rose form. Colour deep
rose-pink with the centre a little lighter. Originated at the Giardino Borghese, Rome, Italy.
Orthographic variant: ‘Borghese, Don Paola’. Abbreviation: ‘D. Paola Borghese’.
Don Pedro. (C.japonica), de Jonghe, 1851, Traité de Culture du Camellia, p.104. No description.
Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.26: Very large, broad petals, deep pink, imbricated.
Originated in Italy. Orthographic variant: ‘Don Pedros’. (Believed extinct.)
Don Pedro. André, ed., 1874, L’Illustration Horticole, p.8, pl.156, invalidly for Dom Pedro V, Rei
de Portugal.
Don Pedro II. de Jonghe, 1851, Traité de Culture du Camellia, p.104. Abbreviation for Dom
Pedro II, Imperator do Brazil.
Don Pedro V.
Linden Catalogue, 1875. Abbreviation for Dom Pedro V, Rei de Portugal.
Don Pedro Variegated. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.58. Synonym for Milady. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding
Camellias, p.421. Chinese synonym ‘Fuse Dengpaidao’.
Don Pedros. Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.10. Orthographic error
for ‘Don Pedro’.
Don Wilson. (C.japonica), ACRS., 1981, Camellia News, No.79, p.28, Reg. No.275: Originated by G.W.
Hooper, Camellia Vale Nursery, Bexley North, N.S.W., Australia. A chance seedling that first
bloomed 1977. An upright plant with 10.5 cm x 5 cm dark green, broad-elliptic, strongly
acuminate leaves. The flowers, formal double, 8.5 cm across, spinel pink with darker veining.
Blooms early to mid-season. Chinese synonym ‘Weierxun’.
Dona Adelaide Paula. (C.japonica), Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense, 1892, Catalogue
No.27. p.59. Formal double, white with some vivid pink stripes. The centre is chamois
coloured. Barbarosa Catalogue, 1894. No description. Originated in Portugal.
Dona Agnese Borghese. (C.japonica), Jean Vervaene fils, 1864, Price List, No.1, p.6. No
description. Mercatelli, 1881 Catalogo della Camelie, p.17: Snow white with a few pink
streaks. Perfectly imbricated. Originated by Borghese, Italy. Orthographic variant for Donna
Agnese Borghese.
Dona Angelica Santos. (C.japonica), Jacintho de Mattos, 1900, Catalogue No.14, p.64; Pale pink with
wide white splashes, rose form. Originated in Portugal.
Dona Anna Maria Borghese.
Auguste van Geert, 1861, Catalogue, No.50, p.33. Loureiro
Catalogue No.9, 1872-1873. Orthographic variant for Donna Anna Maria Borghese.
Dona Anna Rodrigues. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.35, & No.9,
1872-1973, p.42: Irregular rose form of light pink sometimes striped white. Originated in
Portugal.
Dona Ausenda. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.31; Formal double, cherry
coloured or dark pink. Originated in Portugal.
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Dona Beatriz de Portugal. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.33, & No.9,
1872-1873, p.42: Formal double of a purple rose colour with darker venation. Orthographic
variant and abbreviation; ‘D. Beatris de Portugal’. Originated in Portugal.
Dona Branca (Abbadeça de Olgas). (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.30,
& No.9, 1872-1873, p.42: Peony form. Pure white. Abbreviations;; 'D. Branca (Abbadeça
d’Olgas)’, ‘D.Branca’. Originated in Portugal.
Dona Camilla de Faria. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro, Catalogue No.17, 1881-82, p.70; Formal
double, pure white. Abbreviation ‘D. Camilla de Faria’. Originated in Portugal.
Dona Carlota de Barros van-Zeller. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogues, No.12, 18751876, p.105, no description, and No.15, 1878-1879, p.57: Formal double white, striped with
rose-pink. Originated in Portugal. Abbreviation: ‘D. Carlota de Barros van-Zeller’.
Dona Casimira Chaves. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro, Catalogue No.17, 1881-82, p.70; and
Catalogue, No.19. 1883: Rose form. Rose-pink with white splashes. Originated in Portugal.
Abbreviation: ‘D. Casimira Chaves’.
Dona Catharina d’Athaide. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.30, & No.9,
1872-1873, p.42: Formal double. Delicate rose-pink. Originated in Portugal. Abbreviation:
‘D. Catharina d’Athaide’. Orthographic variant: ‘Dona Catharina d’Athayde’.
Dona Catharina d’Athayde. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue, 1895-1896,
p.46. Orthographic variant for Dona Catharina d’Athaide.
Dona Clarice de Cardoso. (C.japonica), Original manuscript list of Companhia Horticola, ref. 1083. No
description.
Dona Constança de Portugal. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.35, &
No.9, 1872-1873, p.42: Formal double, colour pink becoming more vivid in the centre. White
streaks. Originated in Portugal. Abbreviation: ‘D. Constana de Portugal’.
Dona Emilia Seabra. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro, Catalogue No.25, 1889-90, p.92; Formal
double. Well imbricated. Scarlet. Orthographic variant ‘Dona Emilia Pimentel de Seabra’.
Abbreviation; ‘D. Emilia Seabra’. Originated in Portugal.
Dona Emilia Pimentel de Seabra. (C.japonica), Real Companhia Horticolo Agricola Portuense
Catalogue,1902: Formal double. Scarlet. Orthographic variant for Dona Emilia Seabra.
Dona Hearts.
Kurume Camellia, 1997, English translation, p.43. Orthographic error for Dona
Herzilia de Freitas Magalhaes.
Dona Helena de Souza Holstein. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro, Catalogue No.17, 1881-82, p.70,
and Catalogue No.19, 1883: Double, white striped pink. Originated in Portugal. Abbreviation
and orthographic variant: ‘D. Helena de Sousa Holstein’.
Dona Herzília de Freitas Magalhães. (C.japonica), Alfredo Moreira da Silva Catalogue No.80, 1946,
p.16, ref.93, beautiful variety, violet-coloured, and 1949 catalogue: Red with distinct violet
shade. Medium sized semidouble to anemone form, Mid-season flowering. For illustration see
The Camellia, vol.I, Urquhart, 1956 and p.79, The Colour Dictionary of Camellias, Macoboy,
1981, also between p.44, 45, RHS., 1990, Rhododendrons with Camellias and Magnolias,
No.42. Ferreira & Celina, 2000, O Mundo da Camélia, p.79. Abbreviation: ‘D. Herzilia de
Freitas Magalhaes’, ‘D. Magalhaes’. Orthographic errors: ‘D. Herillia de Freitas Magalhaes’,
‘D. Hertzilia de Freitas Magalhais’, ‘Mme. Herilla de Freitas Magalhaes’, ‘D. Hertilia de
Freitas’, Orthographic variant: ‘Donna Herzilia de Freitas Magalhaes’.. Originated in Portugal
by Mr Freitas Magalhães, and named for his wife. Received a “Preliminary Commendation”
from the RHS in 1958. Variegated form: Magalhaes Variegated. Chinese synonym:
‘Makalasi’. Note; The colour of this cultivar has been found to vary from mauve pink to deep
88
purple, according to various growing factors such as soil acidity, temperature, rainfall and age
of plant.
Dona Ignez de Castro. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.33, & No.9,
1872-1873, p.43: Regular rose form. Colour milk white with rare stripes of pink. Ferreira &
Celina, 2000, O Mundo da Camélia, p.80 with colour photo, incorrectly as ‘Dona Iñez de
Castro. Originated in Portugal. Abbreviations: ‘Dona Inez’, ‘D. Inez’; Orthographic errors,
‘D.Iñez de Castro’, ‘Dona Iñez de Castro’, ‘Dona Iñez’.
Dona Inês. (C.japonica), Alfredo Moreira da Silva Catalogue No.99, 1964-65, p.27, ref 106; Pink,
sometimes with a white splash. Ferreira & Celina, 2000, O Mundo da Camélia, p.80 with
colour photo; Pink with white stripes and blotches, rose form, medium size. Flowers midseason to late. Strong, vigorous shrub. Originated in Portugal.
Dona Iñez. Alfredo Moreira da Silva Catalogue, 1966-1967. Orthographic error for Dona Inȇs.
Dona Isabel Pinto da Silva. (C.japonica), Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue
No.27, 1892, p.59. Rose form white with rose-pink stripes. Originated in Portugal.
Dona Jane Anderson. Ferreira & Celina, 2000, O Mundo da Camélia, p.80 with colour photo;
Orthographic error for Dona Jane Andresen.
Dona Jane Andresen. (C.japonica), Jacintho de Mattos Catalogue No.14, 1900 as ‘D. Iane Andresen’,
Alfredo Moreira da Silva Catalogue, 1920, as ‘D. Jane Andresen’. Deep satin pink. Medium
size rose form double with fimbriated petals. Sport of Doutor Balthazar de Mello,
originated in 1896 by Alfredo Moreira da Silva, Portugal. Ferreira & Celina, 2000, O Mundo
da Camélia, p.80 with colour photo; Late flowering. Vigorous, fast growing plant.
Orthographic errors: ‘Dona Joanna Andresen’, ‘Dona Joana Andressen’, ‘D. Iane Andresen’,
‘D. Jane Andressen’, ‘D. Jane Andresson’. Abbreviation ‘D. Jane Andresen’.
Dona Joana Andressen.
Jane Andresen.
Allan, John Ltd. Nursery Catalogue, 1978. Orthographic error for Dona
Dona Joanna Andresen. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue No.50, 1914,
p.71. Orthographic error for Dona Jane Andresen.
Dona Josephina Ferreira da Silva. (C.japonica), Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue, No.27, 1892, p.59. Formal double. Pure white. Originated in Portugal.
Dona Julia. (C.japonica), Griffin, ea., Nov.1958, Camellian, p.30: Light salmon pink to dark rose. Large
anemone form. Vigorous, upright growth. Blooms mid-season. Originated by Harris,
Longview Nursery, Florida, USA and named for the mother of the Director of the Dominican
Republic. Sport: Vaughn Drinkard.
Dona Kay. Feray’s Fine Flowers Catalogue, 1960. Orthographic error for ‘Donna Kaye’, synonym
for Arrabella.
Dona Leonor d’Arrochella. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.9, 1872-1873: Formal
double, pure white. Originated in Portugal. Abbreviation and orthographic variant: ‘D. Leonor
d’Arrochela’.
Dona Leonor de Portugal. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.30, & 9,
1872-1873, p.43: Same form as ‘Pomponia’ (Pompone). Pure white. Originated in Portugal.
Dona Leonor de Sá. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.30, & No.9,
1872-1873, p.43: A semi-regular, rose form . Pure white. Originated in Portugal.
Dona Magdalena Galvão. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.33; Anemone
form, white with a yellow hue. Originated in Portugal
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Doña Maria-Anna. de Bisschop Nursery Catalogue, 1935, p.14: White with pink stripes. Originated in Spain. Orthographic variant for ‘Donna Maria-Ann’.
Doña Maria Barbo. (C.japonica), Ambroise Verschaffelt, 1850, Catalogue Général, p.46. No
description. Luzzatti Catalogue 1853. No description. Van Houtte Catalogue, 1852-1853,
48:38. Medium sized, white formal double. Auguste van Geert, 1863-1864, Catalogue No.54,
p.36: Beautiful white with sulphur yellow central tint. Numerous petals. Illustration in
Verschaffelt, 1858, book 3, pl.2. Originated in Italy, said to be from Besson. Orthographic
variant: ‘Donna Maria Barbo’.
Dona Maria Cecilia. (C.japonica), Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense, Catalogue No.34,
1900, p.25. No description.
Dona Maria de Conceição P. d’Albuquerque. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro, Catalogue No.25,
1889-90, p.92,: Double. Bright vermilion with white stripes. Originated in Portugal.
Synonyms: ‘Dona Maria da C. Pinto Albuquerque’, ‘Dona Maria da Conceição Pinto
d’Albuquerque’.
Dona Maria da C. Pinto Albuquerque. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue
No.40, ca.1904, p.68. Synonym for Dona Maria da Conceição P. d’Albuquerque.
Dona Maria da Conceição Pinto Albuquerque.
d’Albuquerque.
Synonym for Dona Maria da Conceição P.
Dona Maria da Purificação de O. Santos. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro, Catalogue No.25,
1889-90, p.92, Rose form double. Flesh coloured with very distinct red stripes, sometimes
pink with white stripes. Orthographic variant ‘Dona Maria da Purificação Santos’. Originated
in Portugal.
Dona Maria da Purificação Santos.
Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense, Catalogue,
p.60. Orthographic variant for Dona Maria da Purificação de O. Santos.
Dona Maria de Lourdes P. d’Albuquerque. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro, Catalogue No.25,
1889-90, p.92. Formal double. Pure white. Originated in Portugal. Abbreviation ‘Dona Maria
de Lourdes Albuquerque’. Orthographic variant; ‘Dona Maria de Lourdes Pinto
d’Albuqueque’.
Dona Maria Helena Van-Zeller. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro, Catalogue No.25, 1889-90, p.92;
Formal double, white with occasional pink stripes. Remarkable. Jornal de Horticultura
Practica, Vol.23, 1892, p.100; “very correct formal double, showing constantly the more
remarkable cases of dymorphism”; p.141; “pure white with cherry coloured centre”. Sequeira
Catalogue, 1892: White with occasional pink stripes. Created at Quinta de Fiaes, Portugal, by
Christiano van Zeller for his daughter Maria Helena.
Dona Maria Luiza.
José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.12, 1875-76, and No.19, 1883-1884.
Synonym for Maria Luigia.
Dona Maria Pia.
Portugal.
Linden Catalogue, 1875. Abbreviation for Dona Maria Pia, Rainha de
Dona Maria Pia, Rainha de Portugal. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.34,
& No.9, 1872-1873, p.43.: Rose form double. Virginal white with stripes of carmine.
Originated in Portugal. Abbreviations: ‘D. Maria Pia’, ‘Dona Maria Pia’. Orthographic error;
‘Donna Maria Pia’.
Dona Maria II. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue, No.29, 1895-1896, p.47:
Abbreviation for Dona Maria II, Rainha de Portugal.
Dona Maria II, Rainha de Portugal. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.35,
& No.9, 1872-1873, p.43: Formal double. Cherry coloured, with occasional splashes of white.
90
Jardim Portuense, 1844, April, No.7, p.106 as ‘Maria 2a’. Beautiful regular flower, dark
scarlet, striped irregularly with white. Obtained by head gardener João José Gomes.
Originated in Portugal. Abbreviations: ‘D. Maria II, Rainha de Portugali, ‘Dona Maria II’.
Dona Marianna Relvas. (C.japonica), Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue, 1902,
No.36, p.50, No description. Catalogue No.40, 1906, p.69; Formal double, delicate pink.
Originated in Portugal.
Dona Rita de Cassia. (C.japonica), Olivera Junior, 1871, Jornal de Horticultura Practica, Vol.II,
pp.119-20 as ‘D. Rita de Cassia’. Formal double, medium size; outer petals vivid pink; central
petals pale pink marbled with white, and in the eye they become brighter pink, regular
imbrication. Bloomed for the first time in 1868-69. José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.9,
1872-1873, p.47: Rose form. Vermilion marbled with white. Originated in Portugal.
Dona Rosa Damasceno. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue Supplement, 1884: Double.
white. Catalogue No.25, 1889-90, p.92; Pure white, formal double. Originated in Portugal.
Dona Sophia Braga. (C.japonica), Jornal de Horticultura Practica, Vol.22, 1891, p.93, by Eduardo
Sequeira: Rose form double white with touches of yellow in the centre. Real Companhia
Horticolo-Agricola Portuense, Catalogue No.27, 1892, p.59; Rose form, white, with a slight
yellow hue in the centre. Originated in Portugal.
Dona Stephania, Rainha de Portugal. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.35,
& No.9, 1872-1873, p.43: Formal double. Colour vivid cherry spotted with white. Originated
in Portugal. Abbreviation: ‘D. Stephania, Rainha de Portugal’.
Donald Davidson. (C.japonica), Dodd, 1968, An Adventure in Camellia Seedlings, p.7, colour photo:
Light scarlet. Open, informal double, 10 cm across, channelled petals, centre fascicles of stamens mixed with small, erect irregular, centre petals. Originated by Richard Dodd, Marshallville, Georgia, USA.
Donation. (C.x williamsii), Anonymous, 1941, Gardeners’ Chronicle, ser.3, 109:145: RHS. “Award of
Merit”. Raised at Borde Hill from C.saluenensis x ‘Donckelaeri’, (Masayoshi). The large,
rounded flowers are a lovely shade of pink. Exhibited by Col. Stephenson R. Clarke, C.B.
Borde Hill, Sussex, England. The bloom is pale orchid pink, flushed and veined Red-Purple
Group 64D, large semi-double. Vigorous, compact growth. Flowers mid-season. In America it
received the “National Hall of Fame Award” in 1978. Illustrated in colour in many
publications including: Macoboy, 1981, The Colour Dictionary of Camellias, p.184; Sharp,
1957, Camellias Illustrated, p.29; Urquhart, 1960, The Camellia, vol.II, pl.XXVII;
Fairweather, 1979, Rhododendrons and Azalea, p.116; front cover, SCCS., 1957, The
Camellia Review, vol.18, No.8. Awarded a First Class Certificate, 1974 by the RHS. Sport:
Donation Variegated. Its Chinese synonym is ‘Zengfeng’.
Donation Variegated. (C.x williamsii), Domoto Nursery Catalogue, 1957, as ‘Donation Var.’. A virus
variegated form of Donation - Orchid pink blotched white. Originated in the USA.
Doncalma. (C.japonica), Giles & Son Nursery Catalogue, 1881, p.91. No description. Originated in
Australia. (Believed extinct.)
Doncelari. Berlèse, 1841, Iconographie index with ref to p.9. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’,
synonym for Masayoshi.
Donchô.
Izu, Ohshima Hawaii Botanic Gardens Catalogue, 1980. Synonym for Tôyô-no-hikari.
Donckclaari. Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.4. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donckclaari E. Lize.
Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.4. Synonym for Eugene Lizé.
91
Donckclaari Variegated.
Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.4, as ‘Donckclaari Var.’.
Synonym for ‘Donckelaeri’. (Masayoshi).
Donckelaari. Raggouet-Godefroy, 1843, Revue Horticole, p.399-402. Orthographic variant for
‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donckelaari Eugène Lizé.
Donckelaari Frise.
Donckelaari Rosea.
Rosea.
Laborey, 1986, Les Camellias, pp.51. Synonym for Eugene Lizé.
Scott, John, Nursery Catalogue, 1957-1958. Synonym for Ville de Nantes.
Verschaffelt, 1844-1845, Catalogue, p.24. Orthographic error for Donckelaeri
Donckelaarii. Longone Catalogue, 1849. Orthographic variant for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for
Masayoshi.
Donckelaarii Alba.
Le Texnier Catalogue, 1911. Synonym for Donckelaeri Flore Alba.
Donckelaeri. Courtois, 1833, Magazin d’Horticulture 1[pt.E]:159 as ‘Doncklaeri’; Lindley, 1836,
Botanical Register, t.1854; Edwards, 1836, Botanical Register. Synonym for the Japanese
Masayoshi. See under ‘Doncklaeri’ for full details.
Donckelaeri Flore Alba. (C.japonica), Pepin, Apr.1849, Revue Horticole, p.142 as ‘Doncklaeri Flore
Alba’: An unusually good seedling from ‘Donckelaeri’ (Masayoshi), by Bertin. A large
white, semi-double from Belgium Orthographic errors: ‘Donckelaarii Alba’, ‘Donkelaarii
Alba’.
Donckelaeri Fulgens. (C.japonica), C.J. Marchant, Keepers Hill Nursery Catalogue, 1965, p.14, as
‘Donckelaarii Fulgens’: Medium size, 8 cm across, single, bell-shaped flowers of rich scarlet.
Synonym for Eugene Bolen.
Donckelaeri Mobala. (C.japonica), Riverview Nursery Catalogue, 1957-1958 as ‘Donckelarii Mobala’.
No description. Originated in USA.
Donckelaeri Pimpernel. (C.japonica), C.J. Marchant, Keepers Hill Nursery Catalogue, 1965, p.14 as
‘Donckelaarii Pimpernel’: Clear scarlet flowers, 8 cm across with 3 rows of petals. A seedling
of ‘Donckelaeri’, (Masayoshi). Originated at Keeper’s Hill Nursery, Dorset, England.
Donckelaeri Rosea. (C.japonica), Geldorf, Const., 1844, Catalogue of Plants and Price List, p.6:
Double, soft pink, blotched with white. Cachet Catalogue, 1845-1846, p.6 as ‘Donkelaari
Rosea’. No description. Originated in Belgium. Orthographic errors: ‘Donkelaari Rosea’,
‘Doncklarii Rosea’, ‘Donckelaari Rosea’.
Donckelaleri. Baumann, Mulhouse Nursery Catalogue, 1841-1842, p.13. Orthographic error for
‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donckelari. Felix & Dykhuis Nursery Catalogue 1967-1968, p.18. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donckelari Double.
Peer, 1956, American Camellia Yearbook, p.53. Synonym for Eugene Lizé.
Donckelaeri, Mitchel Strain. James Rare Plant Nursery Catalogue, 1954-1955, p.6. Synonym for
‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donckelari Mobala. River View Nursery Catalogue, 1957-1958, p.8. Orthographic variant for
Donckelaeri Mobala.
Donckelari (Tea Garden). Overlook Nursery Catalogue, 1951-1952, p.17. Orthographic error for
‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donckelaria. Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue.Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’,
synonym for Masayoshi.
92
Donckelarii. Morren, 1834, L’Horticulture Belge, Journal Jardiniers Amateurs, 2:63, pl.129. The
name is spelt ‘Donkelarii’ under illustration. Orthographic variant for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym
for Masayoshi.
Donckelarii California.
The Pacific Camellia Society, 1946, Camellia Nomenclature, p.11.
Synonym for Monjusu.
Donckelarii (California) Red. The Pacific Camellia Society, 1946, Camellia Nomenclature, p.11.
Synonym for Shusugasane as ‘Otome Red’.
Donckelarii Californica.
Camellia Digest, 1(1),1942. Synonym for Monjusu.
Donckelarii English. Hertrich, 1954, Camellias in the Huntington Gardens, vol.I, p.105. Synonym
for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donckelarii Eugène Lizé.
Hume, 1946, Camellias in America. Synonym for Eugene Lizé.
Donckelarii Fulgens. Anthony Estates Nursery Catalogue, 1966, p.3: Large size, semi-double, red.
Orthographic variant for ‘Donckelaeri Fulgens’, synonym for Eugene Bolen.
Donckelarii Middleton. Valley Garden Centre Catalogue, 1946-1947. Synonym for ‘Donckelaeri’,
synonym for Masayoshi.
Donckelarii Red.
Fruitland Nursery Catalogue, 1945-1946, p.27. Synonym for Eugene Bolen.
Donckelarii Special. Hertrich, 1955, Camellias in the Huntington Gardens, vol.II, p.91. There are
many strains of ‘Donckelaeri’ with varying amounts of white variegation. This is considered
just one of the forms of ‘Donckelaeri’. (Masayoshi).
Donckelarii (Special Strain). Valley Garden Centre Catalogue, 1949. See above. Considered one of
the forms of ‘Donckelaeri’. (Masayoshi).
Donckelarii West Coast.
Shusugasane.
Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Synonym for
Donckelarrii. The Fairlight Camellia Nursery Catalogue, 1983. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donckeleari.
Sewell Nursery Catalogue, 1878, p.43. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’,
synonym for Masayoshi.
Donckerari. Jones, 1952, SCCS., The Camellia Review, vol.14, No.3, p.16. Orthographic error for
‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donckerlarii. F. le Poidevin & Son Catalogue, 1980. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Doncklaari. Berlèse, 1841, Iconographie, facing pl.14. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Doncklaari California.
Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2. Synonym for Monjusu.
Doncklaari California Red. Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2 as ‘Doncklaari Calif. Red’.
Synonym for Shusugasane.
Doncklaari Do. Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2. Abbreviation for ‘Donckelaeri
Double’, synonym for Eugene Lizé.
Doncklaari Eddinger’s. Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2. Synonym for ‘Donckelaeri’,
synonym for Masayoshi.
Doncklaari Flore Pleno. Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2. Orthographic error for
Donckelaeri Flore Alba.
Doncklaari Red.
Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2. Synonym for Eugene Bolen.
93
Doncklaari Rosea.
Rosea.
Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1847-1848, p.56. Orthographic error for Donckelaeri
Doncklaarii. D.,C.S., 1901, The Garden, vol.59, p.227. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Doncklaarii Middleton 15. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from
Nursery Catalogues, p.58. Synonym for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Doncklaarii Red.
Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.58. Synonym for Eugene Bolen.
Doncklaarii Special. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.58. Synonym for ‘Donckelaeri’. (Masayoshi).
Doncklaarli Tea Garden. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues,, p.58. Synonym for ‘Donckelaeri’. (Masayoshi).
Doncklaarii Varie. Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2. Abbreviation for ‘Donckelaeri
Variegated’, synonym for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Doncklaeri. Courtois, 1833, Magasin d’Horticulture, 1 [pt.E]:159: The other is the Camellia
‘Doncklaeri’, so named after M. Doncklaer, Chief Gardener at the Botanical Garden of
Louvain who distributed it. The leaves are oval-lanceolate, pointed; the flower is broad, 12
cm across, double, spread out; petals smooth, notched, half of them have a background of
pure white, marbled with red, the other half pure red or red marbled white. This cultivar was
brought to Belgium from Japan by Franz von Siebold in 1830, together with Tricolor,
Ochroleuca and Candidissima, which were propagated and released by M. Donckelaer. It
became a most popular variety and received a number of synonyms as well as having its name
misspelt in every possible way. It was figured and described in 1834 by Morren in
L’Horticulture Belge, Journal Jardiners Amateurs, 2:63, pl.29 with the orthography
‘Donkelarii’ under the illustration and ‘Donckelarii’ in the text. This latter orthography had
been considered valid until the recent location of the 1833 listing. Considerable research was
put into endeavouring to locate an authoritative record of the correct spelling of the name.
These include: ‘Doncklaer’, Courtois, 1833; ‘Donckelaer’, his signature on letters at the
Bruxelles Library, according to C.P. Adams, RHS Journal, 1954; ‘Donkläer’, Beaton, 1849
also according to Adams and ‘Donckelaar’, Spae, 1858, Begique Horticole. Research by Marc
de Coninck, International Camellia Journal, 2005 No.37, pp.60-65, reveals that ‘Andries
Donkelaar’ was his signature on his youngest daughter Elisabeth’s birth certificate in Leuven
records. When he went from the Netherlands to Belgium in 1803, the country was part of
France. While old records called the city Leuven, the French called it Louvain, and for
reasons of pronunciation, changed the spelling of Donkelaar to Donckelaer. Since he appears
to have used both Dutch and French versions in signatures, ‘Donckelaeri’ is retained as
correct orthography. ‘Donkelaari’ would also be correct orthography if used. However this
name is, in fact, only the approved Western synonym for the name of the old Japanese
cultivar Masayoshi, which was first listed in the Tsubaki Hangata Tsuki Obo’echô, 1788 and
Shoshiki Hanagatachô, 1789. Chinese synonyms are ‘Zhengyi’ and ‘Dongkelarui’. Amongst
the many other synonyms that have been used for this cultivare are: ‘Aileen’, ‘Aleen’,
‘Middleton No.15’, ‘Winnie Davis’, ‘Mary Robertson’, ‘Camellia-T’, ‘Don Kaleare’,
‘Angustifolia’, ‘Tea Garden’, ‘Georgia’, ‘Pump House’, ‘Cantelou’, ‘English’, ‘Tallahassee’,
‘Donckelarii Middleton’, ‘Donckelarii Special’, ‘Doncklaari Eddinger’s’. ‘Donckelaeri’ has
been the origin of a number of fine sports. These include: Eugene Bolen, Ville de Nantes and
Lady Kay. These latter two, in turn producing Ville de Nantes Red and Lady Kay Red.
Many colour illustrations have been published including: American Camellia Yearbook, 1953,
facing p.50; Camellias by G.G. Gerbing, 1945, p.61; Macoboy, 1981, The Colour Dictionary
of Camellias, p.80 and pl.1 facing p.20, The Camellia, Longhurst & Savige, 1982; Botanical
94
Register, 1836, vol.24, old series pl.1854 as ‘Donckelaeri’. In 1978 it received the “National
Hall of Fame Award” in the USA and in 1960 the RHS “Award of Merit”.
Doncklari. Berlèse, 1841, Iconographie, p. facing pl.9. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Doncklarii. Desportes, Apr.1846, Revue Horticole, p.47-49. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’,
synonym for Masayoshi.
Doncklarii Rosea.
Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1850, p.45. Orthographic error for Donckelaeri Rosea.
Donckleari. Scott, J. & Son Nursery Catalogue, 1868. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Doncklearia.
Wilmot, 1943, Floricultural Review, 93(2393):17. Orthographic error for
‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Doncklerii. Knight’s Nursery Catalogue, 1881. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for
Masayoshi.
Donclerii. Warren’s Descriptive Catalogue, 1844, p.37. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Dondo-Shibori. Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Reserch, p.4. Corruption of the Japanese name Gondôshibori.
Dondunami.
Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie. Orthographic error for Don d’un Ami.
Donekelari. Coolidge Rare Plants Gardens Catalogue, 1952. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’,
synonym for Masayoshi.
Doneklari. de Bisschop Nursery Catalogue, 1958. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym
for Masayoshi.
Doneklari Eugene Lize.
Doneklari Frise.
de Bisschop Nursery Catalogue, 1958. Synonym for Eugene Lizé.
de Bisschop Nursery Catalogue, 1959. Synonym for Ville de Nantes.
Donetti. (C.japonica), Cels, Paris Nursery Catalogue, 1839, p.31 as ‘Doneti’: No description. Originated
in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Dongbu Juren. Gao, Jiyin, 1998, The World's Best Camellia Cultivars, p.40. Chinese synonym for
Great Eastern.
Dongfang Shaonü. (Eastern Maid). Gao, Jiyin, Ltr, 22nd August, 1992. Chinese synonym for the
New Zealand C.japonica China Maid.
Dongfangjin. Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia in China, p.73, No.530. Chinese synonym for
the Japanese sasanqua Azuma-nishiki.
Dongfangliang. (Eastern Light), (C.japonica), Liu, 1959, Chung Kuo Chu Ming Ti Chi Chung Hua Hui.
This Camellia belongs to the “Baozhu” type (formal double). The flowers are light red resembling the rising sun. Chang, ShaoYun,1987, Camellias from Zhejiang, colour photo, [p.118]:
Pink formal double with 6-7 rows of pointed petals. 60-70 in number, 7-9 cm across. Leaves
elliptic, 7.2-8.4 cm long x 1.4-4.2 cm wide, glossy, deep green, serrations close-set and obuse,
apices acute, bases cuneate, veins thin and distinct; petioles 8-10 mm long. Buds elliptic,
yellowish green. See Gao & Zhuang, 1988, The Camellia in China, p.48, colour photo
No.163. Originated in China. Different reading: ‘Tung-fang-liang’.
Donghai Guangyao. (East Sea Brilliance), (C.japonica), China Regn No.42. China Flowers &
Horticulture, July 2008, No.14, p.46 with colour photo; A sport of Tama-no-ura, originated
by Wu Guangyao, Xiangshan, Zheijiang, China. Flowers purple, with prominent veining.
95
Semi-double, 8-11 cm diameter, stamens yellow. Leaves deep green, flat and dense. Vigorous
growth. Flowers mid-season to late.
Dongkelarui.
Gao, Jiyin, Ltr, 14th Sept., 1992. Chinese synonym for the Japanese C.japonica
Masayoshi as ‘Donckelaeri’.
Dongle Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.410; Chinese synonym
for the USA C.hybrid Winter’s Joy.
Donglin. (East Forest). (C.reticulata), Feng, Guomei, July 1989, Chuxiong Camellia Catalogue with
colour illustration: Large, 12-14 cm across, deep pink semi-double with 2-3 rows of irregular
petals and a central stamen cluster broken by a few petaloids. Leaves mid-green, elliptic,
apices blunt acute. Blooms mid-season. Originated in Chuxiong, China. Orthographic variant
‘Donglincha’.
Dongmei. (Winter Magic).
American Camellia Yearbook, 1993, p.44 as ‘Dongmo’. Chinese
synonym for the USA C.sasanqua x C.oleifera Winter’s Charm.
Dongmeigui. American Camellia Yearbook, 1993, p.44. Chinese synonym for the USA C.oleifera
x C.hiemalis Winter’s Rose.
Dongmeike.
Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.409; Chinese
synonym for the USA C.japonica Don-Mac.
Dongmeiyingchun. (C.petelotii hybrid). Chinese Camellia Culture, 2003, p.252 with colour photo
showing a small white single flower. No other details.
Dongmudan. Gao, Jiyin, 1998, The World's Best Camellia Cultivars, p.160. Chinese synonym for
Azumabotan.
Dongnaier.
Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.409. Chinese
synonym for the USA C.reticulata hybrid Mary O’Donnell.
Dongqu. Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.410; Chinese synonym
for the USA C.hybrid Winter’s Interlude.
Dongshanchun. (C.reticulata). Chinese Camellia Culture, 2003, p.247 with colour photo; Pink semidouble from Tengchong County, China. Diameter 9-10 cm. Flowers mid-season.
Dongxing.
American Camellia Yearbook, 1993, p.44. Chinese synonym for the USA C.hybrid
Winter’s Star.
Dongyun. Gao, Jiyin, 1998, The World's Best Camellia Cultivars, p.157. Chinese synonym for
Shinonome.
Dongmudan. (Winter Peony), Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia in China, p.76, No.569. Chinese
reading for the Japanese sasanqua Azumabotan.
Dongyue. (C.nitidissima hybrid). Proceedings of the ICS Congress, Chuxiong 2012, p.169. Originated by
Huang Liandong et al, Nanning Golden Camellia Park, Guangxi, China. An F2 hybrid
(C.nitidissima x C.sasanqua ‘Dark Red Sweet’), backcrossed to C.nitidissima. Flower rose
form double, milky yellow, 6-7 cm diameter, stamen centre mostly petaloids. Juvenile leaves
reddish-brown and glabrous. Mature leaves ovate or elliptic, varying greatly in size, 6-10 cm
x 3-6.5 cm. Flowers midseason.
Dongyun. (Eastern Halo), Gao & Zhuang, 1989, The Camellia in China, p.75, No.560. Chinese
synonym for the Japanese sasanqua Shinonome.
Donicelaari. van der Vis, Boskoop, Special Garden List, 1964-1965. Orthographic error for
‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
96
Donisia Poniatowski. van Houtte Catalogue, 1860-1861, 83:44. Orthographic error for Dionisia
Poniatowski.
Donk. Cal. Varie.
Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, p.2. Abbreviation for ‘Donckelaeri
California Variegated’. Synonym for Monjusu.
Donk. Eu. Lezze. Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2. Abbreviation for ‘Donckelaeri
Eugène Lizé’, synonym for Eugene Lizé.
Donkaelarii.
Wilder, 1848, Transactions of Massachusettes Horticultural Society, 1:36, 37.
Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donkalaari. Buist, 1839, Flower Garden Directory, p.12. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’,
synonym for Masayoshi.
Donkalaerri. Camellia Society of America Bulletin, 1939, p.2. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donkalarii. Buist, 1839, Flower Garden Directory, p.6. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donkalerii. John Miller, Bristol Nursery Catalogue, 1838. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’,
synonym for Masayoshi.
Donkelaari.
de Jonghe, 1851, Beknopte Handleiding tot het Kweeken von Camellias, p.117.
Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donkelaarii Alba.
Alba.
Le Texnier Catalogue, 1911, p.28. Orthographic error for Donckelaeri Flore
Donkelaarii Fulgens. Marchant, Keepers Hill Nursery Catalogue, No.6, 1956. Synonym for Eugene
Bolen.
Donkelaarii Pimpernel. Marchant Nursery Catalogue, 1965. Natural seedling of ‘Donckelaeri’.
Clear, scarlet flowers, 7.5-8.5 cm across with three rows of petals. Orthographic error for
Donckelaeri Pimpernel.
Donkelaarii Rosea.
Loddige’s Catalogue,1849, p.34. Orthographic error for Donckelaeri Rosea.
Donkelaarii Striata.
Loddige’s Catalogue, 1849, p.34. Synonym for ‘Donckelaeri’. (Masayoshi).
Donkelaeri. L.L. Liebig, 1839 Verzeichnis von Warmen und Kalten Hauspflanzen…, p.9. von
Biedenfeld, 1856, Practische Grundlehren Culture von Camellien, p.20. Orthographic error
for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donkelaeri Flore Albo. Pepin. Apr.1849, Revue Horticole, p.142. Orthographic error for Donckelaeri Flore Alba.
Donkelaerii. Whiting, 1846, Gardeners’ Chronicle, pp.743, 744. Orthographic error for
‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donkelairi. Longview Nursery Catalogue, 1931. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for
Masayoshi.
Donkelari. Buist, 1845, The American Flower Garden Directory, p.217. Desportes, Jun.1847,
Revue Horticole, p.212-217. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donkelarii. Anonymous, 1841, Catalogue Giardini Boboli, p.12. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donkelarii Eugène Lizé.
Mathurin Lize Catalogue, 1883. Synonym for Eugene Lizé.
Donkelary. Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.25. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’,
synonym for Masayoshi.
97
Donkelary Vera.
Burdin Catalogue, 1835. Synonym for ‘Donckelaeri’.
Donkeleri. Hillier Nursery Catalogue, 1924-1925, p.36. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donkelerie.
Wilmot, 1943, Floricultural Review, 93(2393):17. Orthographic error for
‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donkellaera. Paxton, 1838, The Magazine of Botany, vol.4, p.21. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donkerlaari. Bartley Nurseries Catalogue, 1961, p.1. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donkilari. Lindo Nursery Catalogue, 1940-1941. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym
for Masayoshi.
Donkillaria. The Gardener & Practical Florist, vol.2, 1843. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’,
synonym for Masayoshi.
Donkillarii.
Bergami Catalogue, 1859. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for
Masayoshi.
Donklaari. Leroy, Louis, Catalogue, 1902, p.5. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for
Masayoshi.
Donklaarii. Rubel, 1940-1941, Floral Gems from China, Catalogue, No.79, p.24. Orthographic
error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donklaeri.
Berlèse, 1837, Monographie, ed.1, p.132. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’,
synonym for Masayoshi.
Donklaeri English.
Masayoshi.
SCCS, 1946, Camellias, p.19. Synonym for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for
Donklaeri Middleton No.15. SCCS., 1946, Camellias, p.19. Synonym for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym
for Masayoshi.
Donklaeri Tallahassee Variety.
(Masayoshi).
SCCS., 1946, Camellias, p.19. Synonym for ‘Doncklaeri’.
Donklaeri Tea Garden Variety.
(Masayoshi).
SCCS., 1946, Camellias, p.19. Synonym for ‘Donckelaeri’.
Donklaerii. Berlèse, 1843, Iconographie facing pl.181. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donklari.
Berlèse, 1837, Monographie, ed.1, p.118. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’,
synonym for Masayoshi.
Donklarii.
Johnson, 1847, Dictionary of Modern Gardening, p.114. Orthographic error for
‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donklarii Eugène Lizé.
Leroy, André, Catalogue, 1911, p.47. Synonym for Eugene Lizé.
Donklarri. Portland Camellia Nursery Catalogue, 1946-1947, p.14. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for Masayoshi.
Donklary. Shneiderff, 1841, Catalogue. p.8. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for
Masayoshi.
Donklavi. Del Lungo & Girardi, 1928, Le Camelie, p.161. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’
synoym for Masayoshi.
98
Donkleari. Le Coq Catalogue, 1846, p.138. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, synonym for
Masayoshi.
Donklerii. Wakefield, 1869, Gardeners’ Chronicle, p.17,18. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’,
synonym for Masayoshi.
Donna Agnese Borghese. (C.japonica), Burnier Catalogue, 1855-1856: Imbricated. Candidissima with
rare stripes of rose-pink. Orthographic variant: ‘Borghese, Donna Agnese’. Orthographic
error: ‘Dona Agnese Borghese’. Originated at the Giardino Borghese, Rome, Italy.
Donna Anna Maria. Peer, 1956, American Camellia Yearbook, p.57. Abbreviation for Donna
Anna Maria Borghese.
Donna Anna Maria Borghese. (C.japonica), Burnier Catalogue, 1855-1856: Imbricated. Rose form,
pearl white with stripes of carmine rose. Orthographic variants: ‘Dona Anna-Maria
Borghese’, ‘Borghese, Donna Anna Maria’. Abbreviation: ‘Donna Anna Maria’. Originated in
the Giardino Borghese, Rome, Italy.
Donna Blair. (C.reticulata x C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1981, p.96, Reg. No.1737: A
very large, bright pink to rose red, semi-double C.reticulata hybrid, C.reticulata ‘Butterfly
Wings’ (Houye Diechi) x C.japonica All American), flowering mid-season to late;
originated by Ted Alfter, Bakersfield, California, USA. The 8 year old seedling first bloomed
1978. Average flower size, 15 cm wide by 11 cm deep with 10-15 petals. Plant growth,
upright, rapid in rate with dark green leaves, 12 cm long x 5 cm wide.
Donna Buono. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1962-1963, p.217, Reg No.611: A 10 year
old chance seedling, originated by Ferol Zerkowsky, Slidell, Louisiana, USA. The dark green
leaves are 10 cm long by 5 cm wide. The rose form double flowers are 10 cm across by 6cm
deep with 36 petals. Colour is Tyrian Rose 24/2 (Horticultural Colour Chart vol.2) with a
silvery effect. An excellent seed parent.
Donna Chiari. (C.japonica), Cattolica, G., Le mie Camelie, My Camellias, 2005, p.82 with colour
photo; Medium size, cup-shaped semidouble with prominent column of stamens. White with
varying amounts of pink blotches or streaks (RHS.CC.54B). A seedling of Alba Simplex x
‘Rubra Simplex’ (Rubra), first flowered in 1987. Originated by Dott. Guido Cattolica,
Livorno, Italy.
Donna Clara. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1951, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature: Camellia rose.
Medium large, peony form. A ring of large petaloids above a row of stamens and around a
group of stamens. Vigorous, pedulous growth. Blooms mid-season. Originated by R.H.
Roberts, Biloxi, Mississippi, USA. Reg. No.64, American Camellia Yearbook, 1954.
Donna Derrick. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1981, Camellia Nomenclature, p.47: Soft pink with deeper pink
veins. Large, formal double. Medium, upright growth. Mid-season blooming. Originated by
S.E. Merrick, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.
Donna Ersilia Caetani. (C.japonica), Burnier Catalogue, 1855-1856. No description. Originated by
Conte de Medici Spada, at Villa Quiete, Rome, Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Donna Francesco Salviati. (C.japonica), Medici Spada, 1858, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.5:
Flower, medium to large, petals oval, becoming pointed towards the centre, channelled and
imbricated to form a star shape. Colour, intense rose with centre petals margined with white,
always a little rosy. Originated at the Giardino Borghese, Rome, Italy.
Donna Helen. (C.japonica), Stuart Low & Co, Enfield, 1 page Catalogue, 1939-1940: Semi-double,
white striped. Originated in UK.
Donna Herzilia. Thermal Nurseries (Rotorua) Ltd Catalogue, 1986, p.4. Abbreviation and error for
Dona Herzilia de Freitas Magalhaes.
99
Donna Herzilia de Frietas Magalhaes.
Mount Congreve Wholesale Nursery, 1990-1991, Price
List, p.4. Orthographic error for Dona Herzilia de Freitas Magalhaes.
Donna Herzog. Magor, 1980-1981, RHS., Rhododendrons with Magnolias and Camellias, p.67 as
exhibited by Mrs E. Mackenzie in the camellia competition. No description. An abbreviation
and orthographic error for Dona Herzilia de Freitas Magalhaes.
Donna Isabel Salviati. (C.japonica), Medici Spada, 1858, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.5:
Flower, medium to small, imbricated, petals elegantly shell-like, colour rose-magenta, a little
darker midway to the centre and on the circumference. Originated at the Giardino Borghese,
Rome, Italy.
Donna Kay.
Donna Kaye.
Abbot’s Nursery Catalogue,1961. Synonym for Arrabella.
Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Synonym for Arrabella.
Donna Lechi. Burdin Maggiore & Co., 1849-1850, Catalogue General. Burdin Maggiore & Co.
Catalogue, 1863. Orthographic error for ‘Dorina Lechi’.
Donna Louise Timmins. (C.reticulata), ACRS., 1984, Camellia News, No.91, p.22, Reg. No.309: Originated by T.E. Pierson, Hurstville, NSW, Australia. A chance seedling of C.reticulata
Tranquillity, that first flowered 1982. The informal flower, 12 cm across by 8 cm deep, is
silver rose with heavy silver overtone. Flowers early to late. The upright, open plant has
lanceolate, narrow pointed, 11 cm x 4.5 cm wide leaves. Abbreviation: ‘Donna Timmins’.
Donna Lyn. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1980, p.162, Reg. No.1617: A medium sized,
bright red, peony form C.japonica chance seedling, flowering mid-season to late, originated
by Paul Gilley, Florida, USA. The 6 year old seedling first bloomed 1976. Average flower
size, 9-10 cm across x 6 cm deep with 20-25 petals and yellow stamens. Plant growth is
upright, average, open and medium in rate with dark green, 9 cm x 6 cm leaves.
Donna Maria Barbo. Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.26. Orthographic variant for Doña
Maria Bardo.
Donna Maria Borghese.
Borghese.
Medici Spada, 1858, Catalogue. Abbreviation for Donna Anna Maria
Donna Maria d’Adda. (C.japonica), Burdin Maggiore & Co. Catalogue, 1871-1872. No description.
Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Donna Maria Pia. Scarlatti Nursery Catalogue, 1888. Abbreviation for Dona Maria Pia, Rainha
de Portugal.
Donna Newton. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1979, p.104, Reg. No.1569: A very large,
white, loose peony form C.japonica chance seedling, mid-season blooming; originated by
Mrs W. Grady Griffin, Dawson, Georgia, USA. The 10 year old seedling first bloomed 1975.
Average flower size, 12.5 cm across by 5 cm deep. Large petaloids in the centre. Sturdy
grower. Plant growth upright, average in density, medium in rate with dark green leaves, 9 cm
long by 4.5 cm wide. Sport: Donna Newton Blush.
Donna Newton Blush. (C.japonica), Cannon, 1984, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.39, No.4, p.19: A
blush pink form of Donna Newton. Originated in USA.
Donna Rita. (C.x williamsii). ACRS, Camellia News, Issue No.127, p.9, Colour photo p.2: Originated by
Edgar Sebire, Wandin North, Victoria, Australia. A seedling of C.x williamsii Mary Phoebe
Taylor, pollen parent unknown. First flowered 1987. Light Red (RHS.CC.63B), informal
double of 62 petals; 7.5 cm across x 3.5 cm deep. Blooms early to late season on a slow
growing, upright, bushy, free flowering plant. Leaves olive green, glossy, flat, elliptic, apices
acuminate, margins serrulate, 7.5 cm long x 3.4 cm wide. Petals open flat. A distinctive
lavender hybrid.
100
Donna Timmins. Cannon, 1986, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.41, No.4, p.27. Abbreviation for
Donna Louise Timmins.
Donnan’s Dream. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1984, p.176, Reg. No.1952: A large,
white, washed and shaded Orchid pink, formal double, C.japonica chance seedling; early to
late flowering; originated by Nuccio’s Nurseries, Altadena, California, USA. The 8 year old
seedling first flowered 1977. Average flower size, 10 cm across. Plant growth, upright, dense
and medium in rate with dark green leaves, medium size. See colour photo, front cover
SCCS., The Camellia Review, vol.46, Nov-Dec., 1984; and p.8, International Camellia
Journal, No.21, 1989.
Donnybrook. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1956, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.39: White.
Large semi-double with pointed and turned up petal tips. Originated in USA.
Donrose Pendant. (C.x williamsii), American Camellia Yearbook, 1961, p.221, Reg. No.536: An 8 year
old hybrid, (C.saluenensis x C.japonica) that first bloomed 1957; originated by K.M. White,
Axminster, Devon, England. Plant growth is spreading and medium in rate with dark green
leaves, 7.5 cm x 3.5 cm. The semi-double, deep pink flowers are 10.5 cm across and 4 cm
deep with 13 petals, several petaloids, yellow stamens. Its colour is deeper than Donation and
often has a long, pointed, rose-bud centre. Flowers mid-season to late.
Doomsday Beauty. (C.reticulata hybrid). International Camellia Journal, No.23, 1991, p.101, Reg.
No.22: Originated by R.H. Ellis, Doomsday Gardens, Horsham, West Sussex, England.
Flower: Large size, 11-12.5 cm across x 5 cm deep, semi-double of 20 petals. A chance
seedling of Milo Rowell that first flowered 1986. Blooms mid-season to late. Buds acornshaped, green showing pink. Leaves, medium green, elliptic to oblate, 7.5 cm long x 3.8 cm
wide, apices abruptly acuminate, margins bluntly serrate. Plant growth upright and rapid, well
branched.
Doomsday Sunshine. (C.reticulata hybrid). International Camellia Society, No.24, 1992, p.80, Reg.
No.23: Originated by R.H. Ellis, Doomsday Gardens, Horsham, West Sussex, England:
Small, 8 cm across x 5 cm deep, pink (RHS.CC.55A, 56C) single. A chance seedling of Milo
Rowell that first flowered 1985 at 7 years of age. Buds round, (RHS.CC.139). Flowers midseason. Petal texture heavy. Self grooming. Similar to C.japonica Gertrude Preston. Leaves
green, elliptic, 7.5 cm long x 4 cm wide, smooth. Plant growth bushy and rapid.
Doppia Nuova. (C.japonica), Giacomelli ed., 1847, Padova cor tipo della Liviana. No description. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.) ‘Dupla-nova’ is given as an orthographic variation.
Dora Dee Walker. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1967, p.225, Reg. No.955: A 5 year old
chance seedling that first bloomed 1966; originated by W.M. Walker, South Georgia, USA.
Plant growth is spreading, average in density and medium in rate with dark green leaves, 9 cm
x 5 cm. The peony form flower is 12.5 cm across and 6 cm deep with 20 petals and 4
petaloids. Its formation varies from peony to semi-double with fimbriated petaloids. Colour is
dark red, blotched white with yellow anthers. Blooms mid-season to late.
Dora Elise. (C.reticulata), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1974, vol.VIII, No.6, P.46, 47, Reg. No.91: A
chance seedling of ‘Crimson Robe’, (Dataohong), originated by Mrs E.D. Clark, Matamata,
New Zealand. It first flowered 1971. Plant growth is upright and well furnished with midgreen foliage, 11 cm long x 4.5 cm wide, sharply serrate. The flowers are large, 15 cm across
x 7 cm deep, with 16-20 petals, semi-double with golden anthers on cream filaments. Colour
is deep, clear pink, RHS.CC. Red Group 53A. Flowers early to late.
Dora Lee. (C.reticulata hybrid). SCCS Camellia Nomenclature 2009, p.139; Bright pink, very large
semi-double to loose peony form. Vigorous, upright growth. Late flowering. Valley Knudsen
x Jean Pursel. Originated in 2008 by CamelliaShop, Savannah, Ga., USA.
Dora McCarter.
Fruitland Nursery Catalogue, 1945-1946. Abbreviation for Miss Dora McCarter.
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Dorbrielle. (C.japonica), Boblink & Atkins Nursery Catalogue, 1937: Medium sized, crimson, formal
double. McIlhenny, (1941) gives ‘Tokayama’ as a synonym., but this proved to be a
pseudonym for Margherita Coleoni, which Fendig (1953) gives as a synonym. The
‘Dobrielle’ listed by McIlhenny, (1937) is also the same variety.
Dorceti.
Cachet Catalogue, 1840-1841, p,2. Orthographic error for ‘Dorsettii’.
Dorcetti.
Trillon, Le Mans Nursery Catalogue, 1845, p.4. Orthographic error for ‘Dorsettii’.
Doreen. (C.japonica), Oregon Camellia Society, 1949, Camellias as a Hobby, p.42: Crimson. Medium
sized single of tulip form with long, yellow stamens. A seedling of Kimberley, originated by
H.H. Harms, Portland, Oregon, USA.
Doretti.
Tagliabue, 1840, Nomenclatore Camelliae. Orthographic error for ‘Dorsettii’.
Dori McCarter. Portland Camellia Nursery, Camellia Catalogue, 1947-1948, p.14. Orthographic
error for Miss Dora McCarter.
Doria Boschi. (C.japonica), Mariotti Catalogue, 1924, p.15: Large flowered, bright pink. Originated in
Italy by David Boschi.
Doria Tursi. (C.japonica), Rovelli Catalogue, 1892-1893: Imbricated beautifully. Rose-pink, veined and
shaded a little brighter, margined with white. Originated in Italy.
Dorian. (C.japonica), ACRS., 1960, Camellia Annual, No.7, p.23, Reg. No.44: Originated by H.J. Henty,
Balwyn, Victoria, Australia as a seedling from Esther Henty that first flowered 1955. The
flower is an informal double, soft pink with a faint salmon pink tone and consists of 5-6 rows
of petals. The outer petals curve up and outwards, the inner, twisted and more erect, giving a
loose hose-in-hose effect. Burnt gold tipped stamens intermixed with petaloids and small
petals, brushed with white towards the base; 9-11 cm across. Growth, vigorous and spreading.
Leaves mid-green, 9 cm x 5 cm, well serrated and pointed.
Dorina. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue,1845-1846, 23:4: Vivid rose-pink with splashes and stripes
of pure white. Regular. de Jonghe, 1851, Traité de la Culture du Camélia, p.104, as ‘Dorina
Lechi’: Regular double flowers, cherry red with rounded petals, speckled with pink.
Originated by B. Lecchi, Italy. Synonym: ‘Dorina Lecchi’. Orthographic errors: ‘Donna
Lechi’, ‘Dorina Lechi’.
Dorina Lecchi.
Rovelli Catalogue, 1852, p.16. Synonym for Dorina.
Dorina Lechi.
de Jonghe, 1851, Beknopte Handleiding tot het Kweeken von Camellias, p.118.
Synonym for Dorina.
Doris Delight. (C.japonica), Gentry, 1979, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.34, No.4. (advert). No
description. Originated in USA. No valid listing located.
Doris Ellis. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1970, p.162, Reg. No.1089: An 11 year old
chance seedling that first bloomed 1963; originated by Frank Ellis and Jay W. Ellis Jr.,
Jacksonville, Florida, USA. Plant growth is upright, average in density and rapid in rate, with
small, light green leaves. The formal double bloom is pale, blush pink with darker pink on the
outer petals and a distinct, coral rose centre. Medium size, formal double, completely
imbricated with a small, rose-bud centre, 9.5 cm across by 4 cm deep with 94-110 petals.
Blooms early. Sport: Doris Ellis Pink. See colour plates on front cover, ACS, The Camellia
Journal, Sept.1969 and pl.44, p.34, Encyclopedia of Camellias in Colour, vol.II, 1978.
Chinese synonym: ‘Ailisi’.
Doris Ellis Pink. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1980, p.162, Reg No.1601: A medium
size, pale pink, rose form double C.japonica mutant of Doris Ellis, blooms early to
mid-season. Originated by Paul Gilley, Grandridge, Florida, USA. Average size flower, 9.5
cm wide by 4 cm deep with 30 petals. In place of being as formal as its parent, it tends to open
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and incurve with a tendency to swirl. Plant growth is upright, spreading, open with light green
leaves, 8 cm x 4 cm.
Doris Fowler. (C.reticulata hybr.) , ACS., May 1987, The Camellia Journal, vol.42, No.2, p.8, Reg.
No.2046: Large size, red, semi-double C.reticulata hybrid (‘Crimson Robe’ (Dataohong) x
Jean Pursel). Blooms mid-season to late. Originated by Frank Pursel, Oakland, California,
USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 1987, p.80, colour photo facing p.60: The seedling first
bloomed 1978. Average flower size 12.5 cm across x 6 cm deep. Plant growth is upright,
average, open and rapid in rate, with dark green leaves, 8 cm long x 5.5 cm wide.
Doris Freeman. (C.japonica), Sewell, 1956, American Camellia Yearbook, p.50-52: Originated by W.H.
Barnsley, Apopka, Florida, USA. Large semi-double to incomplete double blooms, pink marbled and blotched white. Compact, upright growth. Blooms mid-season. According to SCCS.,
Camellia Nomenclature, 1972, p.92, the same as Ma-Dot-Cha.
Doris Hirst. (C.japonica), ACRS., 1961, Camellia Annual, No.4, p.24, Reg No.45: Originated by W.
Neville, Castle Hill, N.S.W., Australia. A seedling of Gauntlettii, pollen parent unknown.
First bloomed 1958. The blooms are irregular double, pure white and 12.5 cm across. Flowers
midseason. Leaves are large, glossy green. See colour plate, p.21, ACRS., 1977, Camellia
News, No.66. Chinese synonym ‘Baiduoli’.
Doris Madalia.
Hume, 1946, Camellias in America, p.330. Synonym for ‘Beauty of Holland’.
Doris Nadeau. SCCS., 1954, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.39. Orthographic
error for Doris Wadeau.
Doris Stone. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 2000, p.3, colour photo p.c9. A deep red semidouble chance seedling with 22 petals, 5 petaloids, yellow anthers and yellow filaments.
Blooms show heavy texture, and petals reflex back towards the stem. Average flower size is
12.7 cm across x 6.5 cm deep. Originated by Elizabeth R. Scott, Aiken, S.C., USA. The 17
year old seedling first flowered in 1989. Flowers early to mid-season. Plant is spreading and
vigorous, with dark green leaves.
Doris Tag.
Tagg.
Hazlewood Nurseries Pty Ptd Catalogue, 1964, p.53. Orthographic error for Doris
Doris Tagg. (C.japonica), Waterhouse, 1952, Camellia Trail, p.37: This Camellia is not of Australian
origin but was brought out from Monaco about 1920 to Adelaide. It is a charming, light pink
(RHS.CC. Fuchsine Pink 627/1) with 6 well rounded petals. It is slightly fragrant. Lighter in
colour and smaller than Spencers Pink. Orthographic error: ‘Doris Tag.
Doris Wadeau. (C.japonica), Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Large, deep pink formal double. Flowers mid-season. Orthographic error: ‘Doris Nadeau’. Originated in USA.
Dormoyama. (C.dormoyama), Sealy, 1956, American Camellia Yearbook, p.3. The species
Camellia dormoyama (Pierre) Sealy from Thea domoyama Pierre ex Lanesson, 1886.
Dorothea Blanche. SCCS, 1947, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature. Synonym for
Chô-nohanagata.
Dorothee Rogers. (C.reticulata), ACRS, 1984, Camellia News, No.91, p.22, Reg. No.315 with colour
photo on rear cover: Originated by T.E. Pierson, Hurstville, N.S.W., Australia. C.reticulata
Three Dreams seedling that first flowered 1982. The 14 cm x 12.5 cm deep flowers are rosepink, heavily moired darker pink, informal double flowers with distinct rabbit ears. Flowers
mid-season to late. The upright, dense plant has dark green, reticulate leaves, ovate, 11.5 cm
long x 5.2 cm wide.
Dorothy. (C.japonica), Harris’ Longview Nursery Catalogue, 1955-1956, p.6. No description. Originated
by Clower, Florida, USA.
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Dorothy Aimee. (C.rosiflora hybrid). New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, March 2004, Issue No.147,
vol.XXIII, No.5, p.8 Reg. No.455. Registered by Dorothy Hansen, Waikanae, New Zealand.
A chance seedling from C.rosiflora, pollen parent unknown. Flower is a single, 3 cm diameter
x 2 cm deep, somewhat trumpet-shaped, with 8-9 petals that are lightly veined. Colour is a
light pink (RHS.CC.62B) with 62A for the veins, and the stamens form a tight column about
0.8 cm across. The plant has a low, spreading habit, dense structure and slow growth rate,
making it an attractive plant for small gardens, as do changes in the leaf colour with the
seasons. Leaves are generally mid-green, 5 cm long x 2.5 cm wide. Flowers mid-season to
late.
Dorothy Ashley. (C.japonica), Levi, 1958, American Camellia Yearbook, p.242, 250. No description.
Hillcrest Nursery Catalogue, 1958: Light rose-pink. Large semi-double. Vigorous, upright
growth. Mid-season flowering. Originated at Middleton Gardens, Charleston, South Carolina,
USA. Abbreviation: ‘Dot Ashley’.
Dorothy B. Decuers. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Dec 2008, p.34 with colour photo, Regn
No. 2750; A sport of Happy Birthday, which first flowered in 1991. Originated and
propagated by John W. Shirah, Lakeland, Fla., USA. A 10 cm diameter, rose pink,
semidouble to rose form double flower with yellow to orange anthers and ivory filaments.
Dark green leaves are 7.5 cm x 3.7 cm. Plant is upright with average growth rate. American
Camellia Yearbook, 2008, p.110 with colour photo.
Dorothy Biddle. (C.japonica), Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1962, p.3. No description. Originated in USA. No valid listing located.
Dorothy Blanche. River View Nursery Catalogue, 1957-1958, p.8, 10. Orthographic error for
‘Dorothea Blanche’, synonym for Chô-no-hanagata.
Dorothy Brown. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1970, p.163, Reg. No. 1069: An 8 year old
chance seedling that first bloomed 1964; originated by L.B. Wilson Jr., Gulfport, Mississippi,
USA. Plant growth is medium in rate with dark green leaves, 11.5 cm long x 6 cm wide. The
peony form flower is 12.5 cm across by 5 cm deep with 26-30 petals and 6-8 petaloids. The
flower is soft pink (Nickerson Color Fan Munsell Hue 7.5 RP8/5) with yellow anthers and
filaments. Flowers mid-season.
Dorothy Caldwell. (C.japonica), Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue: Small, pink peony form.
Originated at Azalea Glen Nursery, USA.
Dorothy Chester. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1979, p.105, Reg. No.1561: A large to
very large, white, peony form C.japonica chance seedling; originated by Grover C. Chester,
Augusta, Georgia, USA. The 14 year old seedling first bloomed 1968. It has 40 petals, yellow
anthers and filaments. Average flower size 13 cm wide x 7.5 cm deep. Plant growth is upright
and spreading with dark green leaves, 10 cm long x 6 cm wide.
Dorothy Copeland. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1972, p.129, Reg. No.1213: A 4 year
old chance C.japonica seedling that first bloomed 1968; originated by Clyde X. Copeland,
Jackson, Mississippi, USA. Plant growth is upright, average with dark green leaves, 9 cm x
5.5 cm wide. The semi-double, Frizzle White type, bloom is white with golden anthers and
filaments. It has 28 petals and 12-15 petaloids, The long, fluted, wavy petals have good
substance. Flower size is 13.5 cm across by 5 cm deep. Flowers mid-season.
Dorothy Culver. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1978, p.128, Reg. No.1481: A large,
white, peony form C.japonica chance seedling; mid-season flowering; originated by Paul
Gilley, Grandridge, Florida, USA. The Daikagura type bloom has 30 petals, cream anthers
and yellow filaments. Average size, 12.5 cm across and 7.5 cm deep. Plant growth is upright,
average with light green leaves, 9 cm long by 4 cm wide. Chinese synonym: ‘Kawa’.
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Dorothy Edinger. (C.japonica), NCCS. Bulletin, 1949, vol.3, no.2, p.7. No description. Originated in the
USA.
Dorothy Harbutt. (C.japonica), Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1963-1964, p.4. No description.
Originated in USA. No valid listing located.
Dorothy Henry. (C.japonica), ACS., Feb. 1989, The Camellia Journal, vol.44, No. 1 , p. 12, Reg.
No.2105: Medium size, rose-pink, formal double C.japonica chance seedling that blooms
mid-season to late. Originated by Johnny Aldrich, Brooklet, Georgia, USA. American
Camellia Yearbook, 1989, p.120, colour photo [p.132]: The 15 year old seedling first bloomed
1978. Average size bloom, 8 cm across x 3.2 cm deep with 77 petals. Plant growth is upright
and medium with light green leaves, 8 cm long x 3.2 cm wide. See colour photo: Front cover,
ACS., Aug,1990, The Camellia Journal, vol.45, No.4.
Dorothy Hills. (C.japonica), Tammia Nursery Catalogue, 1978; American Camellia Yearbook, 1977,
p.209, Reg. No.1456: A medium sized, white to blush pink, formal double C.japonica that
flowers mid-season. A 12 year old chance seedling that first bloomed 1970; originated by
Ferol Zerkowski, Tammia Nurseries, Slidell, Louisiana, USA. The formal double, Alba Plena
type, bloom has 120-125 petals. Average size, 9.5 cm across x 5 cm deep. It has swirled,
pointed petals. Blooms mid-season. Plant growth is upright and medium in rate with dark
green leaves, 8 cm long by 5.5 cm wide. See colour plate, front cover, ACS., 1976, The
Camellia Journal, vol.31, No.4. Chinese synonym ‘Taoshanqiu’.
Dorothy Holmes.
(C.japonica), Cannon, 1980, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.35, No.4,
(advert.). No description. Originated in USA. No valid listing located.
Dorothy Hooper. (C.japonica), ACS., 1985, The Camellia Journal, vol.40, No.2, p.31, Reg. No.1973:
Medium red, anemone form. C.japonica chance seedling that flowers early to mid-season;
originated by Gordon B. Hooper, Modesto, California, USA. The 12 year old seedling first
flowered 1971. Average flower size, 8 cm wide x 4.5 cm deep with 8 guard petals and 40
petaloids, yellow anthers and white filaments; cluster of petaloids mingled with golden
stamens. Flower has some fragrance. Plant growth is upright, spreading and open with dark
green leaves, mildly serrate, 12 cm long by 5.5 cm wide.
Dorothy James. (C.hybrid), American Camellia Yearbook, 1961, pl. facing p.178 and Yearbook, 19621963, p.217, Reg. No.654: A 7 year old C. hybrid seedling of Robbie x Dr Tinsley that first
bloomed 1959; originated by V.R. James, Aptos, California, USA. Plant growth is upright and
dense, medium slow in rate with light green leaves, 6 cm long x 4 cm wide. The formal
double flowers are 8.5 cm across and 3.5 cm deep and have 65 petals. Flowers are flesh pink
to white, washed pink with the petal tips a deep pink. Flowers mid-season. See colour plate
front cover SCCS, 1962, The Camellia Review, vol.24, No.1.
Dorothy Jean. (C.reticulata hybrid), ACRS., 1987, Camellia News, No.103, p.83, Reg. No.357, with
colour photo on back cover: Originated by Dr James I. Luke, Adelaide, South Australia. First
flowered 1985. A chance C.reticulata seedling of unknown parentage. The flowers are
informal double to Elegans (anemone) form, with approximately 40 petals and over 100
petaloids of an orange-red colour. The outer guard petals are fluted and veined, with stamens
intermixed with the petaloids. The 15 cm x 5 cm flowers, open on an upright, rapid growing
plant. Leaves, large, oval, flat, glossy green, margins serrate. The flower has two rows of
fluted guard petals and numerous petaloids interspersed with stamens.
Dorothy Jessep. (C.japonica), Hazlewood’s Nursery Catalogue, 1949, p.7: Medium sized, pink semidouble. Mid-season flowering. Originated at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Melbourne, Victoria,
Australia. Orthographic error: ‘Dorothy Jessop’.
Dorothy Jessop.
Southdown Nursery Catalogue, 1976. Orthographic error for Dorothy Jessep.
105
Dorothy Jocelyn. (C.japonica), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1994, Issue No.118, vol.XVIII, No.5,
p.31, Reg. No.335: Originated by T. Lennard, Te Puke, New Zealand. Deep pink
(RHS.CC.52B), formal double chance seedling, that first bloomed 1989. Flower is 11 cm
across x 4 cm deep with about 70 petals set in 12 rows; the central petals forming a 6 pointed
star. Flowers mid-season to late. Growth habit is spreading, open and medium in rate with
mid-green foliage 9 cm long x 4 cm wide.
Dorothy Johnson. (C.x williamsii), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1970, vol.VI, No.5, P.32, Reg.
No.44: A seedling of Donation originated by Mrs A.B. Durrant, Rotorua, New Zealand that
first flowered 1966. The flower is a soft pink with a silvery cast and silver edges to the petals.
There are 50-60 narrow, pointed petals in 6-7 rows, opening to show white stamens in the
centre. The plant habit is erect, open and vigorous. Flowers mid-season to late. See colour
illustration, front cover, New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1971, vol.VII, No.1.
Dorothy L. Chattin. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Dec 2008, p.34 with colour photo, Regn
No. 2748; A chance seedling that first bloomed in 1991. Originated and propagated by John
W. Shirah Jr., Lakeland Fla., USA. Medium size, pink formal double, incurving petals with a
fluorescent sheen. Heavy petal texture. Dark green leaves, 7.5 cm x 3.7 cm. Slow, spreading
growth. American Camellia Yearbook, 2008, p.111 with colour photo; Flowers mid-season to
late.
Dorothy M. Wilmot, 1945, Camellia Variety Classification Report, p.7. Synonym for Jessica
Variegated.
Dorothy Mac. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1947, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature: White. Medium
sized, anemone form. Vigorous, bushy growth. Mid-season blooming. Originated by Mrs S.
McPherson, Glendale, California, USA. Illustration, p.107, Hertrich, 1954, Camellias in the
Huntington Gardens, vol.I.
Dorothy Marbutt. (C.japonica), Hillcrest Nursery Catalogue, 1958: White striped pink. Medium sized
semi-double. Vigorous growth. Mid-season flowering. Originated by McDonald, Augusta,
Georgia, USA.
Dorothy Meredith Kernaghan. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1981, p.96, Reg. No.1695:
A medium size to large, blush pink, rose form double, C.japonica chance seedling, originated
by Grover C. Chester, Augusta, Georgia, USA. The 11 year old seedling first flowered in
1973. Average flower size, 10 cm wide by 4 cm deep with 40 petals, yellow anthers and
filaments. Plant growth is upright and dense with dark green leaves, 10 cm long by 6 cm
wide.
Dorothy Minarik. American Camellia Yearbook, 1991, p.77, Reg. No. 2218: Originated by Dr Charles
Minarik, West Harich, MA, USA. Medium size rose-pink single C.japonica chance seedling;
late blooming. The 20 year old seedling first flowered 1975. Average flower size is 8 cm
across x 5 cm deep with 5 petals; extremely cold hardy. Plant growth upright, compact and
rapid with dark green , serrated leaves. Colour photo between pp.80-81.
Dorothy Murphy. (C.japonica), ACRS., 1977, Camellia News, No.66, p.27, Reg. No.194: Originated by
Alice Spragg, Sutherland, N.S.W., Australia. Seed parent ‘Magnoliiflora’, (Hagoromo). First
bloomed 1972. The upright, open plant flowers early to late with off-white to very light pink,
medium sized flowers. Dark green leaves, 19 cm x 5 cm have acute apices, cuneate bases and
are sharply serrate.
Dorothy Parker.
Harris’ Longview Nursery Retail Price List, p.6, 1955-1956. Synonym for
Emmett Pfingstl.
Dorothy Peet. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1959, p.270, 271, Reg. No.368: A 5 year old
chance seedling of Berenice Boddy; originated by David L. Feathers, Lafayette, California,
USA that first flowered 1957. The dark green leaves are 12.5 cm long by 6 cm wide. The
106
semidouble flowers are 11 cm across and 4 cm deep. In colour the centre is blush, shading to
lighter pink. There are 11 petals, the three centre ones being wavy. Blooms mid-season.
Dorothy Penick. (C.japonica), McIlhenny Catalogue, 1945-1946, p.13: Double, loosely imbricated, outside petals rounded and standing out, inner petals irregular; stamens white, tipped cinnamon
ruff; colour of bloom pale, rosalane purple, veined deeper. Originated by McIlhenny, Avery
Island, Louisiana, USA.
Dorothy Rose. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1956, p.60, Reg. No.253: A 10 year old
chance seedling, originated by T. Eagleson, Port Arthur, Texas, USA that first flowered 1950.
Plant growth upright, dense and rapid in rate with leaves averaging 8 cm x 5.2 cm. The
rose-pink flowers, 7.5 cm across by 4 cm deep, have about 30 petals and resemble Cheerful
in form. Flowers midseason.
Dorothy Schmitt. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1978, p.128, Reg. No.1484: A miniature,
medium to deep cadmium red, formal double C.japonica chance seedling; originated by Carl
G. Schmitt, Mobile, Alabama, USA. The 11 year old seedling first bloomed 1970. The Alba
Plena type bloom has a star centre and 60-70 petals. Average size, 5.5 cm across by 3.5 cm
deep. Plant growth is upright, open and medium in rate with dark green leaves, 10.5 cm long
x 4 cm wide.
Dorothy Smith. (C.japonica), Outteridge, 1962, 1000 Named Camellias in Australia: Pink and red,
medium sized, peony form. Blooms early. Originated by Mr Smith, Wollongong, N.S.W.,
Australia.
Dorothy Spengler. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1970, Camellia Nomenclature, p.45: White. Large, rose form
double. Medium growth. Late flowering. Originated by Mrs J.J. Spengler, Durham, North
Carolina, USA.
Dorothy Spengler. Parks, 1976, American Camellia Yearbook, p.50, fig.2. Renamed Dot Spengler
as name already in use.
Dorothy Strong. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1958, Camellia Nomenclature, p.31: Pink and white. Large,
formal double with high centre. Originated by G.G. Gerbing, Florida, USA.
Dorothy Tillett. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1981, p.96, Reg. No.1711: A miniature,
white, formal double C.japonica chance seedling; mid-season blooming; originated by Ferol
Zerkowsky, Tammia Nursery, Slidell, Louisiana, USA. The 6 year old seedling first bloomed
1978. Average size, 6 cm wide by 3.2 cm deep. Growth is upright and average with dark
green leaves, 7.5 cm long x 3.5 cm wide. See colour plate front cover ACS., 1982, The
Camellia Journal, vol.37, No.3.
Dorothy van der Bow. (C.japonica), Nantes. Services des Espaces - Collections, 1980. No description.
Originated in Holland.
Dorothy Zerkowsky. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1974, vol.II, p.232, Reg. No.1308: A
10 year old chance C.japonica seedling that first flowered 1971; originated by Ferol
Zerkowsky, Tammia Nursery, Slidell, Louisiana, USA. Plant growth is upright, open and
medium in rate with dark green leaves, 11 cm long x 5.5 cm wide. The peony form bloom is
white to blush pink with some pink spots. Average size, 12.5 cm across by 7.5 cm deep with
60 petals, yellow anthers and white filaments. Blooms mid-season. Sports: Dorothy
Zerkowsky Blush, Dorothy Zerkowsky Peony, Dorothy Zerkowsky Rosea. For illustration
see back cover, ACS., 1977, The Camellia Journal, vol.32, No.4.
Dorothy Zerkowsky Blush. (C.japonica), Tammia Nsy., 1977, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.32,
No.4, back cover: Blush pink sport of Dorothy Zerkowsky. Originated by Tammia Nry,
Slidell, Louisiana, USA.
107
Dorothy Zerkowsky Peony. (C.japonica), Tammia Nsy., 1977, ACS., The Camellia Journal vol.32,
No.4, back cover illustration: A blush white with pink, peony form of Dorothy Zerkowsky.
Originated by Tammia Nsy., Slidell, Louisiana, USA.
Dorothy Zerkowsky Rosea. (C.japonica), Tammia Nsy., 1977, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.32,
No.4, back cover illustration: A deep, rose-pink formal double sport of Dorothy Zerkowsky
with colour fading to blush at the centre. Originated by Tammia Nsy., Slidell, Louisiana,
USA.
Dorothy’s Folly. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Nov. 1998, p.24, Reg. No.2471. A medium
size, deep rose with a few white stripes, anemone form chance seedling. Late flowering.
Originated by Dr Charles Minarik, West Harwich, USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 1998,
p.2, colour photo before p.1. The 28 year old seedling first flowered in 1976. Average flower
size is 10 cm across x 3.8 cm deep, with dark green leaves 18 petals, 4 petaloids, yellow
anthers and light pink filaments. Plant growth is upright, dense and vigorous, with dark green
leaves 9-10 cm long x 3.8 cm wide. Very cold hardy. Note: The colour photo accompanying
the registration shows a flower with white background and numerous rose red stripes and
flecks, and is semi-double rather than anemone form.
Dorrie Chandler. (C.japonica), ACRS., 1967, Camellia Annual, No.28, p.4, Reg. No.77: Originated by
E.V.R. Chandler, East St Kilda, Victoria, Australia. A seedling from The Czar that first flowered 1958. The rose-pink flowers are 8.5 cm across and 5 cm deep, of an incomplete double
form. Early to mid-season flowering. Leaves, light green, 6.5 cm long x 3.2 cm wide. Plant
has an upright, open growth habit.
Dorrie Higgins. (C.reticulata), ACRS., 1982, Camellia News, No.83, p.22, Reg. No.280: Originated by
T.E. Pierson, Hurstville, N.S.W., Australia from the cross C.reticulata ‘Crimson Robe’
(Dataohong) x William Hertrich. First flowered 1980. Flower size, 13 cm across x 9 cm
deep. A loose peony, rich plum red colour with a silvery sheen. Flowers early. The upright,
open plant has 13 cm long x 6.5 cm wide leaves, dark green, prominent venation, small
serrations.
Dorsetia.
Buist, 1839, Camellias, p.15. Orthographic error for ‘Dorsettii’, synonym for Gigantea.
Dorsetii. Loudon, 1835, Gardener’s Magazine, vol.11, p.216. Orthographic error for ‘Dorsettii’,
synonym for Gigantea.
Dorsetti.
Angelo Longone Catalogue, 1861. Orthographic error for ‘Dorsettii’, synonym for
Gigantea.
Dorsettia. Buist, 1845, American Flower Garden Directory, 3rd ed, p.218. Orthographic error for
‘Dorsettii’, synonym for Gigantea.
Dorsettii. Baumann & Baumann, 1832, Collection de Camellias élevés à Bollwieler, pl.34: Large,
very double flower, the outer petals are gracefully rounded, and, most often, with a whitish
streak at the centre. The inner petals are small and joined in many clusters of different form,
and intermixed with the sexual parts. Berlèse, 1837. Monographie, ed.1, p.92, 83, 37, 38, 71:
Leaves, large, ovate-lanceolate, very acuminate, flat; bud very large, rounded, scales
yellowish green; flower very large, 12.5 cm in diameter, very full, of a pale cherry red, mixed
with several shade of rose-pink or white; petals very large, close set, imbricated, irregular,
numerous; those of the centre smaller, disordered, marked with red and white spots.
Synonyms: ‘Dorsettii Parthoniana’, ‘Rex Georgius’, Orthographic errors: ‘Dorsetia’,
‘Dorsetii’, ‘Dorsettia’, ‘Dorsetti’, ‘Dorceti’, ‘Dorcetti’, ‘Doretti’. Note: As the name
Gigantea is now regarded as the valid name for the variegated form and Gigantea Red for
the solid colour form, this cultivar name now becomes the synonym for Gigantea.
Dorsettii de Savoire. (C.japonica), Trillon, Le Mans Nursery Catalogue, 1843, p.5. Vivid pink.
Originated in France by Trillon.
108
Dorsettii Parthoniana. Colla, 1843, Camelliografia, p.125. Synonym for ‘Dorsettii’, synonym for
Gigantea.
Dorsettii Pendula. (C.japonica), Loudon, 1839, Hortus Kewensis, pl.1, p.617, (G.M.xi p.216) as
‘Dorsetii Pendula’. No description. Originated in England. (Believed extinct.)
Dorsii. (C.japonica), Lindo Nursery price list, 1940-1941: Semi-double rose-pink, large size. Originated
in the USA.
Dorusio à bordes blancs.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1843-1844, 12:ss. Synonym for Adonidea.
Dorylas. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1845-1846, 23:4. No description. Originated by B. Lechi in
Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Dôshi.
Different reading for Dôji.
Dot Ashley.
Gerbing, G.G., Nursery Catalogue, 1958. Orthographic variant for Dorothy Ashley.
Dot Cady. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1981, P.96, Reg. No.1722: A medium size, light
pink base to white centre, formal double, C.japonica, (Dr Tinsley x Erin Farmer) flowering
mid-season to late. Originated by E.P. Akin, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA. The 9 year old
seedling first bloomed 1978. Average flower size 9.5 cm wide by 5 cm deep with 50 petals.
Plant growth is spreading, dense and medium in rate with light green leaves, 10 cm x 5 cm.
Dot Spengler. (C. hybrid), American Camellia Yearbook, 1978, p.128, Reg. No.1469: A small spirea red,
(RHS.CC.025/1) semi-double to loose, peony form C.sasanqua hybrid, a cross of the female
parent Crimson King and the male parent, Asper hybrid No.4, [C.sasanqua x C.reticulata
‘Lion Head’ (Shizetou)], originated by Dr C.R. Parks, North Carolina, USA. The 14 year old
hybrid first flowered 1968. The flower has 10-12 petals, 5 petaloids, yellow anthers and cream
filaments. Average size 7.5 cm across x 4 cm deep. Flowers late. Plant growth, spreading,
dense, open and medium to slow in rate with dark green sasanqua type leaves. This hybrid
was illustrated in American Camellia Yearbook, 1976 facing p.50, invalidly as ‘Dorothy
Spengler’. The name was changed to Dot Spengler on registration.
Dotted Flowered.
Chandler & Booth, 1831, Illustrations and descriptions of the Plants....
Synonym for ‘Punctata’.
Dottie Lynch. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1961, p.221, Reg. No.565: A 9 year old
chance seedling that first bloomed 1956; originated by Dr Gilbert E. Fisher, Alabama, USA.
Plant growth is upright and rapid in rate with dark green leaves, 11 cm x 5.5 cm. The peony
form flower is 13-16 cm across by 8.5 cm deep and phlox pink with a few white spots and
yellow anthers. Flowers mid-season.
Dottor Angelo Borrini. (C.japonica), Cattolica, G., Le mie Camelie, My Camellias, 2005, p.83 with
colour photo; Medium to large formal double, regularly imbricated, red and white with red
variegation (RHS.CC.52B and 52C). A seedling of Madoni x Moshio, first flowered in 1987.
Originated by Dott. Guido Cattolica, Livorno, Italy.
Dottor Ceresa.
Ceresa.
Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.26. Orthographic error for Dottore
Dottor Ernesto. (C.japonica), Cattolica, G., Le mie Camelie, My Camellias, 2005, p.84 with colour
photo; Medium size, anemone form, red (RHS.CC.58B). A seedling of Simon Bolivar, first
flowered in 2001. Originated by Dott. Guido Cattolica, Livorno, Italy.
Dottore Albini. (C.japonica), Angelo Longone Catalogue, 1891, p.77, as ‘Dott Albinii’: Large Red.
Originated in Italy.
Dottore Ceresa. (C.japonica), Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.26 as ‘Dottor Ceresa’: Bright
pink, lined with white. Imbricated. Originated in Italy.
109
Dottore Panceri. (C.japonica), Annales d’Agricultura, 1857 as ‘Dott. Panceri Nova’. No description.
Stefano Pagliai Catalogue, 1867: New rose, veined, many petals striped white. Imbricated.
Originated in Italy.
Dottoressa Stefania Franzetti. (C.reticulata), Italian CS, Notiziario, 2004, No.1, pp.5-6 with colour
photo; Semi-double, medium to large, 10-12 cm diameter, 12-15 petals, cordate, margins
entire, colour red (RHS.CC. 52A). Stamens 80-90, irregular and mixed with 3-4 petaloids.
Filaments orange-yellow (RHS.CC. 25B), anthers polished gold (RHS.CC. 26B). Leaves 1011 cm x 4.5-5 cm, narrowly ovate, apex acuminate, margins finely serrate, upper surface
green (RHS.CC. 136A), reverse green (RHS.CC. 137C), new growth lightly pink. Originated
by Floricoltura Lago Maggiore, Cerro di Laveno, Italy. Synonym ‘F.L.M. Dottoressa Stefania
Franzetti’.
Doty’s Ecstacy.
Double Blanc.
Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Synonym for Sacco Rose.
André Leroy Catalogue, 1833, p.12. Synonym for Alba Plena.
Double Blush Sasanqua.
for C.maliflora.
Curtis Saml., 1820, Monograph on the Genus Camellia, p.2. Synonym
Double Bowl. Bao, 1980., ACS, The Camellia Review, vol.35, No.2, p.18. Western synonym for
Lianrui.
Double Brocade.
Double Buff.
Camellia Grove Nursery Catalogue, 1946, p.5.Synonym for Eugene Bolen.
Prince & Co. Nursery Catalogue 1822. Synonym for Incarnata.
Double Cherry. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No.182, Autumn 2010, p.7 with colour photo;
Regn No.597-N.; A seedling of Paradise Belinda, first flowered 2002. Large, semi-double to
informal double, bright cherry red. Early to mid-season flowering. Vigorous, upright growth.
Originated by Justin O’Malley Jones, Marian Grove Nursery, Mangrove Mountain, NSW,
Australia.
Double Crimson.
William Prince, 1823, Catalogue, p.99. Synonym for Atrorubens.
Double Dark. (C.japonica), Backhouse & Son Catalogue, 1896, p.38. No description. Originated in
England. (Believed extinct.)
Double Dark Red.
Michael Floy, 1823, Catalogue, p.27. Synonym for Atrorubens.
Double de Neige. McIlhenny, 1934, List of Camellia Japonica for Sale, p.3. Orthographic error for
Boule de Neige.
Double Decker. (C.japonica), Griffiths & Strother, 1954, Nomenclatural Cross Reference List, p.3, 4. No
description. Originated in USA.
Double Deep Pink.
Nobelius Nursery Catalogue, 1939, p.35. Synonym for Mathotiana Rosea.
Double Fringed White.
Fimbriata.
Double Hiryu.
Prince, 1828, A Short Treatise on Horticulture, p.169. Synonym for
Camellia Grove nursery Catalogue, p.9. Synonym for Shishigashira.
Double Kew Blush.
Anonymous, 1816-1817, Allgemeinen Deutschen Garten Magazins, 2.
Synonym for ‘Pomponia’, orthographic variant for Pompone.
Double Mist.
Yashiroda, 1950, American Camellia Yearbook, p.21. Synonym for Yae-gasumi.
Double Myrtle Leaved.
Michael Floy, 1823, Catalogue, p.27. Synonym for Pompone.
Double Peach Pink. (C.japonica), Hillier’s Nursery Catlogue, 1952: Peach pink, formal double. Originated in England.
Double Peony Flowered.
Michael Floy, 1823, Catalogue, p.27. Synonym for Paeoniiflora.
110
Double Petal Korean Camellia.
Shuangban Chaoxin Cha.
Yang, 1965, Camellia Varieties of Taiwan. Synonym for
Double Pink.
Curtis, 1820, Monograph. Synonym for Middlemist Red.
Double Pink.
Rubel, 1936, Wholesale price list No.74, p.7. Synonym for Mathotiana Rosea.
Double Pink. (C.japonica), Marchant, 1965, Keeper’s Hill Nursery Catalogue, p.14: Delicate rose-pink.
Imbricated. Originated in Dorset, UK.
Double Pink Pompom. (C.japonica), McIlhenny Catalogue, 1942, p.7: Deep rose-pink, lightly veined
rose. Large peony form. Originated in the USA.
Double Pink Waratah. Curtis, Saml., 1820, Monograph on the Genus Camellia, p.2. Hazlewood &
Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery Catalogues, p.59. Synonym for
Anemoniflora Rosea.
Double Pompone.
Double Purple.
Michael Floy, 1823, Catalogue, p.27. Synonym for Pompone.
Falla, William, Gateshead Nursery Catalogue,1827. Synonym for Rubra Plena.
Double Rainbow. (C.sasanqua). SCCS, 1993, Camellia Nomenclature, p.143: White bordered rose-red,
small to medium size semi-double. Originated in USA.
Double Red.
Aiton, 1812, Hortus Kewensis. Synonym for Rubra Plena.
Double Rose. (C.japonica), Fairlight Camellia Nursery Catalogue, 1987: Deep rose-pink, formal double
to rose form double. Blooms early to mid-season. Large, long lasting blooms on a strong bush
of compact, upright growth. Originated in England.
Double Rose Pink. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues p.59. Synonym for Mathotiana Rosea.
Double Rouge.
André Leroy, Angers Nursery Catalogue, 1833, p.13. Synonym for Rubra Plena.
Double Scarlet.
William Prince, 1828, A Short Treatise on Horticulture. Synonym for Coccinea.
Double Striped.
Aiton, 1812, Hortus Kewensis. Synonym for Variegata.
Double Variegated Waratah de Knight. Jakob Makoy et Cie Nursery Catalogue, 1838. Synonym for
Dianthiflora.
Double Variegated Warratah de la Chine. Jacob Makoy et Cie Catalogue, 1839, p.16. Synonym for
Dianthiflora.
Double Ville.
Kay.
Gentry, 1969, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.23, No.1, p.26. Synonym for Lady
Double White.
Aiton, 1812, Hortus Kewensis. Synonym for Alba Plena.
Double White.
McIlhenny, 1937, 600 Varieties of Camellias. Synonym for Fuji-no-mine.
Doug Haviland. (C.japonica), ACRS, Camellia News, 1999, No.151, p.10, colour photo p.2, Reg.
No.527. Originated by Alan Truran, Hornsby, NSW, Australia. Seed parent C.japonica
Prince Eugene Napoleon, pollen parent unknown. First flowered 1994. The single, rose pink
(RHS.CC.51B) flower of 6 petals is veined darker pink (RHS.CC.51A), and is 8 cm across x
6 cm deep. It flowers mid-season on a medium, spreading, slow growing plant. Leaves dark
green, glossy, keeled, elliptic, 11 cm long x 4 cm wide. Filaments columnar. Flower colour is
identical to R.L. Wheeler.
Doug Mayfield. Gentry, 1986, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.41, No.4, p.23. Abbreviation for
Douglas Mayfield.
Douglas Dean Hall. (C. rusticana x C.japonica), ACS., Aug. 1987, The Camellia Journal, vol.42, No.3,
p.6, Reg. No.2057: Small size, deep red to rose-pink, rose-form double to formal double,
111
C.hybrid (C.rusticana Yoshida x C.japonica White Butterfly). Blooms early to late season.
American Camellia Yearbook, 1989, p.80 with colour photo between p.60-61: The 10 year old
seedling first bloomed 1981. Average flower size is 5.8 cm across x 3.5 cm deep with 54
petals, yellow anthers and cream filaments. The plant growth is average and medium in rate
with dark green leaves, 8 cm long x 4 cm wide. originated by Dr. W.L. Ackerman, Maryland,
USA.
Douglas Mayfield. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1986, p.89, Reg. No.2009: A medium
size, white, anemone form, C.japonica seedling, (Sadie Mancill x Evalina) blooms early to
mid- season. Originated by Mrs Henry S. Stone, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. The 20 year
old seedling first flowered 1970. Average flower size is 9.5 cm wide x 6 cm deep with 42
petals and 42 petaloids with white filaments. Plant growth is rapid in rate with dark green
leaves, 7.5 cm long x 3.8 cm wide.
Douglas Potter. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1977, p.209, 210, Reg. No.1446: A large,
deep rose-pink, peony form C.japonica; early to mid-season flowering. An 11 year old
seedling that first bloomed 1970; originated by Douglas Mayfield, Baton Rouge, Louisiana,
USA. The peony form, Debutante type bloom has 32 large petals and white filaments.
Average size is 12 cm across and 7.5 cm deep. It has 7 large, curled, crinkled petals, yellow
anthers. Plant growth is upright, open and rapid with dark green leaves, 11 cm long x 7.5 cm
wide.
Douglasii. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1839, 1:3. No description. van Houtte Catalogue, 1842,
8:9: as ‘Douglasi’. Vivid, velvety rose-pink, completely veined, very double. Del Lungo e
Girardi, 1928, Le Camelie: Vigorous bush with large full flowers in the form of a peony.
Mertens & Fontaine, Collection de cent espèces.....camellia, 1845, pl. 97. Originated in England. Orthographic error: ‘Douglassi’. Synonym: ‘Helena’.
Douglassi. Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.10. Orthographic error for
Douglasii.
Doukelaarii.
Andre, ed.1864, L’Illustration Horticole, p.243. Orthographic error for
‘Donckelaeri’.
Doutor Antonio Claro da Fonseca. (C.japonica), Jornal de Horticultura Practica, 1891, Vol.22, by
Eduardo Sequeira: Rose form double. Bright rose-pink, sometimes splashed white. A sport of
Zoraide Vanzi. Originated in Portugal. Abbreviations: ‘Dr Antonio Clara da Fonseca’. ‘Dr.
A. Claro da Fonseca’. See also Doutor Claro da Fonseca.
Doutor Balthazar de Mello. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro, Catalogue No.25, 1889-1890, p.92;
Jornal de Horticultura Practica, 1891, Vol.22, p.94 by Eduardo Sequeira as ‘Dr Balthazar de
Mello’: Rose-form double, fimbriated, white with wide carmine stripes. A sport of
Bonomiana. Originated in Portugal. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Balthazar de Mello’. Orthographic
errors: ‘Dr Balthazar de Milo’, ‘Dr Baltazar de Mello’, ‘Dr Balthaza de Mello’, ‘Balzac de
Mello’, ‘Dr Balthazar de Melo’. Orthographic variant: ‘Doctor Balthazar de Mello’. Sports to
Dona Jane Andresen. Received 1st class certificate at Exposição in Palacio de Crystal, 1889.
Doutor Cerqueira Gomes. (C.japonica), Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue,
No.27, 1892, p.59: Peony form, yellow-chamois colour. Remarkable.. Originated in Portugal.
Abbreviation ‘Dr Cerqueira Gomes’.
Doutor Claro da Fonseca. (C.japonica), Jacintho de Mattos, Catalogue No.14, 1900, p.65; Rose form,
brilliant pink very large. Abbreviation; ‘Dr. Claro da Fonseca’. Originated in Portugal. Note;
This is listed separately from Doutor Antonio Claro da Fonseca in the de Mattos, 1900,
Catalogue. It is not known whether it is a solid coloured sport or a separate cultivar.
Doutor Julio Henriques. (C.japonica), Barbarosa Catalogue, 1894, as ‘Dr. Julio Henriques’.. No
description. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue No 27,, 1892, p.59:
112
Formal double, pinkish white with bright rose-pink stripes. Originated in Portugal.
Abbreviation: ‘Dr Julio Henriques’. Originated in Portugal.
Doutor Pedro Dias. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Supplementary Catalogue, 1888 & Catalogue
No.25, 1889-1890, p.92: Formal double, white with an occasional rose-pink splash.
Originated in Portugal. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Pedro Dias’.
Dove of Peace. (C.japonica), McCaskill Gardens Catalogue, 1965: White, formal double. American
Camellia Yearbook, 1980, p.163, Reg. No.1585: A medium size, white formal double
C.japonica Shiragiku x Pax. Blooms mid-season to late; originated by McCaskill Gardens,
Pasadena, California, USA. The seedling first bloomed 1949. Flower is 10 cm across x 5 cm
deep. Plant growth is vigorous and rapid.
Doveriana.
Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1846, p.52. Orthographic error for Dauweriana.
Dovie Fifield. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1966, p.86, Reg. No.839: A 9 year old chance
seedling of Robert Norton that first flowered 1956; originated by H.C. Petteway, Lakeland,
Florida, USA. Leaves are medium green, 10 cm long by 6 cm wide. Plant growth is bushy and
average in density and rate. The flower is peony form with a slightly sunken group of
petaloids with bright yellow stamens. Colour is blush pink with scattered pink speckles.
Flower is 9-12.5 cm across by 6-7.5 cm deep. Blooms mid-season.
Downing. (C.japonica), Smith, ed., July,1856, Horticulturalist, 6:325. No decription. Proceedings
of the RHS., 1861, p.480. Exhibited Mar.26th 1861 by E.G. Henderson & Sons - A
handsome, rose coloured American variety. Abbreviation for A.J. Downing.
Down’s White Seedling. (C.japonica), Hazlewood &: Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from
Nursery Catalogues, p.60. No description. Originated in USA. (Believed extinct.)
Dowring. Bahuaud-Litou Nursery Catalogue, 1914. Orthographic error for ‘Downing’, abbreviation for A.J. Downing.
Downing Pink. Abbot’s Sunny Knoll Nursery Catalogue.1950, p.17. Synonym for ‘Downing’,
abbreviation for A.J. Downing.
Dr A. Claro da Fonseca. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue No.27, 1892,
p.59, & No.40, ca. l904, p.69. Abbreviation for Doutor Antonio Claro da Fonseca.
Dr Agnew Hilsman. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1956, p.61, Reg. No.272: A 7 year old
chance seedling; originated by Dr P.L. Hilsman, Albany Georgia, USA that first flowered
1953. Plant growth is open, upright, rapid and compact with dark green leaves, 10 cm x 4 cm,
ovateelliptic, tapered at base, acuminate apex and heavily veined. Flowers are 10-12 cm
across and up to 8 cm deep, semi-double to incomplete double, with fascicles of stamens
between petals and petaloids. There are about 30 petals, 5 cm long, wavy and crinkled. The
colour is white, suffused blush pink, variegated with streaks, blotched and dots of neyron rose
and turkey red. The plant sports both neyron rose and red blooms. Flowers mid-season to late.
Orthographic error: ‘Dr Agnue Hilsman’. Chinese synonym ‘Aniu Boshi’.
Dr Agnue Hilsman.
man.
Feray’s Fine Flowers Catalogue 1960. Orthographic error for Dr Agnew Hils-
Dr Allen Ames.
Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.60. Synonym for Imura.
Dr Alvin Johnson. (C. reticulata. hybr.), American Camellia Yearbook, 1982, p.171, Reg. No.1838: A
very large, red, semi-double hybrid C.reticulata (‘Crimson Robe’ (Dataohong) x [‘Cornelian’
(Damanao) x C.japonica Mrs D.W. Davis back crossed to ‘Cornelian’]). Flowers early to
late. Originated by Frank Pursel, Oakland, California, USA. Average flower size is 13 cm
wide x 6 cm deep, with bright yellow filaments and crinkled petals like Ming Temple. Plant
growth is upright and average in rate with dark green leaves, 12.5 cm long x 5.5 cm wide.
113
Dr Antonio Clara da Fonseca. Sequeira Catalogue, 1891. Abbreviation for Doutor Antonio Clara
da Fonseca.
Dr Archie Sasser. (C.japonica), Cannon, 1957, Camellian vol.VIII, No.1, p.20. No description. Originated in USA.
Dr Baiduval. Waterhouse, 1953, American Camellia Yearbook, p.91. Orthographic error for
Docteur Boisduval.
Dr Balthazar de Mello.
Sequeira Catalogue, 1891. Abbreviation for Doutor Balthazar de Mello.
Dr Balthazar de Milo. Marwood Hill Gardens Catalogue, 1985. Orthographic error for Doutor
Balthazar de Mello.
Dr Baltazar de Melo. da Silva & Filhos Nursery Catalogue No.97, 1962, p.27. Orthographic error
for Doutor Balthazar de Mello.
Dr Bill Harrison. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1962, Camellia Nomenclature, p.35: Deep rose-pink to coral
pink to deep blush pink. Very large, semi-double with upright, swirled petals mixed with
stamens. Vigorous, upright growth. Mid-season flowering. Originated by Harrison in the
USA.
Dr Bliss Shafer.
Shafer.
SCCS., 1974, Camellia Nomenclature, p.48. Abbreviation for Doctor Bliss
Dr Bob.
SCCS., 1954, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.40. Abbreviation for
Doctor Bob.
Dr Bob Withers. (C.reticulata hybrid). ACRS, Camellia News, 2000, No.154, p.18, colour photo front
cover, Reg. No.534. Originated by Dr R.M. Withers, Donvale, Vic., Australia. A cross
between C.reticulata hybrid Suzanne Withers, seed parent, x C.reticulata hybrid Jean
Pursel, which first flowered 1995. The peony form flower of 50 petals and 150 petaloids
mixed with stamens is medium pink at the tips of the petals fading to pale pink at the base
(RHS.CC.67D to 69A), and is 14 cm diameter x 7 cm deep. Flowers mid-season on a rapid
growing, open, upright plant. Leaves dark green, glossy, flat, elliptic, 10.5 cm long x 6.5 cm
wide Shape, form and colour are regarded as unique, being a multiflora or pom-pom type,
with up to five distinct flowers coming from one central calyx.
Dr Bob Womack. (C. hybrid), American Camellia Yearbook, 1973, p.189, Reg. No.1255: An 8 year old
hybrid cross between C.japonica Letitia Schrader and C.reticulata hybrid Buddha that first
bloomed 1968; originated by Dr R.K. Womack, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA. Leaves light
green, 11 cm long x 6 cm wide. The semi-double, Frizzle White type, bloom is light red with
10-12 petals and yellow anthers. It measures 14.5 cm across and 7.5 cm deep. It has thick
petals and blooms mid-season.
Dr Bocsduval. Newman’s Nursery Catalogue, 1886-1887, p.116. Orthographic error for Docteur
Boisduval.
Dr Bois Duval.
Dr Boisduval.
Henderson Nursery Catalogue, 1867. Orthographic error for Docteur Boisduval.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1865-1866, 110:27. Abbreviation for Docteur Boisduval.
Dr Boisdwal. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue, No.29, 1895-1896, p.46.
Orthographic error for Docteur Boisduval.
Dr Brian Doak. (C.reticulata), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1974, vol.VIII, No.6, p.46, Reg. No.89:
A chance seedling of C.reticulata ‘Tali Oueen’, (Dali Cha) originated by Mrs T. Durrant,
Rotorua, New Zealand. First bloomed 1971 and is a full peony with 24 petals and a high
centre of folded petals and rabbit ears. The colour is deep pink with heavy veining of deeper
shades, the petal edges being much lighter and almost white. The blooms are large, 15-16 cm
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across x 7 cm deep, RHS.CC. Red-Purple Group 58B shading to 62A, petals veined, margins
entire. Foliage midgreen, heavily textured, 10 cm x 5 cm. Sport: Dr Brian Doak Variegated.
Dr Brian Doak Variegated. (C.reticulata), Cannon, 1980, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.35, No.4 as
‘Dr Brian Doak Var.’: A virus variegated form of Dr Brian Doak - Deep pink blotched
white. Originated in USA.
Dr Burnside. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1962-1963, p.217, Reg. No.658: An 8 year old
chance seedling that first bloomed 1959; originated by Dr A.F. Burnside, Columbia, South
Carolina, USA. Plant growth is upright and average in rate with dark green leaves, 10 cm x
7.5 cm. The semi-double to peony form flowers, 15 cm across x 7.5 cm deep, are true, dark
red with yellow stamens and 25-35 petals. Blooms mid-season. See p.80, 81, Macoboy 1981,
The Colour Dictionary of Camellias and the front cover ACS., 1963, The Camellia Journal,
vol.18, No.4. Sport: Dr Burnside Variegated.
Dr Burnside Variegated. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1966, Camellia Nomenclature, p.44 as ‘Dr Burnside
Var.’: A virus variegated form of Dr Burnside - True dark red blotched white. Originated in
USA.
Dr C.U. Shepherd. Griffiths & Strother 1954, Nomenclatural Crossreference List, p.3, 12. Orthographic error for ‘Dr Shepherd’, synonym for Grand Sultan as ‘Te Deum’.
Dr Campbell. SCCS, 1950, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.33. Abbreviation for
‘Doctor Campbell’, synonym for Gigantea Red as ‘Jacksoni’.
Dr Carl Beard. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Feb. 1997, p.15, Reg. No.2390. A large red
and white variegated, semidouble cross of ‘Donckelarii’ (Masayoshi) x Pirates Gold.
Flowers mid-season to late. Originated by Marvin Jernigan, Warner Robins, Ga., USA.
American Camellia Yearbook, 1997, p.2, colour photo before p.1. The 14 year old seedling
first flowered in 1985. Average flower size is 10.7 cm across x 6.5 cm deep, with 23 petals, 7
petaloids, white anthers and white filaments. Plant growth is upright, dense and average with
dark green fimbriated leaves 11.5 cm long x 4.5 cm wide.
Dr Carver. (C.japonica), Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. No description. Originated in
USA.
Dr Cato.
Fisher, 1957, Camellian, vol.VIII, No.4, back page. Abbreviation for Dr Frank Cato.
Dr Cerqueira Gomes.
Barbarosa Catalogue, 1894. Abbreviation for Doutor Cerqueira Gomes.
Dr Charles. Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1963-1964, p.5. Named Dr Charles Petteway,
ACS., Reg. No.836, 1966.
Dr Charles Petteway. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1966, p.87, Reg. No.836: An 8 year
old chance seedling that first bloomed 1956; originated by H.C. Petteway, Florida, USA.
Leaves dark green, 12 cm x 6 cm. Plant growth upright and medium. The rose-pink flower is
9-10 cm across with yellow stamens. Blooms start with a rose-bud shape and open to an
irregular semidouble. Mid-season flowering. There is a variegated form. Abbreviation: ‘Dr
Charles’. Sport: Dr Charles Petteway Variegated.
Dr Charles Petteway Variegated. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1966, p.87, Reg. No.837
as ‘Dr Charles Petteway Var.’: the same as Dr Charles Petteway except variegated by
grafting onto virused understock. Colour rose-pink, heavily variegated with white. Blooms
mid-season.
Dr Charles Thompson. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1976, Camellia Nomenclature, p.49: Light pink striped
red. Medium to large semi-double. Vigorous, compact, upright growth. Blooms mid-season.
Originated by Haynie, USA.
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Dr Clifford Parks. (C.reticulata.x C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1972, p.128, Reg.
No.1210: A 6 year old hybrid cross (‘Crimson Robe’ (Dataohong) x Kramer’s Supreme),
first bloomed 1970; originated by Dr Clifford Parks, North Carolina USA. Plant growth is
rapid in rate with dark green leaves, 15 cm x 8 cm. The anemone form, red (orange cast)
bloom has yellow anthers. It measures 14-15 cm across and 7.4-8 cm deep and flowers
mid-season. It has received the “Frank L. Stormont Reticulata Award” for 1976, the “William
E. Woodroof Camellia Hall of Fame Award” for 1983, the “Aubrey Harris Hybrid Award” for
1977 and the “National Hall of Fame Award” for 1979, 1981 and 1982. For colour
illustrations see: American Camellia Yearbook, 1977, facing p.82; Macoboy, 1981, The
Colour Dictionary of Camellias, p.155 and the front cover SCCS., 1979, The Camellia
Review, vol.40, No.4. There is also a variegated form. The Chinese synonym is ‘Pakesi
Xiansheng’. Orthographic variant: ‘Doctor Clifford Parks’.
Dr Clifford Parks Variegated. (C.reticulata x C.japonica), Gentry, 1975, ACS., The Camellia Journal,
vol.30, No.4, as ‘Dr Clifford Parks Var.’: A virus variegated form of Dr Clifford Parks - Red
blotched with white. Originated in USA.
Dr Colin Crisp. (C.pitardii hybrid). New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, March 1999, Issue No.132,
vol.XXI, No.1, p.15, Reg. No.403. Registered by N. Haydon, Takanini, New Zealand. A
seedling of Nicky Crisp, pollen parent unknown. The semi-double flowers are medium size,
8 cm diameter x 3.5 cm deep, and are pure white with good weather resistance. This is the
first registered pure white pitardii hybrid, and has the usual long-lasting golden anthers. Plant
is dense, slow-growing and bushy, with dark green leaves 8 cm long x 3.5 cm wide.
Dr Cy Echols. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1986, p.89, Reg. No.2002: A large, deep,
rose-pink, variegated white semi-double, chance japonica seedling; originated by Paul Gilley,
Grandridge, Florida, USA. The 6 year old seedling first bloomed 1983. Average flower size,
12 cm wide x 6 cm deep with 18 petals, 4 petaloids, white filaments and bright, golden
anthers. Plant growth is rapid with dark green leaves, 11 cm x 6 cm.
Dr D.G. Lee. Heutte, 1955, American Camellia Yearbook, p.292. Orthographic error for ‘Dr W.G.
Lee’, synonym for Doctor Lee.
Dr D.V. Knapp.
Knapp.
Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1962, p.3. Orthographic error for Dr J.V.
Dr Dan Ellis. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1973, p.190, Reg. No.1260: A 10 year old
chance seedling that first bloomed 1966; originated by Mrs Daniel W. Ellis, Charleston, South
Carolina, USA. Plant growth is upright, dense and medium in rate with dark green leaves, 10
cm x 5 cm. The peony form, ‘Daikagura’ type, bloom is 2.5R5/11 deep pink on the Munsel
Hue, Nickerson fan. It measures 13 cm in diameter and 7.5 cm deep with 48 petals. The
anthers are yellow and the filaments white. The petals are deeply veined, outer edges lighter.
Outer layers of petals curl outwards and downwards. Centre has rabbit eared, kinky petals
mixed with stamens. Its variegated form is named Kitty Ellis.
Dr Dan Ellis Variegated. Gentry, 1975, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol. 30, No.4 as ‘Dr Dan
Ellis Var.’. Synonym for Kitty Ellis.
Dr. Dan J.
J.
American Camellia Yearbook, 1991, p.77, Reg. No.2216. Abbreviation for Doctor Dan
Dr Dan Nathan. (C.reticulata x C.lutchuensis), American Camellia Yearbook, 1981, p.97, Reg. No.1732:
A very large, deep red, semi-double, C.reticulata hybrid (C.reticulata ‘Crimson Robe’
(Dataohong) x C.lutchuensis) that blooms mid-season to late; originated by Frank Pursel,
Oakland, California, USA. The 7 year old seedling first bloomed 1978. Average sized flowers
13.5 cm across x 6 cm deep. Plant growth upright and rapid with dark green leaves, heavily
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textured and serrated, 10.5 cm long x 6 cm wide.See colour plate front cover ACS., 1982, The
Camellia Journal, vol.37, No.1. Sport: Dr Dan Nathan Variegated.
Dr Dan Nathan Variegated. (C.reticulata.x C.lutchuensis.), American Camellia Society, 1985, The
Camellia Journal, vol.40, No.4, p.13 as ‘Dr Dan Nathan Var.’: A virus variegated form of Dr
Dan Nathan - Deep red, blotched white. Originated in USA.
Dr Dave.
American Camellia Yearbook, 1992, p.33. Abbreviation for Doctor Dave.
Dr David Sloan. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1971, p.97, Reg. No.1752: A medium
sized, pure white, formal double, C.japonica chance seedling, mid-season blooming;
originated by S.L. Marbury, Wilmington, North Carolina, USA. The 15 year old seedling first
bloomed 1970. Average flower size is 8 cm across x 5 cm deep with 80 petals. Plant growth is
dense and rapid with dark green leaves 8 cm x 5 cm. wide.
Dr Donald Koonce.
Koonce.
SCCS., 1964, Camellia Nomenclature. Abbreviation for Doctor Donald
Dr Doreen Clark. (C.reticulata hybrid). ACRS, Camellia News, Autumn 2002, No.158, p.8 Reg.
No.540. Originated by Alan Truran, Hornsby, NSW, Australia, and registered by Patrick
Clark, Pymble. A chance seedling of C.reticulata Ellie Rubensohn that first flowered 1995.
A full semi-double to loose peony form flower of 36 petals, petaloids and stamens, rose pink
(RHS.CC.62B-62D), deepening at the centre of the flower to RHS.CC68B, and 14.5 cm
diameter x 5 cm deep. Petals 6 to a row, with up to 6 rows, some upright petals arched and
fluted. Petals notched and veined. Flowers freely early mid-season to late on a tall, vigorous,
rapid growing plant. Flowers a month before seed parent. Leaves matt, dark green
(RHS.CC.135A), leathery, flat, keeled, obovate with sharply acuminate apex, margins
recurved, 5 sharp serrations per cm, 12 mm petiole, 10 cm long x 4.8 cm wide.
Dr Duval. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery Catalogues,
p.60. Orthographic error for Docteur Boisduval.
Dr Duval Alba.
Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.60. Synonym for Docteur Boisduval.
Dr Ecorchard. Claude Thoby, 1993, Camélias, p.41. Abbreviation for Doctor Ecorchard.
Dr Ed. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1977, p.210, Reg. No.1454: A very large, pure white,
semi-double, C.japonica, that blooms mid-season to late. A 13 year old chance seedling of
Tomorrow that first bloomed 1969; originated by William Garoni, South Carolina, USA. The
semi-double, Frizzle White type, bloom is pure white, golden anthers and filaments, 34
petals and 11 petaloids. Average size, 13 cm across x 7.5 cm deep. Heavy texture. Plant
growth is upright, medium in rate with dark green leaves, 10 cm long x 6.5 cm wide.
Dr Edward Porubsky. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Aug.2001, p.21, Reg. No.2546. A
peony form chance seedling, pink, with golden anthers and pink filaments. Plant growth is
upright and vigorous and blooms midseason. Originated by Jack Mandarich, Salinas, Calif.,
USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 2001, p.94, colour photo p.c13. The 12 year old seedling
first flowered in 1994. Average flower size is 12.7 cm across x 5 cm deep, with heavy petal
texture. Dark green leaves are 10 cm long x 5 cm wide.
Dr Emil Carroll. (C.reticulata. hybr.), American Camellia Yearbook, 1983, p.157, Reg. No.1904: A very
large, burgundy red, anemone to loose peony form, C.reticulata hybrid (C.reticulata
‘Crimson Robe’ (Dataohong) x 5X = [C.reticulata ‘Cornelian’ (Damanao) x C.japonica
Mrs D.W. Davis]), that flowers mid-season to late. Originated by Frank Pursel, Oakland,
California, USA. The 9 year old seedling first bloomed 1980. Average flower size is 13 cm
wide by 6 cm deep. Sport: Dr Emil Carroll Variegated. Chinese synonym: ‘Kaluoer Boshi’.
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Dr Emil Carroll Variegated. (C.reticulata. hybr.), Valdosta Camellias, 1986, ACS., The Camellia
Journal, vol.41, No.4, p.9 as ‘Dr Emil Carroll Var.’: A virus variegated form of Dr Emil
Carroll - Burgundy red, blotched white. Originated in USA.
Dr Fay Shaw.
Shaw.
Pyron, 1969, American Camellia Yearbook, p.101. Abbreviation for Doctor Fay
Dr Firth. (C.japonica), Griffin ed., 1957, Camellian. No description. SCCS., 1958, Camellia
Nomenclature, p.31: Pink to lavender pink. Large, peony form. Originated by L.W. Ruffin,
Mississippi, USA. Orthographic error: ‘Dr Frith’.
Dr Frank Cato. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1949, p.243: A seedling of unknown
parentage; originated by S.J. Katz, Louisiana, USA and first bloomed 1947. The flower is 11
cm across of light rose colour, loose peony form with short stamens. Blooms mid-season.
Hardy, bushy and compact with mid-green leaves, broad, pointed and average, shallow
serration, 5 cm long x 3.5 cm wide. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Cato’. Registration No.58 with the
ACS, 1954, American Camellia Yearbook. Sport: Dr Frank Cato Variegated.
Dr Frank Cato Variegated. (C.japonica), Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue 1962, p.3 as ‘Dr Frank Cato
Var.’: A virus variegated form of Dr Frank Cato - Light rose blotched with white.
Originated in USA.
Dr Frank Poole. (C.japonica), SCCS, 1960, Camellia Nomenclature, p.46: Ivory white. Large,
semi-double to peony form with loose, irregular petals and yellow stamens interspersed with
upright petaloids. Originated by Gilbert Fisher, USA.
Dr. Frank Wilson. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Sept. 2013, p.26 with colour photo; Regn
No.2857; Originated by Hulyn Smith, Valdosta, Ga., USA. ACS, Yearbook, 2013, p.112 with
colour photo; A 14 year old seedling of Edna Campbell, pollen parent not known, first
flowered 2005. Registered and propagated by Randolph Maphis, Tallahassee, Fla. Small, 6.58.2cm diameter x 2.5cm deep flower is described as semidouble to formal double
(accompanying photo shows a formal double with too many petals for a semidouble, and no
description of stamens). Raspberry red with incurving petals. Upright, dense plant with
average growth rate. Mid-green leaves average 7.5cm x 3.8cm, with low serration. Flowers
early to midseason.
Dr Frau Schiffner.
Veitch Nursery Catalogue,1911. Orthographic variant for Frau Dr Schiffner.
Dr Fred E. Heitman.
Heitman.
American Camellia Yearbook, 1995. Abbreviation for Doctor Fred E.
Dr Fred Lee. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1976, Camellia Nomenclature, p.50: White with pink stripes and
spots. Large, semi-double with crinkled petals. Vigorous, upright, compact growth.
Originated in USA by Haynie.
Dr Frith.
Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1962, p.3. Orthographic error for Dr Firth.
Dr G.A. Bunch. SCCS., 1964, Camellia Nomenclature, p.42. However name was registered the
same year as Dr George Bunch.
Dr Gary Carroll. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1981, p.97, Reg. No.1714: A medium
size, dark red, semi-double to peony form C.japonica chance seedling that flowers
mid-season, originated by Ferol and Sam Zerkowsky, Tammia Nursery, Slidell, Louisiana,
USA. The 10 year old seedling first flowered 1980. Average flower size 10 cm across by 7 cm
deep with 40 petals, yellow anthers and red filaments. Plant growth upright, medium in rate
with dark green leaves, 8.5 cm long x 2.5 cm wide. See colour plate front cover ACS, 1986,
The Camellia Journal, vol.40, No.4. The registration was repeated in 1985, American
Camellia Yearbook, p.182 with minor variations.
Dr Geechee.
SCCS., 1970, Camellia Nomenclature, p.46. Abbreviation for Doctor Geechee.
118
Dr Geechee Variegated. Gentry, 1971, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.26, No.4, p.21 as ‘Dr
Geechee Var.’. Abbreviation for Doctor Geechee Variegated.
Dr Gehry. (C.japonica). Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1962, p.3. No description. Originated
in USA. No valid listing located.
Dr Gehry Variegated. (C.japonica), Mark S Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1962, p.3. No description.
Originated in USA. No valid listing located.
Dr George A. Bunch. Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1964-1965, p.5. Synonym for Dr George
Bunch.
Dr George Bunch. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1965, p.230, Reg. No.791: An 8 year old
chance seedling that first flowered 1960. Propagated by True’s Camellias, Columbia, South
Carolina, USA and released in 1963 as ‘Dr G.A. Bunch’ and changed to Dr George Bunch
on registration. Plant growth is upright, dense and rapid with dark green leaves 12.5 cm long
x 7.5 cm wide. The flower is large to very large, heavy peony form with a pink centre grading
to white at the margins with some margins deep pink as in Betty Sheffield Blush. Flower
colour variable, some mostly white with pink markings, true blush and some solid, deep pink.
Sports freely. Blooms measure 14-15 cm across x 8.5 cm deep. Blooms mid-season. SCCS.,
Camellia Nomenclature lists this name as a synonym for Sarah R (a sport of Big Beauty)
which was registered the same year, Reg No.808. As Sarah R was commercially listed in
1960 this would give it priority if they are, in fact, identical. While the American Camellia
Yearbooks do not give the names of the actual originators, Camellia Nomenclature, under the
name ‘Dr G.A. Bunch’ gives the originator as W.M. Arant, West Columbia, South Carolina,
1962 and Sarah R as originated by B. Ruffin, Elliville, Mississippi, 1961 and states that it is
also believed to be the same as Tillie Worth.
Dr Gilbert Fisher. River View Nursery Catalogue, 1957-1958, p.12. Orthographic variant for
Gilbert Fisher.
Dr Gilbert E Fisher.
Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1962, p.3. Synonym for Gilbert Fisher.
Dr Gordon Richmond. (C.reticulata.x C.japonica), SCCS., 1984, Camellia Nomenclature, p.115:
Salmon pink. Large, full semi-double to rose form double. Vigorous, compact, upright
growth. Flowers mid-season. (C.reticulata ‘Cornelian’ (Damanao) x C.japonica Mrs D.W.
Davis). Originated by Dr Clifford Parks, USA.
Dr Guy Bethea. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1958, Camellia Nomenclature, p.31: Dark waxy red. Large, semidouble with irregular petals. Vigorous, upright growth. Mid-season blooming. Originated by
Dr G. Bethea, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, USA.
Dr H.G. Mealing. (C.japonica), Walter Allan Nursery Catalogue, 1946. No description. Fendig, 1950,
American Camellia Catalogue: Large, deep red, semi-double 10-13 cm in diameter by 2.5 cm
deep. Petals are 5-6 cm x 3.8 cm. Stamens resemble those of ‘Lady Clare’. Buds are tulip
shaped and open quickly. Petals prominently veined. Very late bloomer. Leaves dark green,
unusually flat, stiff, oval, 8-10 cm long x 5-7.5 cm wide. Tips rounded with small point,
serrations shallow. Growth vigorous, spreading, slender. Originated by Walter Allan,
Summerville, South Carolina, USA from seed of unknown parentage. First bloomed about
1941. Black & white photo, p.108, Hertrich, 1954, Camellias in the Huntington Gardens,
vol.I and p.54, Sharp’s Camellias Illustrated, 1948. There is also a variegated form.
Dr H.G. Mealing Variegated. (C.japonica) Hillcrest Nursery Catalogue, 1358 as ‘Dr G.H. Mealing
Var.’: A white marbled form of Dr G.H. Mealing. Originated in USA.
Dr Hagood. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1955, p.336, Reg. No.236: A 15 year old
chance seedling, originated by Dr Haywood Smith, South Carolina, USA that first flowered
1954. Plant growth slow. Flower buds oval to round, dark red. The very dark red, purplish
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flowers, 7-8 cm across, are complete formal double, similar to Alba Plena, with 62 petals.
Late flowering.
Dr Harry Moore. (C.reticulata.x C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1980, p.163, Reg. No.1642:
A very large, cerise red with sheen, semi-double to loose, peony form, C.reticulata hybrid
(C.reticulata x C.japonica) chance seedling that blooms mid-season to late; originated by
Kramer Bros Nursery, Upland, California, USA. The 10 year old seedling first bloomed 1975.
Flower size is 15.4 cm wide x 8 cm deep with heavy texture. Plant growth is upright,
spreading, dense and rapid in rate with light green leaves. See colour photo, front cover ACS.,
1980. The Camellia Journal, vol.35, No.4. Sport: Dr Harry Moore Variegated. Chinese
synonym ‘Hali Boshi’.
Dr Harry Moore Variegated. (C.reticulata.x C.japonica), Cannon, 1982, ACS., The Camellia Journal,
vol.37, No.4 as ‘Dr Harry Moore Var.’. A virus variegated form of Dr Harry Moore - Cerise
red, blotched white. Originated in USA.
Dr Henry B. Harvey.
Harvey.
Dr Horner.
American Camellia Yearbook, 1995. Abbreviation for Doctor Henry B.
Seidel, 1870, Pflanzen Catalog, p.7. Abbreviation for Docteur Horner.
Dr Howard House. SCCS., 1966, Camellia Nomenclature as ‘Dr Howard Howse’. Abbreviation
for Doctor Howard House.
Dr Huffman. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1966, p.87, Reg. No.835: A 12 year old
chance seedling that first flowered 1958; originated by S.L. Marbury, Wilmington, North
Carolina, USA. Plant growth is dense and rapid with light green leaves, 7.5 cm long x 4 cm
wide. The pink with yellow stamens, flower is 11 cm across x 5 cm deep and 25 petals and a
mass of petaloids. Flower form variable, anemone to semi-double with yellow stamens in the
centre. Flowers mid-season.
Dr Hugo. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1974, p.169, Reg. No.1296: An 8 year old chance
seedling that first bloomed 1969; originated by Jim Luker, Savannah, Georgia, USA. Plant
growth is upright and medium in rate with dark green leaves, 7.5 cm long x 3.5 cm wide. The
semi-double, Frizzle White type, blooms are white with twisted and creped outer petals, 7
centre rabbit ears, 220 stamens with golden anthers and cream filaments. Average size, 11.5
cm across and 6 cm deep. Blooms mid-season.
Dr J. Ellis. (C.japonica), Gerbing Camellia Nursery, 1963, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.18,
No.4, inside back cover. No description. Originated in USA. No valid listing located.
Dr J.C. Raulston. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Nov. 1998, p.24, Reg. No.2473. A very
large, bright red to red-orange, anemone form chance seedling. Originated by Bond Nursery
Corporation. Flowers mid-season to late. American Camellia Yearbook, 1998, p.2, colour
photo before p.1. The 14 year old seedling first flowered in 1987. Average flower size is 13.5
cm across x 3.8 cm deep, with 14 petals, 16 petaloids, yellow anthers and filaments. Plant
growth is upright, dense and vigorous with dark green leaves 9 cm long x 5.7 cm wide.
Dr J.M. Howell. (C.japonica), ACS., May 1987, The Camellia Journal, vol.42, No.2, p.8, Reg. No.2041:
Large size, white, rose-form double C.japonica chance seedling. Early blooming. Originated
by Dr O.V. Lewis, Picayune, Mississippi, USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 1987, p.80
with colour photo between p.60-61: The 10 year old seedling first bloomed 1980. Average
flower size, 12.5 cm across x 8 cm deep with 32 petals, yellow anthers and white filaments.
Blooms are white velvet with stamens interspersed and petal margins slightly ruffled. Plant
growth is upright and rapid in rate with dark green leaves, 8 cm long x 5 cm wide.
Dr J.V. Knapp. (C.japonica), Sewell, 1956, American Camellia Yearbook, p.52: The flowers of this
variety are large, bright red, usually with splotches of white and open in late mid-season. It
was originated by R.W. Vincent, Zellwood, Florida, USA. An outstanding characteristic is its
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holly-like leaves. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Knapp’. Sport: Dr J.V. Knapp Variegated.
Orthographic error: ‘Dr D.V. Knapp’.
Dr J.V. Knapp Variegated. (C.japonica), Tammia Nursery Catalogue,1960, 1961, p.3: A white marbled
form of Dr J.V. Knapp - Virus variegated, bright red splotched with white. Originated in
USA. Chinese synonym ‘Hua Napu’.
Dr Jack Davis. (C.reticulata hybr.), American Camellia Yearbook, 1981, p.97, Reg. No.1747: A very
large, rose red, semi-double hybid, (C.reticulata ‘Crimson Robe’ (Dataohong) x [12X =
C.reticulata ‘Cornelian’ (Damanao) x C.japonica Mrs D.W. Davis]) that blooms
mid-season; originated by Frank Pursel, Oakland, California, USA. The 7 year old seedling
first bloomed 1979. Average flower size 15 cm wide by 7.5 cm deep. Plant growth is upright
and medium with dark green leaves, 11.5 cm long x 7.5 cm wide. Sport: Dr Jack Davis
Variegated.
Dr Jack Davis Variegated. (C.reticulata. hybr.), Cannon, 1984, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.39,
No.4, p.19 as ‘Dr Jack Davis Var.’. A virus variegated form of Dr Jack Davis - Rose red,
blotched white. Originated in USA.
Dr James Brown. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1972, p.128, Reg. No.1217: A 10 year
old chance japonica seedling that first bloomed 1966; originated by Ferol Zerkowsky,
Tammia Nursery, Slidell, Louisiana, USA. Plant growth, upright, dense and rapid with dark
green leaves, 10 cm long x 2 cm wide. The peony form, rose red bloom has yellow anthers
and filaments, to rose form double in solid colour or heavily variegated. It measures 11-12.5
cm across and 8-10 cm deep with 100 petals and 20-30 petaloids. Blooms mid-season. There
is a variegated form.
Dr James Brown Variegated. (C.japonica), Tammia Nursery Catalogue, 1971: A white variegated form
of Dr James Brown, originated by Tammia Nursery, Slidell, Louisiana, USA. See colour
photo, back cover, ACS., 1974, The Camellia Journal, vol.28, No.3.
Dr James W. Frick. (C.reticulata x C.hybrid), American Camellia Yearbook, 1981, p.97, Reg. No.1771:
A very large, clear pink washed silver, C.reticulata hybrid, (William Hertrich x Buddha)
that flowers late; originated by Marjorie O’Malley, Woodside, California, USA. The 10 year
old seedling first bloomed 1973. Average flower size is 17 cm across and 7.5 cm deep with
9-10 petals, golden anthers, white filaments. Plant growth is upright, open and rapid with dark
green leaves,11 cm long x 6.5 cm wide.
Dr Jane Crisp. (C.reticulata. hybr.), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1977, vol.X, No.3, p.15, Reg.
No.128: Originated by Mrs Bettie Durrant, Rotorua, New Zealand from ([C.pitardii var.
yunnanica x C.reticulata ‘Willow Wand’ (Liuye Yinhong)] x C.reticulata ‘Willow Wand’).
The flower form is open peony with 24-26 petals and an occasional large petaloid. The inner
petals are folded and partially joined, giving a very high centre. Colour is silvery pink
(RHS.CC. Red Purple Group 66C) with darker veining and silvery edges. Stamens are in
fascicles with white filaments and golden anthers. Average flower size is 15.5 cm and 8-9 cm
deep. Leaves are mid-green, reticulate with waved edges, fine serration and measure 11 cm x
4.5 cm. Flowers early to late season.
Dr Jane Day. (C.japonica), Cannon, 1974, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.29, No.1. (advert). No
description. Originated in USA. No valid listing located.
Dr Jane Norwood. (C. hybrid), American Camellia Yearbook, 1981, p.97, Reg. No.1696: A medium
size, sweet pea coloured, peony form C.hybrid chance seedling that blooms mid-season to
late; originated by A.R. Parker, Elloree, South Carolina, USA. The 15 year old seedling first
flowered 1965. Average flower size is 9 cm wide by 7 cm deep with about 30 petals, a few
petaloids, light yellow anthers and dark yellow filaments. Plant growth is upright, open and
rapid with dark green leaves, 8 cm long x 3.5 cm wide.
121
Dr Jean-Paul Anthoine.
Anthoine.
Claude Thoby, 1993, Camélias, p.41. Abbreviation for Doctor Jean-Paul
Dr Joe Roberts. (C.japonica), McIlhenny Catalogue, 1949-1950, p.4: Carmine. Medium size peony to
anemone form. Originated by McIlhenny, Avery Island, Louisiana, USA.
Dr John. (C.japonica), Tourje, 1955, Camellia Culture, p.33: Dark red peony form. Vigorous, compact,
upright growth. Early flowering. Originator: David Feathers, Lafayette, California, USA.
Dr John Bell. James Rare Plant Nursery, California, Catalogue, 1954-1955, p.6. Abbreviation for
Dr John D. Bell.
Dr John D. Bell. (C.japonica), NCCS, Bulletin,1950, 4:13, Variegated form of Beau Harp - Dark red,
heavily variegated white. Incomplete double, 10-12.5 cm across. The petals are notched and
crinkled. Petals and large petaloids separate the large tiers of stamens, filaments light yellow,
anthers dark, golden yellow. Leaves medium green, wide-oval, 11 cm x 10 cm. Prominent
venation, coarsely serrate. See black and white photo, Hertrich, 1955, Camellias in the
Huntington Gardens, vol.II, p.93 and colour photo, p.80, 82, Macoboy, 1981, The Colour
Dictionary of Camellias. Synonym: ‘Beau Harp Variegated’. Originated by G.H. Wilkinson,
Pensacola, Florida, USA.
Dr John D. Lawson. (C.reticulata hybrid), American Camellia Yearbook, 1973, p.128, Reg. No.1178: A
6 year hybrid cross, Fluted Orchid x Marjorie Magnificent, that first bloomed 1969;
originated by Dr John D. Lawson, Antioch, Georgia, USA. Plant growth is upright, open and
medium in rate with dark green leaves, 9.5 cm long x 5 cm wide. The semi-double bloom is a
strong purplish pink (Nickerson fan 7.5 RP7/10) with yellow anthers. It measures 12.5 cm
across and 6 cm deep with 9 centre petals and 9 outer petals. It has three or more petaloids
and blooms mid-season. The petals are edged with a white line and are crinkled.
Dr. John H. Urabec. (C.japonica), Reiners, 1962, NCCS., 1962, The Camellia Bulletin, vol.15, No.4,
p.20: “An exhibition item which will attract best-of-show awards. The manner of plant
growth, type of foliage and degree of floriferousness would be rated neither as outstanding or
mediocre. The merit lies in the bloom, which is very large, of an anemone form...the most apt
way to describe the new flower is to say that it is C.M. Wilson on a grand scale, of somewhat
looser construction and a more deep, rich pink.”
Dr John Ragland. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1962, The Camellia Review, vol.23, No.4, p.31: Originated by
R.W. Ragland, Orange, California, USA. A 6 year old seedling of ‘Magnolia Queen’, male
parent unknown. Flower semi-double, 12.5 cm across and 6 cm deep. Colour carmine red
with white stamens. SCCS Reg. No.62-5.
Dr John Vaughn. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1972, p.129, Reg.No.1181: An 18 year
old chance seedling that first flowered 1955; originated by Judge H.C. Petteway, Florida,
USA. Plant growth, upright, spreading and medium in rate with dark green leaves, 12.5 cm
long by 6 cm wide. The formal double bloom is bright rose with 40 petals. It measures 10-12
cm and 5 cm deep and blooms early to mid-season. The blooms are often lighter-coloured in
the centre.
Dr Johnson. (C.japonica), Giles & Son Nursery Catalogue, 1881. No description. Originated in Australia. (Believed extinct.)
Dr Jonas Salk. (C.japonica), American Camellia Quarterly, 1956, 4:14. No description. Originated in
USA.
Dr Judge.
American Camellia Yearbook, 1995, p.4. Abbreviation for Doctor Judge.
Dr Julio Henriques. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue, No.28, 1895-1896,
p.47. Abbreviation for Doutor Julio Henriques.
122
Dr. Karl Horn. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Dec. 2013, p.27 with colour photo; Regn No.
2879; Originated, registered and propagated by Vernon E. Howell, Lucedale, Miss., USA.
ACS, Yearbook, 2013, p.112, with colour photo; A 35 year old seedling, parentage unknown,
first flowered 1983. The medium size, 9cm diameter x 5cm deep flower is a white formal
double with 50 petals. Interior petals pointed. Heavy texture, and flowers fall whole. Plant is
upright and open with average growth rate. Mid-green leaves average 7.5cm x 5cm, with
medium serration. Flowers mid-season.
Dr King. (C.japonica), Camellia Grove Nursery Catalogue, 1944: Light red, large, semi-double. Upright,
bushy growth. Flowers mid-season. Originated in Australia. See black & white photo, p.68,
Hertrich, 1959, Camellias in the Huntington Gardens, vol.III. Orthographic variant: ‘Doctor
King’. Chinese synonym ‘Jin Boshi’.
Dr Knapp.
Thomasville Nursery Catalogue, 1958, p.28. Abbreviation for Dr J.V. Knapp.
Dr Lauti.
Nantes, Services des Espaces, Collection, 1980. Orthographic variant for Docteur
Louti.
Dr Lautil.
Dr Lee.
Treseder’s Nursery Catalogue, 1967. Orthographic error for Docteur Louti.
Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.4. Abbreviation for Doctor Lee.
Dr Lee Variegated.
gated.
Thomasville Nursery Catalogue, 1947. Abbreviation for Doctor Lee Varie-
Dr Lee’s Number 19. (C.japonica), Gerbing Azalea Garden Catalogue Supplement, 1943-1944 as ‘Dr
Lee’s No.19’: This semi-double white with a pink dash is hardy and vigorous. Flowers are
8-10 cm across, showing prominent stamens in the centre. Foliage, light green, large, glossy.
Growth, vigorous, sturdy, upright. Originated by Dr W.G. Lee, USA.
Dr Lee’s Number 43. (C.japonica), Gerbing Azalea Nursery Catalogue Supplement, 1943-1944 as ‘Dr
Lee’s No.43’: This variety, from the garden of Dr W.G. Lee, is a full double, medium pink
flower of about 8 cm across. Flowers mid-season. Foliage is small, deep green, glossy.
Growth upright and sturdy. Originated by Dr W.G. Lee, USA.
Dr Leslie.
Lesley.
Hilsman, 1966, American Camellia Yearbook, p.135. Orthographic error for Dr
Dr Lesley. (C.saluenensis.x C.reticulata), Harrison’s Nursery Catalogue, 1959, p.73; New Zealand
Camellia Bulletin, 1961, Vol.II, No.4, P,38, Reg. No.5: A semi-double, average size, 12.5 cm
across with 25 creped and notched petals; colour HCC.625/3, Phlox Pink, yellow stamens.
First flowered 1957. Vigorous, upright growth. A hybrid between C.saluenensis (seed parent)
x C.reticulata Captain Rawes; originated by Dr Brian Doak, Papatoetoe, New Zealand.
Orthographic error: ‘Dr Leslie’.
Dr Lewis Shelton Jr.. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1974, vol.II, p.232, Reg. No.1303: A
15 year old chance japonica seedling, originated by Dr Lewis Shelton Jr., Jacksonville,
Florida, USA. Plant growth is upright and rapid in rate with dark green leaves, 12.5 cm long x
7 cm wide. The semi-double, ‘Herme’ (Hikarugenji) type, bloom is deep red. Average size,
12.5 cm across x 5.5 cm deep. It has yellow anthers, light yellow filaments, 11-12 petals and
4-6 petaloids. Blooms mid-season.
Dr Lilyan Hanchey. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1976, p.160, Reg. No.1399: A chance
C.japonica seedling that first bloomed 1972; originated by Vi Stone, Baton Rouge, Louisiana,
USA. Plant growth, upright, open and medium in rate with light to medium green leaves.10.5
cm x 3.5 cm. The formal double, Alba Plena type, bloom is very pale pink with 40 petals.
Average size, 8 cm across x 2.5 cm deep. Outer 2-3 rows, flat, outspread petals; all others
imbricated. Blooms mid-season. See colour photo front cover, New Zealand Camellia
Bulletin, 1987, vol.XV, No.3.
123
Dr Louis Polizzi. (C.saluenensis.x C.reticulata), American Camellia Yearbook, 1970, illustration facing
p.52 as ‘Doctor Louis Polizzi’; 1971, p.45, Reg. No.1124: A 12 year old hybrid that first
bloomed 1959; a cross of C.saluenensis and C.reticulata Captain Rawes; originated by Ferol
Zerkowsky, Tammia Nursery, Slidell, Louisiana, USA. Plant growth, upright and rapid in rate
with midgreen leaves, 8 cm long x 2.5 cm wide. The semi-double to peony form flower is
white to blush pink with darker edges and golden anthers with white filaments. The bloom is
10 cm across and 6 cm deep with 35 or more petals. Blooms early to late mid-season.
Orthographic errors: ‘Dr Louis Pollizzi’, ‘Dr Louis Pollizi’. Abbreviation: ‘Polizzi’, ‘Dr
Polizzi’. See colour photo front cover ACS., 1969, The Camellia Journal, vol.24, No.4.
Orthographic variant: ‘Doctor Louis Polizzi’.
Dr Louis Pollizi.
Polizzi.
Nuccio’s Nurseries Catalogue, 1974 1975. Orthographic error for Dr Louis
Dr Louis Pollizzi.
Polizzi.
Nuccio’s Nurseries Catalogue, 1981-1982. Orthographic error for Dr Louis
Dr Loutil.
Treseder Nursery Catalogue, 1964-1965, p.4. Orthographic error for Docteur Louti.
Dr M. Wolfe. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1958, Camellia Nomenclature, p.31: White with many red stripes
and dots. Medium size, semi-double. Originated in USA by Baker.
Dr Macgruder. (C.japonica), Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1964-1965, p.5 as ‘Dr MaGruder’. No
description. SCCS., 1968, Camellia Nomenclature, p.35: Light rose-pink. Large, peony form.
Originated by G.M. Wheeler, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. Sport: Dr Macgruder
Variegated.
Dr Macgruder Variegated. (C.japonica), Cannon, 1968, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.23, No.1,
(advert.): A virus variegated form of Dr Macgruder - Light rosepink, blotched with white.
Originated in USA.
Dr Macleod. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1956, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.40: Red. Large,
semi-double. Originated in California, USA.
Dr Max.
Camellia Hall Catalogue, 1950. Abbreviation for Doctor Max.
Dr McLean. The Pacific Camellia Society, 1946, Camellia Nomenclature, p.4. Abbreviation for
Doctor McLean.
Dr McIntosh.
Dr Merilatt.
SCCS., 1955, The Camellia Review. Abbreviation for Dr W.H. McIntosh.
Fruitland Nursery Catalogue, 1947-1948. Orthographic error for Dr Merrillat.
Dr Merillat. The Pacific Camellia Society 1946, Camellia Nomenclature, p.4. Orthographic error
for Dr Merrillat.
Dr Merrillat. (C.japonica), Valley Garden Supplies Catalogue, 1946-1947: Bright red. Large, semi-double to peony form with petals of crepe-like texture. Vigorous, open growth with medium
sized, dark green foliage. Mid-season blooming. See black and white photo, p.95, Hertrich,
1955, Camellias in the Huntington Gardens, vol.II. Originated by the Star Nursery,
California, USA. Orthographic errors: ‘Dr Merilatt’, ‘Dr Merillat’, ‘Doctor Merilatt’, ‘Dr
Merrillot’.
Dr Merrillot.
SCCS Bulletin, vol.11, No.2, p.17, Dec 1949. Orthographic error for Dr Merrillat.
Dr Moore. (C.japonica), Malbis Nursery Catalogue, ca.1845. No description. Originated in USA.
(Believed extinct.)
Dr Newsom. (C.japonica), Griffiths, 1949, American Camellia Yearbook, p.243: Seed of unknown
parentage planted in 1940 by S.J. Katz, Covington, Louisiana, USA and named for Dr Sedgie
Newsom, Hammond, Louisiana; first bloomed 1945. Mid-season to late bloomer. Deep bright
red, semi-double with prominent stamens and an occasional white splotch on one or more of
124
its petals. Petals long, narrow and undulating; about half the blooms have one petal curved
amongst the stamens. Foliage is dark green, long pointed and twisted, with moderate serration. Moderate growth habits. Orthographic error: ‘Dr Newsome’. Reg. No.59, American
Camellia Yearbook, 1954.
Dr Newsome. SCCS., 1950, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.33. Orthographic error
for Dr Newsom.
Dr Nicky Shuman. (C.japonica), ACS., 1989, The Camellia Journal, vol.44, No.3, p.9, Reg. No.2141: A
large size white, anemone form C.japonica chance seedling that blooms mid-season to late.
Originated by Johnny Aldrich, Brooklet, Georgia, USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 1989,
p.120, 121: The 15 year old seedling first bloomed 1978. Average flower size, 11 cm across x
5.5 cm deep with 19 petals, 101 petaloids, yellow anthers and brown filaments. Plant growth
is spreading and medium with dark green leaves, 10 cm long x 4 cm wide.
Dr O.V. Lewis. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1986, p.89, Reg. No.1996: A large, dark
red, anemone form, C.japonica chance seedling, early to mid-season flowering; originated by
Dr O.V. Lewis, Picayune, Mississippi, USA. The 12 year old seedling first bloomed 1980.
Average flower size 12.5 cm across x 6 cm deep with 10 petals, 20 petaloids, yellow anthers
and red filaments. Plant growth is erect and rapid with dark green leaves, 7.5 cm long x 5 cm
wide.
Dr O.V. Lewis Variegated. Valdosta Camellia Scions, ACS, 1991, The Camellia Journal, vol.48,
No.4, p.32. Abbreviation for Doctor O.V. Lewis Variegated.
Dr. Olin Owen. American Camellia Yearbook, 1991, p.78. Abbreviation for Doctor Olin Owen.
Dr Oldwig Thayer. (C.japonica), McIlhenny Catalogue 1937, p.2: Bright Cherry red. Medium sized
double to rose form double. Stamens sometimes mixed with centre petals. Vigorous, compact
growth. Originated by McIlhenny, Avery Island, Louisiana, USA.
Dr Paul Sanders. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1960, p.195, Reg. No.446: A 9 year old
chance seedling, originated by Mrs Florence Sanders, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. First
flowered 1955. Plant growth upright, dense and rapid in rate, with dark green leaves, 11 cm
long x 5 cm wide. The semi-double, deep pink flower, 11 cm across x 5.5 cm deep, has 18-20
petals and 2-5 petaloids with yellow stamens. Flowers mid-season. Sport: Dr Paul Sanders
Variegated.
Dr Paul Sanders Variegated. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1962, Camellia Nomenclature, p.35 as ‘Dr Paul
Sanders Var.’: Deep pink and white, semi-double form of Dr Paul Sanders. Originated in
USA.
Dr Pedro Dias.
Dias.
José Marques Louriero Catalogue, 1883, No.19. Abbreviation for Doutor Pedro
Dr Percy Jenkins. (C.japonica), C.Aust., Camellia News, Autumn 2006, No.160, p.13, colour photo
p.19, Reg No. 569. Originated by Mrs Mary Elizabeth Jenkins, Ringwood, Vic, Australia. A
chance seedling of C.japonica Dr Tinsley. The semi-double flower of 10 petals is pale pink at
base of petals, shading deeper pink to the outer (RHS.CC. 49D to 69A), 11 cm across x 4 cm
deep. Flowers mid-season to late. on a bushy, upright plant. Leaves dark glossy green, curled,
lanceolate, slightly serrated margins. Stamens tubular. Flowers fall whole.
Dr Polizzi.
SCCS., 1970, The Camellia Review, vol.32, No.2, p.1. Abbreviation for Dr Louis
Polizzi.
Dr Quattlebaum. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1960, p.195, Reg. No.495: A 10 year old
chance seedling that first bloomed 1955; originated by S.D. Coleman Nurseries, Fort Gaines,
Georgia, USA. Leaves dark green, 10 cm x 5 cm. The semi-double flowers are Turkey red or
Oriental red in colour, 12.5 cm across x 5.5 cm deep with 27 petals and regular stamens.
125
Flowers mid-season to late. See colour plate front cover, 1967, New Zealand Camellia
Bulletin, vol.V, No.2. There is also a variegated form.
Dr Quattlebaum Variegated. (C.japonica), Cannon, 1962, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.17, No.1 as
‘Dr Quattlebaum Var.’ (Advert, back cover). A virus variegated form of Dr
Quattlebaum - Turkey red, blotched white. Originated in USA.
Dr R.E. Shwartz. Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1962, p.3. Abbreviation and orthographic
error for Dr Robert E. Schwartz.
Dr R.P. McDonald. (C.reticulata.x C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1982, p.171, Reg.
No.1793: A very large, burgundy red, semi-double to peony form C.reticulata hybrid
(C.reticulata ‘Crimson Robe’ (Dataohong) x [1OX = C.reticulata ‘Cornelian’ (Damanao) x
C.japonica Mrs D.W. Davis]), mid-season to late flowering; originated by Frank Pursel,
Oakland, California, USA. The 8 year old seedling first bloomed 1979. Average flower size,
11.5 cm wide x 5 cm deep.
Dr Ralph Gladen. (C.japonica), Fendig, 1951, American Camellia Catalogue: Large, white with pink
splashes, complete double (formal), 10-11 cm across and less than 2.5 cm deep. Petals
generally in 5 distinct tiers, numerous, averaging about 110 to the flower, the outer ones being
5 cm long. Bud round. The leaves, mid-green, elliptic-oval, 9-11 cm long x 3.8-6 cm wide.
Texture thin, veins recessed, apex blunt, base tapering, serrations shallow. Originated by Mrs
Elizabeth C. Councilman, El Monte, California, USA from seed of unknown parents. First
bloomed 1949.
Dr Ralph Watkins. (C.x williamsii), American Camellia Yearbook, 1978, p.129, Reg. No.1468: A
medium size, phlox pink. peony form C. hybrid; a cross of C.saluenensis (English Form) x
Princess Lavender. Blooms mid-season to late; originated by Dr Clifford Parks, Chapel Hill,
North Carolina, USA. The 14 year old seedling first bloomed late 1960’s. Colour
RHS.CC.625/1-625/2. It has 11 petals, 7 inconspicuous petaloids, yellow anthers and cream
filaments. Average size 8 cm wide x 4 cm deep. Late mid-season flowering. Vigorous plant;
cold resistant.
Dr Reeves Wells. (C.reticulata.x C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1983, p.157, Reg. No.1902:
A large, dark red, semi-double C.reticulata hybrid (Womack 13 x [5X = C.reticulata
‘Cornelian’ (Damanao) x C.japonica Mrs D.W. Davis]); originated by Frank Pursel,
Oakland, California, USA. The 10 year old seedling first bloomed 1980. Average flower size
is 12.5 cm across x 6 cm deep. Plant growth is upright and rapid in rate with dark green,
heavily serrated leaves, 11.5 cm long x 6 cm wide.
Dr Robert E. Schwartz. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1958, Camellia Nomenclature, p.31, 86: A sport of
Vedrine Watermelon pink with waxy petals. Medium to large size. Originated by M.
Baldwin, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, USA. Abbreviation: ‘Dr Schwartz’.
Dr Robert Holmes. (C.japonica), Cannon, 1974, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.29, No.1. No
description. Originated in USA. No valid listing located.
Dr Robert K. Cutter. (C.hybrid), American Camellia Yearbook, 1983, p.157, Reg. No.1906: A large,
red, veined Turkey red, anemone form, C.hybrid (D4(2) = [C.japonica Mrs Bertha A.
Harms x C.saluenensis Apple Blossom] x Temple Incense), mid-season blooming to late;
originated by Dr Robert K. Cutter, Berkeley, California, USA. The 10 year old seedling first
bloomed 1980. Average flower size, 11.5 cm across x 6 cm deep with 12 petals, 55 petaloids,
golden anthers and filaments that are reddish at the base. Has a spicy fragrance becoming
sweet with increasing temperature. Plant growth is upright and medium in rate with light
green leaves, 10 cm long x 5 cm wide. Chinese synonym: ‘Luobote Kate Boshi’.
Dr Robert Pigford. SCCS., 1968, Camellia Nomenclature, p.46. Abbreviation for Doctor Robert
Pigford.
126
Dr Salk. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1957, p.300, Reg. No.307: An 8 year old seedling
of Mon Louis Pink, originated by E.B. Mann, Pascagoula, Mississippi, USA. that first
flowered 1953. Plant growth is upright, dense and rapid in rate. The leaves average 9.5 cm
long x 6.5 cm wide. The flowers are a deep, clear pink, shading to light lavender on outer
margin and range from incomplete double to full peony with 35-55 petals. Flowers average
over 12.5 cm across x 6 cm deep. Flowers early to mid-season. Sport: Dr Salk Variegated.
Dr Salk Variegated. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1960, Camellia Nomenclature, p.46 as ‘Dr Salk Var.’: A virus
variegated form of Dr Salk - Deep, clear pink, blotched white. Originated in USA.
Dr. Schwartz. Cannon, 1957, Camellian, vol.VIII, No.3, p.27. Abbreviation for Dr Robert E.
Schwartz.
Dr Schwartz Variegated. (C.japonica), Cannon, 1962, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.17, No.1, back
cover: A virus variegated form of Dr Robert E. Schwartz - Silvery red, blotched white.
Originated in USA.
Dr Shephard. The Pacific Camellia Society, 1946, Camellia Nomenclature, p.11. Orthographic
error for ‘Dr Shepherd’, synonym for Grand Sultan as ‘Te Deum’.
Dr Shephard Red.
The Pacific Camellia Society, 1946, Camellia Nomenclature, p.11.
Orthographic error for ‘Dr Shepherd Red’, synonym for Grand Sultan as ‘Te Deum’.
Dr Shepherd. Magnolia Gardens and Nursery Catalogue, 1942-1943. Synonym for Grand Sultan
as ‘Te Deum’.
Dr Shepherd Red. Valley Garden Supplies Catalogue, 1946-1947. Synonym for Grand Sultan as
‘Te Deum’.
Dr Shepherd Variegated. Valley Garden Supplies Catalogue, 1946-1947 as ‘Dr Shepherd Var.’.
Synonym for ‘Te Deum Variegated’ a virus variegated form of Grand Sultan.
Dr Sheppard.
Gerbing, G.G., 1945, Camellias, p.90. Orthographic error for ‘Dr Shepherd’;
synonym for Grand Sultan as ‘Te Deum’,
Dr Stafford. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1978, p.129, Reg. No.1487: A large, vivid
pink, semi-double chance seedling C.japonica, that blooms mid-season to late; originated by
Mrs M.J. Hair, Lecompte, Louisiana, USA. The Frizzle White type, 9 year old seedling, first
bloomed 1976. It has 12 petals, 4 or more petaloids, yellow anthers, white filaments. Average
size, 12.5 cm across x 4.5 cm deep. Plant growth is upright and medium in rate with dark
green leaves, 11 cm long x 5 cm wide.
Dr T.E. Pierson. (C.reticulata), ACRS, 1982, Camellia News, No.83, p.22, Reg. No.289: Originated by
T.E. Pierson, Hurstville, N.S.W., Australia. A chance seedling from C.reticulata Samantha
that first flowered 1980. A loosely imbricated, formal double, deep rich pink flower, 14 cm
across x 5 cm deep, blooming mid-season to late. An open, upright plant with 9.5 cm x 5 cm,
mid-green leaves with acuminate apex. Orthographic error: ‘Dr T.R. Pierson’.
Dr T.R. Pierson. Cannon, 1986, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.41, No.4, p.27. Orthographic
error for Dr T.E. Pierson.
Dr Theodor Bellman. (C.japonica), ACRS., 1981, Camellia News, No.79, p.28, colour photo, p.5, Reg.
No.270: Originated by T.J. Savige, Wirlinga, N.S.W., Australia. A chance seedling from
‘Yobeki-dori’, that first flowered 1977. Plant is open, spreading, inclined to weep with mid
green leaves, 9 cm x 3.5 cm, narrow-elliptic, cuspidate; base acute, margins finely serrate.
The 10-11 cm, hose-in-hose, semi-double flowers have 16-18 petals, pointed of palest pink
and slender stamen column. Blooms mid-season to late.
Dr Tinsley. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1949, p.244: The variety Dr Tinsley, ‘Tinsley
71’, ‘Tinsley 7-11’, was purchased as a small plant from Heyman’s Nursery, Lafayette,
127
Lousiana, USA in 1940. It is thought to have come from McIlhenny’s Jungle Gardens. It first
bloomed 1944. Heyman’s Nursery obtained the propagating right and sold it as Dr Tinsley.
The variety blooms freely in mid-season. This incomplete double variety has a white ground
colour with a pink blush, becoming progressively deeper towards the petal edges. Stamens
have white filaments and yellow anthers. Plant growth is upright and compact. Colour plates
in Garden Plants in Colour sec.59:4, 1957, Skinner, ed. on p.81 and Macoboy, 1981, The
Colour Dictionary of Camellias, p.81; Front cover, ACS, 1973, The Camellia Journal, vol.28,
No.2. It is Reg. No.39, American Camellia Yearbook, 1954. Synonyms: ‘Tinsley’, ‘Tinsley
71’, ‘Tinsley 7-11’. Orthographic variant: ‘Doctor Tinsley’. Chinese synonym: ‘Tingsili
Boshi’. Sport: Dr Tinsley Supreme.
Dr Tinsley Supreme. (C.japonica), Gerbing Azalea Gardens Catalogue, 1962: A sport of Dr Tinsley
with double the number of rows of petals. Originated by G.G. Gerbing, Florida, USA.
Dr W.G. Lee.
Lee.
Gerbing Azalea Gardens Catalogue, 1941-1942. Orthographic variant for Doctor
Dr W.G. Lee Variegated. Wine, 1956, American Camellia Yearbook, p.42 as ‘Dr W.G. Lee Var.’.
Orthographic variant for Doctor Lee Variegated.
Dr W.H. Mclntosh. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1955, p.336, Reg. No.217: A 7 year old
seedling of White Empress; originated by Charles L. Chiles, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, USA
that first flowered 1950. Plant growth is open, pendulous and rapid in rate. Flowers are 10-11
cm across, semi-double, similar to ‘Donckelaeri’ (Masayoshi) with 17 petals. The colour is
rose red with a purplish tinge on the margins. Flowers early. Sport: Dr W.H. Mclntosh
Variegated.
Dr W.H. Mclntosh Variegated. (C.japonica), Mark S. Cannon Scion Catalogue, 1963-1964, p.4 as ‘Dr
W.M. McIntosh Var.’: A virus variegated form of Dr W.H. McIntosh - Rose red blotched
white. Originated in USA.
Dr W.L. Barton. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1977, p.210, Reg. No.1439: A large, light
pink, semi-double chance seedling of C.japonica Lindsay Neill; originated by R.E. Dodd,
Marshallville, Georgia, USA. The semi-double, (from loose semi-double with creped petals to
compact semi-double with incurved petals and stamen centre) type bloom is light pink with
yellow anthers and filaments. Average diameter, 11 cm and 6-7 cm deep. Late blooming.
Plant growth is upright and rapid in rate with dark green leaves, 10cm long x 5 cm wide.
Synonym: ‘Dr William Barton’.
Dr Walker Wells. (C.x williamsii), Hilsman, 1966, American Camellia Yearbook, p.122. Synonym:
‘W.M.W.’. No description. Originated in USA. No valid listing located.
Dr Welch. (C.japonica), Cannon, 1957, Camellian, vol.VIII, No.3, p.27, Large, dark red, full peony
form, about 12.5 cm across. Originated in USA.
Dr Wilds.
Fruitland Nursery Catalogue,1944-1945, 27. Abbreviation for Doctor Wilds.
Dr William Barton. Dodd, 1968, Adventure in Camellia Seedlings, p.10, colour photo. This variety
was renamed Dr W.L. Barton when registered in 1977.
Dr William Beasley. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1965, p.231, Reg. No.787: A 12 year
old chance seedling that first bloomed 1957; originated by Mrs W.J. Beasley, Hartsville,
South Carolina, USA. Plant growth is upright, open and medium in rate with light green
leaves, 11.5 cm long x 5.2 cm wide. The rose form double flowers, similar to ‘Purity’,
(Shiragiku) are 10 cm across x 4cm deep, with 9 layers containing 66 petals and 8 petaloids.
Colour is white with white filaments and yellow anthers. Blooms mid-season.
Dr William Beckman. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1969, p.160, Reg. No.1047: A 10
year old chance seedling that first bloomed 1961; originated by H.W. Johnson, Mt. Pleasant,
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Georgia, USA. Plant growth is upright, dense and rapid in rate with dark green leaves, 12.5
cm long x 3.5 cm wide. The semi-double flower is 12.5 cm across x 5 cm deep with 14 petals.
Rose red with darker veins, yellow anthers and white filaments. Blooms early to mid-season.
Dr William D. Battle. (C.hybrid), American Camellia Yearbook, 1984, p.176, Reg. No.1949: A large to
very large, soft pastel spinel pink, C.reticulata hybrid (C.reticulata Buddha x C.fraterna)
blooms early to late; originated by Barbara Butler, Modesto, California, USA. The 14 year old
seedling first flowered 1980. Average flower size, 12.5 cm across x 6 cm deep with 11 petals,
golden anthers and white filaments. Leaves, light green, 11.5 cm long x 3.5 cm wide.
Dr Wray. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1949, p.174. No description. Originated by Robert
Carr, Philadelphia, USA about 1832. (Believed extinct.)
Dr Zhivago. (C.hybrid), American Camellia Yearbook, 1980, p.163, Reg. No.1620: A large, orchid pink
with pink overtones, loose peony form C.hybrid chance seedling of William’s Lavender;
midseason blooming to late; originated by Thomas Sellers, Bolivia, North Carolina, USA that
first bloomed 1965. Average flower size 10 cm across x 6 cm deep with 36 petals, yellow
anthers and cream filaments. Plant growth is upright, open and medium in rate with light
green leaves, 6 cm long x 4 cm wide.
Draffera. Camellias, Y.C. Shen, 2009, p.56 with colour photo; Leaves yellow bordered and thick,
slightly folded, size and appearance similar to kumqaut plant. Single white flower, 5 cm
diameter. Vigorous but low growing. Originated by Nuccio's Nurseries, Altadena, California,
USA.
Dragée. (C.japonica), Pépinières Thoby, Carquefou, France, Plant List, 2003, p.17. Pink, imbricated.
Dragon Eye. (C,japonica), SCCS., 1972, Camellia Nomenclature, p.49: Dark red. Miniature anemone
form. Slow growth. Blooms mid-season. Originated by Dr L.E. Chow, Bakersfield,
California, USA.
Dragon Fireball. ACS, Yearbook 2011, p.7; colour photos front cover and pp.7 & 8. Also photo
p.16 as ‘Longhuozhu Dragon Fireball’. Western translation for the Chinese registration No.39
Longhuozhu.
Dragon Lady. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1952, The Camellia Review; Fendig, 1953, American Camellia
Catalogue: Large, pink-variegated, incomplete double, 10-11 cm across x 5-6 cm deep. The
colour is bright pink with variegated pink and white petaloids and 12 petals. The stamens
intermixed with the petaloids, consist of light yellow filaments and dark, golden yellow
anthers, Buds are crinkly and slow to open. Leaves, medium, dull green, oval, 10 cm long x
3.8 cm wide with acute apex and very fine serrations. Habit is bushy, spreading and informal,
similar to Elegans. Originated by Elizabeth C. Councilman, El Monte, California USA from
seed of unknown parents. First bloomed 1949. Reg. No.138, American Camellia Yearbook,
1954.
Dragon’s Treasures.
Camellias, Y.C. Shen, 2009, p.165 with colour photo; Synonym for Ryûhô.
Drama Girl. (C.japonica), SCCS Bulletin, vol.11, No.6, p.4, June 1950. SCCS., 1951, The Camellia. Its
Culture and Nomenclature: Deep salmon rosepink. Very large, semi-double. Vigorous, open,
pendulous growth. American Camellia Yearbook, 1959, p.271, Reg. No.430: A 14 year old
seedling of Latifolia Variegated, originated by Mrs Anne Galli, California, USA. The dark
green leaves average 16 cm long x 8 cm wide. The flowers range from 13-18 cm across and 8
cm deep. They have yellow stamens and 20-30 petals of heavy texture. Flowers mid-season.
The American Camellia Yearbook, 1983 has a colour photo facing p.47. It is also illustrated in
Macoboy, 1981, The Colour Dictionary of Camellias, p.81; Sharp’s 1957 Camellias
Illustrated, p.95.This cultivar received the 1978 “National Hall of Fame Award” and the
RHS, FCC, 1969. Chinese synonym: ‘Wutai Nülang’. Sports: Drama Girl Dream, Drama
Girl Variegated, Estella d’Ancona.
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Drama Girl Dream. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1966, Camellia Nomenclature, p.45. Sport of Drama Girl
with petaloid centre. Originated in USA.
Drama Girl Peony.
d’Ancona.
Levi, 1967 American Camellia Yearbook, p.41. Synonym for Estella
Drama Girl Tison. (C.japonica), ACS, The Camellia Journal, Mar. 2009, p.29, Regn No. 2643.
Originated by Dr. Frank A. Wilson III, Leslie, Ga., USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 2008,
p.111 with colour photo; A sport of Drama Girl, first noted in 1999, and has remained stable
for 4 years on propagations. Flower is similar, but has white edging to the petals. Flowers
average 15 cm diameter x 3.8 cm deep with 16 petals and no petaloids. Dark green leaves 7.5
cm x 3.8 cm. Vigorous, upright, open growth.
Drama Girl Variegata. Fairlight Camellia Nursery Catalogue, 1986. Orthographic error for Drama
Girl Variegated.
Drama Girl Variegated. (C.japonica), Cannon, 1957, Camellian, vol.VIII, No.3, p.27: A virus
variegated form of Drama Girl - Deep, salmon rosepink, blotched white. Originated by Mark
S. Cannon, Dothan, Alabama, USA. Orthographic error: ‘Drama Girl Variegata’. Colour plate
No.45, p.34, Encyclopedia of Camellias in Colour, Vol.II, 1978. Chinese synonym ‘Hua
Wutai Nülang’.
Drayton F. Hastie. Wilmot, 1943, Camellia Variety Classification Report, p.10. Abbreviation for
Drayton Franklin Hastie.
Drayton Franklin Hastie. (C.japonica), Miller, 1908, Country Life in America, with photo, p.498: Light
coloured single with erect stamens and slightly reflexed petals. Originated at Magnolia Gardens, Charleston, South Carolina, USA.
Dream.
Camellias, Y.C. Shen, 2009, p.333 with colour photo; Synonym for Yume.
Dream Awhile. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1960, Camellia Nomenclature, p.47: Light Lavender pink. Medium
to large semi-double with upright petals. Medium, bushy growth. Mid-season flowering.
Originated by Harvey Short, Ramona, California, USA.
Dream Baby. (C.hybrid), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1986, vol.XIV, No.8, p.14, Reg. No.245: A
miniature hybrid originated by O. Blumhardt, Whangarei, New Zealand from a cross of
Dream Girl x (Unnamed ‘Buddha’ x C.fraterna). The seedling is 8 years old and first
flowered 1982. It has dark green leaves, 6 cm x 2 cm, on a plant of average habit and growth.
The flowers are semi-double, 6 cm across x 2 cm deep, bright pink with 12-14 petals and
some central stamens. RHS.CC. Red Purple Group 63B. Flowers mid-season. Synonym:
‘Little Dreamer’.
Dream Boat. (C.x williamsii), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1976, Vol.IX, No.6, P.27, Reg. No.123: A
seedling of C.saluenensis x C.japonica K. Sawada; originated by F.M. Jury, Waitara, New
Zealand. The plant habit is open, upright with dark green leaves, 7.5 cm long x 3.5 cm wide.
Formal double flower with up to 50 petals, each with a distinctly incurved margin. Colour is
bright pink with a lavender cast. Flower size 11 cm across x 4 cm deep. Flowers mid-season.
Colour photo, front cover, New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1979, vol.XI, No.2. Chinese
synonym: ‘Mengchuan’.
Dream Castle. (C.reticulata.x C.japonica), Nuccio’s Nurseries Catalogue, 1972. American Camellia
Yearbook, 1973, Colour plate facing p.84 - A cross of C.reticulata ‘Crimson Robe’
(Dataohong) x C.japonica Coronation. Silver pink. Very large, semi-double with fluted,
upright petals. Vigorous, upright growth. Originated by Nuccio’s Nurseries, Altadena,
California, USA. Colour plate, front cover SCCS., 1972, The Camellia Review, vol.34, No.2.
Chinese synonym: ‘Gucheng Baomeng’, later changed to ‘Mengcheng’.
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Dream Girl. (C.sasanqua.x C.reticulata), Merino, 1966, American Camellia Yearbook, p.62: “Another
interesting hybrid (C.sasanqua Narumigata x C.reticulata Buddha) that has a flower like
Buddha, a very large semi-double with wavy, upright, irregular petals, approximately 15 cm
across and 10 cm deep with light pink colouring. Blooms early. Foliage similar to Buddha.”
Orthographic variant ‘Dreamgirl’. Originated by Howard Asper, Escondido, California, USA.
Dream Light.
Camellias, Y.C. Shen, 2009, p.187 with colour photo; Synonym for Yume-akari.
Dream Spinner. (C.japonica), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1989, vol.XVI, No.1, p.26, Reg. No.261:
Originated by Mrs K.M. Campbell, Wanganui, NZ. The seedling is 12 years old and first
flowered in 1980. The plant is slow growing with a dense, upright habit. The leaves are dark
green, 8.5 cm long x 5 cm wide. The sweet pea coloured flowers are single with 7 petals and
some stamens with white filaments and yellow anthers. The petal edges have fine fimbriation
and the colour shades from pale pink centre to deep pink outer edge. Blooms mid-season to
late. Flowers measure 9.5-10 cm acros x 4.5 cm deep Colour is from RHS.CC.62D- 62A.
Dream Time. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1976, Camellia Nomenclature, p.51: Blush pink shaded light orchid.
Large semi-double. Medium, upright growth. Mid-season blooming. Originated by Mark Cannon, Alabama, USA.
Dreamgirl. Mount Congreve Wholesale Nursery Catalogue, 1989-1990, p.4. Orthographic variant
for Dream Girl.
Dreamland. (C.sasanqua), Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.252: Pink blotched white. Originated in USA.
Dreamlover. (C.sasanqua). C. Aust, Camellia News, No.182, Autumn 2010, p.8 with colour photo; Regn
No.606-N.; A seedling of Jane Morgan. Semi-double, about 10 cm diameter. White centre
with a deep lavender pink edge. Leaves 7 cm x 4 cm. Fast, upright growth. Originated by
Roger Nancarrow, Orange, NSW, Australia, and released by Camellia Grove Nursery in 2005.
Dreamy. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1980, p.163, Reg. No.1630: A large, red variegated
white, semi-double to rose form double C.japonica chance seedling, mid-season blooming;
originated by Ted Alfter, Bakersfield, California, USA. The 5 year old seedling first bloomed
1979. Average flower size 12.5 cm across x 7.5 cm deep with 20-30 petals, yellow anthers,
white filaments. Flower colour from full red to nearly full white. Plant growth, upright,
spreading and medium in rate with dark green leaves, 11 cm long x 5 cm wide. Synonym:
‘Dreamy Variegated’.
Dreamy Variegated. Gentry, 1984, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.39, No.4, p.17 as ‘Dreamy
V.’. Synonym for Dreamy.
Dress Circle. (C.japonica), Camellia Lodge Nursery Catalogue, 1981: Pink, formal double, medium size,
upright growth. Blooms early to mid-season. Originated by David Feathers, Lafayette,
California.
Dress Parade. (C.japonica), SCCS, Camellia Nomenclature, p.51: Red. Medium size, semi-double to
loose peony form. Medium, spreading growth. Mid-season blooming. Originated in USA by
Novick.
Dresden China. (C.x williamsii), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1980, vol.XI, No.5, p.18, Reg. No.154:
A hybrid seedling C.saluenensis x C.japonica Joshua E. Youtz originated by Felix Jury,
Waitara, New Zealand. The plant has a slow growth rate with an upright, spreading habit, and
flowers mid-season to late. The leaves are dark green, 8 cm long x 4 cm wide. The flower is
pale pink, peony form with about 30 petals and measures 11 cm across x 6 cm deep.
Driade.
Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II. Orthographic error for Dryade.
Dride. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1847-1848, p.56, No description. Verschaffelt, 1849, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book I, pl.I: Received from Italy in 1847...it belongs to the class of
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camellias with regular imbricated and striated blooms, It differs from Verschaffeltiana by its
oval-oblong leaves, which are smaller and more sharply serrated; by its blossoms of paler
pink, and composed of pointed, not rounded petals as is the latter.
Drifting Scent. (C.x williamsii). New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1994, Issue No. 118, vol.XVIII, No.5,
p.31, Reg. No.343: Originated by J.R. Finlay, Whangarei New Zealand. A seedling of Mrs
Bertha A. Harms x (Salab seedling x Lookaway). A fragrant pink peony, (RHS.CC.52A-C).
A firm textured flower of 26 petals and 24 petaloids, 11 cm across x 5 cm deep with yellow
anthers on light cream filaments. Flowers mid-season to late.
Driftwood.
SCCS., 1956, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.49: Synonym for
Margaret McCown.
Dristalie. (C.japonica), Seidel, 1870, Pflanzen Catalog, p.7: Rose pink with white veining. Originated in
Germany.
Dronard Gouillon. Del Lungo & Girardi, 1928, Le Camelie, p.91. Orthographic error for Drouard
Gouillon.
Droopy. (C.japonica), Good, 1955, American Camellia Yearbook, p.277. No description. Originated in
USA.
Drouard.
Loddige’s Catalogue, 1849, p.34. Abbreviation for Drouard Gouillon.
Drouard Gouillon. (C.japonica), Cachet Catalogue, 1840-1841, p.1. White. Berlèse, 1840,
Monographie, ed.2, p.78, 225: Shrub vigorous, of a good form and leaves; bud fairly large, a
little elongated; flower about 9.5 cm across, full, white, of the form of ‘Welbancksiana’ (Welbankiana). Originated in France, from seed by Drouard Gouillon and released in 1839.
Orthographic errors: ‘Drouard Guillon’, ‘Dronard Gouillon’, ‘Grovard Govillon’, ‘Drouard’.
Drouard Guillon.
Drouetii.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1841, 7:6. Orthographic error for Drouard Gouillon.
van Houtte Catalogue,1851, 44:27. Synonym for Cockii.
Drovard Govillon.
Isola Madre Catalogue, 1845. Orthographic error for Drouard Gouillon.
Drumlea. (C.japonica), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1962, vol.III, No.1, p.38, Reg. No.16: A chance
seedling of C.japonica The Czar; originated by Mrs W.M. McFarlane, New Zealand. Habit
upright and vigorous. The flower is a semi-double with 14 petals, colour HCC Crimson 22/ 1.
Drummondii. (C.japonica), Jacob Makoy Nursery Catalogue, 1838. No description. van Houtte Catalogue, 1839, 1:3 and Annonymous, 1839, Revue Horticole, p.205-207 as ‘Drummundi’: A
clear, red rose form, well imbricated. Berlèse, 1840, Monographie ed.2, p.117-118, 231 as
‘Drummundii’: Leaves 6 cm wide x 10 cm long, deformed, some long, others rounded,
venation prominent, shell-like, apex recurved, large serrations, dull green; flower about 8 cm
across, double, clear, cherry red with touches of rose-pink; exterior petals in 2-3 rows, broad,
rounded, entire, forming a saucer, well imbricated, of a charming rose red; those of the
interior, numerous, in groups, erect, serried, with occasional petaloid stamens. Orthographic
errors: ‘Drummundi’, ‘Drumundii’, ‘Drummondi’. Originated in England.
Drummundi. Jacob Makoy Catalogue, 1839, p.16. van Houtte Catalogue, 1839, 1:3. Orthographic
error for Drummondii.
Drummond’s Double White Sasanqua.
for C.oleifera.
Drumundii.
Lindley, 1827, Botanical Register, Folio 1091. Synonym
Trillon, Le Mans Nursery Catalogue, 1843, p.5. Orthographic error for Drummondii.
Drunken Lady Yang.
Waterhouse, 1970, ACRS., Camellia News. Synonym for Zuiyangfei.
Drupacea. Lemaire, 1864, L’Illustration Horticole. Orthographic variant for C.drupifera, synonym
for C.oleifera.
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Drupifera. Loureiro, 1890 as Camellia drupifera but considered the same as C.oleifera by Sealy.
In his Revision of the Genus Camellia, 1958, p.212, he advises abandoning the use of the
name and regarding it as a nomen confusum.
Dryada.
Seidel, 1879, Pflanzen Catalog, p.7. Orthographic error for Dryade.
Dryade. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1842, 9:51: Admirable rose pink, well imbricated. Rose
pink shading to lighter pink at the centre, veined a deeper pink, small formal double.
Compact, upright growth. Mid-season flowering. Orthographic variants and errors: ‘Dryde’,
‘Driade’. Synonyms: ‘Dansi’, ‘Danci’, ‘Iride Variegata’, ‘Iride’, ‘D’Iride’, ‘Dryada’.
‘Dryade’ and ‘Iride’ are two names probably erroneously alternatively applied to two
different cultivars. The first is French and the second Italian for the English “Dryad”.
Originated in Italy by Negri.
Dryade Variegated. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1964, Camellia Nomenclature, p.43: A virus variegated form
of Dryade - Rose-pink blotched white. Originated in USA.
Dryde.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1864-1865, 104:80. Orthographic error for Dryade.
Dryden Variegated. Rogers, 1974, ACS., The Camellia Journal, vol.29, No.3 as ‘Dryden Var.’. The
virus variegated form of Elsie Dryden.
Drys-daeli.
Burnier Catalogue, 1855-1856. Orthographic error for Drysdalei.
Drysdale. Florist, Fruitist and Garden Misc. 1859. Orthographic variant for Drysdalei.
Drysdalei. (C.japonica), Harrison ed., 1850, Floricultural Cabinet, p.148 as ‘Drysdalii’. No description.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1854-1856, 53:40: Striped like a carnation. Deep rose, striped cerise
and large bands of white, well imbricated; petals well rounded. Originated by Drysdale & Co.
Glascow, Scotland. Orthographic errors: ‘Drysdale’, ‘Drysdalii’, ‘Drysdaleii’, ‘Drys-daeli’.
Synonym: ‘Drysdale’s Camellia’. The Gardener’s Magazine of Botany, 1850, p.145: This is a
beautiful and finely formed, striped camellia, raised several years ago by Drysdale & Co.
Nurserymen of Glascoe. Drysdale’s Camellia; A rose red and white, striped full double, finely
formed rose striped Camellia. Note: The coloured illustration opposite shows a formal double
with rounded petals, rose red with a white stripe down the centre of each petal- the centre
petals, however, being white with rose-red streaks.
Drysdaleii.
Drysdalii.
Giles & Son Nursery Catalogue, 1881. Orthographic error for Drysdalei.
Floricultural Cabinet, 1850, p.148. Orthographic variant for Drysdalei.
Du Puy. (C.japonica), Huttleston, 1957. List of Camellias at Longwood. No description. The Longwood
Collection dates from 1918 and is mostly from France. Orthographic variant; ‘Dupuy’.
Duarte de Oliveira. (C.japonica), Jean Verschaffelt Catalogue No.16, 1871-1872, p.65: Very large
flowers of the most beautiful cherry red. A regular form similar to Rosa Centifolia with
perfect imbrication, without a sign of irregularity. Good habit. Beautiful foliage, free
flowering. Camillo Aureliano, 1871, Jornal de Horticultura Pratica 2:2, pl.: Vivid scarlet,
uniform colour, large rose form double, outer petals big, notched, cordiform, central petals
smallerand oval, closing in a bud, all veined carmine and with a perfect imbrication.. A sport
of Bonomiana. Can sport to Dona Jane Andresen. Originated in Portugal. Orthographic
error: ‘Quarte d’Olivera’. Note: The photos, International Camellia Register, vol.I, 1993,
p.xiv, and Ferreira & Celina, 2000, O Mundo da Camélia, p.80 are incorrect.
Dubia. Sealy, 1956, American Camellia Yearbook, p.45. A new species nominated by Sealy as
Camellia dubia Sealy, sp.nov. in A Revision of the Genus Camellia, 1958.
Dubia Belardi. (C.japonica), Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Guardino a Villa Quiete, p.10. No
description. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
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Dubia Flore Plena Rubra. (C.japonica), Ridolfi, 1843, Catalogue of Camellias Cultivated at Bibbiani:
Red formal double. Ridolfi, Florence Catalogue, 1848, p.7 as ‘Dubia Fl. Pl. Rubr.’. No
description. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Dubiana. (C.japonica), Giacomelli Catalogue, 1847. No decription. Originated in Italy. (Believed
extinct.)
Dublin. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt Catalogue, No.50, 1844, p.19. No description. (Believed extinct.)
Dubois-Violette. (C.hybrid). Pépinières Thoby, Carquefou, France, Plant List, 2003, p.17. Pink, single to
semi-double.
Dubonnet. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1950, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.33: Dark wine red
with darker veins. Medium semi-double to peony form. Vigorous, upright growth. Mid-season flowering. Originated in USA by Malbis. Sport: Dubonnet Variegated.
Dubonnet Variegated. (C.japonica), SCCS, 1960, Camellia Nomenclature, p.47 as ‘Dubonnet Var.’:
Variegated form of Dubonnet - Dark wine red and white. Originated in the USA.
Duc d’Aumale. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt, 1851, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book XI, pl.I: Obtained from
seed recently in Belgium. The blossoms are of medium size, of rich, cherry red colour; The
petals are rounded, outspread, convex, imbricated with extreme regularity, longitudinally
veined a deeper shade, the emargination at the apex is edged with white; at the centre the
petals are lanceolate, intersected with a white stripe. Orthographic variant: ‘Duc de Aumale’.
Duc d’Orleans. (C.japonica), Jacob Makoy et Cie Catalogue, 1839, p.16. No description. van Houtte
Catalogue, 1839, 1:3 as Tamponets. No description. Berlèse 1840, Monographie, ed.2, p.155156, 231: Leaves diverse, mature specimens 5.5 cm wide x 10 cm long, round-oval, a little
acuminate, thick, reflexed, apex recurved, prominent venation, of a normal green; buds large,
obtuse, solid with scales of yellowish green; the flower is about 10 cm across, full, deep,
cherry red carmine, corolla irregularly round; the centre convex, composed of a numerous
quantity of petals, equal in length, varying in size, some spoon shaped, the others ovoid, close
set, twisted, rumpled, uniting in a compact, uniform mass, entire and imbricated, and forming
a central sphere of 4-5 distinct groups, but united and equal: the form of ‘Colvilli’. Rollisson
& Son, 1875-1876, Plant Catalogue, p.101: Delicate pink striped with carmine. Paeoniflora
shape. This is erroneous and would be the start of the confusion with the Duchesse
d’Orleans. Originated from seed by M Tamponet, France, 1838. The name has invalidly been
used as a synonym for the Duchesse d’Orleans, and later, in America, it was confused with
the variety Marguerite Gouillon. Orthographic variant: ‘Duca d’Orleans’.
Duc d’Orleans. Thomasville Nursery Catalogue, 1935, p.7, erroneously for Marguerite Gouillon.
This incorrect listing was used by most American nursermen for the next 25 years.
Duc d’Orleans Pink.
‘Stardust’.
McIlhenny Catalogue 1937, p.2 as ‘Duc de Orleans Pink’. Synonym for
Duc d’Orleans Shell Pink. Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2 as ‘Duc de Orleans Shell
Pink’. Synonym for ‘Stardust’.
Duc d’Ursel. (C.japonica), Berlèse, 1845, Monographie, ed.3, p.253: Flowers full, peony form; exterior
petals in 2-3 rows, while the central ones are grouped together in a large sphere. Colour
orange red. Originated by van der Maelen, Brussels, Belgium about 1837. Mertens &
Fontaine, Collection de cent espèces.....camellia, 1845, pl.10.
Duc d’Urset.
International Camellia Journal, 1992. p.46. Orthographic error for Duc d’Ursel.
Duc d’York. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1847-1848, p.56. No description. Originated in Belgium. (Believed extinct.)
134
Duc de Aumale. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue No.29, 1895-1896,
p.47. Orthographic variant for Duc d’Aumale.
Duc de Bedford. (C.japonica), Burdin Maggiore & Co., 1849-1850, Catalogue General. No description.
Longone, Angelo, Catalogue, 1861, p.77: Pink and red. Origin unknown.
Duc de Berry. Le Texnier, 1911, Le camellia, essais sur l’histoire..., .p.37. Orthographic error for
Duchesse de Berry.
Duc
de
Bordeaux. (C.japonica), Alex Verschaffelt, 1849-1850, Catalogue, p.45. No
description.Verschaffelt, 1850, Nouvelle Iconograhie, Book V, pl.II: The petals of this variety
are large, well rounded, spread out, imbricated, slightly emarginate, of a pink colour. At the
centre they are small, oval, pointed and close set but still spread out. It was obtained as a
seedling in France.
Duc de Boutourlin.
Bouturlin.
Louis Leroy, 1868, Catalogue, p.123. Orthographic error for Conte
Duc de Brabant. (C.japonica), Oudin, Lisieux Nursery Catalogue, 1844, p.10: Beautiful form. Pure
white striped with carmine. This camellia from Belgium seems similar to Parini from
Mariani. van Houtte Catalogue, 1844-1845, 18:11: Imbricated.White streaked carmine. van
Houtte Catalogue, 1846-1847, 27:23: Of the form of the Duchesse d’Orleans but a pure
white, but larger and presented better with the petals entirely developed. Berlèse, 1844,
Annales Société de Horticulture de Paris, 34(197):205: The flower is 9-10 cm across, of a
milky white with stripes of vivid carmine red, sometimes regularly imbricated, almost at the
same time peony form. The outside 3 or 4 rows of petals are large, rounded and veined with
marks and lines and further splashes of red. The centre is composed of a group of numerous
petals of many shapes. The corolla is similar to Picturata; sometimes the flower is regular
and generally resembles the Duchesse d’Orleans. Mertens & Fontaine, Collection de cent
espèces.....camellia, 1845, pl. 73. Originated by Moens, Belgium from seed. Orthographic
variant: ‘Duc de Braband’. Synonym: ‘Brabantii Princeps’. Orthographic error: ‘Duc de
Brabaud’.
Duc de Brabaud. Burdin Maggiore & Co. Catalogue, 1863. Andre Leroy, 1878, Supplement to
Catalogue Général, p.55. Orthographic error for Duc de Brabant.
Duc de Bretagne. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1846-1847, 27:23: Flower dense, exceptionally
well imbricated, of a most beautiful vivid rose, striped and spotted with white. Verschaffelt,
1848, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book III, pl.III: This variety was obtained from seed by M.
Drouard, Nantes, France. The plant is of vigorous growth. Its leaves, 9-10 cm in length and
6-7 cm in width, are round-oval, acuminate, with smooth venation and little serration. The
bloom, over 10 cm across, is a beautiful cherry red (Carmine rose HCC., 621 to 621/1), often
blotched and striped with white. Orthographic variants: ‘Duke of Britain’, ‘Duca di
Brettagna’, ‘Duke of Brittany’. Orthographic errors: ‘Duke de Britagne’, ‘Duc de Britagne’.
Duc de Britagne.
Lindo Nursery price list,1940-1941. Orthographic error for Duc de Bretagne.
Duc de Caraman.
Caraman.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1849-1850, 38:39. Orthographic variant for Duca di
Duc de Cerbellone.
Orthographic error for Duca Serbelloni.
Duc de Chartres. (C.japonica), Auguste van Geert Catalogue, 1848. No description. van Houtte Catalogue, 1848-1849, 34:37: Vivid red. Sport of Duchesse d’Orleans. Verschaffelt, 1848,
Nouvelle Iconographie, Book I, pl.IV: This variety appeared accidently on a branch of
Duchesse d’Orleans in the collection of Mr van Geersdale, who grafted it. Its flowers are
large and a cherry pink colouring with white stains. Its imbrication is perfect. Originated in
Belgium. Orthographic error: ‘Duc de Chartress’.
135
Duc de Chartress.
Chartres.
Baptist & Son Nursery Catalogue, 1861, p.9. Orthographic error for Duc de
Duc de Clarence. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1847-1848, p.56. No description. Originated in
England. (Believed extinct.)
Duc de Devonshire. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt, 1851, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book X, pl.I: The
Camellia ‘Duc de Devonshire’ with its bright, cherry red colour, its large size and regular and
imbricated form, make it not unworthy of the name it bears. It is of English origin.
Orthographic variant: ‘Duke of Devonshire’. Synonyms: ‘Duc de Devonshire’(England), ‘Duc
de Devonshire 1’. Orthographic variant: ‘Duque de Devonshire’. The name was erroneously
used in America for the variety C.M. Hovey.
Duc de Devonshire (England).
SCCS., 1951, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature.
Synonym for Duc de Devonshire.
Duc de Devonshire 1.
shire.
Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Synonym for Duc de Devon-
Duc de Devonshire 2. Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Erroneously used for C.M.
Hovey as ‘Colonel Firey’.
Duc de Gaze.
Decazes.
Duc de Ghise.
Fairlight Camellia Nursery Catalogue, 1985. Orthographic error for Duchesse
Auguste van Geert, 1852, Catalogue, p.31. Orthographic error for Duca di Guise.
Duc de Guise.
Guise.
Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.27. Orthographic variant for Duca di
Duc de Letta. da Silva, 1880, Forcing Varieties of Camellias in Oporto, p.8. Orthographic error for
Duca di Litta.
Duc de Litta. Alex Verschaffelt, 1846, Catalogue, p.53. Morren, 1848, Annales de Gand, 4:290.
Orthographic variant for Duca di Litta.
Duc de Litte. Veitch, James Jr, 1853, Catalogue of Select Stove Plants…, p.13. Orthographic error
for Duca di Litta.
Duc de Lytta. Morren, 1848, Annales de Gand, 1:186, pl.17 as ‘Littae’ or ‘Duc de Lytta’. Orthographic error for Duca di Litta.
Duc de Morny. (C.japonica), Bull Nursery Catalogue, 1876, p.158. No description. Originated in France.
(Believed extinct.)
Duc de Nemour.
Nemours.
Magnolia Gardens and Nursery, 1943. Orthographic error for Duchesse de
Duc de Nemours. (C.japonica), Le Texnier, 1911, Le Camellia essais sur l’histoire..., p.21. A seedling of
Lefèvre, Belgium, who raised it in 1835. The name was invalidly used by Magnolia Gardens,
USA as a synonym for Duchesse de Nemours. (Believed extinct).
Duc de Neurs. Hume, 1946, Camellias in America, p.330. Orthographic error for Duchesse de
Nemours.
Duc de Normandie. (C.japonica), Oudin, Lisieux Nursery Catalogue, 1844, p.10. No description.
Berlèse, 1849, Annales de la Société d’Horticulture de France, vol.40, p.82(34): Flower, rose
form, similar to the Camellia Florida with a more intense colour. The 5 outer rows are
composed of broad petals, arranged as a fan, notched at the apex, loosely imbricated. The
inner circle are spherical, and, by their grouping, form a considerable centre. Originated by
Boursault, Versailles, France. Orthographic error: ‘Duc de Normandy’.
136
Duc de Normandy.
Normandie.
Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Orthographic error for Duc de
Duc de Northumberland.
Northumberland.
Seidel, 1870, Pflanzen Catalog, p.7. Orthographic variant for Duke of
Duc de Orleans. McIlhenny 1937, 600 Varieties of Camellia, p.2. Orthographic variant for Duc
d’Orleans.
Duc de Orleans Pink.
Dust’.
McIlhenny, 1937, 600 Varieties of Camellias, p.2. Synonym for ‘Star
Duc de Orleans Shell Pink.
Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II. Synonym for ‘Star Dust’.
Duc de Parme. Jean Nuytens Verschaffelt, 1879, Catalogue No.21, p.77. Orthographic error for
‘Duchesse de Parme’, synonym for Fulgens d’Italie.
Duc de Reichstadt. Rollisson & Son, 1846, Catalogue No.1, p.7. Jacob Makoy et Cie Catalogue,
1849, p.19. van Houtte Catalogue, 1849-1850, 38:39. Orthographic variant for Duca di
Reichstadt.
Duc de Reichyta.
Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1846, p.53. Orthographic error for Duca di Reichstadt.
Duc de Sante. (C.japonica), Veitch, James Jr, 1853, Catalogue of Select Stove Plants..., p.13. Originated
in Italy. No description. (Believed extinct.)
Duc de Serbelloni.
Auguste van Geert, 1852, Catalogue, p.31. Joseph Baumann, 1856, Prix
Courant, p.3. No description. Orthographic variant for Duca Serbelloni.
Duc de Toll. August van Geert Nursery Catalogue, No.75, 1869-1870, p.52. Synonym for Comte
de Toll.
Duc de Trévise. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt, 1860, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book II, pl.IV: Received from
Mr Delimon-Paleleu, Ghent, Belgium. It is a perfection by the regularity of its floral
proportion. The blossoms, larger than average, are a delicate pink, paler towards the centre.
The petals are numerous, even, rounded, faintly emarginate and inserted with perfect
imbrication.
Duc de Zighsii.
Verschaffelt, 1844-1845, Catalogue, p.24. Synonym for General Zighsi.
Duc Devonshire. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense, Catalogue No.40, ca.1904, p.69.
Orthograpic error for Duc de Devonshire.
Duc di Gise.
Joseph Baumann, 1856, Prix Courant, p.3. Orthographic error for Duca di Guise.
Duc di Gize.
Guise.
Auguste van Geert, 1855, Catalogue No.38, p.26. Orthographic error for Duca di
Duc di Reichstadt. Burdin Maggiore & Co., 1849-1850, Catalogue General. Orthographic error for
Duca di Reichstadt.
Duc di Sassiona.
nia.
Duc Litta.
Oudin, Lisieux Nursery Catalogue, 1844, p.10. Orthographic error for Duca di Litta.
Duc of Karamann.
Duc of Lancaster.
Duc Zuichi.
Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1867-1868, p.40. Orthographic error for Duca di Sasso-
Angelo Longone Catalogue, 1891. Orthographic error for Duca di Caraman.
Luzzatti Catalogue, 1853. Orthographic error for Duke of Lancaster.
Jacob Makoy et Cie Nursery Catalogue, 1949, p.19. Synonym for Varischi.
Duca Altieri. (C.japonica), de Jonghe,1851, Traité de la culture du Camellia, p.104. No description.
Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
137
Duca d’Aragona. (C.japonica), Burdin Maggiore & Co. Catalogue, 1856-1857. No description. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Duca d’Orleans. Del Lungo & Girardi, 1928, Le Camelie, p.129. Orthographic variant for Duc
d’Orleans.
Duca d’Ursel.
d’Ursel.
Del Lungo & Girardi, 1928, Le Camelie, p.139. Orthographic variant for Duc
Duca de Geuza.
Guise.
Charles Vuylsteke, 1875-1876, Price List, p.14. Orthographic error for Duca di
Duca de Guise. Auguste van Geert Nursery Catalogue, No.75, 1869-1870, p.52. Orthographic error
for Duca di Guise.
Duca de Litta.
Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.62. Orthographic error for Duca di Litta.
Duca di Bedford. (C.japonica), Burdin Maggiore & Co. Catalogue, 1856-1857. No description. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Duca di Brabante.
bante.
Burnier & Grilli Catalogue, 1846-1847.Orthographic variant for Duc de Bra-
Duca di Braganza. José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.9, 1872-1873. Orthographic variant for
Duque de Bragana.
Duca di Bretagna. Burdin Maggiore et Cie Catalogue, 1870-1871. Orthographic variant for Duc de
Bretagne.
Duca di Brettagne.
Fratelli Rovelli, 1852, Catalogue, p.16. Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di
Camelie, p.26. Orthographic variant for Duc de Bretagne.
Duca di Caraman. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1845-1846, 23:4: Imbricated. Red with white
stripes. Verschaffelt, 1859, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book II, pl.II: Its flowers, at least 10 cm
in diameter, of flawless imbrication, are composed of ample, ovate petals, outspread, convex,
almost full, somewhat ruffled and serried at the centre; all of a vivid pink with a broad,
longitudinal stripe. Originated in Italy. Orthographic errors: ‘Duke of Caraman’, ‘Duca di
Caramann’, ‘Duca de Caraman’, ‘Duke of Caraman’, ‘Duck of Karaman’, ‘Duck of
Caraman’, ‘Duca di Carman’, ‘Duc de Caramon’, ‘Duck Karman’, ‘Duc of Karamann.
Duca di Caramann. Luzzatti, 1851, Collezione di Camelie, p.13. Orthographic error for Duca di
Caraman.
Duca di Carman.
Notizziario della Società Italiana della Camelia, Dec.1989, No.4, p.14.
Orthographic error for Duca di Caraman.
Duca di Cerbelloni. de Jonghe, 1851, Traité de la Culture du Camellia, p.104. Orthographic error
for Duca Serbelloni.
Duca di Genova. (C.japonica), de Jonghe, 1851, Traité de la Culture du Camellia, p.104. Imbricated.
Similar in type and form to the Duchesse d’Orleans, pink striped white. Franchetti, 1855,
Collezione di Camelie, p.16: Imbricated, pink with white stripes in the centre of the petals.
Verschaffelt, 1859, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book V, pl.IV: This variety is of Italian origin.
The flowers are very large, (more than 10 cm) of a uniform pink, obscurely streaked with
white at the centre. The petals are ample, outspread, regularly imbricated; those at the
periphery, large, rounded, lobulate, the others oval-lanceolate. Synonym: ‘Dux Genova’.
Duca di Guisa. de Jonghe, 1851, Traité de la Culture du Camellia, p.104. Orthographic error for
Duca di Guise.
Duca di Guisa Nova.
Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.26. Synonym for Duca di Guise.
138
Duca di Guise. (C.japonica), Ambroise Verschaffelt, 1850, Catalogue Général, p.47. No description.
Luzzatti, 1851, Collezione di Camelie, p.15: Clear rose-pink with a tendency to purple; flower
large, petals, separated, imbricated. Originated in Italy. Orthographic variants: ‘Duc de
Guise’, ‘Duca Guise’. Synonym: ‘Duca di Guisa Nova’. Orthographic errors: ‘Duca di Guisa’,
‘Duc de Geuse’, ‘Duc de Ghise’, ‘Duc de Gise’, ‘Duc di Gize’.
Duca di Litta. (C.japonica), Oudin, Lisieux Nursery Catalogue, 1845-1846, p.43: Imbricated, very full
double, very dark red, blotched and streaked with white. Morren, 1845, Annales de Gand, I,
p.186, pl.17: As ‘Littae’ or ‘Duc de Lytta’. (Casoretti of Disio, pres. de Milan) Introduced by
Verschaffelt in 1844. Originated by Casoretti. Van Houtte Catalogue, 1845-1846, 23:4:
Imbricated. Very double. Beautiful deep carmine red, blotched or streaked with white.
Berlèse, 1849, Annales de la Société Central d’Horticulture de France, vol.40, p.227 as ‘Duc
de Litta’: Flower formal double, 10 cm diameter, of a deep, velvety, orange-red carmine,
marked with lines and bands of white. Petals ample, loosely displayed, some notched, others
entire; those at the centre, margined or flamed with white. Synonyms: ‘Littae’, ‘Dux Littae’,
‘Zighsii’. Orthographic variants: ‘Duc de Litta’, ‘Duca Litta’, ‘Duca di Litta’. Orthographic
errors: ‘Duc de Letta’, ‘Duc de Lytta’, ‘Duc de Litte’.
Duca di Reichstadt. (C.japonica), Oudin, Lisieux Nursery Catalogue, 1845-1846, p.43: Very full, imbricated double, deep carmine. van Houtte Catalogue, 1845-1846, 23:3: [from B. Lechi]. Imbricated, very double, deep crimson, blotched or streaked white. Berlèse, 1849, Annales de la
Société Central d’Horticulture de Paris, Vol.40, p.279, as ‘Duc de Reichstadt’. Formal
double, 10-11cm across, salmon orange red with white stripes. Petals in 5-6 rows, blood red
veins, parted vertically by a white stripe. Verschaffelt, 1850, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book
IX, pl.II as ‘Duc de Reichstadt’: a deep maroon red, formal double with streaks of pure white.
Originated in Italy by Count Bernardin Lechi. Orthographic variants: ‘Duc de Reichstadt’,
‘Duca Reichstadt’, ‘Duc di Reichstadt’. Orthographic error: ‘Ducca de Reichstadt’.
Duca di Sassiona.
Sassonia.
Jean Verschaffelt, 1860-1861, Price List, p.13. Orthographic error for Duca di
Duca di Sassonia. (C,japonica), Medici Spada, 1858, Della Nuova Camelie. dalle Semine Romane, p.5.
No description. Originated in the Giardino Borghese, Rome, Italy. (Believed extinct.) Orthographic errors: ‘Duc di Sassiona’, ‘Duca di Sassiona’.
Duca di Serbilloni.
Serbelloni.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1854-1855, 53:40. Orthographic error for Duca
Duca Geura. (C.japonica), Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense Catalogue No.29, 1895-1896,
p.47. No description. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Duca Litta.
Litta.
Burdin Maggiore & Co. Catalogue, 1845, p.42. Orthographic variant for Duca di
Duca Mellezi. Louise Leroy, 1868, Catalogue, p.123. Orthographic error for ‘Duca Melzi’,
synonym for Mazzuchelli.
Duca Melsi. Charles Vuylsteke, 1875-1876, Price List, p.14. Orthographic error for ‘Duca Melzi’,
synonym for Mazzuchelli.
Duca Melzi. de Jonghe, 1851, Traité de la culture du Camellia, p.104; Luzzatti, 1851, Collezione di
Camelie, p.15. Synonym for Mazzuchelli according to Franchetti, 1855. Orthographic errors:
‘Duca Melzii’, ‘Duca Metzi’, ‘Duca Melsi’, ‘Duca Mellezi’.
Duca Melzii. van Houtte Catalogue, 1852-1853, 48:38. Orthographic error for ‘Duca Melzi’, synonym for Mazzuchelli.
Duca Metzi.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1854-1855, 53:40. Orthographic error for ‘Duca Melzi’.
139
Duca Reichstadt. Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.10. Orthographic
variant for Duca di Reichstadt.
Duca Salviati. (C.japonica), Burnier Catalogue 1855-1856: Rose form, imbricated, vivid rose-pink with
veining of a little more intense colour while the extremity of the petals is a little lighter. Originated at the Giardino Borghese, Rome, Italy.
Duca Serbelliona.
Jose Maria Serra, Establecimento de Horticultura, Catalogue, 1855, p.55.
Orthographic error for Duca Serbelloni.
Duca Serbelloni. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1847-1848, p.56. No description. Franchetti,
1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.16: Very large, dark red. Imbricated. Verschaffelt, 1858,
Nouvelle Iconographie, Book V, pl.IV: This camellia is of Italian origin; its blossoms, more
that 12 cm across, are a vivid cherry pink colour, veined a deeper shade. They are composed
of numerous, ample petals, oval or rounded, regularly imbricated. Orthographic variant: ‘Duc
de Serbelloni’. Orthographic errors: ‘Duca di Serbilloni’, ‘Duca Cerbelloni’, ‘Duc di
Serbelloni’, ‘Duc Cerbelloni’, ‘Duca Serbelliona’. Originated by B. Lechi, Florence, Italy.
Duca Verri. (C.japonica), Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Ville Quiete, p.10. No
description. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Duca Visconti.
Magazine of Horticulture, 1853. Orthographic error for Duchesse Visconti.
Ducca de Reichstadt. Harrison ed., 1846, Floricultural Cabinet, p.44. Orthographic error for Duca
di Reichstadt.
Ducca Melzii. Seidel, 1870, Pflanzen Catalog, p.7. Orthographic error for ‘Duca Melzi’, synonym
for Mazzuchelli.
Duch. de Gaze.
Decazes.
Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.2. Orthographic error for Duchesse
Duches d’Orleans.
Rubel Catalogue, 1928. Orthographic error for Duchesse d’Orleans.
Duchess. (C.japonica), S.,E.H., “A few good Camellias”, 1899, Gardeners’ Chronicle, ser.3, 25:221. No
description. Originated in England. (Believe extinct.)
Duchess d’Casses.
Decazes.
Lindo Nursery Catalogue, 1948, p.4. Orthographic error for Duchesse
Duchess d’Orleans. Warren’s Descriptive Catalogue, 1844, p.37. Orthographic variant for
Duchesse d’Orleans.
Duchess de Berri.
Berry.
Rollisson Nursery Catalogue, 1877-1878. Orthographic error for Duchesse de
Duchess de Berry. Scott, J. & Son Nursery Catalogue, 1868. Orthographic variant for Duchesse de
Berry.
Duchess de Brabant.
The Pacific Camellia Society, 1946, Camellia Nomenclature, p.11.
Orthographic variant for Duchesse de Brabant.
Duchess de Casa. Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2. Orthographic error for Duchesse
Decazes.
Duchess de Case. Hariss’ Longview Nursery Retail Price list, 1955-1956, p.3. Orthographic error
for Duchesse Decazes.
Duchess de Cases.
Doty & Doerner Catalogue, 1942. Orthographic error for Duchesse Decazes.
Duchess de Casse. SCCS., 1942, Classification of Camellias, p.5. Orthographic error for Duchesse
Decazes.
140
Duchess de Cassi.
Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery
Catalogues, p.62. Orthographic error for Duchesse Decazes.
Duchess de Caze.
Decazes.
Duchess de Gaze.
Sharp, 1957, Camellias Illustrated, p.143.Orthographic error for Duchesse
Tucker, 1933, Camellia List. Orthographic error for Duchesse Decazes.
Duchess de Gazes. Russell, L.R., Nursery Catalogue, 1963-1964. Orthographic error for Duchesse
Decazes.
Duchess de Montpensier.
RHS., 1957, Rhododendron and Camellia Yearbook, p.121.
Orthographic variant for Duchessa di Montpensier.
Duchess de Nassau. Shepherd & Co. Nursery Catalogue, 1879. Orthographic variant for Duchesse
de Nassau.
Duchess de Nassua. Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2. Orthographic error for Duchesse
de Nassau.
Duchess de Orleans. Johnson, 1847, Dictionary of Modern Gardening, p.114. Orthographic error
for Duchesse d’Orleans.
Duchess de Roban.
Rohan.
Lindo Nursery Catalogue, 1941-1942. Orthographic error for Duchesse de
Duchess de Rohan. Gerbings Azalea Gardens Catalogue, 1938-1939. Orthographic variant for
Duchesse de Rohan.
Duchess du Cazes.
Decazes.
Haskins Nursery Ltd. Catalogue, 1980. Orthographic error for Duchesse
Duchess of Berry.
B.S. Williams Nursery Catalogue, 1879, p.93. Orthographic variant for
Duchesse de Berry.
Duchess of Buccleugh. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt, 1853, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book XII, pl.I: This
variety was obtained from seed by Mr Jackson, nurseryman of Kingston, England. Its
blossoms resemble Myrtifolia but larger and of a delicate pink veined with rare, longitudinal
stripes. The blooms are composed of a multitude of small petals, regularly imbricated,
rounded or oblong, deeply emarginate. Orthographic errors: ‘Duchesse of Burclough’,
‘Duchess of Buceleugh’, ‘Duchess of Buccleuch’.Orthographic variants: ‘Duchesse de
Buccleugh’, ‘Duchesse d’Buccleugh’, ‘Duchesse of Buccleugh’.
Duchess of Buccleuch. The Journal of Horticulture & Cottage Gardener, 1862. Orthographic error
for Duchess of Buccleugh.
Duchess of Buceleugh. de Bisschop Nursery Catalogue, 1937. Orthographic error for Duchess of
Buccleugh.
Duchess of Cornwall. Savige, 1982, International Camellia Journal, No.14, p.49. Orthographic
variant for The Duchess of Cornwall.
Duchess of Covington. (C.japonica), Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue: Medium to large,
white-variegated, incomplete-double, 9-10 cm in diamenter. The colour is white flecked and
frosted with pink. Outer petals are round and ruffled on their margins. Some of the inner
petals are semi-erect and intermingle with the central stamens. Filaments are yellow, anthers
are darker golden yellow. The leaves are medium green, elliptic, averaging 9.5 cm x 4 cm
with narrow, prominent tips, prominent veins and shallow serrations. The plant habit is
vigorous, bushy, informal and erect. Fixed by grafting by Mrs Sigmund J. Katz, Covington,
Louisiana, USA, from a sport of the variety Duchess of Sutherland made in 1947. Reg.
No.152, American Camellia Yearbook, 1954, p.308.
141
Duchess of Exeter.
Standardized Plant Names, 1942. Synonym for Marchioness of Exeter.
Duchess of Northumberland. (C.japonica), Oudin, Lisieux Nursery Catalogue, 1845-1846, p.43:
Majestic imbricated form. Alabaster White, embellished with wide, pink stripes, without any
streaks or blotches. Berlèse, 1849, Annales de la Société Central d’Horticulture de France,
vol.40, p.131 as ‘Duchesse de Northumberland’: Flower 9-10 cm across, often more; pure
milk white, striped pink, cup-shaped formal double, with numerous petals, finely serrate,
lightly veined, symmetrically imbricated. van Houtte Catalogue, 1846-1847, 27:23; from Lee
& Co. of England. It was listed by Veitch, 1856-1857 as “White, spotted rose” and Wakefield,
1869, Gardeners’ Chronicle, p.17-18 as “White striped with carmine.” Verschaffelt, 1849,
Nouvelle Iconographie, Book XI, pl.IV as ‘Duchesse de Northumberland’: The unusual size
of its petals, its pure colouring, relieved here and there by broad single or double pink stripes.
The exterior petals are convex and inverted; towards the centre, they are erect and recall
hybrid, everblooming roses. Orthographic variants: ‘Duchesse de Northumberland’,
‘Duchessa di Northumberland’, ‘Duchesse of Northumberland’. Orthographic error:
‘Duchesse de Notemberland’. The name has been erroneously applied to a cultivar from
Magnolia Gardens in USA.
Duchess of Northumberland (MG). (C.japonica), Magnolia Gardens and Nursery Catalogue, 1942-1943, invalidly as ‘Duchess of Northumberland’: Large satiny, light rose semi-double, 10.5
cm across x 3.5 cm deep. Petals orbicular, tips fringed, forming a cup about centre stamens.
Anthers light yellow, filaments white. Leaves mid-green, 8 cm long x 1.8 cm wide, thin
texture, depressed venation, deep, coarse serrations. Originated at Magnolia Gardens, St.Johns
Island, South Carolina, USA, either from seed of unknown parents or an old lost label variety
and named by Rev. John G. Drayton.
Duchess of Orkney.
Orkney.
Treseder Special Camellia List, 1965. Orthographic variant for Countess of
Duchess of Orkney Rose Form. Treseder Special Camellia List, 1965. Synonym for Countess of
Orkney Rosea.
Duchess of Orleans. Harrison, ed., 1842, Floricultural Cabinet, p.105. Orthographic variant for
Duchesse d’Orleans.
Duchess of Southerland. Orton Nursery Price List, 1947-1948. Orthographic error for Duchess of
Sutherland.
Duchess of Sutherland. (C.japonica), Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.4 as ‘Duchesse of Sutherland’. No description. Gerbings Azalea Gardens Catalogue, 1941-1942: Semi-double white
with 15 cm blooms which occasionally have a white stripe on one petal. Long, glossy,
medium-green foliage, spreading growth. Mid-season flowering. See colour plate No.65, G.G.
Gerbing’s, 1945, Camellias; Sharp, 1957, Camellias Illustrated, p.83. Sports: Duchess of
Sutherland Pink, Duchess of Covington, Ruth Royer, Claudia Phelps, Patricia Burks.
Originated at Magnolia Gardens, St. John’s Island, South Carolina, USA. Orthographic errors:
‘Duchess of Sutherlin’, ‘Duchess of Southerland’, ‘Duchesse de Sutherland’, ‘Duchesse of
Sutherland’.
Duchess of Sutherland Coral. River View Nursery Catalogue, 1957-1958, p.8. Synonym for Claudia Phelps.
Duchess of Sutherland Pink. (C.japonica), Fruitland Nursery Catalogue, 1945-1946, p.24: A solid pink
sport of Duchess of Sutherland. Orthographic variants: ‘Pink Duchess of Sutherland’, ‘Pink
Duchess’. Originated in USA.
Duchess of Sutherland Spotted.
Royer.
River View Nursery Catalogue, 1957-1958. Synonym for Ruth
142
Duchess of Sutherland Variegated. Hertrich, 1955, Camellias in the Huntington Gardens, vol.II,
p.89. Synonym for Ruth Royer.
Duchess of Sutherlin.
Portland Nursery Catalogue, 1947-1948, p.14. Orthographic error for
Duchess of Sutherland.
Duchess of Teck. (C.japonica), RHS., Journal vol.22, 1898-1899, pl.lxxiii. “Award of Merit” when
exhibited by Paul. Medium sized flowers a shade of salmon pink. Originated in England.
Duchess of Windsor. (C.japonica), Magnolia Gardens and Nursery Catalogue, 1942-1943: White. Large,
loose, peony form. Low, bushy growth. Blooms early. Originated in USA.
Duchess of York. (C.x williamsii). Trewidden Estate Nursery, 1995, Retail Camellia List, p.4: Large
single flower of an unusual shade of pinky mauve. Originated at Tregrehan, Cornwall,
England.
Duchess of York.
Duchess Pink.
Cook Nursery Catalogue, 1899-1900, p.234-235. Synonym for Lady Loch.
Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2. Synonym for Mathilde.
Duchess Pink Variegated. Hillcrest Nursery Catalogue, 1958 as ‘Duchess Pink Var.’ Synonym for
Ruth Royer.
Duchess Vicsenti. Guichard Soeurs Nursery Catalogue, 1928. Orthographic error for Duchesse
Visconti.
Duchessa d’Etruria. van Houtte Catalogue, 1844-1845, 18:11. Abbreviation for Granduchessa
d’Etruria.
Duchessa d’Etrusie. Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1850, p.46. Orthographic error for Granduchessa
d’Etruria.
Duchessa d’Etrutio. da Silva, 1880, Forcing varieties of Camellias in Oporto, p.8. Orthographic
error for Granduchessa d’Etruria.
Duchessa d’Orleans.
Longone Catalogue, 1846. Orthographic variant for Duchesse d’Orleans.
Duchessa de Brabant.
Brabant.
Duchessa de Litta.
Litta.
Carlo Costantini Catalogue, 1886. Orthographic variant for Duchesse de
Harrison, ed., 1846, Floricultural Cabinet. Orthographic variant for Duchessa
Duchessa de Montpansies
Montpensier.
Corbelli Catalogue, 1882. Orthographic error for Duchessa di
Duchessa de Nemours. Carlo Costantini Catalogue, 1886. Orthographic error for Duchesse de
Nemours.
Duchessa de Normandie. de Jonghe, 1851, Beknopte Handleiding tot het Kweeken von Camellias,
p.119. Orthographic variant for Duchesse de Normandie.
Duchessa de Sassonia.
Sassonia.
Carlo Costantini Catalogue, 1886. Orthographic error for Duchessa di
Duchessa del Balgo. Le Texnier, 1911, Le camellia essais sur l’histoire de quelques fleurs
d’ornement. p.36. Orthographic error for Duchessa del Balzo.
Duchessa del Balzo. (C.japonica), Real Società Toscana, di Orticultura Bollettino, No.2:107, 1877:
Flower large, imbricated, white lightly striped red on some petals. Originated in Italy by
Franchetti, Florence. Orthographic error: ‘Duchessa del Balgo’.
Duchessa di Berri.
Berry.
Fratelli Rovelli Catalogue, 1852, p.16. Orthographic error for Duchesse de
143
Duchessa di Berry. Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1847-1848, p.56. Orthographic variant for Duchesse de
Berry.
Duchessa di Calabria. (C.japonica), Italian CS, Notiziario, 2002, No.1, p.4 with colour photo; Rose
form to formal double, large, diameter 13-14 cm, 30 petals, margins entire, deep pink. 10-20
stamens, filaments cream, anthers yellow. 7-12 petaloids in a circle around the stamens, and
raised 1 cm over outer petals. Leaves 10-11 cm x 6 cm, lanceolate, apex cuspidate, margins
finely serrate, upper surface medium green, lower surface light green. Originated by Pietro
Capecchi Nursery, Masiano, Tuscany, Italy in 1983. Upright, compact growth. Early
blooming. Plant is resistant to burn in full sun. Dedicated to SAR Camilla di Borbone,
Duchessa di Calabria, at the Naples Camellia Show, 2002.
Duchessa di Genova. (C.japonica), Giardino Allegra Catalogo generale della piante, No.54, 1915, p.56.
No description. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Duchessa di Litta.
Litta.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1845-1846, 23:4. Orthographic variant for Duchessa
Duchessa di Milano. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1847-1848, p.56. No description. Originated
in Italy by Croft. Fratelli Rovelli Catalogue, 1852, p.16: Very large, recurved petals, pale pink
blotched with vivid pink; double. Orthographic variants: ‘Duchesse de Milano’, ‘Duchesse di
Milano’.
Duchessa di Montpensier. (C.japonica), de Jonghe, 1851, Traité de la Culture du Camellias, p.104:
Large size, imbricated double, white streaked with pink. From Tuscany. Luzzatti, 1851,
Collezione di Camelie, p.14-15:- Similar form to Bella di Pontedera, imbricated, very large,
ivory white, lined with rose-pink with the flower, star shaped as Incarnata. Originated in
Florence, Italy by Gattai. Orthographic errors: ‘Duchessa di Montpansies’, ‘Duchesse de
Montpensia’, ‘Duchessa d’Montpensier’, ‘Duchessa di Moutpensier’. Orthographic variant:
‘Duchesse de Montpensier’.
Duchessa di Moutpensier. Notizziario della Società Italiana della Camelia, Dec.1989, No.4, p.15.
Orthographic error for Duchessa di Montpensier.
Duchessa di Nassau.
Catalogo della Stablimento Agrario-Botanico de Castagnola e Casabono,
1867-1868. Orthographic error for Duchesse de Nassau.
Duchessa di Nemours. Fratelli Rovelli Catalogue, 1852, p.16. Orthographic variant for Duchesse
de Nemours.
Duchessa di Normandia. Roda Catalogue, 1885, p.556. Orthographic error for Duchesse de Normandie.
Duchessa di Northumberland. Luzzatti, 1851, Collezione di Camelie, p.14. Orthographic variant for
Duchess of Northumberland.
Duchessa di Parma. van Houtte Catalogue, 1858, 72:11 as ‘Duchesse de Parme’. Synonym for Fulgens D’Italie.
Duchessa di Praslin.
Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.10.
Orthographic variant for Duchesse de Praslin.
Duchessa di Rignano. (C.japonica), Medici Spada, 1858, Delle Nuova Camellie. dalla Semine Romane,
p.5. Originated in Italy by Mauri. Large, convex, perfectly imbricated flower. The numerous
petals of soft vermilion, tinted with scarlet, light up the circumference; the semi-erect centre
petals are very pale pink, almost white.
Duchessa di Sassonia. (C.japonica), Burnier Catalogue, 1855-1856: Imbricated. Blood red with whitish
stripes in the middle of each petal. The numerous petals are deep, blood red, tinted purple,
144
with a broken, whitish stripe in the centre of each. Originated at the Giardino Borghese,
Rome, Italy. Orthographic variant: ‘Duchessa de Sassonia’.
Duchessa di Savoia. (C.japonica), Costa, 1846, Catalogue de la collection de Camellias présentée à sa
majesté L’lmperatrice de toutes les Russies et Reine de Pologne, p.9. No description.
Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Duchessa di Sesa. (C.japonica), Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.27: Bright red, striped white;
imbricated. Verschaffelt, 1856, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book XII, pl.I as ‘Duchessa di Seza’:
A fine plant we received from Mssrs Grilli & Co, Florence, Italy. The foliage is medium size;
blossoms large than usual, with an unusual amplitude of petals, ovate and apiculate to
rounded and slightly lobulate. Colouring is pink with a few whitish streaks. Orthographic
variant: ‘Duchessa di Seza’.
Duchessa di Seza. Verschaffelt, 1856, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book XII. Orthographic variant for
Duchessa di Sesa.
Duchessa Litta. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1844-1845, 18:11: No description. Del Lungo e
Girardi, 1928, Le Camelie, p.137: Flowers large blush, full rose form with yellowish white
markings at the centre. Originated by Peregalli, Italy. Orthographic variants: ‘Duchessa di
Litta’, ‘Duchesse de Litta’.Orthographic errors: ‘Duchessa de Litta’, ‘Duchessa di Leza’,
‘Duchesse Litta’, ‘Ducisia Litta’, ‘Duchezza Litta’.
Duchessa Melzi d’Eril. (C.japonica), Il Giardiniere, 1883, Illust. Formal double, white with every petal
having some thin, pink stripes. Originated in Italy.
Duchessa Salviati. (C.japonica), Medici Spada, 1858, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.5: A campanulate flower of average size, often perfectly imbricated, concave, vivid rose-pink, purple
veins with the margins narrow and a little paler, a few, almost white, streaks divide the central
petals. Scarlatti Catalogue, 1891-1892: Perfect imbrication, colour intense flesh rose,
reflections of purple and with the margins a little lighter, with a few of the centre petals lined
with white. Orthographic variant: ‘Duchesse Salviati’. Orthographic error: ‘Duchesse de
Salviate’. Originated in Italy by Borghese, Rome.
Duchessa Visconti. Burdin Maggiore & Co., 1849-1850, Catalogue General. Luzzatti, 1851,
Collezione di Camelia, p.14. Orthographic variant for Duchesse Visconti.
Duchessa Viscontii. Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1847-1848, p.56. Orthographic error for Duchesse
Visconti.
Duchesse Anne. (C.japonica), J & F Thoby, Gaujacq, France, Catalogue, 2005, p.41. No details
Duchesse d’Angoulème. (C.japonica), Menoreau Catalogue, 1890: Cerise red, formal double. Originated
in France.
Duchesse d’Buccleugh.
Scott, J. & Son Nursery Catalogue, 1868. Orthographic variant for
Duchess of Buccleugh.
Duchesse d’Etrurie. Trillon, Le Mans Nursery Catalogue, 1843, p.5. Synonym for Granduchessa
d’Etruria.
Duchesse d’Montpensier. Scott, J. & Son Nursery Catalogue, 1868. Orthographic variant for
Duchessa di Montpensier.
Duchesse d’Orleans. (C.japonica), Cels, Paris Nursery Catalogue, 1839, p.29: Large, meticulously
imbricated. Jacob Makoy et Cie Catalogue, 1839, p.16. No description. van Houtte Catalogue,
1839.1:3, with synonyms: ‘Reine d’Angleterre’, ‘Reine des Camellias’, ‘Nobilissima Nova’
but no description. However in van Houtte Catalogue, 1842, 9:9: Formal double, petals
rounded and imbricated. White, very lightly tinted with vermilion, speckled and splashed with
carmine. Berlèse 1843, Iconographie, vol.3, pl.212: The flower is about 10 cm in diameter, it
is full, regular, a soft whitish carmine rose, sometimes with pale red stripes, sometimes a
145
lively red, according to the season. The petals are numerous, oval-elongate to broad-oval,
notched, flat, arranged and close-set, lightly reflexed, regularly imbricated from the
circumference to the centre with one or two vertical marks of pale rose-pink; those of the
centre are long, acuminate, lanceolate and also well imbricated. The corolla forms a perfect
rosette. Mertens & Fontaine, Collection de cent espèces.....camellia, 1845, pl. 69. Originated
from seed by M. Mariani, Milan, Italy. This cultivar was for many years confused with the
Duc d’Orleans, but they are in fact separate and distinct cultivars. Orthographic variants:
‘Duchess of Orleans’, ‘Duchessa d’Orleans’, ‘Duquesa de Orleans’, ‘Duchesse de Orleans’.
Orthographic errors: ‘Duchess de Orleans’, ‘Duchess de l‘Orleans’, ‘Dutchess of Orleans’,
‘Duches d’Orleanse’. Synonyms: ‘Reine d’Angleterre’, ‘Reine des Camellias’, ‘Ducissa
Aurelianensis’, ‘Nobilissima Nova’, ‘Nuova de Genoa’, ‘Nuova di Genoa’, ‘Nuova di
Genova’. Sports: Duc de Chartres, Comte de Paris.
Duchesse d’Orleans Shell Pink. Vanderbilt, 1941, Camellia Research, II, p.2. Synonym for Comte
de Paris.
Duchesse de Berri.
Floral Magazine, 1865. Orthographic error for Duchesse de Berry.
Duchesse de Berrii. Smith, Edwin, Nursery Catalogue, 1893-1894, p.39. Orthographic error for
Duchesse de Berry.
Duchesse de Berry. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1848-1849, p.46 as ‘Duchessa di Berry’. No
description. Verschaffelt, 1855, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book IX, pl.III: Its blossoms could be
taken for a white rose, full bodied and of the largest size. Mr Aug. Van Geert received this
variety in 1851 from Count B. Lechi, Brescia, Italy. It is thus of Italian origin. However it is
named for a French noblewoman, so the French orthography is given precedence. It is a
creamy white, large formal to rose form double of 9-10 cm across with waved, heavy textured
petals. Occasionally reveals a few stamens when fully open. Leaves light, glossy green, about
7.5 cm long x 5.5 cm wide. Medium, compact growth. Orthographic variant: ‘Duchessa di
Berry’. Orthographic errors: ‘Duchess de Berry’, ‘Duchesse du Berry’, ‘Duchesse de Perry’,
‘Duchesse de Berri’, ‘Duchess de Berri’, ‘Duchesse de Berrii’, ‘Duchesse de Bery’. See also
pl.147, The Floral Magazine, 1863, vol.3 for illustration.
Duchesse de Bery.
Berry.
Auguste van Geert, 1852, Catalogue, p.31. Orthographic error for Duchesse de
Duchesse de Bosteaux. (C.japonica), Stefano Pagliai Catalogue, 1867, p.66. No description. Originated
in France. (Believed extinct.)
Duchesse de Brabant. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt, 1859, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book I, pl.II: Produced
in our nursery by a freak of nature on a branch of Marquise Elise and grafted immediately. It
has perfect imbrication, white colouring tinged a delicate pink with a touch of carmine at the
base of the petals. A large, high centred peony. The plant has medium, upright, spreading
growth with light green foliage. Flowers mid-season. Originated by Verschaffelt, Ghent,
Belgium. Orthographic variants: ‘Duchess de Brabant’, ‘Duchessa de Brabant’.
Duchesse de Buccleugh.
Auguste van Geert, 1853, Catalogue No.33, p.24. Scott, J. & Son
Nursery Catalogue, 1868. Orthographic variant for Duchess of Buccleugh.
Duchesse de Casas. Thomasville Nursery Catalogue, 1938-1939. Orthographic error for Duchesse
Decazes.
Duchesse de Case. Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Orthographic error for Duchesse
Decazes.
Duchesse de Cases. SCCS., 1945, Camellias, p.19. Valley Garden Supplies Catalogue, 1951.
Orthographic error for Duchesse Decazes.
146
Duchesse de Cases White.
SCCS., 1950, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature.
Orthographic error for Duchesse Decazes White.
Duchesse de Cassi. Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.4. Orthographic error for Duchesse
Decazes.
Duchesse de Caze. Henri Guichard Nursery Catalogue, 1908-1912. Orthographic error for
Duchesse Decazes.
Duchesse de Caze White. SCCS Bulletin, vol.11, No.2, p.17, Dec. 1949. SCCS, 1951, The
Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature. Orthographic error for Duchesse Decazes White.
Duchesse de Caze Pink. SCCS, 1962, Camellia Nomenclature, p.37. Orthographic error for
Duchesse Decazes Pink.
Duchesse de Gaze.
E.B.Champernowne Catalogue, 1972-1973, p.3. Orthographic error for
Duchesse Decazes.
Duchesse de Gazes.
Dauvesse Catalogue, 1855-1856. Orthographic error for Duchesse Decazes.
Duchesse de Kent. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1849-1850, p.46. No description. Originated in
England. Orthographic variant: ‘Duchesse of Kent’. (Believed extinct.)
Duchesse de l‘Orleans. Law Somner & Co. Nursery Catalogue, 1884. Orthographic error for
Duchesse d’Orleans.
Duchesse de Leza. da Silva, 1880, Forcing Varieties of Camellias in Oporto, p.8. Orthographic
error for Duchessa Litta.
Duchesse de Litta.
Litta.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1848-1849, 35:37. Orthographic variant for Duchessa
Duchesse de Milan.
di Milano.
Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1849-1850, p.46. Orthographic variant for Duchessa
Duchesse de Montpensier. Jean Vervaene fils, 1864, Price List, No.1, p.6. Mercatelli Catalogue,
1881, p.17. Orthographic variant for Duchessa di Montpensier.
Duchesse de Nassau. (C.japonica), Lemaire, 1863, L’Illustration Horticole, pl.376: Light pink with
some petals tipped white. Medium large formal double. Mid-season blooming. Originated by
Verschaffelt, Ghent, Belgium. Orthographic variants: ‘Duchess of Nassau’, ‘Duchessa di
Nassau’. Orthographic errors: ‘Duchess le Nassau’, ‘Duchesse de Nassua’. See coloured
pl.346, The Floral Magazine, vol.6, 1867.
Duchesse de Nassua. Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.4. Orthographic error for Duchesse
de Nassau.
Duchesse de Nemours. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1842, 9:51: Very gracefully imbricated, the
flower is a transparent, soft white, flecked with carmine. Van Houtte acquired all of the
plants. See van Houtte Catalogue, 1844-1845, 18:11: Sent by M. Gheldof to Berlèse who
described and figured it in his Monographie. Imbricated, sometimes a peony form, white
petals, lightly flesh coloured and streaked pink, transparent. It was named by Berlèse from the
specimen sent by the assignor. Originated by Lefrèvre, Ghent, Belgium. Orthographic
variants: ‘Duchessa di Nemours’, ‘Duchessa de Nemours’. Synonym: ‘Madame le Duchesse
de Nemours’.
Duchesse de Normandie. (C.japonica), Oudin, Lisieux Catalogue, 1844, p.10. No description. de
Jonghe, 1851, Traité de la Culture du Camélia, p.105: Large double of a beautiful yellowish
white. van Houtte Catalogue, 1847, 30:13: No description. Del Lungo e Girardi, 1928, Le
Camelie, p.91 as ‘Duchesse di Normandie’: Large white. Imbricated with creamy white at the
centre. Originated by Drouard, France. Orthographic variants: ‘Duchessa di Normandie’,
‘Duchessa de Normandie’.
147
Duchesse de Northumberland. Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1847-1848, p.56. Orthographic variant for
Duchess of Northumberland.
Duchesse de Notemberland.
Escuela de Agricultura de Pontevedra, 1882, Catalogo, p.28.
Orthographic error for Duchess of Northumberland.
Duchesse de Orleans. Whiting, 1846, Gardeners’ Chronicle.Orthographic variant for Duchesse
d’Orleans.
Duchesse de Orleans Shell Pink. Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.4 as ‘Duchesse de
Orleans Shell Pk’. Synonym for Comte de Paris.
Duchesse de Parme. van Houtte Catalogue, 1858, 72:15. Synonym for ‘Fulgens Plenissima’, synonym for Fulgens d’Italie.
Duchesse de Perri.
Schomburgh, 1878, Botanic Gardens, Adelaide. Orthographic error for
Duchesse de Berry.
Duchesse de Praslin. (C.japonica), Charles van Geert, 1850, Catalogue No.117, p.6: Very distinguished
white. Originated in Italy. Orthographic variant ‘Duchessa di Praslin’.
Duchesse de Richmond. (C.japonica), Rollisson Catalogue, 1871, p.130. No description. Originated in
England. (Believed extinct.)
Duchesse de Rohan. (C.japonica), Caledonia Nursery Catalogue, 1874: No description. Gerbing Azalea
Gardens Catalogue, 1938-1939: Loose peony form flowering of a good size, light pink; small,
glossy foliage; mid-season flowering. Orthographic errors: ‘Duchess de Rohan’, ‘Duchesse de
Rowan’, ‘Duchess de Roban’. Synonym: ‘Stiles Perfection Pink’. The synonymy given with
Preston Rose (SCCS., 1947) seems doubtful and is rejected. The black and white photo,
p.102, Hertrich, 1955, Camellias in the Huntington Gardens, vol.II shows a variegated form.
Originated by the Caledonia Nursery, The Channel Isles.
Duchesse de Rowan. SCCS, 1947, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature. While an orthographic error for Duchesse de Rohan, the description is of the variegated form.
Duchesse de Salviate. Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense, Catalogue, No.29, 18951896, p.60. Orthographic variant for Duchessa Salviati.
Duchesse de Savoie. van Geert Nursery Catalogue, 1848, p.16. Orthographic variant for Duchessa
di Savoia.
Duchesse de Sutherland. Nantes, Services des Espaces, - Collection, 1980. Orthographic variant
for Duchess of Sutherland.
Duchesse de Visconti.
conti.
Leroy, Louis, Catalogue, 1902, p.5.Orthographic variant for Duchesse Vis-
Duchesse Decaze. Mount Congreve Wholesale Nursery, 1990-1991, Price List, p.4. Orthographic
variant for Duchesse Decazes.
Duchesse Decazes. (C.japonica), Poiteau, Apr.1846, Review Horticole, p.6-8: Named at the March Exposition and is the earliest positive listing and gives the name ‘Decazes’ in one word. It is a
place name and the splitting into “De Cazes” is erroneous. Later in the same year, van Houtte,
in his Catalogue 27:19, gives Adonidea, ‘Gallesi d’Italie’ and ‘Dorusio à bords blancs’ as
synonyms. The last two are synonyms for Adonidea, which was in commerce in 1837, and it
is probable that these are all the one cultivar. The Duchesse Decazes at present listed by
Claude Thoby, Nantes in Colour Catalogue, Apr.1971 as ‘Duchesse de Caze’ is a soft pink
with a veining and edging of white. A medium size, full peony form with vigorous, upright,
compact growth. Flowers mid-season. Said to have been introduced by Souchet. Orthographic
variant: ‘Duchesse Decaze’. Orthographic errors: ‘Duchess de Case’, ‘Duchess de Casa’,
‘Duchess de Cases’, ‘Duchess de Casse’, ‘Duchess de Caze’, ‘Duchess de Cazes’, ‘Duchess
148
de Gaze’, ‘Duchesse de Casas’, ‘Duchesse de Case’, ‘Duchesse de Cases’, ‘Duchesse de
Cassi’, ‘Duchesse de Caze’, ‘Duchesse de Cazes’, ‘Duchesse de Gaze’, ‘Comtessa de Cazes’,
‘duches duy Cazes’, ‘Duchese de Cazes, ‘Comtesse de Cages’. See colour illustration, p.115,
Fairweather, 1979, Rhododendrons and Azaleas. Synonyms received in America include:
‘Hime’, ‘Juanita’, ‘Opelousa’s Peony’ and ‘Mrs Conrad Wall Jr.’. Sports: Duchesse Decazes
Pink, Duchesse Decazes White.
Duchesse Decazes Pink. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1962, Camellia Nomenclature, p.36 as ‘Duchesse de Caze
Pink’. A solid pink sport of Duchesse Decazes. Originated in USA.
Duchesse Decazes White. (C.japonica), SCCS., 1950, The Camellia. Its Culture and Nomenclature, p.33
as ‘Duchesse de Caze White’. A white sport of Duchesse Decazes. Originated in USA.
Duchesse di Milano.
Joseph Baumann, 1849, Prix Courant,
Duchessa di Milano.
Duchesse di Visconti.
Visconti.
p.4. Orthographic variant for
Louis Leroy, 1868, Catalogue, p.123. Orthographic variant for Duchessa
Duchesse du Berry. Schneider, 1894, Revue Horticole, p.432. Orthographic error for Duchesse de
Berry.
Duchesse Litta.
van Houtte Catalogue, 1844-1845. Orthographic variant for Duchessa Litta.
Duchesse of Buccleugh. Verschaffelt, 1853, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book XII. Orthographic
variant for Duchess of Buccleugh.
Duchesse of Burclough. Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.4. Orthographic error for Duchess
of Buccleugh.
Duchesse of Orkney.
Treseder’s Nurseries Catalogue, 1967. Synonym for Countess of Orkney.
Duchesse of Orkney Rose Form. Treseder’s Nurseries Catalogue, 1967. Synonym for Countess of
Orkney Rosea.
Duchesse of Northumberland. Loddiges Catalogue, 1847, p.34. Orthographic variant for Duchess
of Northumberland.
Duchesse of Sutherland. Vanderbilt, 1940, Camellia Research, p.4. Orthographic variant for
Duchess of Sutherland.
Duchesse Salviati. André; 1864, Plantes de terre de Bruyères..., p.234. Orthographic variant for
Duchessa Salviati.
Duchesse Visconti. (C.japonica), Verschaffelt Catalogue, 1849-1850, p.46 as ‘Duchesse Viscontii’. No
description. de Jonghe, 1851, Traité de la Culture du Camellias, p.105: Imbricated; deep flesh
colour, streaked with red. Verschaffelt, 1854, Nouvelle Iconographie, Book III, pl.II. Van
Houtte Catalogue, 1851, 44:9: Flesh white with distinct rays of red. Imbricated. According to
Guichard, 1894 - Flesh coloured formal double, striated red. Orthographic variants: ‘Duchessa
Visconti’, ‘Duchessa de Visconti’, ‘Duchesse de Visconte’, ‘Duchesse Viscontii’.
Orthographic error: ‘Duchess Viscenti’.
Duchesse Visconti Nova. (C.japonica), Jacob Makoy et Cie Catalogue, 1858, p.27: No description.
Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Duchezza Litta.
William Prince, 1860, Select Greenhouse Plants, 45th ed, No.13, p.5.
Orthographic error for Duchessa Litta.
Ducissa Aurelianensis.
d’Orleans.
Ducissa Litta.
Colla, 1843, Camelliografia, (Illust.), p.125. Synonym for Duchesse
Berlèse 1845, Monographie, ed.3, p.240. Orthographic variant for Duchessa Litta.
149
Duck of Caraman. Burdin Maggiore & Co., 1849-1850, Catalogue Général. Burdin Maggiore &
Co.Catalogue, 1886. Orthographic error for Duca di Caraman.
Duck of Karaman. Burdin Maggiore et Cie Catalogue, 1870-1871. Orthographic error for Duca di
Caraman.
Dudley Boudreaux. (C.japonica) ACS, The Camellia Journal, Mar. 2003, p.29, Reg. No. 2588. A white
semi-double to loose peony form flower with yellow anthers and white filaments. Plant is
upright and vigorous and blooms mid-season. Originated by Hyman. R. Norsworthy,
Beaumont, Tex., USA. American Camellia Yearbook, 2003, p.62, colour photo p.c3. A 12
year old seedling of (Elizabeth Boardman x Gwenneth Morey) x Colonial Dame, which
first flowered in 1995. Flowers measure 9.5 cm across x 7 cm deep, with 35 petals. The dark
green leaves are 9 cm long x 5 cm wide.
Duff Alan.
Hillier Price List, 1963-1964. Orthographic error for Duffy Allan.
Duff Allan. Hillier Nursery, Large Specimen Shrubs Catalogue, 1966-1968, p.12. Orthographic
error for Duffy Allan.
Duff Allen.
Hillier Nursery Catalogue, 1984. Orthographic error for Duffy Allan.
Duffy Allan. (C.sasanqua), Pearson II, 1957, Camellian, vol.VIII, No.1, p.23: Tiny petaloids mixed with
stamens. Pink. Orthographic errors: ‘Duff Alan’, ‘Duff Allan’, ‘Duff Allen’. Originated by
Allan’s Nursery, South Carolina, USA.
Duftglöckchen. (Scented Bell). (C.japonica x C.lutchuensis). Peter Fischer, 1990, Kamelien [p.13],
colour pl. [p.14]: Salmon rose, small single, honey scented blossom. This new C.japonica
‘Tinsie’ (Bokuhan), x C.lutchuensis hybrid of elegant form is a worthwhile novely.
Originated in Germany by Peter Fischer, Höden, Wingst.
Dughetti (Rosea Odorata).
Dugueti.
Piantaio Comunale Romano, 1859. Synonym for Duguetti Odorata.
International Camellia Journal, 1992, p.49. Orthographic error for Duguetti Odorata.
Duguetti Adorata. Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.10. Orthographic
error for Duguetti Odorata.
Duguetti Odorata. (C.japonica), Geldorf, Const., 1844, Catalogue of Plants and Price List, p.6: Very
beautiful, large flowers, similar to Pomponia but deepened in colour. Flowers give off the
scent of Azalea liliflora and daphne. Graulhie, Jun.1844, Revue Horticole, p.69; van Houtte
Catalogue, 1844-1845, 18:11, as ‘Duquetti Odorata’. Berlèse, 1849, Annales de la Société
Central d’Horticulture de France, vol.40, p.277: Flower very large, 10 cm when well grown;
colour delicate rose-pink. This variety opens to the warmth of the sun spreading an agreeable
scent similar to the Azalea ‘Liliiflora’. Originated by Pierre Tourres, Macheteaux, France.
Orthographic errors: ‘Duguetti Adorata’, ‘Dughetti (Rosea Odorata)’, ‘Dugnetti Odorata’,
‘Duquetti Odorata’, ‘Duqueti Odorata’.
Dujuan Baozhu. (Azalea Precious Pellet). (C.azalea). China Regn No.3. China Flowers & Horticulture,
Mar 2006, No.6, p.49, with colour photo; A bud mutation of C.azalea, originated by Fu
Bingzhong, Jinhua, Zhejiang, China. Leaves dark green, 5.5 cm long x 2 cm wide,
conspicuous midrib, apices concave. Flowers red, anemone form with 8-10 oblong outer
petals and a compact hemispherical cushion of folded, erect petaloids.
Dujuancha.
Chinese Camellia Culture, 2003, p.216. Synonym for Zhizhucha.
Duk of Lancaster. Franchetti, 1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.27. Orthographic error for ‘Duke of
Lancaster’.
Duke de Britagne.
Lindo Nursery Catalogue, 1948, p.4. Orthographic error for Duc de Bretagne.
Duke de Orleans.
lon.
Kiyono Nursery Catalogue, 1933, p.8. Invalid synonym for Marguerite Gouil150
Duke of Britain. Puddle & Hanger. 1961, RHS., The Rhododendron and Camellia Yearbook,
No.15, p.113. Synonym for Duc de Bretagne.
Duke of Brittany. Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Orthographic variant for Duc de
Bretagne.
Duke of Buccleugh. Scott, J. & Son Nursery Catalogue, 1868. Orthographic error for Duchess of
Buccleugh.
Duke of Burgundy. (C.japonica), Magnolia Gardens and Nursery Catalogue, 1942-1943: Deep pink
fading to white around the petal margin. Large semi-double. Compact growth. Mid-season
blooming. Originated at Magnolia Gardens, St John’s Island, South Carolina, USA.
Duke of Caraman.
man.
Piantaio Comunale Romano, 1859. Orthographic variant for Duca di Cara-
Duke of Devonshire. Jones 1958, Planting Fields. Orthographic variant for Duc de Devonshire.
Invalidly used as a synonym for C.M. Hovey in USA.
Duke of Lancaster. (C.japonica), Charles van Geert Catalogue, 1846, p.66. No description. Franchetti,
1855, Collezione di Camelie, p.27 as ‘Duk of Lancaster’: Imbricated; pink streaked with
white. Journal of Horticulture, 1871, vol.1, p.197: Deep rose, large. Osborne & Son Nursery
Catalogue, 1880, p.46: Fine, clear rose; large and handsome. Originated in England by Halley.
Orthographic errors: ‘Duk of Lancaster’, ‘Duke of Laucaster’, ‘Duke of Lankaster’.
Duke of Lankaster. de Jonghe, 1851, Traité de la Culture du Camellia, p.105. Orthographic error
for Duke of Lancaster.
Duke of Laucarter.
Mariotti Catalogue, 1924. Orthographic error for Duke of Lancaster.
Duke of Northumberland. (C.japonica), Scott, J. & Son Nursery Catalogue, 1868. Orthographic variant,
‘Duc de Northumberland’. No description. (Believed extinct).
Duke of Wellington. (C.japonica), Magnolia Gardens and Nursery Catalogue, 1942-1943: Red, large
semi-double with loose petals mixed with stamens. A seedling originated by Magnolia Gardens, St John’s Island, South Carolina, USA.
Duke of Windsor. Rubel, 1940-1941, “Floral Gems from China” Catalogue, No.79, p.25. Synonym
for Mathotiana Rosea.
Duke of Worcester. (C.japonica), Greenbrier Farms Catalogue, 1945; Fruitland Nursery Catalogue,
1945-1946, p.27. No description. Orthographic variant: ‘Duke of Worchester’. Originated in
USA.
Duke of Worchester.
Worcester.
Duke of York.
Hume, 1946, Camellias in America, p.330. Orthographic variant for Duke of
Beverfield Nursery Catalogue, 1902. Synonym for Otahuhu Beauty.
Dulante Xiansheng. American Camellia Yearbook, 1993, p.42. Chinese synonym for New Zealand
C.reticulata hybrid Tom Durrant.
Dulcata.
Berlèse, 1845, Monographie, ed.3, p.242. Orthographic error for Sulcata, (synonym
‘Bell’ Irene’).
Dulcie.
Caledonia Nursery Catalogue, 1874, p.5. Orthographic error for Dulcis.
Dulcis. (C.japonica), Jacob Mackoy Catalogue, 1836, p.16. No description. Berlèse, 1840, Monographie,
ed.2, p.186, 234 :Leaves oblong, shell-like, strongly veined; buds large scales blackish;
flowers to 9.5 cm across, full, of deep orange-red, corolla fully grown with a convex rosette,
like Colvilii; petals of the circumference, broad, few in number, round, spoon shaped; the
others are numerous, thick-set, unequal, creped, erect and forming a flattened bowl; in the
151
centre there is a glimpse of 2 or 3 small petals marked with a longitudinal band of white.
Originated in England. Orthographic error: ‘Dulcie’.
Dulcis Maddalane. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1875-1876, 163: 304. No description. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Dulcis Major. van Houtte Catalogue, 1841, 7:21. Synonym for ‘Palmer’s Superba’ according to
Berlèse.1843. However the prior name for this camellia is Vandesiana Carnea.
Dulmeri. (C.japonica), Jacquin, Paris Nursery Catalogue, 1845, p.13. No description. Originated in
France. (Believed extinct.)
Duma.
Gao, Jiyin, 2007, The Identification....Outstanding Camellias, p.415; Chinese synonym
for the USA C.reticulata hybrid Howard Dumas.
Dumlaps Imbricata.
cana.
Dumlompi Americana.
Volonte Catalogue, 1888, p.112. Orthographic error for Dunlap’s AmeriMaupoil Catalogue, 1853. Orthographic error for Dunlap’s Americana.
Dumosa. (C.japonica), Franco Agostoni, 1844, Catalogo Plantarum... No description. Originated in
Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Dumouitier.
de Jonghe, 1851, Beknopte Handleiding tot het Kweeken von Camellias, p.119.
Orthographic error for Monsieur Dumoustier.
Dun Kaleri. Wilmot, 1943, Florists’ Review, 93(2393):17. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’
(Masayoshi).
Dun Xiansheng.
American Camellia Yearbook, 1993, p.42. Chinese synonym for the USA
C.reticulata hybrid S.P. Dunn.
Dunckelearii.
Trillon, 1845, Catalogue, p.4. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’, (Masayoshi).
Duncan Bell.
Camellia Digest, 1943, 1(3). Synonym for Mena Ladnier.
Duncan Fletcher. Fruitland Nursery Catalogue, 1946-1947, p.29. Abbreviation for Senator Duncan U. Fletcher.
Duncan Shivel.
Dundanamii.
Hillcrest Nursery Catalogue, 1958. Orthographic error for Shivel Duncan.
Scott, J. & Son Nursery Catalogue, 1868. Orthographic error for Don d’un Ami.
Dundunamii. Hazlewood & Jessep, 1972, Checklist - Camellia Cultivars from Nursery Catalogues,
p.64. Orthographic error for Don d’un Ami.
Duniao.
Gao, Jiyin, Ltr, 22nd August, 1994. Chinese synonym for the Japanese C.japonica
Miyako-dori.
Dunkelarii.
Arnaud Catalogue, 1839-1840. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’ (Masayoshi).
Dunkelaerii.
Grilli, 1843-1844, Catalogo Generale. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’,
(Masayoshi).
Dunklaari.
Linden Catalogue, 1873. Orthographic error for ‘Donckelaeri’ (Masayoshi).
Dunlap Americana. Rousseau, Angers Catalogue, 1842-1843, p.2. Orthographic error for Dunlap’s
Americana.
Dunlap d’America. Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.10. Orthographic
variant for Dunlap’s Americana.
Dunlap Imbricata. Rousseau, Angers Catalogue, 1842-1843, p.2. Orthographic error for Imbricata
Dunlapii.
152
Dunlap White Waratah. Trillon, Le Mans Catalogue, 1843, p.5. Orthographic error for Dunlap’s
White Waratah.
Dunlap White Waratah. Rousseau, Angers Catalogue,1842-1843, p.2. Orthographic error for
Dunlap’s White Waratah.
Dunlappii.
Dunlaps.
Horticulteur Universal, 1844. Abbreviation for Imbricata Dunlapii.
Spae, 1847, Annales de Gand, 3:251, pl.140. Abbreviation for Dunlap’s Americana.
Dunlap’s Americana. (C.japonica), Dunlap, 1840, Magazine of Horticulture, 6:23: Leaves 8 cm long
and 6.8 cm wide, nearly flat, round-oval, slightly acuminate, dentated, smooth, glossy green,
finely veined. The bud is large, oval with greenish, calycinal scales; petals, 70 in number, full
to the centre, clear white, regularly spotted as in the guard petals of Punctata Rosea. The
parents were the old ‘Middlemist’ fertilized by Punctata. Originated by Thomas Dunlap of
Harlem, New York, USA. Orthographic errors: ‘Dunlop’s Americana’, ‘Dunlappii’,
‘Dunlaps’, ‘Americana Dunlaps’, ‘Dunloop’s Americana’, ‘Dumlompsi Americana’,
‘Dumlap’s Imbricata’, ‘Dunlap d’Ameriana’, ‘Dunlap Americana’. ‘Dunlops’, ‘d’Amerique
de Dunloop’, ‘Americana’. See illustrations: Berlèse, 1843, Iconographie, pl.300 and Annales
de Gand, 1847, pl.140 as ‘Dunlaps’.
Dunlap’s Anemona Flora. Gills, E. Nursery Catalogue, 1889-1890, p.28. Synonym for Dunlap’s
White Waratah.
Dunlap’s Blush. William Prince Linnean Gardens and Nursery, 1860, Select Greenhouse Plants,
45th ed. No.13, p.5. Synonym for Americana.
Dunlap’s d’Americana.
Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Ville Quiete, p.10.
Orthographic variant for Dunlap’s Americana.
Dunlap’s Imbricata. Harrison, 1846, Floricultural Cabinet, vol.14, p.44. Volonte Catalogue 1888.
Orthographic variant for Imbricata Dunlapii.
Dunlap’s Imbricated. Gill, E. Nursery Catalogue, 1889-1890. Orthographic variant for Imbricata
Dunlapii.
Dunlap’s New. Wm. R. Prince, Linnean Gardens & Nursery Catalogue, 1860, p.6. Abbreviation
for ‘Dunlap’s New White’, synonym for Imbricata Dunlapii.
Dunlap’s White.
Hovey & Co. Catalogue, 1857, p.9. Abbreviation for Dunlap’s White Waratah.
Dunlap’s White Waratah. (C.japonica) Lemaire, 1843, L’Horticulteur Universal as ‘Dunlap’s White
Warratah’; Harrison, 1846, Floricultural Cabinet, vol.14, p.44 as ‘White peony’. Originated
by Thomas Dunlap, Harlem, New York, USA. Buist, 1852, American Flower Garden
Directory, p.211: Pure white, perfectly imbricated, a free grower. Synonyms: ‘Dunlop’s New
White’, ‘Dunlop’s Alba Nova’, ‘Dunlop’s Anenoma Flora’, ‘Dunlap’s New’ . Abbreviations:
‘Dunlop’s White’, ‘Dunlap’s White’. Orthographic error: ‘Dunlop’s White Warratah’.
Dunloop’s Americana. Fréres Noisette, Nantes Nursery Catalogue, 1857, p.35. Orthographic error
for Dunlap’s Americana.
Dunloop’s Imbricata. Fréres Noisette, Nantes Nursery Catalogue, 1857, p.35. Orthographic error
for Imbricata Dunlapii.
Dunlop’s Alba Nova. Koch, 1862, Belgique Horticole, p.119,120. Synonym for Dunlap’s White
Waratah.
Dunlop’s Americana. Anonymous, Oct.1843, Revue Horticole, p.423. Orthographic error for Dunlap’s Americana.
Dunlop’s Imbricata. Thibault, Paris Nursery Catalogue, 1845, p.12. Orthographic error for Imbricata Dunlapii.
153
Dunlop’s New White. Halliday, 1880, Practical Camellia Culture, p.138. Synonym for Imbricata
Dunlapii.
Dunlop’s White. Buist, 1852, American Flower Gardeners’ Directory, p.211. Abbreviation for
Dunlap’s White Waratah.
Dunlop’s White Warratah. Anonymous, 1843, Revue Horticole, p.423. Orthographic error for
Dunlap’s White Waratah.
Dunneth. (C.japonica), Linden Catalogue, 1873, No.94, p.22. No description. Orthographic error,
‘Dunneti’. Originated in Belgium. (Believed extinct.)
Dunneti.
Carlo Costantini Catalogue, 1886. Orthographic error for Dunneth.
Duntruen. (C.hybrid), RHS., 1981-1982, Rhododendron with Magnolia and Camellias, p.97, entered by
Mr Scott in hybrids division of Camellia Competition. No description. Originated in England.
Duoban Jinxin. (Many Petalled Gold Heart), (C.japonica), Wang, Yiping & Yu, Zhonglu, 1989,
Camellias No.9, p.20: Small dense shrub. Flower buds spherical. Flowers dark red with
purplish tints. Petals 7-11 emarginate petals; single to semidouble. Stamens numerous with
long filaments. Styles shorter than filaments, 3-lobed. Flower 6-7.5 cm across. Late flowering.
Originated in China.
Duobuluo. Gao, Jiyin, 1998, The World's Best Camellia Cultivars, p.106. Chinese synonym for
Dobro.
Duoer.
Chinese synonym for USA C.japonica Kewpie Doll.
Duojing. (Surpassing Beauty), (C.japonica), Liu, 1959, Chung Kuo Chu Ming Ti Chi Chung Hua Hui:
Dark red and belongs to the peony type. It has two layers of flat petals in the outer rows while
the divided centre is made up of pinched petals. Different reading: ‘To Ching’. Originated in
China.
Duoladuo.
Gao, Jiyin, Ltr, 22nd August 1994. Chinese synonym for the USA C.hybrid El
Dorado.
Duolidaier. Shao, Taichong, 1992, The Observations from Camellia World, p.74, No.289. Chinese
synonym for the Australian C.japonica Dorothy Dyer.
Duolisi. Gao, Jiyin, 1998, The World's Best Camellia Cultivars, p.31. Chinese synonym for Doris
Ellis.
Duoluoleisi. Gao, Jiyin, 1998, The World's Best Camellia Cultivars, p.106. Chinese synonym for
Dolores Hope.
Duonier. Gao, Jiyin, 1998, The World's Best Camellia Cultivars, p.34. Chinese synonym for Ellen
Daniel.
Dupla-Nova. (C.japonica), Giacomelli, ed.1847, Padova coi tipo della Liviani. No description.
Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Duplex. (C.japonica), Thomasville Nursery Catalogue, 1942, p.6: Deep pink, medium, semi-double,
hose-in-hose type. Originated in USA.
Duplicata. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.9, 1872-1873: Medium size anemone
form, colour rose-red with white markings. Originated in Italy.
Dupont d’Alerne.
l’Eure.
Burdin Maggiore & Co. Catalogue, 1862. Orthographic error for Dupont de
Duponte de l’Eune. Fendig, 1953, American Camellia Catalogue. Orthographic error for Dupont
de l’Eure.
154
Dupont de l’Eure. (C.japonica), van Houtte Catalogue, 1859, 77:56. No description. Verschaffelt, 1859,
Nouvelle Iconographie, Book IV, pl.III: obtained from seed in Italy. The blossoms are small,
imbricated with the utmost regularity, cherry red at the circumference and a vivid pink at the
centre. Originated by B. Lechi, Brescia, Italy. Orthographic errors: ‘Dupont d’Alerne’,
‘Dupont de l’Eune’, ‘Dupont de l’Ure’.
Dupuy. (C.japonica), Nantes, Services des Espaces, Collections, 1980. No description.
Orthographic variant: ‘Du Puy’. Originated in France.
Duque da Terceira. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.31, & No.9,
1872-1873, p.43: Formal double. Colour vivid pink, with splashes of white. Originated in
Portugal.
Duque de Bragança. (C.japonica) José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.36, & No.9,
1872-1873, p.42: Formal double. Vivid chery. Centre paler with white splashes. Orthographic
errors; ‘Duca di Braganza’, ‘Duque de Bragana’. Originated in Portugal.
Duque de Devonshir. Escuela di Agricultura Catalogue, 1882. Orthographic variant for Duc de
Devonshire.
Duque de Laföes. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.35; Rose form, pale
pink with white stripes and dots. Originated in Portugal.
Duque de Loulé. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.35, & No.9, 1872-1873,
p.43: Regular rose form. Colour pale rose pink variegated with stripes of white. Originated in
Portugal.
Duque de Palmella. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro, Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.36; Dark pink,
striped white or carmine. Originated in Portugal.
Duque de Saldanha. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.32, & No.9,
1872-1873, p.43: Peony form of vivid cherry. Originated in Portugal.
Duque do Porto. (C.japonica), Jardim Portuense, 1844, No.7, p.106; Regular flower, light pink, inner
petals slightly striped with white, similar to Duqueza de Bragança (‘Carneiro’s Rose’).
Obtained in Portugal by Mr João José Gomes.
Duquesa da Terceira. (C.japonica), José Marques Loueiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.31, & No.9,
1872-1873, p.43: Formal double of vivid pink with blotches of white. Orthographic variant
‘Duqueza da Terceira’. Originated in Portugal.
Duquesa de Bragança. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.34, & No.9,
1872-1873, p.43: Similar form as ‘Pomponia’ (Pompone), colour flesh pink, striped and
dotted with carmine. Originated in Portugal. Orthographic variant: ‘Duqueza de Bragança’.
Orthographic error ‘Duquesa de Braganza’.
Duquesa de Lafões. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.9, 1872-1873, p.47: Double.
Rosy white spotted carmine. Orthographic variant ‘Duqueza de Laföes’. Orthographic error
‘Duquesa de Lafoes’.Originated in Portugal.
Duquesa de Orleans. Escuela de Agricultura Catalogue, 1882. Orthographic variant for Duchesse
d’Orleans.
Duquesa de Palmella. (C.japonica), José Marques Loureiro Catalogue No.1, 1865, p.36, & No9,
1872-1873, p.43: Formal double of pale pink, sometimes with white markings and streaks.
Orthographic variant; ‘Duqueza de Palmella’. Originated in Portugal.
Duquesa di Cassi.
Duqueti Odorata.
Odorata.
Pul, 1964, American Camellia Yearbook, p.58. Synonym for Althaeiflora.
Jacob Makoy et Cie Catalogue, 1849, p.9. Orthographic error for Duguetti
155
Duquetti Odorata.
Odorata.
Alexis Dalliere, 1852, Price List, p.16. Orthographic error for Duguetti
Duqueza de Bragança (‘Carneiro’s Rose’). (C.japonica), Jardim Portuense, 1844, No.7, p.104; Regular
flower, purplish pink with several petals splashed white. Blooms early season.
Duqueza de Lafoes.
Real Companhia Horticolo-Agricola Portuense, Catalogue, No.29, 18951896, p.47. Orthographic variant for Duquesa de Lafões.
Duratti. (C.japonica), Burnier & Grilli Catalogue, 1846-1847: Large flower, perfectly imbricated, colour
rose-pink splashed by areas of velvety white. Originated in Italy.
Durazzo. (C.japonica), Luzzatti, 1851, Collezione di Camelie, p.15. No description. Franchetti, 1855,
Collezione di Camelie, p.27. No description. Andrè Leroy, 1868, Catalogue, p.133:
Imbricated pink. Originated in Italy. (Believed extinct.)
Durazzo 1º. (C.japonica), Luzzatti, 1851, Collezione di Camelie, p.15: Formal double, carmine red
with large and small spots of white. Imbricated. Originated in Italy. Orthographic variant for
Durazzo Primo.
Durazzo 2º. (C.japonica), Luzzatti, 1851, Collezione di Camelie, p.15: Dark carmine with many spots
and lines of white. Imbricated. Originated in Italy. Orthographic variant: ‘Durazzo II’.
Durazzo II. Medici Spada; 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a villa Quiete, p.10. Orthographic variant
for Durazzo 2º.
Durazzo Prima. (C.japonica), Le Camelie Ottocentesche del Parco Duazzo Pallavicini, ca. 1997, with
colour photo. It is considered that this should be regarded as the valid name as against the
orthographic variant ‘Durazzo 18’ (‘Durazzo 1º’) as published in the ICS Register, p.519.
Durazzo Primo. Mercatelli Catalogue, 1894. Orthographic variant for Durazzo 1º.
Durfee Road.
SCCS., 1942, Classification of Camellias, p.1. Synonym for California.
Durfee Road Pink. Wilmot, 1943. Camellia Variety Classification Report, p.10. Synonym for
California.
Duriensis. (C.japonica), Jardim Portuense, 1844, No.7, p.106; Dark scarlet flower, regular, and very
similar to ‘Myrtifolia Lusitana’. Originated in Portugal.
Durini. (C.japonica), Linden Catalogue, 1871-1872, p.16. No description. Originated in Italy. (Believed
extinct.)
Durrant’s Dilemma. (C.japonica), New Zealand Camellia Bulletin, 1969, vol.IV, No.2, p.9, Reg. No.42:
Chance seeding of Ville de Nantes raised by Mrs T Durrant, Rotorua, New Zealand, that first
flowered, 1964. Plant habit and foliage similar to the seed parent. The leaves are bright green,
lanceolate, with broad, shallow serrations. The flower has a distinct, spiral form of 7 radial
arms, each with 12-13 petals. Colour is red with a central stripe on some petals. Occasional
tiered formation on some flowers. The flowers are 8-10 cm across and become hemispherical.
Illustration p.10.
Dusheng. (Superb Metropolis), (C.japonica), Chen, Jingyi, 1253, Quan Fang Bei Zu: Flowers deep red.
Originated in China. (Believed extinct).
Dusty. (C.japonica), American Camellia Yearbook, 1986, p.89, Reg. No.2010: A large, dusty rose-pink,
formal double, C.japonica chance seedling; mid-season to late flowering. Originated by
Elmer and Berenice Achterberg, Citrus Heights, California, USA. The 7 year old seedling first
flowered 1984. Average flower size, 12.5 cm acoss x 6 cm deep with 80-85 petals. Plant
growth is erect and rapid with dark green leaves, 10.5 cm long x 5.5 cm wide.
156
Dusty Variegated. (C.japonica), ACS, February 1996, The Camellia Journal, vol.51, No.1, p.29.
Valdosta Camellia Scions as ‘Dusty V.’. A white blotched, dusty rose-pink, virus variegated
form of Dusty. Originated in USA. Chinese synonym ‘Ban Shajin’.
Dutchess d’Gaze.
Rubel, 1940-1941, Floral Gems from China, Catalogue No.79, p.24.
Orthographic error for Duchesse Decazes.
Dutchess of Orleans.
Dute. (Unique).
Buist, 1839, Camellias, p.6. Orthographic error for Duchesse d’Orleans.
Chinese synonym for the USA C.japonica One Alone.
Dutisepala. Hilsman, 1956, SCCS., The Camellia Review, vol.17, No.8, p.33. Orthographic error
for C.acutisepala.
Dux Amori Canus. (C.japonica), Veitch, James Jr, 1853, Catalogue of Select Stove Plants..., p.13.
Originated in Italy. No description. Orthographic variant ‘Dux Amoricanus’. (Believed
extinct).
Dux Armoricanus. Medici Spada, 1857, Catalogo nel Giardino a Villa Quiete, p.10. No description.
Dux Genove.
Dux Litta.
Isola Madre Catalogue, 1845. Synonym for Duca di Genova.
Charles Van Geert Catalogue, 1846, p.66. Synonym for Duca di Litta.
Duxin Dali Cha. (Single Heart Dali Camellia), (C.reticulata), Yü & Bartholomew, 1980, American
Camellia Yearbook, p.22: Scarlet. Mid-season. Kunming. Feng et al. 1986, Yunnan Camellias
of China, p.99 as ‘Duxindalicha’: Leaves large, thick, broad-elliptic to elliptic-ovate, apices
acute or acuminate, bases round or broad-cuneate, flat or slightly raised, margins undulate,
7.6-10 cm long x 5-6 cm wide. Flowers large, dark red (RHS,CC.53B), diameter 12-18 cm.
Petals about 30 in 4-5 whorls, outer whorls flat, inner whorls folded. Stamens numerous,
united to form a tube. Pistils mostly well developed; a few rudimentary, fertile. This cultivar
was selected from a bud mutation of Dali Cha from which it differs by its flattened petals and
by the stamens united to form a tube and placed in the centre of the flower. Different
readings: ‘Tu-hsin Ta-li Ch’a’, ‘Duxindalicha’.
Duxindalicha.
Feng et al., 1981, Yunnan Chahua, p.99. Different reading for Duxin Dali Cha.
Duxin Diechi. (Single Heart Butterfly), (C.reticulata), Yü & Bartholomew, 1980, American Camellia
Yearbook, p.16: Spinel pink. Mid-season, Kunming. Feng et al.1986, Yunnan Camellias of
China, p.63: Leaves long, ovate to oblong, thin, apices acuminate and recurved, bases
cuneate, reclinate in a V-shape, 6-9 cm long x 2.5-4 cm wide. Flowers spinel pink
(RHS.CC.68C), diameter 13-15 cm. Petals 17-19 in 2-3 whorls, folded, erect. Stamens
numerous, united to form a tube. This is a new cultivar selected from seedlings of open
pollinated seeds by researchers at the Kunming Botanical Garden. This cultivar has pink
spinel flowers and folded, erect petals that look like butterflies. Different Reading: ‘Tu-hsin
Tieh-ch’ih’. Western synonym: ‘Single Heart Butterfly’. Synomym: ‘Single Heart Butterfly
Wings’.
Duxin Guiye. (Single Heart Osmanthus Leaf), (C.reticulata), Chuang, 1959, Yunnan Shanchahua. No
description. Different reading ‘Tu-hsin Kuei-yeh’, ‘Tuhsinkueiyeh’. Originated in China.
Duxin Yinhong. (Single Heart Spinel Pink), (C.reticulata), Feng et al.1986, Yunnan Camellias of China,
p.37 as ‘Duxinyinhong’: Leaves elliptic, apices acuminate, bases cuneate, 7-8 cm long x 2.5-3
cm wide. Flowers are light spinel pink (RHS.CC.62D), diameter 7.5-8 cm, single. Petals 5-7.
Stamens numerous, united at the base to form a ring. Stigmas irregularly lobed. Fertile. This
is a new cultivar selected from seedlings of open pollinated seeds by researchers of the
Kunming Botanic Gardens. Flowers early. Different reading: ‘Tuhsingyinhung’, ‘Tu-hsin
Yin-hung’.
157
Dwarf Pink. (C.sasanqua), Tom Dodd Nurseries Catalogue, 1968-1969, p.6. No description. Originated in USA. No valid listing located.
Dwarf Pomegranate.
Hailiu Cha.
Bartholomew, 1982, American Camellia Yearbook, p.152. Synonym for
Dwarf Rose. Yü, 1950, RHS, Rhododendron and Camellia Conference Report. Synonym for
Hentiangao.
Dwarf Rose. (C.sasanqua), American Camellia Yearbook, 1959, p.271, Reg. No.354: A 6 year old
chance seedling, originated by J.M. Jones, Savannah, Georgia, USA that first flowered 1954.
Leaves 4 cm x 2.5 cm. The flowers, 7.5 cm across and 5 cm deep, resemble Rose Dawn in
form and Berenice Boddy in colour. There are 21 petals and 4 petaloids. The light pink
flowers, shading to dark at the centre, open to display yellow stamens. Flowers early.
Dwarf Shishi. (C.sasanqua), Nuccio’s Nurseries Catalogue, 1988-1989, p.16: Originated by Toichi
Domoto Nursery, California, USA. Very compact, low growing, small leaved seedling of
Shishigashira. Small size, bright red semi-double. An outstanding dwarf sasanqua.
Dwarf Shishi White. (C.sasanqua). ACS, The Camellia Journal, Nov. 1997, p.7, Reg. No.2442. A
miniature, white, semi-double sport of Dwarf Shishi, discovered and verified by Dr William
L. Ackerman, Ashton, Md, USA. Flowers early. American Camellia Yearbook, 1997, p.2,
colour photo before p.1. First observed in 1986, and has flowered true on several plants for 5
years. Average flower size is 3.8 cm across x 1.2 cm deep, with 10 petals, 2 petaloids, pale
yellow anthers and creamy white filaments. Plant growth is spreading, dense and slow, with
dark green leaves 5.7 cm long x 1.8 cm wide.
Dwarf White Shishi. Camellias, Y.C. Shen, 2009, p.315 with colour photo; Orthographic error for
Dwarf Shishi White.
Dwight Eisenhower. Nantes, Services des Espaces, Collections, 1980. Abbreviation for General
Dwight Eisenhower.
Dyanthiflora.
Dyka-Gura.
Burdin Catalogue, 1835, p.38. Orthographic error for Dianthiflora.
Chandra Nursery Catalogue, 1928, p.4. Corruption of the Japanese name Daikagura.
Dynasty. (C.reticulata. hybr.), ACS., 1985, The Camellia Journal, vol.40, No.4, p.47, Reg. No.1978: A
very large, irridescent deep pink, peony form C.reticulata hybrid, chance seedling of
Buddha, midseason blooming; originated by Houghton S. Hall, San Anselmo, California,
USA. The 6 year old seedling first bloomed 1980. Average flower size 15 cm across x 10 cm
deep with 30 petals, golden anthers and yellowish white filaments. Plant gowth is upright and
rapid with light green leaves, 12 cm x 5.5 cm.
158

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