digital DEWI Magazin #48

Сomentários

Transcrição

digital DEWI Magazin #48
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Windenergie
WINDENERGIE Wind
WINDenergy
ENERGY Énergie
ÉNERGIEÉolienne
ÉOLIENNE energia
ENERGIA
eólica
EÓLICA ernergía
ERNERGÍA
eólica
EÓLICA
Editorial
02
08 || 2016
2015
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
UL International
GmbH, Wilhelmshaven,
Germany
UL International
GmbH, Wilhelmshaven,
Germany
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Content
Please click here for information how to
navigate in the digital DEWI Magazin
Bitte hier klicken, um etwas über die
Navigation im digitalen DEWI Magazin
zu erfahren
Impressum
|
Content
English
Deutsch
Editorial
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power Curve Measurements (continuation)
nur in Englisch verfügbar
Conversion System and Autonomous Converter for the Transformation
of Wind Turbines from Fixed Speed to Variable Speed
nur in Englisch verfügbar
Relative Calibration Process for Long Term Thermal Stratification
Measurements in the Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer
nur in Englisch verfügbar
What is the Impact of Offshore Wind Farms on Each Other and on the
Regional Climate?
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore Windparks untereinander und auf das
lokale Klima?
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Wind Energy Use in Germany - Status 31.12.2015
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Reporting of Commissioning and Approval of Wind Turbines in the
Installations Register for the year 2015
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und Genehmigung von WEA im Anlagenregister für das Jahr 2015
Power Generation from Renewable Energies in Germany
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren Energien in Deutschland
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
DEWI/UL News
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Kontakt
Author
zum
Contact
Autor
J. P. Molly
DEWI, Wilhelmshaven
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
Editorial
On the afternoon of the fourth of February this year, DEWI held an enjoyable and
entertaining reception to celebrate its 25th anniversary together with clients,
long-term companions and employees. It became clear once more what an
incredible development wind energy has gone through in these past 25 years,
nationally as well as internationally. Along with many others, we at DEWI have
had the privilege to accompany and help shaping this process. Certainly the
numerous DEWI employees who over the years have left DEWI to work with
other companies of the wind industry have also contributed to this development. At the anniversary I mentioned that at the beginning of my over 40 years
of working for the wind energy I would have declared anyone crazy who at that
time had predicted for the year 2015 more than 430 GW of wind power installed
worldwide, more than 10 % of which installed in Germany. For me as an engineer
the growth in size of wind turbines is even more impressive. The difference
between the wind energy converters which were on the market at the beginning, with a capacity of a few kilowatts and rotor diameters between 10 and 15
m, to modern wind turbines with 180 m diameter and up to 8,000 kW, shows
the enormous gain in know-how, which certainly involved a great deal of effort,
but also led to the high reliability wind turbines have achieved today. This rapid
development is unique in the history of industry and has made wind energy one
of the cheapest energy sources available today.
Germany not only had a leading role in the development and application of wind
energy, but also set an example for other countries in implementing the energy
transition, a goal set for the next decades which will certainly benefit the economy. UL International DEWI looks forward to making a contribution to this goal
with its knowledge and experience of 25 years. When travelling abroad, it often
strikes me how little is known about the progress already made in Germany in
the energy transition. As a small contribution to change this, we are publishing
in this DEWI Magazin an article by IWR (International Economic Platform for
Renewable Energies) which gives a monthly overview of the average hourly contributions of solar and wind power in the German electricity grid (see article on
page 54). Wind power alone had a share of 15% in the power supply and this
amount in a country that in view of its wind resources is not exactly predestined
for wind energy use. The same applies for solar power with a share of almost 6%
in German power supplies in 2015. Maybe this article can contribute to a better
understanding in countries rich in wind and solar resources that even a power
supply grid with a very high share of 21% of volatile energy resources – unthinkable 30 years ago – can be kept stable. Germany is facing the task to integrate
even considerably higher shares of renewable power in the supply grid. To deal
with this task in a cost-effective way is a big challenge and requires the cooperation of all the players in the electricity market.
In order to achieve this, a fundamental paradigm shift
in the structure of our electricity supply will be necessary. Many years ago we
had electricity supply monopolies who had optimized their system of production, transport and distribution of electricity so as to achieve the maximum
profit for their companies. The disadvantage of this supply system was the necessary government control of tariffs, in other words there was no competition.
When a new system was introduced, unbundling energy suppliers from network
operators and distributors, the players were competing with each other, but they
only optimized the segment of electricity supply for which they were responsible, with the result that no one felt responsible any longer for optimizing the
overall supply. For the energy transition to be successful, new ways of sharing
responsibilities have to be found in order to ensure the necessary security of the
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
electricity supply by a cost-optimized adjustment of the energy production
to the consumption. This means that the grid operator responsible should be
able to influence certain parts of the energy production, such as the operation of storage systems or the specific power installation of the wind turbines that is most cost-effective for the supply system. In other words, after
the “unbundling” a certain amount of “re-bundling” will be reasonable and
necessary.
I wish all the customers and friends of DEWI a successful year 2016 with
favorable market conditions ensuring further growth and a successful energy
transition. We will be there for you to support you with our know-how and
25 years of experience.
Wilhelmshaven, February 2016
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
Jens Peter Molly
Managing Director
UL International GmbH
WE KNOW WIND
Course Program 2016
Latin America & Spain
Location
Brazil, São Paulo
Argentina, Buenos Aires
Chile, Santiago
Peru, Lima
Colombia, Bogotá
Costa Rica, San José
Mexico, Mexico City
Spain, Madrid
Days
14/15.04.2016
10/11.05.2016
12/13.05.2016
16/17.05.2016
26/27.09.2016
29/30.09.2016
04/05.10.2016
15/16.11.2016
All seminars will be conducted in Spanish
except in Brazil, which will be in Portuguese.
DEWI/UL News
Contact the experts at:
Impressum
|
Content
[email protected] / dewi.de
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Author
Contact
J. Ripa; DEWI Spain
M. Illarregi; Acciona Energía
ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
Uncertainty Correlations in Power Curve Measurements
(continuation)
As explained in the last DEWI Magazine (issue 47, Article: “UNCERTAINTY CORRELATION IN SIMULTANEOUS POWER CURVES, by Mikel Illarregi, Acciona Energía and
Joseba Ripa, DEWI), there is definitely a sound interest in the industry to enhance
accuracy when measuring power curves. As a clear indication of this, we have
received, after publishing the article, many expressions of interest about the topic
on several forums from different stakeholders in the industry and, in consequence,
we want to share with all of you the next steps that ACCIONA and DEWI are taking together to increase the mutual knowledge in this field.
In the previous article, we explained that the precision of power curve characterizations is highly dependent on many factors, but is especially sensitive to wind
speed measurements. Fig. 1 shows an example of uncertainty contributions distribution by bins on a 2MW wind turbine for flat terrain using TFC Advance (class
0.9). It displays very clearly that below cut-in and above the wind speed in which
rated power is reached, uncertainty is mostly dependent on electrical power readings while wind speed uncertainty contribution dominates massively the resultant
uncertainty on the intermediate bins (specifically the weightier bins in most of the
standard wind distributions).
Using the same example, Fig. 2 shows relative uncertainty values for different
Rayleigh wind speed distributions (from average wind speed 4 m/s to 11m/s) with
and without considering wind speed uncertainty contributions. The graph shows
two very important facts:
• Relative uncertainty is much higher for low wind speed regimes, which makes
it much more important to make extra efforts to achieve precise power curve
characterizations on those sites.
• Wind speed uncertainty contributions play a major role in the final uncertainty
and therefore most of the efforts to decrease uncertainties should be orientated
to diminish the uncertainty contributions to wind speed characterization:
• Utilization of high-class and range-fitting sensors
• Calibrations in high-performance labs
• Best practices in mountings
• Extended campaigns to collect a highly representative database
The meaningfulness of results begins to be under discussion when uncertainties
are largely higher than 5%. When this happens, the power-curve test results are
not robustly useable as truthful inputs for the financial models or guarantee
claims. Fig. 2 shows that this can be easily expected on low wind speed regime
sites (average wind speed lower than 7 m/s) because absolute uncertainty contributions (when given in m/s) are relatively much more relevant.
The most relevant wind farm owners in general follow the recommendations
above. They are aware that the tiny investment on high-class tests will pay off, but
as it was explained in the DEWI Magazine #47, there is an additional source for
potential exploration: correlation.
Testing several turbines on a wind farm should in theory increase the precision of
the average result if there is some degree of independency between the tests. The
dependency or independency degree has to be represented by the correlation factor, which in time is related to covariance. The following formula represents the
uncertainty for parameter C when C is the average between factors A and B:
uC2 =
(
1 2
2
u A + u B + 2u Au B ρ i , j
4
)
If the correlation factor equals 1, factors A and B are fully correlated (dependent)
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
and therefore the uncertainty of the average is the average of uncertainties. However if correlation equals 0 (fully independent factors), the uncertainty of the average is the root of the quadratic sum and therefore lower than the uncertainties A
and B separately.
The question therefore orbits around this correlation factor and how it could be
characterized. In view of this rationale, ACCIONA ENERGY and DEWI started to
work in a cooperation project with the aim of characterizing different correlation
factors by setting-up different measurement configurations with different degrees
of dependency. Different ideas were discussed in view of the costs and potential
results. As DEWI is performing power curve tests in a number of ACCIONA’s wind
farms, there were several options to decide. The Wind Farm Gostyn II located in
Województwo wielkopolskie (Poland) was selected for the tests because the installation schedule was appropriate for the project but specially because the wind
speed regime (low average wind speed) allows being more sensitive with the different analyses as uncertainties are higher than explained before. The wind farm
Gostyn II is composed of 11 wind turbines of the type AW116-3MW (Acciona Windpower) and it is located in a flat, open and agricultural area. DEWI is performing
two power curve tests on turbines #1 and #2 of this wind farm (See Fig. 3).
With the use of a U-shape goalpost, the project targets to obtain different power
curve results from a single wind turbine under test by mixing different instrumentation setups on one single meteorological mast. Consequently, there are six different measurement combinations with different degrees of dependency.
Installation was performed in early December 2015 (see Fig. 4 and Fig. 5) and the
following concepts were applied:
• Duplication of meteorological sensors (anemometers (WS), wind vanes(WD),
temperature probe (T) and barometer (P)):
• Different models (Met_Sys_1 / Met_Sys_2):
• WS: TFC A / Vector
• WD: Thies / Vector
• T: Galltec / Thies
• P: Vaisala / Setra
• Anemometers calibrated in two different wind tunnels (DEWI / WindGuard)
in independent sessions for Met_Sys_1 and Met_Sys_2
• Duplication of electrical power sensors on wind turbine #1 (WT_Sys_1) with six
additional current transformers (CTs) and two additional power transducers
(PTs) as rotor and stator are measured separately. Therefore three different electrical power measurement systems were defined:
• WT_Sys_1_A (Electrical Power System A on turbine #1)
• WT_Sys_1_B (Electrical Power System B on turbine #1)
• WT_Sys_2 (Electrical Power System on turbine #2)
• Duplication of loggers on the meteorological mast:
• Different models (Ammonit Meteo 40L / Campbell CR3000)
A cabinet for signals duplication was included (see Fig. 6) to allow crossing
options and consequently duplicating setups. With all the explained arrangements, six combinations were generated for the two turbines under test:
1. Met_Sys_1 vs WT_Sys_1_A
2. Met_Sys_1 vs WT_Sys_1_B
3. Met_Sys_1 vs WT_Sys_2
4. Met_Sys_2 vs WT_Sys_1_A
5. Met_Sys_2 vs WT_Sys_1_B
6. Met_Sys_2 vs WT_Sys_2
With the results of the different test combinations (with variety of degrees of
dependency and different averaging options), DEWI and ACCIONA will work on a
more precise characterization of uncertainty contributions for the averaged results.
We target to define the different dependency factors in order to use correlation/
covariance as a powerful tool to decrease uncertainties on power curve tests without inflating testing costs.
We are willing to know more about this interesting topic, which can help the
industry to enhance power curve characterizations, and you are invited to join us
in the endeavor.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Author
Contact
A. P. Ortega
Ingeteam Power Technology
S.A., Spain
External Article
ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
Conversion System and Autonomous Converter for the Transformation
of Wind Turbines from Fixed Speed to Variable Speed
Fixed Speed Wind Turbine (FSWT) technology was the main workhorse of the
wind industry until the appearance of the Variable Speed Wind Turbine (VSWT)
technology in the mid-nineties. The first prototype of a VSWT was introduced in
Europe in 1995, back then on the recently commissioned wind farm of “El Perdón” (Navarre) with a type C Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) driven by
Ingeteam’s IngeconWind power converter.
As we will see later, FSWT technology lacks critical features required to ensure
electrical grid stability, which in combination with the desire to reduce the Cost
of Energy (CoE), led to the origin of the VSWT technology and the rapid displacement of the fixed speed topologies over the following years.
Type A fixed speed generators are characterized by being directly connected to
the electrical grid, causing its rotational speed to be load-dependent and almost
fixed to grid frequency. Therefore, suffering from high mechanical stress and low
power quality (flicker effect and uncontrolled reactive power consumption), as
wind’s turbulences are directly transferred through the drive train down to outputted power. Rotor aerodynamic efficiency is also low as optimum Tip Speed
Ratio (TSR) can only be achieved for just one wind speed value (partially solved
by dual-speed generator technologies).
When comparing both technologies, FSWT and VSWT (Fig. 1 and Fig. 2), it is
concluded that the FSWT topology is limited in some features in which the VSWT
performs better, such as:
The VSWT enables the system to obtain the optimum Cp (power coefficient)
in a wide range of wind speeds inside the Maximum Power Point Tracking
(MPPT) regime (below rated), thus obtaining an increment in the annual
energy production (ΔAEP).
• In terms of power quality, the VSWT avoids the flicker effect in the grid side
and removes the low frequency harmonics generated by the capacitor banks
needed in FSWT topologies for power factor compensation of the generator.
Also, it allows for power factor regulation on the grid and enables the system to comply with all grid codes and Fault Ride Through (FRT) events.
• When considering the turbine from a mechanical point of view, the transformation from FSWT to VSWT has an impact in the lifetime of the wind turbine by extending it (Lifetime Extension, LTE), due to the reduction of torque
steps in the drive train caused by wind gusts. Similarly, the transients in the
start-up of the turbine, the abruptly changing of the generator’s speed, and
transients in emergency stops and the ones caused by the electrical grid are
drastically reduced, thus also increasing the wind turbine’s lifetime.
Considering these advantages in operation and performance of the VSWT over
the FSWT, the transformation of topologies A (Fig. 3) and B to either C or D will
represent an improvement in certain characteristics of the wind turbine.
The solution here presented consists in an autonomous system of power conversion and control, as described in Fig. 4. Such an approach ensures that the modifications to be performed in the FSWT system are minimal, consequently the
investment to be relatively low, increasing the Return of Investment (RoI) of the
solution.
•
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
For more information: www.ingeteam.com
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
In order to characterize the improvements related to the transformation of the
topology of the wind turbine, INGETEAM is currently involved together with
DEWI-UL in a project in which an already installed and in operation type A wind
turbine is transformed into a topology type D. Such a project, in an overall view,
covers the following stages:
The first step is to obtain the aerolastic simulation model that resembles the
FSWT behavior in order to be able to simulate its operation and performance.
The plant modelling is defined by certain parameters which are unique for the
wind turbine reference under study.
The second step is the characterization through on-site measurements of the
needed FSWT characteristics, such as the power curve and mechanical loads. A
particular wind turbine already installed on-site is selected for analysis. By characterizing the turbine, the simulation model previously mentioned can be tuned
and validated with real application measurements.
Based on this tuned and validated FSWT simulation model, the VSWT solution
and simulation model are developed, so that the behavior of the variable speed
topology for the wind turbine can be simulated, and improved control strategies
can be developed in order to increase its AEP and LTE. Once the correct performance and safe operation of the WT under variable speed are validated against
the aerolastic model, the wind turbine topology is transformed on-site through
the implementation of the autonomous system of power conversion and control. Once modified, the wind turbine is again characterized by on-site measurements (Fig. 5 and Fig. 6).
By the end of the process, a comparison of topologies by means of on-site measurements for the wind turbine under analysis is performed, together with an
analysis based on the simulation models of the various control strategies that
optimize the RoI for any given wind turbine.
Content
organised by:
17 / 18 October 2017
Bremen, Germany
13th GERMAN
WIND ENERGY
CONFERENCE
SAVE THE DATE
Two days of concentrated
wind energy technology
and research with
representatives from all
over the globe addressing
the latest commercial,
technical and scientific
developments.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Author
Contact
R. Frühmann, T. Neumann,
F. Bégué; DEWI, Wilhelmshaven
ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
Relative Calibration Process for Long Term Thermal Stratification
Measurements in the Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer
Abstract
Introduction
The work in this paper describes a method of calibrating temperature sensors
for measuring vertical thermal gradients on meteorological masts. The method
uses current state-of-the-art measurement systems to enable digitisation of the
sensor signal close to the sensor, thereby avoiding signal distortion over long
cable lengths. The sensors are calibrated together with the digitisation module
in a thermal chamber, using one sensor as a reference. A linear correlation
between the sensors is obtained, allowing the reading from each sensor/module pair to be related to all other sensors to within ± 0.05 °C. Results from 4
months of deployment on the FINO1 offshore measurement platform at 5 heights
from 30 to 100 m are presented as proof of concept.
At the measurement platform FINO1, located in the North Sea approximately 50
km north of the island of Borkum, thermometers are mounted at five elevations
(33, 40, 50 70 and 100 m) to provide temperature profile measurements. The
temperature profile in the lowest 100 m of the atmosphere is a good indicator
of boundary layer stratification and stability. This is relevant to energy yield from
wind farms since it influences the vertical wind profile, the length of wakes from
individual wind turbines, as well as turbulent loads that affect fatigue life of
wind turbine components. Obtaining accurate temperature profiles is difficult
due to the long distances between sensors and the data logger, and the resulting challenges of calibrating the sensor or avoiding corruption of the signal from
external influences along the cable. Thus,
obtaining reliable comparisons of temperature
between different heights has hitherto posed a
significant challenge.
The work described in this paper presents a
new approach to sensor calibration that took
place as part of a greater data logging system
change on the FINO1 offshore research platform. The calibration / measurement approach
makes use of current state-of-the-art data logging hardware that enables the measurement
signal to be digitised close to the sensor and a
www.ammonit.com
Your partner for accurate and reliable wind measurement campaigns. Meteo-40 Data Logger with user-friendly web interface and broad
sensor library • AmmonitOR: MEASNET-compliant monitoring and reporting web platform • First class measurement instruments • LiDARs
accepted for bankable wind energy assessments in simple terrain • The one and only SoDAR with a first well-done IEC sensitivity analysis.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
digital signal that is less susceptible to external influences, to be transferred over
the long cable lengths to the data logger. By calibrating the sensor together with
the complete cable and the measurement module, it is shown that sufficient
precision can be achieved to enable temperature differences at heights 10 m
apart to be measured reliably. The calibration procedure conducted in-house at
DEWI and the first four months of operation on FINO 1 are presented.
System Reliability
In response to increased demand for higher data capture rates, a trial was
started in 2010 to test the long term reliability of a new data logging system with
a recording rate capability of 1 Hz and greater. Another major difference is a modular approach to signal acquisition, with separate bespoke modules for conversion of the sensor outputs into digitised measurements. This modularity enables
spatial distribution of the signal acquisition for different sensors and sensor
types. For the temperature sensors (which output a very small temperature
dependent voltage) the measurement modules could be positioned in close
proximity to the sensors, thereby minimising the distance over which the analogue signal from the sensor needs to be transmitted. For this purpose however,
the module would need to be installed outside the protective environment of
the measurement container, bringing increased risks such as exposure to lightning strike, severe ranges of temperature, and condensation that could lead to
loss of data and equipment.
A trial was therefore conducted over an extended period (4 years) to investigate
data availability. This was found to be of the order of 90 % as shown in Fig. 1
– the low values in 2010 and 2013 were due to manual disruptions to the measurement while testing different system configurations. After four years, no
signs of hardware performance deterioration were observed and no influence of
environmental conditions on data reliability identified.
The trial was conducted with temperature and humidity measurements at the
33 and 50 m levels where existing temperature measurements were already in
place. The sensors used for the trial were chosen to be identical to the existing
sensors already installed on FINO1 to provide a direct comparison. The sensor
units contained both temperature (PT100) and relative humidity (hair hygrometer) sensors and were connected to Gantner e.bloxx A5-1 modules. Tab. 1 lists
the sensors, modules and data logger.
A direct comparison between the temperature measurements showed a discrepancy of approximately 1°C – the new measurements giving a lower temperature.
This offset was however not
constant over time but showed
occasional slight fluctuations of
first class advanced
a similar order of magnitude to
World wide the only class 0.5 Anemometer
accredited according IEC 61400-12-1
the difference between the two
(2005-12), ISO 17713-1, Measnet
measurements. For this reason,
a third short term measurement
was conducted using a separately calibrated system that
included sensor, measurement
and logger (Galltec-Mela KPC.RS
high quality
sensor with RS232 connection to
anemometer class 0.5
Class A,B and S accredited
a Laptop). This was calibrated as
acc. IEC 61400-12-1 for site
assessment and power
a complete system before and
performance of WTG.
• Optimised dynamic behaviour
after the verification campaign.
• minimum over speeding
• high accuracy
The verification was conducted
• excellent linearity r >0,99999
• high survival speed
at all five heights for a period of
• low power
• excellent price performance ratio
approximately 30 minutes at
• patented design
each height. An image of the
adolf ThIeS GMBh & Co. KG
Hauptstraße 76
setup at 33 m is shown in Fig. 2
D-37083 Göttingen (Germany)
Telefon +49 551-79001-0
. The campaign took place over
Fax + 49 551-79001-65
[email protected]
two days – 33, 40, 50 and 70 m
www.thiesclima.com
heights on day 1 and the 100 m
T h e W o r l d o f W e aT h e r d aTa
height on day 2. A comparison
aneMoMeTer
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
between the temperature measurements is shown in Fig. 3. Better agreement
is found between the trial system and the short term verification system at both
the 33 and 50 m heights. As a result of this trial, increased confidence was placed
in the new system over the old.
Calibration of the New Temperature Measurement System
Setup
Five new replacement sensors were purchased, of the same type as listed in
Tab. 1. These were calibrated in air according to the DAkkS standard at 5 temperatures (-10, 0, 10, 20 and 30 °C). Significant scatter was observed in the comparison between each sensor and the reference sensor, ranging from -0.32 to
+0.28 °C over all sensors and temperatures, and as much as -0.06 to +0.28 °C for
a single sensor. With this level of uncertainty, a reliable difference measurement
between two sensors better than ±0.3 °C could not be established.
An in-house relative calibration was therefore conducted subsequently to the
DAkkS calibration. For this purpose, each sensor was paired with a bespoke A5-1
module and the calibration was conducted for each pair. The experimental setup
is shown in Fig. 4. The actual PT100 sensor is located within the tube as indicated
by the small blue rectangles in Fig. 4. The sensors were sampled at 1 Hz, each
sample being the average of 10 pulses of 30 ms duration each. Pulsing the measurement in this manner reduces the power throughput to the sensor, thereby
reducing self-heating of the sensor due to the measurement current. The pulse
frequency of 10 Hz was the default setup of the module and no reason was seen
to change this.
Since the A5-1 modules were to be deployed in junction boxes adjacent to the
sensors, they were placed in the climate chamber together with the sensors so
that any influence of temperature on the operation of the modules could be
included in the calibration. Sensor #08 (placed in the middle) was selected as the
reference sensor. The sensors were arranged so as to minimise the distance
between them, as shown in Fig. 4. No additional ventilation of the box was pro-
vided. The humidity within the climate chamber was not regulated, hence a relative calibration of the humidity sensors could not be conducted.
Sensitivity to module / sensor pairing
An initial test was conducted to verify any effect of the A5-1 module on the measured temperature. Fig. 5 shows a comparison between each sensor with sensor
#09. In Fig. 5 a), sensor #08 was connected first to module 1, then to modules 3,
4 and 5. Sensor #09 remained connected to module 2 throughout the test. The
same procedure applies to the plots in Fig. 5 b) - d). The correlations show that
there is a small dependence of the temperature measurement on the module
used. The outlier, module 5, was found to employ a different sampling process
in which a longer duration pulse was used by comparison to the other modules.
The module was accordingly reconfigured which resulted in better comparison
to the other four modules. This confirmed the decision to calibrate bespoke pairings of A5-1 module and sensor.
Calibration results
The sensors were calibrated over a range of temperatures from approximately
-10 to 50 °C, covering slightly more than the maximum range expected at FINO1.
Each temperature was held for at least 2 hours to allow the temperature to stabilise within the chamber and half hour periods were selected to generate the
calibration curve. These half hour time periods were selected to only include
such periods during which fluctuations in temperature were small (i.e. stable
equilibrium was reached) so that it could be reasonably assumed that all five
sensors had the same temperature. The temperature profile within the climate
chamber is shown in Fig. 6 for the periods used for the calibration. In total 12.5
hours of data were used.
The correlation between the sensors is shown in Fig. 7. From the insert in Fig. 7
it can be seen that the sensors deviate from each other by up to 0.2 °C. A linear
correction for each sensor #09 to #12 was calculated to fit the measurements
relative to sensor #08. These are given in Tab. 2. The standard deviation of the
Sensors and Turnkey Solutions
for
Wind
COLD CLIMATE WIND SITE ASSESSMENT
We offer
Ground-based
LiDARs
Remote Sensing
•
Heated sensor solutions
•
Icing monitoring via sensors and webcams
•
Rugged data logger systems
Turbine Control
•
Offgrid power supply
and Optimization
•
Many years of experience
Wind Profiler
LiDAR
Trailer / Power Supply
Sales and Services
Scanning Systems
Nacelle-based LiDARs
Leosphere Service Center
and
Wind Measurement
Weather
Visibility / Present Weather
Temperature
Ultrasonic 2D & 3D
Beacon Light Control
Humidity
Cup & Vane
Precipitation Intensity
Air Pressure
Propeller
and Aggregation State
Solar Radiation
Global Radiation
Icing Detection
Lightning Detection
... and many more
GWU-Umwelttechnik GmbH
D-50374 Erftstadt
Fon +49 (0)2235 95522-0
[email protected]
www.gwu-group.de
Wilmers Messtechnik GmbH • 22089 Hamburg • Germany
+49-40-75660898 • www.wilmers.com • [email protected]
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
correction (difference between corrected and the reference temperatures) was of
the order of 0.02°C, also given in Tab. 2, with a maximum difference of 0.065
°C. The correction procedure therefore enables a temperature difference measurement to be made with a precision of the order of 0.05 °C for any single measurement. No significant change in either the correction factors or the standard
deviation of the error in the linear fit were found by using 10 min mean values.
Results From the First Four Months of Deployment
Installation of the new data acquisition system on FINO1 took place during July
and August of 2015. Data availability over the first four month period (from September through December) was found to be in excess of 99 %, as shown in Tab. 3
for each height. The low value for the 100 m height was due to a hardware setup
error during the first month. This was corrected and measurements resumed
without further incident. Thanks to the modularity of the system, all other measurements (e.g. cup anemometers) were unaffected by errors in the temperature
measurements. A small difference in availability was noted in the raw data
acquired at 1 Hz. Here it was found that the higher elevations had a slightly
higher rate of missing data values, of the order of 1-10 missing data points per
10 min period at 100 m. This is attributed to the longer distance between the
measurement module and the data logger. Signal interference and/or voltage
drop along the cable are considered the most likely causes. A similar effect has
been noted in the data from other sensors, for example, the ultrasonic anemometers. However, this data loss is not considered to have an impact on the 10 min
mean value.
As a coarse assessment of the quality of the measurements, temperature profiles were investigated during dry conditions. Sample temperature profiles were
selected on the basis of a relative humidity below 80 %. During these conditions
it is considered that the dry adiabatic lapse rate applies. The temperature profiles are shown in Fig. 8, expressed as the differences to the 33 m temperature.
It can be seen that the profiles closely follow the dry adiabatic lapse rate above
40 m, the average gradient being 0.0096 °C/m with a standard deviation of
0.0013 °C/m. Above 50 m the average temperature gradient was 0.0101 °C/m
with a standard deviation of 0.0013 °C/m. In light of the short distance between
measurement elevations, this is considered to be a very good agreement with
the theoretical value of 0.01 °C/m. Further investigation of the outliers has not
yet been conducted. Similarly, the temperature gradients below 40 m warrant a
more detailed study.
Conclusions
The reliability of the modular measurement system has been demonstrated. The
ability to digitise measurements close to the sensor is advantageous for analogue voltage signals which are particularly susceptible to corruption over long
cables. Other signals such as the pulses from cup anemometers can be installed
within the safety of the measurement container, thereby limiting risks of data
or equipment loss due to lightning strike, while maintaining a maximum quality of the measurements. Despite the exposure to large fluctuation in temperature and humidity, the measurement modules proved continued reliable operation for the full 4 year trial period.
By calibrating the complete measurement chain, it was possible to achieve a
high degree of confidence in the system performance. Furthermore, simultaneous calibration of all five sensors enabled a high degree of precision for relative
temperature measurements. This now opens opportunities for future investigations into offshore boundary layer temperature profiles and related effects.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Author
Contact
T. Neumann
DEWI, Wilhelmshaven
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
What is the Impact of Offshore Wind Farms on Each Other and on the
Regional Climate?
This question will be investigated by researchers from five different institutions
and companies in Germany over the next three years within the scope of the
research project „WIPAFF (Windpark-Fernfeld /wind park far field)“. The project
is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economical Affairs and Energy.
The Project
For the wind, offshore wind farms present obstacles on the relatively smooth
surface of the sea, and the wind turbines reduce the energy of the wind. This
slows the wind down and increases the turbulence in the air. Depending on the
weather, (wind direction, air temperature and properties of the sea surface) the
wind speed sometimes recovers its initial value only after 10 to 100 km behind
a wind farm. It is also possible that air masses are diverted to the side or over
the top of large wind farms. This will result in offshore wind farms impacting
each other, and furthermore it cannot be excluded that there may be an impact
on the regional climate, even affecting the distribution of temperature, clouds
and precipitation over the North Sea and adjacent coastal areas. The aim of the
3-year research project WIPAFF, which has been approved recently and for which
now the cooperation agreement will be signed, is to investigate the wake of offshore wind farms in the North Sea with a combination of different methods:
• Detailed measurement of the wind field, weather conditions and waves on
the sea surface before and behind wind farms with different measurement
systems on offshore platforms, with a research airplane and by evaluating
satellite data
• Modelling of the wind field 10 – 100 km behind large wind farms with
numerical models using new approaches for modeling wind farms and
taking into account the sea state
• Improvement of the models to increase planning reliability by a valuation
of the modeling results and comparison with measurement data.
The large-scale development of offshore wind energy in the German Bight in
the last few years now for the first time offers the chance to investigate in reality the large-scale effect of wind farms, which had already been predicted by
various simulation models. The new findings will be used to accompany the further development of wind energy use in the North Sea and to lay the foundations for an efficient and environmentally compatible development of offshore
wind energy.
The Team
The project is headed by Prof. Dr. Stefan Emeis of the Institute for Meteorology
and Climate Research of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Garmisch-Partenkirchen. The other partners are the Institute of Flight Guidance of
the University of Braunschweig, the Eberhard-Karls University of Tübingen, the
Institute of Coastal Research at the Helmholtz Centre Geesthacht (Zentrum für
Material- und Küstenforschung GmbH), and DEWI (UL International GmbH) in
Wilhelmshaven. The partners have already collaborated partly on similar projects in the past and have many years of experience in this field of research.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
DEWI’s Contribution to the Project
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Since 2003 DEWI has been conducting continuous measurements at the offshore research platform FINO1 in the North Sea within the range of the
marine atmosphere of up to 250 m above the sea level which is relevant for
wind turbines. For the new project, however, not only the measurements of
FINO1 and the other platforms FINO2 and FINO3 will be used, but new measuring points will also be set up in the German Bight at strategically important places. These could be installed, for example, on lightships, in cooperation with the Bundesamt für Seeschifffahrt und Hydrographie (BSH) (Federal
Maritime and Hydrographic Agency). By means of this monitoring network,
the aircraft measuring campaigns and satellite observations covering a large
area, as well as the simulation models, will be validated and optimized.
DEWI will also perform own numerical modelling with the focus on utilizing the results of the project for industry-related models and to integrate
them into the service portfolio, for example in the area of energy yield
assessment for wind farms. In future it will thus be possible to incorporate
the extensive effects between neighboring wind farms into the assessments with a high degree of certainty.
The project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economical Affairs
and Energy.
Harness the power of the wind
At Ingeteam, we apply the concept i+c to every project we undertake – innovation to find the
best solution and commitment to provide the best service.
Our engineering teams can provide you with flexible solutions (power converters, generators,
turbine controllers, CMS, SCADA management systems and wind farm O&M services) for wind
turbines up to 10 MW for onshore and offshore applications. With 30 GW of installed wind
power capacity worldwide, almost 8% of all wind turbines operate with Ingeteam technology.
The company’s global footprint includes manufacturing facilities in Europe, North and South
America, along with service centers strategically located globally.
Converters
Low & Medium
Voltage
up to 10 MW
The formula of the new energy
Visit us at:
AWEA WINDPOWER 2016
New Orleans, USA
Booth: 3039
www.ingeteam.com
Impressum
|
Content
[email protected]
READY FOR YOUR CHALLENGES
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Author
Contact
B. Neddermann
DEWI, Wilhelmshaven
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Discussion of Potential Areas for Wind Energy Use and the Perspectives for the Further Development of Wind Energy?
Background
On February 25, 2016, for the first time a Wind Power Decree came into force and
was published in the Niedersächsisches Ministerialblatt (government publication
of Lower Saxony) [1].
The Wind Power Decree was prepared by the Ministry of Environment, Energy and
Climate Protection of Lower Saxony, together with the Ministry of Economics, the
Ministry of Agriculture (responsible for regional and state development) as well
as the Ministry of Social Affairs (responsible for urban development and land use
planning) and the Ministry of the Interior (supervision of local authorities). When
the state government of Lower Saxony passed the resolution on 15.12.2015, a twoyear open and transparent dialog and working process in which associations and
other external stakeholders had taken part, came to an end.
The Wind Power Decree is meant to provide guidance to the local planning
authorities to implement the necessary expansion of wind energy in an environmentally compatible, socially acceptable and economic manner. It is the declared
goal of the state government to install at least 20 gigawatts of onshore wind
power in Lower Saxony by the year 2050. This would require a land use of at least
1.4% of the state territory.
An annex to the Wind Power Decree shows the potential areas for wind energy
use identified by the Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Protection of
Lower Saxony for the entire State and for the individual regional planning areas.
This is supplemented by a table giving an overview on how the regional distribution of wind energy would look like when 1.4 % of the state territory are claimed
for wind energy use and the area potential in the regional planning areas is evenly
utilized.
This article will discuss the perspectives for a further expansion of wind energy
in Lower Saxony when the current regional distribution of wind energy use is
changed in accordance with the area potential shown for 2050 in the annex to
the Wind Power Decree.
Current Status of Wind Energy Use in Lower Saxony
Lower Saxony is by far the number one German state for wind power. By the end
of 2015 5,784 wind turbines with a total capacity of 8,586 MW were installed, so
that the second largest federal state (13.3% of the German territory) accounts for
19 % of the wind power installed in Germany.
Fig. 1 shows the development of wind energy use in Lower Saxony since 1993. As
shown in the diagram, already in the 1990s a very dynamic development took
place, and in 2003 the level of 3,000 MW installed wind power capacity was
exceeded – a figure which only very few federal states have achieved to date. Fig. 1
also shows that since 2012, repowering has had an important share in the new
installations in Lower Saxony.
According to the department responsible for regional planning in the Ministry of
Food, Agriculture and Consumer Protection, at present 1.1 % of the state territory
are used for wind energy.
Fig. 2 (installed capacity) and Fig. 3 (area-related presentation) show the regional
distribution of wind energy use in the districts of Lower Saxony (status July 2014).
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Wind Energy Expansion in 2050 when Regional Area Potential is Evenly
Utilized
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
By means of a geographical information system the Lower Saxony Ministry of
Environment, Energy and Climate Protection has identified the area potential for
wind energy use for Lower Saxony and for the individual regional planning zones.
After deduction of the so-called „hard taboo zones“ (criteria for exclusion of wind
energy use) as well as all the fauna-flora habitats (FFH) and bird protection areas,
woodland areas and industrial/commercial areas, a state-wide potential area of
19.1 % max. of the state territory was identified. It should be noted that the potential areas are different in the individual regions and are not evenly distributed
across all of the regional development zones.
In order to achieve the state government’s target to install wind turbines with a
total capacity of 20 gigawatts by 2050, it is assumed that at least 1.4% of the land
are required. This space requirement could be fulfilled if the regional planning
and local authorities would dedicate at least 7.35 % of their potential area as priority areas for wind energy use. Therefore, in an annex to the Wind Power Decree,
a table gives an overview for all regional planning zones (rural districts, urban
communes, associations of communes) as to how many priority areas for wind
energy use have to be designated in order to achieve the goal set by the State,
taking into account a uniform utilization of regional area potential.
In this connection it should be pointed out clearly that the area data given are
orientation values only and not binding information for regional development
and urban planning. For the time being, the state government will not make any
specific requirements for the implementation of the development target as a
binding planning goal.
The maps in Fig. 4 and Fig. 5 show the regional distribution of wind energy use
for the 2050 scenario, if 1.4% of the state territory of Lower Saxony are used for
wind energy development and the regional potential areas are utilized uniformly
as explained above.
The comparison with the current situation (see Fig. 2 and Fig. 3) shows very
clearly the shift of the regional distribution of wind energy use from the northwest to the eastern and southern parts of the state. The reason for this shift is
that at present wind energy use is concentrated very much on the wind-rich
coastal zones (especially in Ostfriesland (East Frisia). The inland areas with comparatively modest wind conditions on the other hand have not seen a great deal
of wind energy use so far.
With regard to the perspectives for a further expansion it should be taken into
account that the very favorable wind conditions in the coastal regions will have
an important influence on the development also in future. Therefore it is to be
expected that the area potential available in this region will be utilized to a
greater extent than the “minimum” use of 7.35%. By contrast, for the inland areas
the development of 7.35 % of the area potential identified represents quite an
ambitious target which would mean a significant growth compared to the previous use of wind energy in the region.
An important criterion for the regional development is whether or not the previously used wind energy sites meet the requirements on which the area potential
identified is based. According to information supplied by the Ministry of Environment, today approx. 25 % of the wind turbines in Lower Saxony are within a distance of less than 400 m from residential buildings. In the foreseeable future
these sites will no longer be used for wind energy because a repowering of the
turbines after the end of their service life is ruled out. In addition to that, many
wind turbines today are located within „hard taboo zones“ from the point of view
of nature conservation and therefore are also outside the usable potential areas.
In this context it is important to know that especially in the coastal areas there
is a high share of old wind turbines which today would not fulfill the requirements for approval. On the other hand it is safe to assume that the wind energy
development in the coastal regions will primarily be realized in the form of
repowering projects (on sites that are fit for approval). It is not to be expected that
in these wind-rich regions there are any additional areas available that have not
been used previously.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Conclusion
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
The state government of Lower Saxony assumes that 1.4 % of the state territory will be required for wind energy in order to comply with the target of
20 gigawatts by 2050 stipulated in the new Wind Power Decree. Under the
assumption that the wind turbines installed by then will have an average
capacity of 4 MW, this target can even be reached with a lower number of
wind turbines than installed today. However, these turbines with their much
bigger overall height and rotor size will differ significantly from the wind turbines today.
This discussion of the perspectives of the further wind energy development
in Lower Saxony has shown that a shift of the regional distribution of wind
energy use from the northwest to the eastern and southern parts of the
state can be expected. This is true even when taking into account the expectation that the area potential available in the coastal region will continue to
be utilized more intensively than in the inland areas.
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
[1] Planung und Genehmigung von Windenergieanlagen an Land (Windenergieerlass);
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Reference
Niedersächsisches Ministerialblatt Nr. 7/2016, S. 190
Content
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Author
Contact
C. Ender
DEWI, Wilhelmshaven
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
Wind Energy Use in Germany
Status 31.12.2015
In comparison to the year 2014, the growth in wind energy installation in the past
year was influenced even stronger by the market in China. Almost half (30.5 GW)
of the new capacity was installed there [1]. In the USA once again more wind turbines were installed than in the previous year (+ 18%). In the other countries of
the Top 10 the new installations were almost the same or less. All in all 61.9 GW
were added globally, bringing the cumulative global installations to 432.5 GW, one
third of which is now in China (Tab. 1).
On the German market, as expected, installations onshore have decreased compared to 2014. This was mainly due to a decline in repowering, with 60% less
installations than in 2014, whereas the new installations are on the same level as
in the year before. Altogether, a gross number of 1,354 new wind turbines (WT)
with 3,699.9 MW were newly erected1 which is 23 percent less compared to the
previous year. Within the scope of repowering projects, 317 WT with 278 MW were
dismantled and replaced by 268 turbines with 735 MW, bringing the share of
repowering to approx. 20 % (in 2014: approx. 38 %). The „net growth“ of wind
energy onshore, which is crucial for the target corridor established by the federal
government, is 3,422 MW, thus exceeding once more the limit of 2,600 MW. Based
on the power plant register [2] in 2015 a total of 1,378 WT with 3,757 MW started
operating and feeding electricity into the grid.
At sea, a large number of wind farms could finally be connected to the grid, bringing Germany forward to the second position worldwide in offshore wind energy.
In the year 2015, 290 offshore WT with a total capacity of 1,189 MW were installed
and 545 WT with 2,279 MW could start feeding electricity into the grid. All in all,
as per 31.12.2015, 26,651 wind turbines with a total capacity of 45,062 MW were
installed in Germany (on- and offshore).
An overview of the results of the year 2015 is given in Fig. 1, which shows, among
others, the new installations, repowering and offshore figures. Fig. 2 shows the
development of wind energy in Germany during the last few years and also
includes the cumulative values in addition to the new installations added each
year, as well as the offshore capacity of wind turbines installed but not yet connected to the grid.
Regional Distribution of Wind Energy Use
When looking at the new installations in the individual federal states, it is interesting to note that this time Schleswig-Holstein with 853 MW is clearly ahead of
North Rhine-Westphalia (420 MW) (Tab. 2). These two states are followed by
Lower Saxony (414 MW), Brandenburg (395 MW) and Bavaria (373 MW). In terms
of cumulative installations, the lead position is still held by Lower Saxony with
8,586 MW, followed by Bran­den­burg (5,876 MW) and Schleswig-Holstein (5,800
MW). These and other cumulative figures can be found in Fig. 3, where the accumulated installed capacity as per 31.12.2014 is shown in blue and the new installations as per 31.12.2015 are marked orange. The figures given refer to the total
installed capacity at the reference date. An exact overview of the changes in new
installations in 2015 compared to the previous year is given in Tab. 3. The biggest
change, in percentage terms, occurred in Baden-Württemberg, where installations increased from 21 MW in the year 2014 to 144 MW in 2015.
Based on the postal code/location data supplied by the wind turbine manufac1
The data are based on manufacturer information, BNetzA database and own research. The survey was carried out in
January 2016. The WTGS reported were installed but do not have to be already connected to the grid.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
turers, the installed capacity and number of wind turbines were summarized for
rural and urban districts. An overview of districts with the top three for each federal state and information about the remaining districts is given in Tab. 4. When
looking at the new installations at district level, the largest growth is observed in
Schleswig-Holstein especially in the districts of Nordfriesland with 262 MW, Dithmarschen (250 MW), Schleswig-Flensburg (173 MW), followed by the district of
Stendal (Saxony-Anhalt) with 169 MW (TOP 10 in Tab. 5). It should be taken into
account, however, that many rural districts in Eastern Germany extend over very
large regions and therefore cover much more area than rural districts in West German federal states. All in all, new installations were made in 154 districts, but in
82 of these (53 %) only between 1 and 5 wind turbines were erected (Fig. 4).
Analysis of the Development in the DIBT Wind Zones
A differentiation of sites according to coastal/inland areas on the basis of federal
states is not always accurate because some federal states have coastal as well as
different inland sites (e.g. Lower Saxony). For this reason we have carried out a
more differentiated evaluation of the installation data based on the classification
according to wind zones as established in the DIBt guideline for wind turbines [3].
Fig. 5 shows the regional distribution of wind zones ranging from areas with low
wind conditions (wind zone 1) to wind-rich coastal sites (wind zone 4). Tab. 6
shows how the wind turbines newly installed in the year 2015 are allocated following the new system. It can be seen clearly that the hub height is rising from
the coastal to the inland areas in accordance with the wind conditions and that
the specific capacity of the wind turbines is decreasing. The table also shows that
the lowest number of wind turbines was installed in zone 3 and most turbines in
zone 2. Fig. 6 and Fig. 7 show the development in the wind zones over the years,
the number of wind turbines installed on the one hand and the specific installed
capacity (W/m²) on the other hand. Fig. 7 also shows that the specific installed
capacity is continuously decreasing in all wind zones.
Repowering reaches a share of 20% in the newly installed wind energy
capacity
After the withdrawal of the repowering bonus granted until the end of 2014, the
year 2015 has shown that repowering remains an important segment for the
development of wind energy onshore, even without any specific subsidies. According to the information available, repowering reached a share of 20% in the newly
installed capacity onshore last year (734.56 MW of 3,699.9 MW, Tab. 2). Tab. 7 gives
an overview of wind turbines newly installed within the scope of repowering in
the federal states in 2015 and 2014.
The decline in comparison to the record year of 2014 (38 % share of repowering) is
due to the fact that many operators decided to dismantle their old wind turbines
in 2014 to be able to benefit from the (tradable) repowering bonus for the last
time. This can be seen in particular in Rhineland-Palatinate, Hesse, Saxony-Anhalt
und Thuringia where repowering in 2015 – other than in the year before – was
practically without significance for the regional development. The analysis shows
that repowering is realized more and more within the scope of communal planning concepts in which the replacement of wind turbines is not limited to one
wind farm. For example, there has been a simultaneous repowering of several
wind farms within one local authority district or region in Lindewitt, Friedrichskoog, Wanderup and Friedrichsgabekoog (Schleswig-Holstein), in Wittmund (Lower
Saxony), in Lichtenau, Schleiden, Ense (North-Rhine Westphalia) and in Klettwitz/
Kostebrau (Brandenburg). Fig. 8 shows the share of repowering in the new installations of the federal states. The average capacity of the new repowered wind turbines is approx. 2.74 MW. Apart from the new capacity installed within the scope
of repowering it is also interesting to know how much net growth in capacity has
been achieved by these projects. This information is given in Fig. 9, where the
capacity removed (red) was deducted from the new installations (dark blue). The
largest growth in capacity (light blue) in 2015 was recorded in Schleswig-Holstein,
followed by Brandenburg. Fig. 10 shows that the repowering projects recorded for
2015 were mostly realized with wind turbines of the manufacturers ENERCON,
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Vestas and Senvion. Tab. 8 gives an overview of the largest repowering projects
realized in 2015. Fig. 11 / Fig. 12
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Offshore
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
In 2015 a total of 290 WT with a total capacity of 1,189 MW were installed off the
German coast, 46 of which with 166 MW in der Baltic Sea. 545 WT with 2,279 MW
started feeding electricity into the grid – approx. 54 % of these turbines, however,
had already been erected in the previous year. By the end of the year 2015 in Germany altogether 833 offshore wind turbines with 3,541 MW were completely
installed, and 789 WT of these with a total capacity of 3,283 MW were connected
to the grid. The article on page 46 gives a detailed overview on the current status
of offshore wind energy development.
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Potential Annual Energy Yield
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
According to the preliminary figures provided by BDEW (German Association of
Energy and Water Industries) approx. 77.9TWh (onshore) and 8.1 TWh (offshore)
were generated from wind in 2015 [4]. These figures are based on the annual
reports by the distribution grid operators (preliminary figures and estimates), and
it can sometimes take several months until the final data are released. To be able
to give an indication of the contribution of wind energy, the potential annual
energy yield is estimated, assuming a 100% wind year. This is based on the average load factors calculated for wind turbines of different power classes for each
federal state, using the production index IWET V11 [5] (average of the load factors
of the years 2003 to 2012). The calculation furthermore is based on the assumption that all wind turbines reported by the end of the year contribute a full annual
energy yield. Downtimes due to maintenance, repair, grid overload etc. are not
taken into account. The potential share of wind energy in the net energy consumption of the federal states [6] is shown in Fig. 13 where the shares of the calculated potential annual energy yield are represented.
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
Market Trends in Turbine Size
From year to year more wind turbines with rotor diameters of 90 m and more are
installed in Germany (Fig. 14 and Fig. 15), and in 2015 the share of this class has
reached approx. 86 %. The biggest increase compared to the previous year could
be noted for wind turbines with rotor diameters of 100 m and more. Their share
went up from approx. 64% to 75%. The average installed power onshore increased
only slightly to 2.73 MW (Fig. 16),
and. the share of onshore wind
turbines with a capacity of over 3
MW went up from approx. 49%
to 53% ( Fig. 17 center). The average installed capacity of offshore
WT has now reached 4.1 MW.
Apart from the installed capacity
and the rotor diameter another
important feature of wind turbines is the hub height. The share
of wind turbines installed with a
hub height of over 100 m has
increased considerably, so that
meanwhile 61% of wind turbines
have a hub height of 121 – 150 m
(Fig. 18 left). Fig. 18 (right) shows
the shares of total heights of
wind turbines per federal state
erected in 2015, divided into 3
height classes based on the
requirements for obstruction
lighting.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Market Shares of Manufacturers
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
Enercon E-101
Photo/Bild: Bernd Neddermann
The order of sequence in the market shares of manufacturers in the German
onshore segment has not changed much (Fig. 19 center), with Senvion, Nordex
and GE experiencing some growth. Additionally, the offshore market shares (100%
Siemens) are shown separately as well as both segments together. This representation takes into account that not every manufacturer is active in both segments
and offshore has a major share in the new installations. The analysis is based on
the wind turbines newly installed in 2015, not all of which are already connected
to the grid. The market shares on the basis of the wind turbines commissioned
onshore is almost identical with those in Fig. 19, therefore they are not shown
here.
Apart from the market shares in MW for Germany it is also interesting to analyze
the market shares within the individual size categories of wind turbines installed
onshore. According to Fig. 20, Enercon is active in three categories with a major
share. In the range of 2.5 to 2.9 MW GE is the leading manufacturer. In the category of 3.5 MW, e.n.o. Energy has been the only manufacturer installing wind turbines of that size onshore, whereas in the category below 2 MW only Enercon has
been active.
References:
[1]
www.gwec.net/global-figures/graphs/ (January 2016)
[2] Bundesnetzagentur, Anlagenregister - Stand 29.02.2016
[3] Richtlinie für Windenergieanlagen, Fassung Oktober 2012; Hrsg.: Deutsches Institut für Bautechnik,
Berlin
[4]www.enwipo.de/2015/12/21/2015-erneuerbare-erzeugen-30-strom/
[5] Ingenieurwerkstatt Energietechnik (Rade) (Hrsg.): Monatsinfo: Betriebsvergleich umweltbewusster
Energienutzer 2003-2012.
[6] Nettostromverbrauch 2014 lt. BDEW, Bundesländer wurden hochgerechnet
DEWI/UL News
Vestas V-112 3.3 MW
Photo/Bild: Bernd Neddermann
Impressum
|
Content
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Author
Contact
B. Neddermann
DEWI, Wilhelmshaven
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global Offshore
Market
In 2015 a total of 545 wind turbines with a total capacity of 2,279.2 MW started
operations off the German coast. Thus, Germany has achieved a remarkable
share of more than 75% in the offshore wind capacity connected to the grid last
year in all of Europe. Due to the three-fold increase of capacity fed into the grid
within only one year, Germany with a total capacity of 3,295.3 MW and a market
share of 30% in Europe has advanced to the second position in the offshore wind
market behind the United Kingdom (5,061 MW) – not only in Europe (see Fig. 1),
but also world-wide.
The reason for this extraordinary development within one year is the completion
of five grid connection systems with a total capacity of 3,730 MW in the German
North Sea. Tab. 1 provides an overview.
As a result of this, wind turbines in nine offshore wind farms (OWF) in the North
Sea, 296 of which had already been installed completely in 2014, and 249 of
which were installed in 2015, could start feeding electricity into the grid. Fig. 2
shows the geographic distribution of offshore wind farms commissioned in 2015
over the North Sea area. Also shown here is OWF Riffgat which had its capacity
increased by 5.4 MW, and those projects that were under construction at the end
of 2015 (in yellow).
In OWF Amrumbank West the rated power of the eighty 3.6 MW turbines was
increased by 5%, same as in OWF Riffgat, because sufficient grid connection
capacity was available. In OWF Borkum Riffgrund 1, 78 Siemens SWT-3.6-120 turbines with 4 MW rated power have started operations.
In the Baltic Sea the OWF EnBW Baltic 2 with a total capacity of 288 MW was
commissioned and connected to the grid in 2015.
Installation Work at Sea
In 2015, 290 wind turbines with a total capacity of 1,189 MW were erected off the
German coast. Tab. 2 gives an overview of the installation work at sea. In last
year’s offshore projects exclusively Siemens wind turbines were erected: 249 Siemens SWT-3.6-120 and 41 (of 97 in total) Siemens SWT-6.0-154 in OWF Gode
Wind 1 and 2. Additionally, 63 of 72 monopile foundations were installed in the
OWF Sandbank and the first three monopiles in OWF Nordsee One. In the Baltic
Sea there has been no construction work for the installation of new offshore
wind farms in the past year. Fig. 3 illustrates the expansion of offshore wind
energy in Germany and shows that the gap between the installed capacity and
the grid connected capacity could be distinctly reduced in the past year. As of
31.12.2015, 833 WT with a total capacity of 3,541.3 MW had been erected, of which
792 WT with a capacity of 3,295.3 MW are actually generating electricity.
In OWF Gode Wind 1 and 2 all of the 97 monopile foundations and in Gode Wind
2 already 41 of 42 turbines have been installed at sea in 2015. The grid connection DolWin 2 provided for the project, however, was not ready for operation by
the end of 2015, although the converter platform DolWin beta with a total capacity of 916 MW, the world’s biggest converter platform according to TenneT, had
been installed already in August 2015, 45 km north of Norderney.
In February 2016 TenneT announced that the grid connection for OWF Gode
Wind 2 had gone live. This part of the project with 42 Siemens SWT-6.0-154 now
could start feeding electricity into the grid for the first time. Apart from Gode
Wind 1 and 2, also the OWF Nordsee One will be connected to DolWin 2.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Start of construction for OWF Nordsee One was in December 2015, ahead of
schedule, with the installation of the first three monopiles.
For the offshore project Sandbank, 63 foundations had been installed at sea
by 31.12.2015. In February 2016 the 72th monopile was installed and the construction work for installation of the foundations was completed.
WE KNOW WIND
Due Diligence &
Asset Management
Outlook for Offshore Wind Energy Development in 2016
For 2016 we can expect that the OWFs Gode Wind 1 (55 Siemens SWT-6.0.154),
Sandbank (72 Siemens SWT-4.0-130) and Nordsee One (54 Senvion 6.2M126)
will be completed and start feeding electricity into the grid. Furthermore the
start of construction work for OWF Nordergründe (18 Senvion 6.2M126) and
for OWF Veja Mate (67 Siemens SWT-6.0-154) in the German North Sea is
scheduled for the first half of 2016. The OWF Nordergründe situated within
the 12 mile zone of the North Sea is even expected to start operations in this
year.
In the Baltic Sea start of construction work for OWF Wikinger (70 Adwen AD
5-135 – formerly Areva Wind M5000) is planned for 2016.
The start of construction for OWF Merkur Offshore (66 Alstom Haliade 1506MW) in the North Sea originally planned for 2016 is likely to be postponed
because the financial close for the project could not be completed in the fall
of 2015 as scheduled.
Get the service package you need
Project
Mergers and
Development Acquisitions
Project
Execution
Life Time
Extension
Pre-Financing Inspections
Wind Farm
Performance
Training
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Contact the experts at:
Impressum
|
Content
[email protected] / dewi.de
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Author
Contact
B. Neddermann
DEWI, Wilhelmshaven
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
Reporting of Commissioning and Approval of Wind Turbines in the
Installations Register for the year 2015
In order to take stock of the wind energy development in the year 2015, DEWI
also evaluated the information about the commissioning of wind turbines (WT)
onshore between January and December 2015 published by the Bundesnetzagentur (BNetzA) (Federal Network Agency) in the installations register [1]. Small
wind turbines with a rated power of less than 100 kW were not included in the
analysis. In case of differing information about the rated capacity of a wind turbine type in the installations register, a correction was made in order to obtain
a harmonized data basis.
Basically, the installations register which is based on the statutory obligation to
register the approval and commissioning of new wind turbines, has greatly
improved the data collection. It should be noted, however, that the data for
repowering and decommissioning of old turbines have not always been covered
completely. Especially the patchy recording of decommissioned wind turbines
could present a problem because these data are crucial for identifying the net
growth of onshore wind energy (gross additions minus decommissioning in
MW) and therefore also for the further development of the feed-in tariff.
The evaluation shows that for the year 2015, a total of 1,378 wind turbines with
a total capacity of 3,757.33 MW were reported to the installations register as commissioned by 31.12.2015.
The data available for 2015 allow for the first time a comparison between new
installation (source: DEWI manufacturer survey) and commissioning (source:
BNetzA Installations Register) of wind turbines in Germany for a full calendar
year. In Tab. 1 the data on the regional distribution of the WT newly installed are
contrasted with the data on the WT newly commissioned in the past year.
It becomes clear that in the overall balance there is no significant difference
between these figures. When comparing the current information about newly
installed wind capacity onshore it should be taken into account that the turbines
installed in 2015 sometimes are not connected to the grid until 2016. On the
other hand there are projects where wind turbines were commissioned in 2015,
although they had already been installed in the previous year.
Based on the information reported to the installations register, Fig. 1 shows the
TOP 10 of the wind turbine types newly commissioned in the past year, which
together account for 77% of the market. Market leader Enercon is represented
with five turbine types, Vestas with two types.
In the installations register also the data for the approvals already granted (without commissioning) are documented. When evaluating the information registered until 31.12.2015, it should be taken into account that the obligation to register approvals applies to all wind turbines approved after 28.02.2015.
According to an analysis of the data of the installations register carried out by
Fachagentur Windenergie an Land (Onshore wind energy agency) in autumn
20151, 78% of the turbines were connected to the grid within one year after having been approved, with an established mean period of realization of ten months.
On the basis of the approvals registered by 31.12.2015 (2.791 MW), we can estimate that a total of approx. 3,000 MW installed wind power capacity will be
added in the year 2016.
Fig. 2 shows how the approvals for new wind turbines registered until 31.12.2015
are distributed across the federal states. A differentiation is made according to
turbines approved by 30.06.2015 and turbines for which an approval was granted
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
in the second half of 2015. For comparison, the new installations in the individual federal states in 2015 are also shown.
The diagram shows that in Schleswig-Holstein, Brandenburg, North-Rhine Westphalia and Saxony-Anhalt a much lower growth is expected for 2016 than in
2015, whereas for Lower Saxony, Baden-Wurttemberg and Thuringia installation
figures are estimated to increase more strongly than in the previous year.
The diagram also illustrates that in Schleswig-Holstein, Bavaria, North-Rhine
Westphalia and Hessen only comparatively few approvals were granted during
the second half of 2015. This is probably due to regional constraints (especially
the building freeze for wind turbines in Schleswig Holstein because of the necessary revision of the regional development plans and the introduction of stricter
minimum distance rules in Bavaria). By contrast, the number of newly approved
wind turbines in the period of 01.07.-31.12.2015 increased significantly in Lower
Saxony, Baden-Wurttemberg, Thuringia and Saxony.
The overview in Tab. 2 shows for which types of wind turbine the approvals
reported to the installations register were granted. The TOP 10 WT types by Enercon, Vestas, Nordex, General Electric (GE) and Senvion represent 84% of all 988
approvals reported to the installations register until 31.12.2015. The greatest
demand is for Nordex N117/2400, Enercon E-115 and E-101 as well as Vestas V1123.3 MW.
Tab. 2 also shows the regional distribution of the WT types for which approvals
were obtained. Turbines with a very low specific capacity (ratio between capacity and rotor size in W/m²) of less than 250 W/m² (Nordex N117/2400, GE 2.75-120
and GE 2.5-120) are much in demand for sites in Southern Germany, whereas WT
types with a specific capacity of more than 350 W/m² (e.g. Enercon E-92 / E-101 /
E-82) are preferred in the North.
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
References
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
[1]
Content
Bundesnetzagentur, Anlagenregister - Stand 29.02.2016
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Author
Contact
N. Allnoch
Internationales Wirtschaftsforum Regenerative
Energien (IWR), Münster
External Article
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
Power Generation from Renewable Energies in Germany
Electricity generation from renewable energy sources continued to be on a
growth course in the year 2015. According to a preliminary prognosis by IWR
(International Economic Platform for Renewable Energies) the electricity generation from wind, solar, hydro power, biomass and geothermal energy will exceed
for the first time the 190 billion kWh mark (2014: 161.4 billion kWh, Fig. 1 and
Tab. 1 ). The share of electricity generated from renewable energies increased in
2015 to nearly 33 per cent of gross electricity consumption (2014: 27.4 per cent).
The main driving factor for the growth in 2015 has been wind energy. Due to a
good wind year as well as increased installations onshore and offshore, wind
power generation was able to rise by about 50 per cent to approx. 87 billion kWh
(2014: 57.4 billion kWh). Offshore wind energy alone contributed approx. 8 bn
kWh in 2015 (2014: 1.4 bn kWh). Assuming a good wind year, IWR expects wind
power production to rise to almost 100 bn kWh in the year 2016, which means
that the total production of power from renewables in Germany could exceed
the 200 bn kWh mark for the first time.
How Solar Power and Wind Energy can Reduce the Demand for Conventional Power Plant Capacity
Figuratively speaking, the daily course of demand for power describes a bellshaped curve, more or less distinct depending on the season. Starting at the
lower night-time level, the demand for power is rising until reaching the peak at
midday. To cover this additional demand, in the past more and more conventional power plants, such as coal or gas-fired power plants, were added hourly
until midday, and then gradually turned off again during the afternoon due to
the decrease in the demand for electricity. Today, the additional power plant out-
put can largely be covered with the aid of solar power and wind energy plants.
Due to the sunnier weather, the contribution of solar power generation prevails
during the summer months, whereas in winter because of the more frequent
cyclonic weather conditions, wind energy use contributes a greater share to
renewable power production.
In Summer, Solar Energy Covers the Major Part of the Demand for
Power During the Day
During the sunny months (Fig. 2) of summer, solar energy (yellow bars) has
shown itself to be especially reliable, since the solar energy rises and falls parallel to the daily course of demand for power in Germany. And not just when the
sun is shining brightly. Even on cloudy days, the contribution of solar energy to
the peak load at midday reaches an output of 10,000 MW and more, while on
sunny days up to well above 20,000 MW can be reached. The need for conventional power plants (grey bars) falls noticeably due to the use of renewable
energy. The diagram below shows the average daily course of power demand in
May 2015. At midday more than 40 per cent of the total power plant capacity
needed were covered by solar power and wind energy onshore and offshore (yellow and blue bars).
Wind Energy Reliable Supplier of Power During the Wind Months
In contrast to the summer months, in winter (Fig. 3) the power production of
wind energy onshore and offshore (blue bars) is the major renewable energy
source. This is because of the frequent low pressure areas passing through with
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
MOVING ENERGY
FORWARD
distinctly higher wind speeds than in summer. Other than the solar energy,
wind power generation does not have a typical diurnal variation. However, in
combination with the solar power capacity available also during the winter
months, wind energy makes a strong contribution to reducing the demand
for additional conventional power plant capacity.
With the planned further development of offshore wind energy in the German North Sea and Baltic Sea, power generation from renewable sources in
Germany will continue to rise significantly, also because wind speeds at sea
are considerably higher than in inland areas. It is quite realistic to expect
approx. 4,000 full-load hours for offshore wind turbines. Taking a look at the
other countries bordering the North Sea and their offshore development
plans, it becomes obvious that the North Sea is developing into a new type
of energy field: declining oil production and at the same time continuously
rising wind power production in the coming years. Between 2030 and 2040
about 10 per cent of the total power consumption of the European Union
could be covered by North Sea power.
DISCOVER THE NEW SCIENCE
OF SUSTAINABLE ENERGY
From energy generation to distribution, management
and usage, we are helping advance new sustainable
sources and technologies, making energy cleaner,
more reliable and more efficient. Through New
Science, UL is working to mitigate sustainable energy
risks and safeguard innovation.
TRENDS. JOURNALS. INFOGRAPHICS. VIDEOS.
UL.COM/NEWSCIENCE
Content
UL and the UL logo are trademarks of UL LLC © 2013
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
On February 4, 2016, DEWI celebrated its 25th anniversary in the Atlantic Hotel Wilhelmshaven together with numerous guests and DEWI employees from German
as well as from international branches. The anniversary of DEWI was an appropriate reason to glimpse into the future but also to review the past. During the celebration guests could remember DEWI’s milestones in development by taking a
look at the time line that had been built up in the foyer of the hotel.
Ursula Glaser, mayor of the city of Wilhelmshaven, where DEWI had been founded
25 years ago, addressed a few words to the guests. In her speech she talked about
the beginnings of DEWI and its importance for the city of Wilhelmshaven.
Stefan Wenzel, Minister for Environment, Energy and Climate Protection, as well
as deputy prime minister, came as a representative of the federal state of Lower
Saxony. He highlighted the relevance of DEWI’s research work for the further
expansion of renewable energies. Furthermore, he spoke about Lower Saxony’s
efforts to realize energy transition, about the future design of energy systems and
about external conditions for the extension of renewable energies.
A special look back at 3,000 years of wind energy was given by Prof. Dr. Andreas
Reuter, Director of IWES Northwest Fraunhofer Institute for Wind Energy and
Energy System Technology. He gave a very entertaining presentation which showed
quite amazingly how DEWI’s managing director Jens Peter Molly has influenced
the development of wind energy technology from its earliest beginnings. Four
years ago, the former DEWI GmbH was privatized and became a part of the
US-American corporation UL (Underwriters Laboratories). Jeff Smidt, Vice President
and General Manager UL Energy and Power Technologies, and Gitte Schjøtz, Senior
Vice President UL International Demko A/S, took a look back at this process. Both
of them had directly been involved in the privatization process and stressed once
more the high significance of DEWI for UL.
Towards the end of the official part of the celebration, managing director Jens
Peter Molly gave insights into the foundation of DEWI as well as a humoristic and
ironic look back at 25 years of DEWI. During his speech he underlined how important DEWI’s employees are for the success of the company. Without them DEWI
would not have been able to develop into a globally acting and highly respected
company. A major part of the staff has been working for DEWI for many years and
was honored for their commitment during the anniversary celebration.
After a coffee break the less formal part of the program was initiated by an improv
comedy show that soon had the audience laughing out loud. Afterwards the
guests enjoyed a delicious buffet and had the opportunity for a nice exchange of
thoughts that lasted deep into the night and that was accompanied by music and
various games.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
DEWI/UL News
DEWI-OCC Hands Over Certificate to Gamesa at
EWEA
DEWI-OCC, the accredited independent certification body
of the UL/DEWI-group, has issued the type certification
for G114-2.5 MW turbine of Gamesa, a global technology leader in wind energy.
Hergen Bolte, head of DEWI-OCC, handed the certification in person to José
Antonio Malumbres, Gamesa‘s Chief Technology Officer, during the EWEA 2015
trade fair, one of the sector‘s hallmark events that took place in Paris, France,
between November, 17 and 20, 2015. DEWI presented services such as LiDAR measurement, wind farm life time extension and root cause analysis.
DEWI at Enercon’s Opening Event in Costa Rica
DEWI employee Jorge Melero, Renewable Energies Unit
Manager for Mexico and Central America, gave a presentation about Technical Due Diligence Services at Enercon’s
opening event in Costa Rica. “I was happy about the opportunity to speak at this
wonderful event and to get involved in these still young markets”, says Melero.
DEWI has been involved in Central American markets for three years, providing
independent engineering services for wind and PV plants.
Presentation of DEWI at Windenergietage 2015
DEWI was present at 24th Windenergietage from November 10 to 12, 2015. DEWI
expert Jan Raabe, Project Manager in the Micrositing team, talked during the
second day of the conference about the consistency of different long-term data
in the context of energy yield assessment in Germany. “The differences within
long-term standardization while applying various long term data is currently a
widely discussed topic within the industry”, says Raabe.
DEWI Holds Seminar in Madrid and Mexico City
DEWI organized two seminars in October and November
2015 – with great success. The „Advanced Wind Energy“seminar in Madrid focused on risk mitigation through the
different phases of the project (development, construction, operation, and end
of life) while the seminar in Mexico addressed the topic “Optimization of Wind
Farms”. DEWI-experts, who had been preparing the seminar, closed both seminars with a highly satisfactory result according to the feedback received from
participants. These included representatives from developers, operators, manufacturers and engineering companies. This year DEWI will again offer seminars
in Spain as well as in Latin America.
DEWI Sponsors Ladies Soccer Team
DEWI engaged in local community sports team: The global
wind energy service provider sponsored the new jerseys of
FC Zetel’s ladies soccer team. The team is happy to play
with DEWI’s logo on their shirts. “We really appreciate DEWI’s support and hope
to conclude our season successfully”, says Miriam Schwinn, Laboratory Technician
at DEWI and goalkeeper in the FC Zetel team.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Kontakt
zum Autor
J. P. Molly
DEWI, Wilhelmshaven
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
Editorial
Am vierten Februar diesen Jahres feierte DEWI sein 25-jähriges Bestehen mit seinen Kunden, Wegbegleitern und Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeitern in einer
kurzweiligen Nachmittagsveranstaltung. Deutlich wurde noch einmal, welche
unglaubliche Entwicklung die Windenergie in diesen 25 Jahren nahm, national
wie international. Wie vielen anderen war es uns vergönnt, diese Entwicklung
mit dem DEWI zu begleiten und mitzugestalten. Sicher haben auch die unzähligen DEWI-Beschäftigten, die von uns in die Windindustrie und zu den Projektentwicklern abwanderten, hierzu beigetragen. Auf der Geburtstagfeier sagte ich,
dass ich zu Beginn meiner jetzt über 40-jährigen Tätigkeit für die Windenergie
denjenigen für verrückt erklärt hätte, der für das Jahr 2015 über 430 GW weltweit installierter Windleistung prognostiziert hätte und das davon über 10% in
Deutschland stehen würden. Für mich als Ingenieur ist das Größenwachstum
der Windturbinen noch imposanter. Der Unterschied der damals angebotenen
Windenergieanlagen mit wenigen Kilowatt Leistung und 10 bis 15 m Rotordurchmesser bis hin zu den heute realisierten 180 m Durchmesser und 8.000 kW zeigt
den enormen Know-how-Gewinn, der sicherlich mit vielen Anstrengungen verbunden war, aber letztlich zu der heutigen großen Zuverlässigkeit der Windturbinen führte. Diese rasante Entwicklung ist in der Industriegeschichte einmalig
und machte die Windenergie heute zu einem der preiswertesten Energieträger
überhaupt.
So wie Deutschland in der Entwicklung und Anwendung der Windenergie eine
führende Position einnimmt, so kann es auch bei der Umsetzung der Energiewende als Beispiel für andere Länder vorangehen. Eine für die Wirtschaft lohnende Zielsetzung für die nächsten 25 Jahre. UL International DEWI, freut sich
darauf, hierzu mit dem Wissen und der Erfahrung aus 25 Jahren beizutragen. Bei
meinen Reisen ins Ausland fällt mir immer wieder auf, dass über den in Deutsch-
land schon gemachte Fortschritt bei der Umsetzung der Energiewende wenig
bekannt ist. Als kleinen Beitrag haben wir in diesem DEWI Magazin einen Artikel
des IWR abgedruckt, der in einer monatlichen Übersicht den durchschnittlichen,
stündlichen Leistungsbeitrag von Sonne und Wind im Deutschen Stromnetz wiedergibt (siehe Artikel Seite 54). Allein der Windbeitrag war mit 15% an der Stromversorgung beteiligt und das in einem Land, das wegen seines Windangebots
nicht als prädestiniert für die Windenergienutzung angesehen werden kann.
Ähnliches gilt für die Sonne mit einem Anteil von fast 6% an der deutschen
Stromlieferung im Jahr 2015. Vielleicht kann unsere Veröffentlichung in den
wind- und sonnenreichen Ländern zum Verständnis beitragen, dass auch ein
Netz mit einem vor 30 Jahren undenkbar hohen Leistungsanteil von 21% dieser
beiden volantilen Stromquellen stabil betrieben werden kann. Deutschland steht
vor der Aufgabe, weit höhere Anteile im Versorgungsnetz sicher beherrschen zu
müssen. Dies in einer kostenoptimalen Weise hinzubekommen ist eine große
Herausforderung und verlangt das Zusammenspiel aller am Strommarkt beteiligten.
Dies zu erreichen bedeutet einen grundlegenden Paradigmenwechsel in der
Gestaltung der elektrischen Energieversorgung. Vor vielen Jahren gab es die
Stromversorgungsmonopole, die ihr System aus Erzeugung, Transport und Verteilung des Stroms wirtschaftlich optimiert haben, um den größtmöglichen Profit für sich zu erlangen. Der Nachteil dieser Versorgungsform lag in der notwendigen staatlichen Kontrolle der Stromverkaufspreise, in anderen Worten, es gab
keinen Wettbewerb. Mit dem Unbundling von Erzeugung, Netz und Vertrieb
standen die Marktteilnehmer im Wettbewerb, aber sie optimierten nur noch das
ihnen verbliebene Segment der Stromversorgung, mit dem Nachteil, dass niemand mehr für die Optimierung der Gesamtversorgung zuständig war. Soll die
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Energiewende erfolgreich sein, müssen neue Wege der Zuständigkeiten
gefunden werden, damit die ihr obliegende Sicherheit der elektrischen Energieversorgung durch eine kostenoptimierte Anpassung der Energieerzeugung an den Verbrauch gewährleistet werden kann. Dies bedeutet, dass
bestimmte Bestandteile des Energieerzeugungssystems, wie bspw. der
Betrieb von Speichern oder der Einfluss auf die für das Versorgungssystem
kostengünstigste Auslegung der Windturbinen, durch den verantwortlichen
Netzbetreiber beeinflussbar sein sollten. D.h., nach dem „Unbundling“ ist
wieder ein gewisses „Bundling“ sinnvoll und notwendig.
Ich wünsche allen Kunden und Freunden des DEWI ein erfolgreiches Jahr
2016 mit Marktvoraussetzungen, die ein weiteres Wachstum und die Energiewende sicherstellen. Wir stehen zur Verfügung, um Ihnen mit unserem
Know-how und unserer 25-jährigen Erfahrung dabei zu helfen.
Wilhelmshaven, Februar 2016
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
Jens Peter Molly
Managing Director
UL International GmbH
WE KNOW WIND
Course Program 2016
Latin America & Spain
Location
Brazil, São Paulo
Argentina, Buenos Aires
Chile, Santiago
Peru, Lima
Colombia, Bogotá
Costa Rica, San José
Mexico, Mexico City
Spain, Madrid
Days
14/15.04.2016
10/11.05.2016
12/13.05.2016
16/17.05.2016
26/27.09.2016
29/30.09.2016
04/05.10.2016
15/16.11.2016
All seminars will be conducted in Spanish
except in Brazil, which will be in Portuguese.
DEWI/UL News
Contact the experts at:
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
[email protected] / dewi.de
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Kontakt
zum Autor
T. Neumann
DEWI, Wilhelmshaven
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore Windparks untereinander und auf das
lokale Klima?
Diese Frage untersuchen Wissenschaftler von fünf verschiedenen Instituten und
Firmen in Deutschland in den nächsten drei Jahren gemeinsam im Rahmen des
Forschungs-Projekts „WIPAFF (Windpark-Fernfeld)“, mit Förderung vom Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft und Energie.
Das Projekt
Offshore-Windparks stellen für den Wind Hindernisse auf der relativ glatten
Meeresoberfläche dar und durch die Windräder wird dem Wind Energie entzogen. Dadurch wird der Wind gebremst und die Verwirbelung von Luftmassen
(Turbulenz) erhöht. Je nach Wetterlage (Windrichtung, Temperatur der Luft und
Eigenschaften der Wasseroberfläche) erholt sich die Windgeschwindigkeit
manchmal erst nach 10 bis zu 100 km hinter einem Windpark wieder auf ihren
ursprünglichen Wert. Zudem ist es möglich, dass Luft­massen um große Windparks herum zur Seite oder nach oben abgelenkt werden. Das wird zu Beeinflussungen der Windparks untereinander führen und es kann auch nicht ausgeschlossen werden, dass es zu Veränderungen des lokalen Klimas kommt, bis hin
zu Veränderungen der Temperatur-, Wolken- und Niederschlagsverteilung über
der Nordsee und den angrenzenden Küstengebieten.
In dem 3-jährigen Forschungsprojekt WIPAFF, das vor kurzem bewilligt wurde
und bei dem jetzt die Unterzeichnung des Kooperationsabkommens erfolgt, wird
der Nachlauf von Offshore-Windparks in der Nordsee mit einer Kombination von
verschiedenen Methoden untersucht:
Detaillierte Messungen des Windfeldes, der Wetterbedingungen und der Wellen
auf der Meeresoberfläche vor und hinter Windparks mit verschiedenen Messgeräten auf Offshore-Plattformen, mit einem Forschungsflugzeug und durch die
Auswertung von Satellitendaten
• Modellierung des Windfeldes 10 – 100 km hinter großen Windparks mit
numerischen Modellen unter Benutzung neuer Ansätze zur Modellierung
der Windparks und unter Berücksichtigung des Seegangs
• Verbesserung der Modelle zur Erhöhung der Planungssicherheit durch
Bewertung der Modellergebnisse und Abgleich mit den Messungen.
Mit dem großflächig erfolgten Ausbau der Offshore-Windenergie in der Deutschen Bucht der letzten Jahre ergibt sich nunmehr erstmalig die Möglichkeit, die
großräumigen Effekte von Windparks, die in verschiedenen Modelle bereits vorhergesagt wurden, in der Realität zu untersuchen. Die neuartigen Ergebnisse
werden genutzt, um den weiteren Ausbau der Windkraftnutzung in der Nordsee
zu begleiten und Voraussetzungen für einen möglichst effizienten und umweltverträglichen Ausbau der Offshore-Windenergie zu schaffen.
Das Team
Das Projekt wird geleitet von Prof. Dr. Stefan Emeis vom Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung (IMK-IFU) des Karlsruher Instituts für Technologie (KIT)
in Garmisch-Partenkirchen. Weitere Projektpartner sind das Institut für Flugführung der TU Braunschweig, die Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, das Institut
für Küstenforschung am Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (Zentrum für Material-
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
und Küstenforschung GmbH) und das DEWI (UL International GmbH) in Wilhelmshaven. Die Partner haben teilweise bereits früher zu ähnlichen Fragestellungen zusammengearbeitet und verfügen über langjährige Erfahrungen
für solche Forschungsaufgaben.
Der Beitrag des DEWI zum Projekt
Das DEWI betreibt seit 2003 auf der Offshore-Forschungsplattform FINO1 in
der Nordsee kontinuierliche Messungen in dem für Windenergieanlagen
interessanten Bereich der marinen Atmosphäre bis zu 250 m über der Meeresoberfläche. Im Rahmen dieses Vorhabens sollen aber nicht nur die Messungen von FINO1 sowie auf den Plattformen FINO2 und FINO3 genutzt werden, sondern auch weitere Messpunkte in der Deutschen Bucht an
strategisch wichtigen Punkten eingerichtet werden. Hierfür ist beispielsweise in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Bundesamt für Seeschifffahrt und
Hydrographie (BSH) die Nutzung von Feuerschiffen geplant. Durch dieses
Messnetz sollen die weiträumig angelegten Flugmesskampagnen, Satellitenbeobachtungen und auch die Modellrechnungen messtechnisch validiert und optimiert werden.
DEWI wird auch eigene Modellrechnungen durchführen mit dem Schwerpunkt, die Ergebnisse des Projektes für Industriemodelle nutzbar zu machen,
um diese unmittelbar in das Dienstleistungsportfolio, z.B. im Bereich der
Ermittlung von Energieerträgen für Windparks, einfließen zu lassen. Hierdurch wird es in Zukunft möglich sein, die weitreichenden Effekte der
Windparks untereinander mit hoher Sicherheit in die Prognosen einfließen
zu lassen.
Das Projekt WIPAFF wird vom Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft und Energie gefördert.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Kontakt
zum Autor
B. Neddermann
DEWI, Wilhelmshaven
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Eine Betrachtung zu den Flächenpotenzialen und den Perspektiven für den weiteren Ausbau der Windenergie
Hintergrund
Mit Veröffentlichung im Niedersächsischen Ministerialblatt [1] ist seit 25. Februar 2016 in Niedersachsen erstmals ein Windenergieerlass in Kraft.
Das Niedersächsische Ministerium für Umwelt, Energie und Klimaschutz hat
gemeinsam mit Wirtschaftsministerium, Landwirtschaftsministerium (zuständig für Raumordnung und Landesplanung) sowie Sozialministerium (zuständig
für Städtebau und Bauleitpläne) und Innenministerium (oberste Kommunalaufsichtsbehörde) den Windenergieerlass erarbeitet. Mit der Beschlussfassung
der Niedersächsischen Landesregierung vom 15.12.2015 fand ein rund zweijähriger offener und transparenter Dialog- und Arbeitsprozess mit Beteiligung von
Verbänden und anderen externen Akteuren seinen Abschluss.
Mit dem Windenergieerlass sollen die kommunalen Planungsträger dabei unterstützt werden, den erforderlichen Ausbau der Windenergienutzung umweltverträglich, sozialverträglich und wirtschaftlich zu gestalten. Erklärtes Ziel der Landesregierung ist, bis 2050 in Niedersachsen mindestens 20 Gigawatt
Windenergieleistung an Land zu errichten. Hierzu ist ein Flächenbedarf von
mind. 1,4% der Landesfläche erforderlich.
In einer Anlage zum Windenergieerlass sind die vom Niedersächsischen Ministerium für Umwelt, Energie und Klimaschutz ermittelten Windenergie-Flächenpotenziale für Niedersachsen und für die einzelnen Regionalplanungsräume
dargestellt. Ergänzend wird in einer tabellarischen Übersicht zum regionalisierten Flächenansatz aufgezeigt, wie die regionale Verteilung der Windenergie bei
Inanspruchnahme von 1,4 % der Landesfläche und gleichmäßiger Nutzung der
Flächenpotenziale in den Regionalplanungsräumen aussieht. In diesem Beitrag
erfolgt eine Betrachtung zu den Perspektiven für den weiteren Ausbau der Windenergie in Niedersachsen, wenn sich die derzeitige regionale Verteilung der
Windenergienutzung durch eine Nutzung entsprechend der in der Anlage zum
Windenergieerlass für 2050 dargestellten Flächenpotenziale verändert.
Aktueller Stand der Windenergienutzung in Niedersachsen
Niedersachsen ist mit großem Abstand das Windenergieland Nr. 1 in Deutschland. Ende 2015 waren 5.784 Windenergieanlagen mit einer Gesamtleistung von
8.586 MW installiert, so dass das zweitgrößte Bundesland (13,3% Flächenanteil
in Deutschland) 19 % der bundesweit installierten Windenergieleistung erreicht.
Abb. 1 zeigt die Entwicklung des Windenergieausbaus in Niedersachsen seit
1993. Wie die Grafik verdeutlicht, gab es bereits in den 1990er-Jahren eine sehr
dynamische Ausbauentwicklung, so dass schon 2003 die Marke von 3.000 MW
Windenergieleistung überschritten wurde – ein Wert, den bis heute nur wenige
Bundesländer erreicht haben. Darüber hinaus veranschaulicht Abb. 1, dass das
Repowering seit 2012 einen wichtigen Anteil an der Neuinstallation in Niedersachsen hat. Nach Angaben des für Raumordnung zuständigen Referats im Niedersächsischen Ministerium für Ernährung, Landwirtschaft und Verbraucherschutz werden derzeit etwa 1,1% der Landesfläche für die Windenergie genutzt.
Abb. 2 (installierte Leistung) und Abb. 3 (flächenbezogene Darstellung) zeigen
die regionale Verteilung der Windenergienutzung in den niedersächsischen
Landkreisen (Stand Juli 2014).
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Windenergienutzung 2050 bei gleichmäßiger Nutzung der regionalen Flächenpotenziale
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
Das Niedersächsische Ministerium für Umwelt, Energie und Klimaschutz hat
mit Hilfe eines Geoinformationssystems die Flächenpotenziale zur Windenergienutzung für Niedersachsen und für die einzelnen Regionalplanungsräume
ermittelt.
Nach Abzug der sog. „harten Tabuzonen“ (Ausschlusskriterien für die Windenergienutzung) sowie sämtlicher Fauna-Flora-Habitat (FFH)- und Vogelsschutz-Gebiete, Waldflächen und auch Industrie- und Gewerbegebietsflächen wurde eine
landesweite Potenzialfläche von insgesamt max. 19,1 % der Landesfläche ermittelt. Dabei ist zu beachten, dass die Potenzialflächen regionalspezifisch unterschiedlich und nicht gleichmäßig über alle Regionalplanungsräume verteilt
sind.
Für die Realisierung des Landesziels, bis 2050 Windenergieanlagen (WEA) mit
einer Gesamtleistung von 20 Gigawatt zu installieren, wird von einem Flächenbedarf von mind. 1,4% der Landesfläche ausgegangen. Dieser Flächenbedarf
würde erreicht, wenn die Träger der Regionalplanung und Gemeinden
mindestens 7,35 % ihrer jeweiligen Potenzialfläche als Vorranggebiete für die
Windenergienutzung ausweisen. In der Anlage zum Windenergieerlass wird
deshalb in einer tabellarischen Übersicht für alle Regionalplanungsräume
(Landkreise, kreisfreie Städte und Zweckverbandsgebiete) dargestellt, in welchem Umfang Flächen für die Windenergienutzung auszuweisen sind, um das
Landesziel bei einer gleichmäßigen Nutzung der regionalen Flächenpotenziale
zu erreichen.
Es ist in diesem Zusammenhang deutlich darauf hinzuweisen, dass es sich bei
den Flächenangaben um Orientierungswerte und nicht um verbindliche Vorgaben für die Regionale Raumordnungs- bzw. Bauleitplanung handelt. Denn die
Landesregierung verzichtet vorerst darauf, Vorgaben zur Umsetzung des Ausbauziels als verbindliches Planungsziel festzulegen.
Die Karten in Abb. 4 und Abb. 5 veranschaulichen die regionale Verteilung der
Windenergienutzung für das Szenario im Jahr 2050, wenn 1,4% der Landesfläche von Niedersachsen für die Windenergienutzung bei einer gleichmäßigen
Nutzung der regionalen Flächenpotenziale gemäß dem o.g. Ansatz genutzt
wird.
Der Vergleich mit der derzeitigen Situation (siehe Abb. 2 und Abb. 3) zeigt sehr
deutlich die Verlagerung der regionalen Verteilung der Windenergienutzung
vom Nordwesten in die östlichen und südlichen Landesteile. Als Hintergrund ist
zu sehen, dass sich die Windenergienutzung derzeit sehr stark auf die windreichen Küstenregionen (insb. in Ostfriesland) konzentriert. Die Binnenlandregionen mit vergleichsweise mäßigen Windbedingungen werden dagegen bisher
nur wenig genutzt.
Mit Blick auf die Perspektiven für die weitere Ausbauentwicklung ist zu berücksichtigen, dass die sehr günstigen Windverhältnisse in den Küstenregionen
auch in Zukunft einen wichtigen Einfluss haben werden. Deshalb ist zu erwarten, dass das regional vorhandene Flächenpotenzial hier stärker ausgeschöpft
wird als mit der dargestellten „Mindest“-Nutzung von 7,35%. Für die Binnenlandregionen ist die Erschließung von 7,35% des ermittelten Flächenpotenzials
dagegen ein durchaus ambitioniertes Ziel, das einen deutlichen Zuwachs gegenüber der bisherigen Nutzung der Windenergie in der Region erfordert.
Ein wichtiges Kriterium für den regionalen Ausbau wird sein, ob die bisher
genutzten Windenergiestandorte die Voraussetzungen erfüllen, die für die
Ermittlung des Flächenpotenzials zugrunde gelegt wurden. Nach Angaben des
Umweltministeriums sind heute z.B. 25% der niedersächsischen Anlagen in
einem Abstand von weniger als 400 m zu Wohngebäuden in Betrieb. Diese
Standorte entfallen mittelfristig, da ein Repowering der Anlagen nach Ende der
Betriebsdauer ausgeschlossen ist. Darüber hinaus befinden sich zahlreiche WEA
aus naturschutzrechtlicher Sicht innerhalb der „harten Tabuzonen“ und damit
ebenfalls außerhalb der nutzbaren Potenzialflächen.
In diesem Zusammenhang ist von Bedeutung, dass gerade in den küstennahen
Regionen ein hoher Anteil an Altanlagen besteht, die heute nicht mehr genehmigungsfähig sind. Andererseits ist davon auszugehen, dass die Ausbauent-
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
wicklung in den Küstenregionen entscheidend durch das Repowering (an
genehmigungsfähigen Standorten) bestimmt wird. Denn es ist nicht zu
erwarten, dass in diesen windgünstigen Gebieten zusätzliche, bisher noch
nicht genutzte Standorte verfügbar sein werden.
Fazit
Die Landesregierung geht davon aus, dass ein Flächenbedarf von 1,4 % der
Landesfläche für die Windenergie erforderlich ist, um das im neuen Windenergieerlass formulierte Landesziel von 20 Gigawatt Windenergieleistung bis 2050 in Niedersachsen zu erreichen. Unter der Annahme, dass der
gesamte WEA-Bestand dann eine mittlere Leistung von 4 MW hat, lässt
sich das Ausbauziel sogar mit einer geringeren Anlagenzahl als heute
erreichen. Allerdings werden sich diese Anlagen hinsichtlich Gesamthöhe
und Rotorgröße deutlich von dem derzeitigen WEA-Bestand mit einem
hohen Anteil an Altanlagen unterscheiden.
Die vorliegende Betrachtung zu den Perspektiven der Ausbauentwicklung
in Niedersachsen zeigt, dass eine Verlagerung der regionalen Verteilung
der Windenergienutzung in Niedersachsen vom Nordwesten in die östlichen und südlichen Landesteile zu erwarten ist. Dies gilt auch unter
Berücksichtigung der Erwartung, dass die für die Windenergie verfügbaren
Flächenpotenziale im Küstenbereich weiterhin stärker genutzt werden als
in den Binnenlandregionen.
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
Reference
DEWI/UL News
[1] Planung und Genehmigung von Windenergieanlagen an Land (Windenergieerlass);
Niedersächsisches Ministerialblatt Nr. 7/2016, S. 190
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Kontakt
Author
zum
Contact
Autor
C. Ender
DEWI, Wilhelmshaven
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland
Stand 31.12.2015
Im Vergleich zum Jahr 2014 war der Ausbau der Windenergie im vergangenen
Jahr noch stärker durch den Markt in China geprägt. Nahezu die Hälfte (30,5
GW) der neuen Leistung wurde dort installiert [1]. Auch in den USA wurden
wieder mehr Anlagen errichtet als im Vorjahr (+ 18%). In den anderen Ländern
der Top 10 war dies fast gleich oder geringer. Insgesamt kamen weltweit 61,9
GW hinzu und so stieg die Gesamtleistung auf 432,5 GW, wobei sich jetzt 1/3
davon in China befinden (Tab. 1).
Wie zu erwarten war, sind die Errichtungen auf dem deutschen Markt an Land
gegenüber 2014 geringer ausgefallen. Hauptsächlich lag dies am Rückgang im
Bereich des Repowerings, hier war der Ausbau um 60 % geringer als noch in
2014. Bei den reinen Neuerrichtungen liegt der Wert auf dem gleichen Niveau
wie im Vorjahr. Insgesamt wurden an Land brutto 1.354 Wind­energieanlagen
(WEA) mit 3.699,9 MW neu errichtet1, dies sind 23 Prozent weniger als im Vorjahr. Im Rahmen eines Repowerings wurden 317 WEA mit 278 MW abgebaut
und durch 268 Anlagen mit 735 MW ersetzt, somit liegt der Anteil bei rund 20
% (in 2014: ca. 38 %). Der „Nettozuwachs“ der Windenergie an Land, der entscheidend für den Zielkorridor der Bundesregierung ist, beläuft sich somit auf
3.422 MW, was wieder über dem festgelegten Wert von 2.400 - 2.600 MW liegt.
Auf Basis des Anlagenregisters [2] gingen 2015 insgesamt 1.378 WEA mit
3.757 MW in Betrieb und speisen Strom in Netz ein. Auf See ging eine Vielzahl
von Windparks neu ans Netz, so dass Deutschland weltweit auf Platz 2 vorgerückt ist. Im Jahr 2015 wurden 290 Offshore-WEA mit einer Gesamt­leis­tung von
1.189 MW neu errichtet, 545 WEA mit 2.279 MW konnten erstmals Strom ins
Netz einspeisen. Insgesamt waren zum Stichtag 31.12.2015 in Deutschland (onund offshore) 26.651 Wind­
ener­
gieanlagen mit einer Gesamtleistung von
45.062 MW errichtet. Eine Übersicht über das Ergebnis des Jahres 2015 gibt die
Abb. 1, wo u.a. die Neuinstallationen, das Repowering und der Bereich Offshore
dargestellt sind. Die Abb. 2 zeigt den Ausbau der Windenergie in Deutsch­land
in den letzten Jahren und enthält neben den jährlichen Errichtungen auch die
kumulierten Werte sowie die im betrachteten Jahr noch nicht ans Netz angeschlossene Offshoreleistung.
Regionale Verteilung der Windenergienutzung
Bei der Betrachtung der Neuerrichtungen je Bundesland fällt auf, dass Schleswig-Holstein diesmal mit 853 MW deutlich vor Nordrhein-Westfalen (420 MW)
liegt (Tab. 2). Es folgen Nieder­sachsen (414 MW), Brandenburg (395 MW) und
Bayern (373 MW). Kumulativ gesehen führt weiterhin Nie­der­sachsen mit 8.586
MW, gefolgt von Bran­den­burg (5.876 MW) und Schleswig-Holstein (5.800 MW).
Weitere Gesamtzahlen sind in Abb. 3 zu finden, wo zum einen grafisch die
Gesamtleistung zum 31.12.2014 (blau) und zum anderen die Neuerrichtungen
zum 31.12.2015 (orange) dar­gestellt sind. Die Zahlenan­gaben beziehen sich auf
die gesamte installierte Leistung zum Stichtag. Einen genauen Überblick zur
Veränderung bei den Neu­auf­stel­lungen in 2015 gegenüber dem Vorjahr gibt
die Tab. 3. Hier lag die prozentual größte Veränderung in Baden-Württemberg,
wo sich die Aufstellung von 21 MW im Jahr 2014 auf 144 MW in 2015 gesteigert
hat. Auf Basis der gemeldeten PLZ/Ortsangaben der Her­stel­ler wurden die installierte Leistung und die Anzahl der Anlagen auf der Ebene der Landkreise/
1
Die Angaben basieren auf Herstellerangaben, BNetzA Anlagenregister und eigenen Recherchen. Die Erhebung wurde im
Januar 2016 durchgeführt. Die gemeldeten WEA sind errichtet, müssen aber noch nicht ans Netz angeschlossen sein.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
Kreisfreien Städte zusammengefasst. Tab. 4 gibt eine Übersicht je Bundesland
mit den jeweiligen Top 3 sowie eine Angabe zu den restlichen Land­kreisen. Der
größte Zuwachs erfolgte in Landkreisen Schleswig-Holsteins, und zwar in den
Landkreisen Nordfries­land mit 262 MW, Dith­marschen (250 MW) und Schleswig-Flensburg (173 MW), gefolgt vom Landkreis Stendal (Sachsen-Anhalt) mit
169 MW (TOP 10 in Tab. 5). Dabei ist aber zu beachten, dass sich viele Land­kreise
im Osten Deutschlands über sehr große Regionen er­strecken und dementsprechend größere Flächen als in den westdeutschen Bundesländern umfassen.
Insgesamt gab es Neuaufstellungen in 154 Landkreisen, wobei in 82 Landkreisen (53 %) nur 1 bis 5 Anlagen errichtet wurden (Abb. 4).
Analyse der Entwicklung in den DIBT Windzonen
Eine Unterscheidung nach Küsten-/Binnenländern auf Basis der Bundesländer
ist bei einigen Bundesländern sehr ungenau, da sie so­wohl über Küstenstandorte als auch über verschiedene Bin­nenstandorte verfügen (z. B. Niedersachsen). Aus diesem Grund wurde eine differenziertere Auswertung der Errichtungsdaten entsprechend der Klassifizierung nach den Windzonen der
DIBt-Richtlinie für Windenergie­an­lagen [3] durchgeführt. Abb. 5 zeigt die regionale Ver­tei­lung der Windzonen, die von Schwachwindstandorten (Wind­
zone 1) bis zu windgünstigen Küstenstandorten (Wind­zone 4) reicht. In Tab. 6
ist das Ergebnis der Zu­ord­nung für die im Jahr 2015 neu errichteten WEA dargestellt. Es ist deutlich zu erkennen, dass die Nabenhöhe entsprechend der
Windbedingungen von den Küstenzonen zu den Binnenlandzonen ansteigt
und dass die spez. Leistung der eingesetzten WEA abnimmt. Darüber hinaus
ist zu sehen, dass die wenigsten Anlagen in der Zone 3 errichtet wurden und
die meisten in der Zone 2. Abb. 6 und Abb. 7 zeigen den zeitlichen Verlauf der
Entwicklung in den einzelnen Windzonen, zum einen die Anzahl der errichteten WEA und die spezif. inst. Leistung (W/m²) zum anderen. In Abb. 7 wird
deutlich, dass die spezif. inst. Leistung in allen Windzonen von Jahr zu Jahr
immer weiter abnimmt.
Repowering erreicht einen Anteil von 20% an der neu installierten
Windenergieleistung
Nach dem Wegfall des bis Ende 2014 gewährten Repowering-Bonus hat sich im
Jahr 2015 gezeigt, dass sich das Repowering auch unabhängig von einer speziellen Förderung als wichtiges Segment für den Ausbau der Windenergie an
Land etabliert hat. Nach den vorliegenden Informationen erreichte das Repowering im letzten Jahr einen Anteil von 20% der neu installierten Onshore-Windenergieleistung (734,56 MW von 3.699,9 MW, Tab. 2). Tab. 7 gibt einen
Überblick zur Errichtung neuer Windenergieanlagen im Rahmen des Repowering in den Bundesländern in 2015 und 2014. Der Rückgang im Vergleich zum
Rekordjahr 2014 (38 % Repowering-Anteil) ist darauf zurückzuführen, dass sich
viele Betreiber noch in 2014 für den Rückbau der Altanlagen entschieden
haben, um letztmalig von dem (handelbaren) Repowering-Bonus profitieren zu
können. Dies zeigt insbesondere die Entwicklung in Rheinland-Pfalz, Hessen,
Sachsen-Anhalt und Thüringen, wo das Repowering 2015 – anders als im Vorjahr – praktisch keine Rolle mehr für den regionalen Ausbau spielte.
Die Analyse zeigt, dass das Repowering vermehrt im Rahmen von kommunalen Planungskonzepten umgesetzt wird, bei denen sich der Anlagentausch
nicht auf einen einzelnen Windpark beschränkt. Als Beispiel sind das gleichzeitige Repowering mehrerer Windparks in einer Kommune bzw. Region in Lindewitt, Friedrichskoog, Wanderup und Friedrichsgabekoog (Schleswig-Holstein),
in Wittmund (Niedersachsen), in Lichtenau, Schleiden, Ense (Nordrhein-Westfalen) und in Klettwitz/Kostebrau (Brandenburg) zu nennen.
Abb. 8 zeigt den Anteil des Repowerings an den Neuaufstellungen in den
jeweiligen Bundesländern. Die durchschnittliche Leistung der Repowering-Neuanlagen liegt bei rund 2,74 MW. Neben den reinen Neuer­rich­tungen ist vor
allem interessant, welchen Netto-Leis­tungszuwachs dieses gebracht hat. Eine
solche Betrach­tung ist in Abb. 9 zu finden, wo von den Neuaufstellungen (dunkelblau) der Abbau (rot) abgezogen wurde. Der größte Leistungszuwachs (hellblau) war in 2015 in Schleswig-Holstein gefolgt von Brandenburg. Abb. 10 zeigt,
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
dass die für 2015 erfassten Repowering-Projekte hauptsächlich mit Anlagen der
Hersteller Enercon, Senvion und Vestas realisiert wurden. Tab. 8 gibt einen
Überblick zu den größten Repowering-Projekten in 2015. Abb. 11 / Abb. 12
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Offshore
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
2015 wurden insgesamt 290 WEA mit einer Gesamtleistung von 1.189 MW vor
der deutschen Küste errichtet, davon 46 WEA mit 166 MW in der Ostsee. 545
WEA mit 2.279 MW konnten 2015 erstmals Strom ins Netz einspeisen – rund
54 % dieser Anlagen waren allerdings bereits im Vorjahr errichtet worden. Insgesamt waren zum Jahresende 2015 in Deutschland 833 Offshore-WEA mit
3.541 MW vollständig errichtet, wovon 789 WEA mit 3.283 MW Strom einspeisten. Eine detaillierte Übersicht zum Stand des Offhore-Windergieausbaus gibt
der folgende Artikel.
Der potenzielle Jahresenergieertrag
Im Jahr 2015 wurden lt. vorläufigen Zahlen des BDEW insgesamt rund 77,9 TWh
(Onshore) sowie 8,1 TWh (Offshore) aus Wind erzeugt [4]. Die Zahlen beruhen
auf den Jahresmeldungen der Verteilnetzbetreiber (vorläufige Zahlen und
Schätzungen) und es dauert mitunter einige Monate, bis das endgültige Ergebnis vorliegt. Um einen Anhaltspunkt zu bekommen, was die Windenergie zu
leisten vermag, erfolgt eine Ab­schätzung des potenziellen Jahresenergieertrags bei einem 100%-Windjahr. Diese beruht auf den mittleren Ausnutzungsgraden, die unter Verwendung des Windindex IWET V11 [5] für WEA verschiedener Leis­
tungs­
klas­
sen je Bundesland ermittelt wurden (Mittel­
wert der
Ausnutzungsgrade der Jahre 2003 bis 2012). Weiter­hin wird in dieser Abschätzung angenommen, dass alle zum Jahresende gemeldeten WEA einen vollen
Jahres­ener­gie­er­trag beisteuern, d.h. Stillstandszeiten aufgrund von War­tung,
Reparatur, Netzüberlastung etc. werden nicht be­rück­sichtigt. Wie hoch der
Anteil der Windenergie am Nettostromverbrauch [6] sein könnte, zeigt die
Abb. 13, wo die Anteile des rechnerisch ermittelten potentiellen Jahresenergieertrages aufgetragen sind.
Markttendenzen bei der Anlagengröße
Von Jahr zu Jahr werden immer mehr Anlagen mit einem Rotordurchmesser
von 90 m und größer in Deutschland errichtet (Abb. 14 und Abb. 15), im Jahr
2015 lag der Anteil bezogen auf die Anlagenanzahl bei rund 86 %. Die deutlichste Steigerung gegenüber dem Vorjahr liegt bei den Anlagen mit 100 m
Rotordurchmesser und größer. Deren Anteil stieg von ca. 64 % auf 75 %. Die
durchschnittlich installierte Leistung an Land stieg im vergangenen Jahr nur
minimal auf 2,73 MW ( Abb. 16), wobei der Anteil der Anlagen mit einer Leistung
von über 3 MW von rund 49 % auf 53 % zunahm ( Abb. 17 Mitte). Die durchschnittliche installierte Leistung der Offshore-WEA lag bei 4,1 MW. Neben der
installierten Leistung und dem Rotordurchmesser ist die Nabenhöhe ein weiteres wichtiges Kriterium. Der Anteil der errichteten Anlagen mit einer Nabenhöhe von über 100 m hat deutlich
zugenommen, so dass mittlerweile 61 % der WEA eine Nabenhöhe von 121-150 m haben
( Abb. 18 links). Die Abb. 18 (rechts)
zeigt den Anteil der Ge­samt­höhen
je Bundesland für die in 2015
errichteten Anlagen, unterteilt in 3
Höhenklassen auf Basis der
Be­s tim­m ungen zur Kennzeichth
nung von Luftfahrthin­der­nissen.
SAVE THE DATE
2017
17 / 18 October 2017
Bremen, Germany
13 GERMAN WIND
ENERGY CONFERENCE
www.dewek.de
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Marktanteile der Anbieter
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
|
Die Reihenfolge bei den Marktanteilen der WEA-Hersteller in Deutschland ist
im Onshore-Bereich nahezu gleich geblieben (Abb. 19 Mitte), wobei Senvion,
Nordex und GE Zuwächse verzeichnen konnten. Zusätzlich werden die Offshore-Marktanteile (100 % Siemens in 2015) sowie für beide Bereiche zusammen
dargestellt. Diese Darstellung berücksichtigt die Tatsache, dass nicht jeder Hersteller in beiden Segmenten aktiv ist und Offshore einen nennenswerten Anteil
hat. Die Basis für diese Betrachtung sind die 2015 neu errichteten WEA, wobei
ein Teil noch nicht ans Netz angeschlossen ist. Die Marktanteile auf Basis der
an Land in Betrieb genommenen Anlagen ist nahezu identisch mit denen in
Abb. 19, daher wird hier auf eine Darstellung dieser verzichtet.
Neben den Marktanteilen je MW für Deutschland ist es auch interessant, wie
es an Land in den einzelnen Leistungsklassen bzgl. der errichteten Anlagen
aussieht. Dieses zeigt Abb. 20 und hier ist interessant, dass Enercon in drei
Klassen aktiv ist und dort einen nennenswerten Anteil hat. Im Bereich von 2,5
bis 2,9 MW ist GE der Hersteller, der diese Klasse für sich entschieden hat. Im
Bereich der Klasse ab 3,5 MW hat nur e.n.o Energy an Land Anlagen dieser
Klasse errichtet, in der Klasse unter 2 MW nur Enercon.
Referenzen:
[1]
www.gwec.net/global-figures/graphs/ (January 2016)
[2] Bundesnetzagentur, Anlagenregister - Stand 29.02.2016
[3] Richtlinie für Windenergieanlagen, Fassung Oktober 2012; Hrsg.: Deutsches Institut für Bautechnik, Berlin
[4]www.enwipo.de/2015/12/21/2015-erneuerbare-erzeugen-30-strom/
[5] Ingenieurwerkstatt Energietechnik (Rade) (Hrsg.): Monatsinfo: Betriebsvergleich umweltbewusster Energienutzer 2003-2012.
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
Enercon E-101
Photo/Bild: Bernd Neddermann
[6] Nettostromverbrauch 2014 lt. BDEW, Bundesländer wurden hochgerechnet
Inhaltsverzeichnis
Vestas V-112 3.3 MW
Photo/Bild: Bernd Neddermann
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Kontakt
zum Autor
B. Neddermann
DEWI, Wilhelmshaven
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen Deutschland auf Rang 2
im globalen Offshore-Markt
Vor der deutschen Küste sind 2015 insgesamt 545 Windenergieanlagen mit einer
Gesamtleistung von 2.279,2 MW in Betrieb gegangen. Damit erreichte Deutschland einen bemerkenswerten Anteil von gut 75% an der europaweit im letzten
Jahr neu ans Netz angeschlossenen Offshore-Windenergieleistung. Durch die
Verdreifachung der ins Netz einspeisenden Leistung innerhalb nur eines Jahres
ist Deutschland mit einer Gesamtkapazität von 3.295,3 MW und 30%-Marktanteil in Europa hinter Großbritannien (5.061 MW) auf Platz 2 im Offshore-Windenergiemarkt vorgerückt – nicht nur in Europa (siehe Abb. 1) sondern auch weltweit.
Als Grund für diese beispiellose Entwicklung ist die Fertigstellung von gleich fünf
Netzanbindungssystemen mit einer Gesamtkapazität von 3.730 MW in der deutschen Nordsee zu sehen. Tab. 1 gibt hierzu einen Überblick.
In neun Offshore-Windparks (OWP) in der Nordsee konnten deshalb 296 WEA,
die bereits 2014 vollständig errichtet waren und 249 WEA, die 2015 auf See installiert wurden, erstmals Strom einspeisen. Abb. 2 zeigt die regionale Verteilung
der Offshore-Windparks in der Nordsee, die 2015 neu in Betrieb genommen wurden. Dargestellt ist auch der OWP Riffgat, bei dem eine Leistungserhöhung um
insgesamt 5,4 MW erfolgte und die Projekte (in gelb), die Ende 2015 in Bau waren.
Beim OWP Amrumbank West wurde die Nennleistung der achtzig 3,6 MW-Anlagen wie beim OWP Riffgat um 5% erhöht, weil hierfür eine entsprechende Netzanschlusskapazität verfügbar war. Im OWP Borkum Riffgrund 1 sind 78 Siemens
SWT-3.6-120 mit jeweils 4 MW Nennleistung in Betrieb gegangen.
In der Ostsee ging 2015 der OWP EnBW Baltic 2 mit einer Gesamtleistung von
288 MW neu ans Netz.
Installationsarbeiten auf See
In 2015 wurden 290 Windenergieanlagen mit einer Gesamtleistung 1.189 MW vor
der deutschen Küste errichtet. Tab. 2 gibt einen Überblick zu den Installationsarbeiten auf See. Dabei wurden im vergangenen Jahr ausschließlich Windturbinen
von Siemens errichtet: 249 Siemens SWT-3.6-120 und 41 (von insgesamt 97) Siemens SWT-6.0-154 im OWP Gode Wind 1+2. Darüber hinaus erfolgte die Installation von 63 der 72 Monopile-Fundamente im OWP Sandbank und der drei ersten
Monopiles im OWP Nordsee One.
In der Ostsee gab es im letzten Jahr keine Baumaßnahmen zur Errichtung neuer
Offshore-Windparks. Abb. 3 veranschaulicht die Ausbauentwicklung der Offshore-Windenergie in Deutschland und zeigt, dass die Kluft zwischen der installierten Leistung und der ins Netz einspeisenden Leistung im letzten Jahr deutlich
verringert werden konnte. Mit Stand vom 31.12.2015 waren 833 WEA mit einer
Gesamtleistung von 3.541,3 MW errichtet, davon erzeugten 792 WEA mit einer
Leistung von 3.295,3 MW Strom.
Im OWP Gode Wind 1+2 wurden 2015 sämtliche 97 Monopile-Fundamente und
bei Gode Wind 2 auch bereits 41 von 42 WEA auf See installiert. Die für das Vorhaben vorgesehene Netzanbindung DolWin 2 war bis Ende 2015 noch nicht
betriebsbereit, obwohl bereits im August 2015 die nach Angaben von Tennet
weltweit stärkste Konverterplattform DolWin beta mit einer Gesamtkapazität
von 916 MW ca. 45 km nördlich von Norderney in der Nordsee installiert wurde.
Im Februar 2016 gab Tennet bekannt, dass die Netzanbindung für den OWP Gode
Wind 2 unter Spannung gesetzt wurde. Damit konnte das Teilprojekt mit allen
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
42 Siemens SWT-6.0-154 erstmals Strom ins Netz einspeisen. Neben Gode
Wind 1+2 wird auch der OWP Nordsee One an DolWin 2 angeschlossen.
Der Baubeginn für den OWP Nordsee One erfolgte im Dezember 2015 bereits
früher als geplant mit der Installation der ersten drei Monopiles.
Im OWP Sandbank wurden 63 Fundamente bis 31.12.2015 auf See installiert.
Mit der Errichtung des 72. Monopile konnten die Arbeiten zur InstaIlation der
Fundamente im Februar 2016 abgeschlossen werden.
WE KNOW WIND
Due Diligence &
Asset Management
Ausblick für den Offshore-Ausbau in Deutschland in 2016
Für 2016 ist zu erwarten, dass die OWP Gode Wind 1 (55 Siemens SWT6.0.154), Sandbank (72 Siemens SWT-4.0-130) und Nordsee One (54 Senvion
6.2M126) fertiggestellt und Strom ins Netz einspeisen werden. Darüber hinaus ist in der deutschen Nordsee im ersten Halbjahr 2016 der Baubeginn für
den OWP Nordergründe (18 Senvion 6.2M126) und für den OWP Veja Mate (67
Siemens SWT-6.0-154) geplant. Der in der 12 Seemeilenzone der Nordsee
gelegene OWP Nordergründe soll auch noch in diesem Jahr in Betrieb gehen.
In der Ostsee ist für 2016 der Baubeginn für den OWP Wikinger (70 Adwen
AD 5-135 – ehemals Areva Wind M5000) geplant.
Der ursprünglich ebenfalls für 2016 geplante Baubeginn für den OWP Merkur Offshore (66 Alstom Haliade 150-6MW) in der Nordsee wird sich vermutlich verschieben, weil der Financial Close für das Vorhaben nicht wie vorgesehen im Herbst 2015 erfolgte.
Get the service package you need
Project
Mergers and
Development Acquisitions
Project
Execution
Life Time
Extension
Pre-Financing Inspections
Wind Farm
Performance
Training
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Contact the experts at:
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
[email protected] / dewi.de
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Kontakt
zum Autor
B. Neddermann
DEWI, Wilhelmshaven
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und Genehmigung von WEA
im Anlagenregister für das Jahr 2015
Für die Bilanz des Windenergieausbaus im Jahr 2015 hat DEWI auch die von der
Bundesnetzagentur (BNetzA) im Anlagenregister veröffentlichten Daten zur
Inbetriebnahme von Windenergieanlagen (WEA) an Land im Zeitraum Januar bis
Dezember 2015 ausgewertet [1]. Kleinanlagen mit einer Nennleistung unter 100
kW wurden für die Analyse nicht berücksichtigt. Bei unterschiedlichen Angaben
im Anlagenregister in Bezug auf die Leistung eines WEA-Typs erfolgte eine Korrektur, um eine einheitliche Datenbasis zu bekommen.
Grundsätzlich ist festzuhalten, dass die Datenerfassung mit dem Anlagenregister auf Basis der gesetzlichen Meldepflicht für die Genehmigung und Inbetriebnahme neuer WEA erheblich verbessert wurde. Allerdings ist zu beachten, dass
die Angaben zum Repowering und zur Stilllegung von Altanlagen im Anlagenregister teilweise nicht vollständig erfasst werden. Problematisch ist in diesem
Zusammenhang insbesondere die lückenhafte Erfassung der stillgelegten WEA,
weil diese Daten für die Ermittlung des Nettozubaus der Windenergie an Land
(Bruttozubau minus Stilllegungen in MW) und damit für die weitere Entwicklung der Einspeisevergütung entscheidend sind.
Die Auswertung zeigt, dass im Jahr 2015 die Inbetriebnahme von insgesamt 1.378
Windenergieanlagen mit einer Gesamtleistung von 3.757,33 MW bis 31.12.2015 im
Anlagenregister gemeldet wurde. Die vorliegenden Daten für 2015 ermöglichen
erstmals für ein vollständiges Kalenderjahr einen Vergleich zwischen der Neuinstallation (Quelle: DEWI-Herstellerbefragung) und der Inbetriebnahme (Quelle:
BNetzA-Anlagenregister) von Windenergieanlagen in Deutschland. In Tab. 1 werden die Daten zur regionalen Verteilung der im vergangenen Jahr neu installierten und der neu in Betrieb genommenen WEA gegenübergestellt.
Es wird deutlich, dass sich die Werte in der Gesamtbilanz nicht wesentlich unterschieden. Im Vergleich mit den aktuellen Daten zur Neuinstallation für die Windenergie an Land ist zu beachten, dass die 2015 neu errichteten Anlagen teilweise erst 2016 ans Netz angeschlossen werden konnten. Umgekehrt erfolgte
bei einigen Projekten in 2015 die Inbetriebnahme von Anlagen, die bereits im Vorjahr installiert wurden.
Auf Basis der im Anlagenregister gemeldeten Daten sind in Abb. 1 die TOP 10 der
im vergangenen Jahr neu in Betrieb genommenen WEA dargestellt, die insgesamt 77 % des Marktes ausmachen. Marktführer Enercon ist dabei mit fünf
Anlagentypen vertreten, Vestas mit zwei WEA-Typen.
Im Anlagenregister sind auch die Angaben zu den bereits erteilten Genehmigungen (ohne Inbetriebnahme) dokumentiert. Bei der Bewertung der bis 31.12.2015
vorliegenden Meldungen ist zu beachten, dass die Meldepflicht für Genehmigungen für alle Windenergieanlagen gilt, die nach dem 28.02.2015 erteilt wurden. Nach einer Analyse der Anlagenregisterdaten der Fachagentur Windenergie
an Land vom Herbst 20151 gingen 78% der Anlagen innerhalb eines Jahres nach
Erteilung der Genehmigung ans Netz, als mittlere Realisierungsdauer wurde ein
Zeitraum von zehn Monaten ermittelt.
Damit lässt sich anhand der bis 31.12.2015 gemeldeten Genehmigungen
(2.791 MW) eine Größenordnung von rund 3.000 MW als Zuwachs der Windenergie im Jahr 2016 abschätzen.
Abb. 2 gibt einen Überblick zur regionalen Verteilung der bis 31.12.2015 gemeldeten Genehmigungen für neue WEA nach Bundesländern. Dabei erfolgt eine Dif1
Fachagentur Windenergie an Land: Analyse der Ausbausituation der Windenergie an Land - Herbst 2015; 11/2015
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
Referenz
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
ferenzierung nach Anlagen, die bis 30.06.2015 genehmigt wurden und WEA, für
die im zweiten Halbjahr 2015 eine Genehmigung erteilt wurde. Zum Vergleich ist
auch die Neuinstallation in 2015 in den einzelnen Bundesländern angegeben.
Die Darstellung zeigt, dass für 2016 in Schleswig-Holstein, Brandenburg, Nordrhein-Westfalen und Sachsen-Anhalt ein wesentlich geringerer Ausbau als in
2015 zu erwarten ist, während sich für Niedersachsen, Baden-Württemberg und
Thüringen ein stärkerer Zuwachs als im Vorjahr abzeichnet.
Die Darstellung verdeutlicht zudem, dass im zweiten Halbjahr 2015 in Schleswig-Holstein, Bayern, Nordrhein-Westfalen und Hessen nur relativ wenige neue
Genehmigungen erteilt wurden. Als Grund sind hier aktuelle regionalspezifische
Hemmnisse (v.a. der Baustopp für WEA in Schleswig-Holstein wegen der erforderlichen Überarbeitung der Regionalpläne und die Einführung verschärfter
Abstandsregelungen in Bayern) zu nennen. Im Gegensatz dazu stieg die Zahl der
vom 01.07.-31.12.2015 neu genehmigten WEA in Niedersachsen, Baden-Württemberg, Thüringen und Sachsen deutlich an.
Die Übersicht in Tab. 2 zeigt, für welche Anlagentypen die im Anlagenregister
gemeldeten Genehmigungen erteilt wurden. Mit den aufgeführten TOP 10
WEA-Typen von Enercon, Vestas, Nordex, General Electric (GE) und Senvion werden 84% aller 988 bis 31.12.2015 im Anlagenregister gemeldeten Genehmigungen
dargestellt. Die größte Nachfrage besteht für die Anlagentypen Nordex N117/2400,
Enercon E-115 und E-101 sowie Vestas V112-3.3 MW.
Aus Tab. 2 wird auch die regionale Verteilung der genehmigten WEA-Typen deutlich. Anlagen mit einer sehr geringen spezifischen Leistung (Verhältnis von Leistung zu Rotorgröße in W/m²) unterhalb von 250 W/m² (Nordex N117/2400, GE
2.75-120 und GE 2.5-120) werden für Standorte in Süddeutschland stark nachgefragt, während WEA-Typen mit Werten von mehr als 350 W/m² (z. B. Enercon
E-92 / E-101 / E-82) bevorzugt im Norden eingesetzt werden.
[1]
Inhaltsverzeichnis
Bundesnetzagentur, Anlagenregister - Stand 29.02.2016
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Author
Contact
N. Allnoch
Internationales Wirtschaftsforum Regenerative
Energien (IWR), Münster
External Article
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren Energien in Deutschland
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Die Stromerzeugung aus regenerativen Energiequellen in Deutschland ist auch
im Jahr 2015 auf Wachstumskurs. Nach einer ersten IWR-Prognose steigt die
Stromerzeugung aus Wind, Solar, Wasser-, Bio- und Geoenergie erstmals auf
über 190 Mrd. kWh (2014: 161,4 Mrd. kWh, Abb. 1 and Tab. 1). Der Anteil der erneuerbaren Energien am Bruttostromverbrauch erhöht sich 2015 auf knapp 33 Prozent (2014: 27,4 Prozent). Haupttreiber für den Zuwachs im Jahr 2015 ist die Windenergie. Ein gutes Windjahr sowie der Zubau an Land sowie auf See lassen die
Windstromerzeugung um rd. 50 Prozent auf etwa 87 Mrd. kWh (2014:
57,4 Mrd. kWh) ansteigen. Allein die Offshore-Windenergie steuerte 2015 bereits
rd. 8­Mrd. kWh (2014: 1,4 Mrd. kWh) bei. Für das Jahr 2016 erwartet das IWR unter
der Annahme eines guten Windjahres annährend 100 Mrd. kWh Windstrom,
sodass die gesamte regenerative Strommenge in Deutschland erstmals die
Marke von 200 Mrd. kWh überschreiten könnte.
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Wie Solar- und Windenergie im Jahresverlauf den Bedarf an konventioneller Kraftwerksleistung abdecken
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
Bildlich gesprochen beschreibt der Tagesgang der Stromnachfrage in Deutschland eine – je nach Jahreszeit – mehr oder weniger stark ausgeprägte Glockenkurve. Ausgehend vom niedrigen Nachtniveau steigt die Stromnachfrage tags­
über bis zum Mittag auf einen Höchstwert. Um diesen Mehrbedarf abzudecken,
mussten in der Vergangenheit bis zum Mittag immer mehr konventionelle Kraftwerke wie Kohle- oder Gaskraftwerke stundenweise zugeschaltet werden, die
nachmittags wieder nach und nach wegen des Rückgangs der Stromnachfrage
abgeschaltet wurden. Heute kann die zusätzliche Kraftwerksleistung zu großen
Teilen mit Hilfe von Solarstrom- und Windenergieanlagen abgedeckt werden.
Dabei überwiegt aufgrund der Witterung in den Som­mermonaten der Beitrag
der solaren Stromerzeugung. In den Wintermonaten steuert aufgrund der häufigeren zyklonalen Witterung die Windenergienutzung stärker zur regenerativen
Stromerzeugung bei.
Solarenergie deckt im Sommer den Großteil der Tagesleistungs-Nachfrage ab
Vor allem die Solarenergie (gelbe Säulen) erweist sich gerade in den sonnenreichen Sommermonaten (Abb. 2) als besonders zuverlässig, da die Photovoltaik in
Deutschland parallel zum Tagesgang der Stromnachfrage der Verbraucher steigt
und fällt. Und das nicht nur bei strahlendem Sonnenschein. Selbst an wolkigen
Tagen erreicht der Beitrag der Solarenergie zur Spitzenlastzeit am Mittag eine
Leistung von 10.000 MW und mehr, an sonnigen, strahlungsreichen Tagen sind
sogar bis deutlich über 20.000 MW möglich. Der Bedarf an konventionellen
Kraftwerken (graue Säulen) sinkt durch den Einsatz erneuerbarer Energien spürbar. So entfallen im dargestellten mittleren Lastprofil im Mai 2015 zur Mittagszeit über 40 Prozent der insgesamt benötigten Kraftwerksleistung auf Solar- und
On- bzw. Offshore-Windenergieanlagen (gelbe und blaue Säulen).
Windenergie in den Wintermonaten zuverlässiger Ener­gie­liefe­rant
Im Unterschied zu den Monaten im Sommer stellt in den Wintermonaten (Abb. 3)
die Stromerzeugung aus On- und Offshore-Windenergieanlagen (blaue Säulen)
den zentralen regenerativen Leistungsträger. Grund sind die mit den häufig
durchziehenden Tiefdruckgebieten deutlich höheren Windgeschwindigkeiten als
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
im Sommer. Anders als die Solarenergie weist die Windstromerzeugung zwar
keinen typischen Tagesgang auf. Im Ergebnis mindert die Windenergie in Kombination mit der auch in den Wintermonaten vorhandenen Solarstromerzeugung den Bedarf an zusätzlicher konventioneller Kraftwerksleistung deutlich.
Mit dem geplanten, weiteren Ausbau der Offshore-Windenergie in der deutschen Nord- und Ostsee wird die regenerative Stromerzeugung in Deutschland
weiter deutlich steigen. Dazu tragen auch die im Vergleich zum Binnenland
höheren Windgeschwindigkeiten bei. So können für die Offshore-Windkraftanlagen durchaus rd. 4.000 Vollastbenutzungsstunden erwartet werden. Fasst man
die Nordsee-Anrainerstaaten und deren Offshore-Ausbaupläne zusammen, dann
ist absehbar, dass sich die Nordsee zu einem neuen Energiefeld entwickelt: Rückgang der Ölförderung und gleichzeitig immer höhere Windstromerzeugung in
den nächsten Jahren. Zwischen 2030 und 2040 könnten bereits rd. 10 Prozent
des gesamten Strombedarfs der Europäischen Union aus der Nordsee stammen.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
Am 4. Februar 2016 feierte DEWI sein 25-jähriges Bestehen im Atlantic Hotel Wilhelmshaven im Beisein von zahlreichen Gästen sowie den Mitarbeitenden aus den
deutschen und internationalen Niederlassungen. Das Jubiläum bot einen geeigneten Anlass, neben dem Blick in die Zukunft auch die Vergangenheit Revue passieren zu lassen. Die Gäste hatten deshalb Gelegenheit, die Meilensteine der
DEWI-Entwicklung anhand eines Zeitstrahls, der im Hotelfoyer aufgebaut war, in
Erinnerung zu rufen.
Grußworte seitens der Stadt Wilhelmshaven, in der DEWI vor 25 Jahren gegründet
wurde, überbrachte die Bürgermeisterin Ursula Glaser, die in ihrer Rede auch auf die
Vergangenheit und die Bedeutung von DEWI für Wilhelmshaven einging. Als Vertreter des Landes Niedersachsen, dem ehemaligen DEWI-Gesellschafter, kam Stefan
Wenzel, Minister für Umwelt, Energie und Klimaschutz sowie stellvertretender Ministerpräsident. Er hob die hohe Relevanz der DEWI-Forschungsarbeit für den weiteren Ausbau der regenerativen Energien hervor. Außerdem ging er auf die Anstrengungen des Landes Niedersachsen zur Umsetzung der Energiewende ein, auf die
zukünftige Gestaltung der Energiesysteme sowie auf die Rahmenbedingungen für
den Ausbau der erneuerbaren Energien. Einen besonderen Rückblick auf 3.000 Jahre
Windenergie gab Prof. Dr. Andreas Reuter, Leiter des Fraunhofer-Instituts IWES Nordwest für Windenergie und Energiesystemtechnik. Der Vortrag war für alle Gäste
sehr erheiternd und zeigte in verblüffender Weise auf, welchen Einfluss DEWI-Geschäftsführer Jens Peter Molly auf die Entwicklung der Windenergietechnik hatte.
Vor vier Jahren wurde die damalige DEWI GmbH privatisiert und ist seitdem ein Teil
des US-amerikanischen Konzerns UL (Underwriters Laboratories). Einen Rückblick
auf diesen Prozess gaben Jeff Smidt, Vice President and General Manager UL Energy
and Power Technologies, und Gitte Schjøtz, Senior Vice President UL International
Demko A/S. Beide waren an dem Prozess direkt beteiligt und zeigten nochmals die
hohe Bedeutung von DEWI für UL auf.
Zum Ende des offiziellen Teils der Feierlichkeit gab Geschäftsführer Jens Peter Molly
Einblicke in die Gründungsphase von DEWI und einen humorvollen sowie ironischen
Rückblick auf 25 Jahre DEWI. Dabei hob er vor allem hervor, dass DEWI nur mit dem
großen Engagement der Mitarbeitenden zu einem weltweit agierenden und anerkannten Unternehmen wachsen konnte. Ein großer Teil der Mitarbeiterinnen und
Mitarbeiter sind schon seit vielen Jahren bei DEWI beschäftigt und wurden im
Rahmen der Jubiläumsfeier für ihren langjährigen Einsatz geehrt.
Nach einer Kaffeepause stand der weniger formale Programmteil an, den ein Improvisationstheater einleitete und viele herzhafte Lacher erntete. Im Anschluss stärkten
sich die Gäste am Büfett, bevor es zum gemütlichen Gedankenaustausch bis spät in
die Nacht bei Musik und diversen Spielen ging.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Inhaltsverzeichnis
DEWI/UL News
DEWI-OCC übergibt Zertifizierung an Gamesa auf EWEA
DEWI-OCC, die akkreditierte unabhängige Zertifizierungsstelle
der UL/DEWI-Gruppe, hat die Typenzertifizierung für die G114-2.5
MW-Turbine von Gamesa, einem globalen Technologieführer in
der Windenergiebranche, ausgestellt. Hergen Bolte, Geschäftsführer von DEWI-OCC, übergab das Zertifikat persönlich an José Antonio Malumbres,
Gamesas Technologie-Vorstand, während der EWEA 2015. Die Messe, die eine der
wichtigsten Veranstaltungen der Windindustrie ist, fand in Paris, Frankreich, vom 17.
bis 20. November 2015, statt. DEWI stellte Dienstleistungen wie LiDAR-Messungen,
Lebensdauerverlängerung und Ursachenanalyse vor.
DEWI bei Enercons Eröffnungsveranstaltung in
Costa Rica vertreten
DEWI-Mitarbeiter Jorge Melero, Renewable Energies Unit
Manager für Mexiko und Zentralamerika, hielt eine Präsentation über Technical Due Diligence-Dienstleistungen während
der Eröffnungsveranstaltung von Enercon in Costa Rica. „Ich war froh über die Gelegenheit bei diesem wundervollen Event zu sprechen und in diesem noch jungen
Markt involviert zu werden“, sagt Melero. DEWI ist seit drei Jahren in dem zentralamerikanischen Markt präsent und stellt unabhängige Ingenieurdienstleistungen für
Wind und PV bereit.
Präsentationen von DEWI bei den Windenergietagen 2015
DEWI (UL International GmbH) ist bei den 24. Windenergietagen vom 10. bis 12.
November 2015, in Linstow, Deutschland vertreten gewesen. Jan Raabe, Projekt Manager aus dem Micrositing-Team bei DEWI, sprach am zweiten Tag der Konferenz über
die Konsistenz von Langzeitdatenquellen im Rahmen ihrer Verwendung in Energieertragsermittlungen in Deutschland. „Die Differenzen in der Langzeitnormierung bei
Verwendung unterschiedlicher Langzeitdaten sind derzeit ein heiß diskutiertes
Thema in der Branche“, sagt Raabe.
DEWI organisiert zwei Seminare in Madrid und
Mexico City
Im letzten Oktober und November hat DEWI zwei Seminare
durchgeführt – mit großem Erfolg. Das „Advanced Wind
Energy“-Seminar in Madrid befasste sich schwerpunktmäßig
mit Risikominderung während verschiedener Projektphasen (Entwicklung, Aufbau,
Betrieb und Betriebsende), und das Seminar in Mexiko thematisierte die Optimierung
von Windparks. Die DEWI-Experten, die das Seminar vorbereitet hatten, erhielten bei
beiden Veranstaltungen sehr zufriedenstellende Rückmeldungen von den Teilnehmenden. Zu diesen gehörten Vertreter von Entwicklern, Betreibern, Herstellern und
Ingenieurbüros. Auch in diesem Jahr wird DEWI wieder verschiedene Seminare in
Spanien und in Lateinamerika anbieten.
DEWI sponsert Damenfußballmannschaft
DEWI hat sich für ein lokales Sportteam engagiert: Der weltweit tätige Windenergie-Dienstleister sponserte die neuen
Trikots der Damenmannschaft des Fußballvereins FC Zetel.
Die Mannschaft freute sich darüber in Zukunft mit dem Logo
von DEWI auf der Brust zu spielen. „Wir schätzen die Unterstützung von DEWI sehr
und hoffen, dass wir unsere Saison erfolgreich beenden“, sagt Miriam Schwinn, Labortechnikerin bei DEWI und Torhüterin der Mannschaft.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
Welchen Einfluss haben Offshore
Windparks
Windenergieerlass Niedersachsen
Windenergienutzung in Deutschland - Stand 31.12.2015
Neue Netzanbindungen bringen
Deutschland auf Rang 2 im globalen
Offshore-Markt
Meldungen zur Inbetriebnahme und
Genehmigung von WEA
Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren
Energien in Deutschland
Jubiläumsfeier 25 Jahre DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum / Content / Inhalt
Impressum: DEWI-Magazin. Windenergie - Wind Energy - Énergie Éolienne - Energia Eólica - Energía Eólica,
25. Jahrgang 2016, ISSN 0946-1787
Herausgeber:
Verantwortlicher Redakteur:
Redaktion:
Seitenlayout:
Übersetzungen (Englisch):
Erscheinungsweise:
Bezug:
UL International GmbH
Bernd Neddermann
Carsten Ender, Bernd Neddermann, Thomas Neumann
Carsten Ender
Barbara Jurok
2 x jährlich
UL International GmbH, Ebertstraße 96, 26382 Wilhelmshaven, Telefon: 04421/4808-0,
Telefax: 04421/4808-843, Email: [email protected], Internetadresse: http://www.dewi.de
Druck und Gesamtherstellung: Steinbacher Druck GmbH, Anton-Storch-Straße 15, 49080 Osnabrück
Titellayout, Basic Design:
ArtemisConcept GmbH, Kaiserstraße 15, 63065 Offenbach
www.artemisconcept.de
Copyright:
Die Vervielfältigung, der Nachdruck, die Übersetzung oder das Kopieren von ganzen Ar­tikeln, Text­ab­schnit­ten oder einzelnen Abbildungen in
jeglicher Form wird hiermit un­­
tersagt bzw. ist nur mit ausdrücklicher Ge­
neh­
migung durch die UL International GmbH erlaubt.
Zuwiderhandlungen werden strafrechtlich verfolgt.
Anzeigen:
Es gilt die Anzeigenpreisliste, die beim DEWI erhältlich ist.
Fremdartikel:
Im DEWI-Magazin können auch institutsfremde Fachartikel veröffentlicht werden. Die Redak­tion behält sich die Auswahl der Artikel und eine
Begutachtung durch anerkannte Fachleute vor. Für die Inhalte der Fremd­ar­tikel, die nicht unbedingt die Mei­nung der Redaktion wiedergeben, sind die jeweiligen Autoren verantwortlich.
DEWI magazin | FEBRUARY 2016
@
Author
Contact
DEUTSCH | ENGLISH
Editorial
Uncertainty Correlations in Power
Curve Measurements (continuation)
Conversion System and Autonomous
Converter
How to Navigate in the Digital DEWI Magazine
Wie finde ich mich im digitalen DEWI Magazin zurecht
Contact the author by email
Kontakt zum Autoren via E-Mail
Where are the figures & tables?
Relative Calibr.Process for Long Term
Thermal Stratification Measurements
The figures, tables and images are visible only after clicking on the appropriate link
within the text. The links are clearly identifiable by the different color (e.g. Fig. 1) and
the opened lightbox with the figure etc. can be closed by clicking on it or on the “X”.
What is the Impact of Offshore
Wind Farms
Wo sind die Abbildungen & Tabellen?
Lower Saxony Wind Power Decree
Wind Energy Use in Germany Status 31.12.2015
New Grid Connections Take Germany to Position 2 in the Global
Offshore Market
Reporting of Commissioning and
Approval of Wind Turbines
Power Generation from Renewable
Energies in Germany
Celebrating 25 Years of DEWI
DEWI/UL News
Impressum
|
Content
Die Abbildungen, Tabellen und Bilder sind erst sichtbar, nachdem auf dem
entsprechenden Link innerhalb des Textes geklickt wurde. Diese sind deutlich anhand
der anderen Farbe erkennbar (z.B. Abb. 1) und die geöffnete Lightbox mit der
Abbildung etc. kann durch einen Klick darauf oder auf das “X” wieder geschlossen
werden.
Navigation menu with links to the articles, current link in bold characters
Navigationsmenü mit Links zu den Artikeln, der aktuelle wird fett dargestellt
Back to content
Zurück zum Inhaltsverzeichnis
Page forward / backward
Seite vor / zurück
If available, switch between the languages
Sofern verfügbar, kann hier die Sprache geändert werden